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TULEVAN PERINNE HANDS THAT DRAW THE FUTURE HÄNDER SOM SKAPAR FRAMTIDEN 16 June to 5 August 2012 Kunsthalle Helsinki


The Finnish Decorative Artists’ Union was founded by 30 persons in September 1911. The rules stated that potential members were to be persons who practice the decorative arts. In the first meetings the name of the union was Piirto, but in early 1912, the organisation reconsidered its name, and renamed itself Ornamo. In 1927 Ornamo participated in the founding of The Kunsthalle Helsinki Foundation, aiming to establish and build a new space for temporary exhibitions. PAAVO TYNELL and HARRY RÖNEHOLM represented Ornamo at the founding meeting. The foundation received significant donations from industrialists GÖSTA SERCHALIUS, JALO SIHTOLA and AMOS ANDERSON. Also industrialist SALOMO WUORIO, who had worked as a decorative painter himself prior to making his fortune with paints and wallpapers, joined as a benefactor, making a donation of 300,000 marks to the foundation. This donation, that helped complete the construction works, came with a condition: that Ornamo and SAFA (The Association of Finnish Architects) should get their own space in the new building. At the last minute, a storage room was converted into a club for the decorative artists and architects.


Sata vuotta sitten perustimme Ornamon.

A century ago, we founded Ornamo.

Ett århundrade sedan grundade vi Ornamo.

Nimi on aatteellinen kannanotto, mantra, jonka lausumme optimismin ja utopian kielellä.

Our name is an ideological statement, a mantra spoken in an optimistic but utopian language.

Vårt namn är ett ideologiskt anförande, ett mantra uttalat i ett optimistiskt men utopistiskt språk.

Ornamo tarkoittaa koristetta esperantoksi, joka on keinotekoinen, muotoiltu kieli.

Ornamo means ornament in Esperanto, a designed, artificial language.

Ornamo betyder ornament på esperanto, ett formgivet, artificiellt språk.

With our skills we create things. With every work, we produce fragments of the world we envision; better, more beautiful, more just, more intelligent and functional.

Med våra färdigheter skapar vi föremål. Med varje verk producerar vi fragment av den värld vi föreställer oss; en bättre, vackrare, rättvisare, klokare och mer funktionell.

Mutta... Mikä on ollut työmme vaikutus? Mitä perinteitä jatkamme, miten niitä tulkitsemme? Miten olemme osallistuneet nykyajan luomiseen? Miten arvioimme onnistumistamme? Kuinka muotoilemme tulevan?

But... What has been the impact of our involvement? What traditions do we choose to sustain and be part of? How have we participated in creating this contemporary condition? How do we define our success? How will our involvement shape the future?

Vuosisadan taito. Tulevan perinne. Käsin luomme huomenen.

A century of skill. A tradition of the yet-to-be. Hands that draw the future.

Men... Vad har vårt engagemang haft för inverkan? Vilka traditioner väljer vi att upprätthålla och vara delaktiga i? Hur har vi deltagit i skapandet av detta samtida tillstånd? Hur definierar vi vår framgång? Hur kommer vårt engagemang att forma framtiden?

Luomme taidoillamme uutta. Jokainen työ tuottaa palasia maailmasta, jonka osaamme kuvitella: se on parempi, kauniimpi, oikeudenmukaisempi ja toimivampi.

Ett århundrade av färdigheter. En tradition av det kommande. Händer som skapar framtiden.


JAKKALA PEKKA HARNI

VERA TEEMU JÄRVI

ARENA 022 PASI PÄNKÄLÄINEN

STOOL 60 ALVAR AALTO

001 ANTTI NURMESNIEMI EASY CHAIR AHTI TASKINEN

MARKIISI SIMO HEIKKILÄ

AQUA JOUKO JÄRVISALO SONETTI TUULA FALK

MERIVAARA PAULI BLOMSTEDT

JYSKY JUHANI MANNER FLYING CARPET ILKKA SUPPANEN

UNIQUE TAPESTRY BY LAILA KARTTUNEN 1960’S

CHIP ANTTI KOTILAINEN

BABY CHAIR 616 BEN AF SCHULTÉN

CHAIR WERNER WEST

TRIENNALE ANTTI NURMESNIEMI

EXPERIMENT YRJÖ KUKKAPURO


JUTTU JAKKARA EERO AARNIO

TAITOS MIKKO PAAKKANEN

LINDFORS STEFAN LINDFORS

AMOS CAFÉ MARTIN RELANDER

BATH STOOL RAIMO VOLANEN

PROTOTYPE YRJÖ KUKKAPURO

KARUSELLI YRJÖ KUKKAPURO

LOVI JOUKO JÄRVISALO

CRASH SAMULI NAAMANKA

VERDE YRJÖ WIHERHEIMO

VANIKKA KRISTIAN GULLICHSEN

MOSKOVA RUDI MERZ / ILONA RISTA

KISS SARI ANTTONEN

PALACE OLAVI HÄNNINEN

KARI KARI ASIKAINEN TRICE HANNU KÄHÖNEN

VILTER EASY YRJÖ WIHERHEIMO

CHIP TEPPO ASIKAINEN & ILKKA TERHO


VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI Over time, in our profession, we have been called by several different names. Sometimes we are craftsmen, at other times artisans, shape-givers or designers. My final profession must be artist. I find it highly peculiar that chosen this as my definition. A designer’s mission is– in my opinion – to develop things further. It almost converges with science when it’s at its best, because then you are making inventions. Everything begins with experimentation when you are creating a profession [for yourself]. It won’t amount to anything unless you try things. It’s constant exploration. My first job, when I started in this line of work, was to reproduce a fabric pattern. It was common in those days, after the war, to copy patterns. I was 21 years old when I started and was given this fabric, three meters of it. I’ve told this before... it hanged for three years on the wall in our room, and no-one was allowed to touch it. It had this small, intricate pattern... a wonderful fabric, by a fantastic Finnish designer who moved to Sweden and worked for Nordiska Galleriet. This was the fabric I was supposed to copy. My answer to this task was totally different: I created large, clean colour surfaces and printed them on top of each other. In this way we got a completely new world, no-one was doing patterns like this at that time, with large surfaces. It was totally new, and many didn’t understand it and dismissed it. At that time I was incredibly young and open-minded. That was my first lesson about how a designer can extensively affect the world around her.

TEEMU JÄRVI & HEIKKI RUOHO / JÄRVI & RUOHO TEEMU: What fascinates us both, is creating functional everyday objects or imaginative spaces. Having a new angel on the subject– but without forgetting aesthetics. Objects should feel good in your hand and be functional, it’s both the functionality and the aesthetics that pleases the eye. HEIKKI: I always have to get excited about things. It’s always a good indicator when you need to get up, start walking around and your head starts to process. Your gut feeling is important if you begin some kind of problem solving, you have to trust it if things feel forced. When they start to feel less forced and you get excited through the work, then that indicates your on the right track. It’s probably one of the reasons why we do design work, because there is this special factor involved. Of course it also applies to many other lines of work. Maybe I’m a bit of a simple person, because I want think about concrete things, hands on, like the old saying goes: “to think with my hands”. Tradition and hand-craft are important for me in design work. Unfortunately work is shifting more and more towards the theoretical, to sitting by an empty white table. But everything starts with getting excited and doing things with your own hands. It’s a good indicator when you know that you like your work. For us, it seems to work well that I’m more impulsive and your more thoughtful when we work on a mutual project. When I try to throw this tennis ball against a wall and it keeps bouncing back, then when it doesn’t return I know that it has finally sunk into you, juggling of ideas back and forth.


SAKU SYSIÖ / AIVAN I dont’ think we are aiming to be Finland’s biggest design office or anything like that. What we strive for, is to be able to affect a bigger whole, and at an earlier stage in the design process, so that our work would create something else than just surface. I think that’s a common factor and goal for all in the office. And with this attitude, we have now been going further, receiving a bit better and more interesting projects. We are all quite handy, and like to build models and mock-ups, so we have a proper workshop in the back. We actually employ a model builder, and often make study models or mock-ups out of wood, styrofoam or kapa-board. Unfortunately, quite a lot of time goes into emailing and talking on the phone. I think hand-drawing skills have diminished due to computer-based work, asyou can get such precise and high-quality images with it. Drawing is now more notation, an efficient way of taking notes and quickly sketching something. Our work is largely about problem solving. Design is an important part, but it usually comes quite late in the process. Our goal has been to deal with bigger issues, like functionality, and to question if something is necessary in the first place, or why it is done like this? It’s important that [our] products have an elevated value for the end user, that they would want to keep them for a long time. That these things can hold relevance, and become dear to them.

ANNI PUOLAKKA & JENNA SUTELA / OK DO I guess that together, we are cultural operators, mostly... We’ve also called Ok Do an alternative cultural institute. This describes quite well that in addition to creating content, we’ve also tried to construct a framework to operate within– sometimes more successfully than others. In the sense that you always encounter some challenges to survive. Our activities as individuals and a collective is marked by comprehensiveness. It makes defining us and what we do difficult. If we’re researching something or working on a project, then we want to have several personal contact surfaces with it, not just being a graphic designer on the project. In our publishing activities we are interested in being able to control the whole and at the same time have a tight collaborative dialogue with others. We do a lot of publications, and usually they involve some kind of happening, exhibition or installation, created as part of or parallel to the main project. Comprehensiveness is our thing... if we organize a party, then we also want to bake the cake ourselves. Through our work we investigate things we find interesting, things that are an essential part of this ongoing moment and cultural situation. Maybe we also try to provoke and suggest, so we are working somewhere between journalism and design. In journalism, in the sense that we try to understand things, and design, in the sense that we try to change things or participate in changing them. Through art and design we are also interested in everyday life and designing, organizing and renewing it. On the other hand, provoking, triggering debate and asking questions is also important. We are not promoting a lifestyle where things should be made as easy and comfortable as possible, we want to stir up the debate. We want to ask questions and remodel not only the world, but also people– and their thinking.


DANIEL PALILLO

ERJA HIRVI

I haven’t worked for anyone, so I had no impression or template of how it should be, working as a fashion designer. So I’ve had to figure it out by myself. For example, I have no idea how a fashion designer’s desktop should look like... Or the business side of things, I never had a business plan or such. I’ve just been doing things one day at the time, as long as it’s fun, so I don’t really have any expectations to live up to.

In principle, I design printed fabrics, but actually, I draw and paint different images, that eventually become printed fabrics. Maybe I’m oriented to shape what I produce, and whatever comes out of my head, into repeating patterns, as the format happens to be repeating and printed fabrics have the rapport. We’ve sometimes wondered if the art disappears from it. If you have an artwork, and print it for hundreds of meters, does the art diminish the moment it is repeated?

In the end, quite little of a fashion designer’s work is designing fashion. It feels, at least for me, that it consists much more of answering emails, other random tasks and general hustling. I’m often asked what kind of clothes I design, or people come up and tell me how my clothes are so crazy or something. But it’s really difficult for me, after doing this for so many years, to see them as crazy. I feel that they are just everyday clothes, that you can wear at any time and anywhere. I don’t feel that they are crazy. Of course everything I do is a reflection of who I am, and that’s important in a designer’s work.

My work includes a lot of designing here at my studio, and also working at the factory, in my case at Marimekko. I’ve been working with them since 1995. And there, at the factory’s design department, we finalize my patterns and then design all kinds of products with them... like tableware, duvet covers, kitchen towels, cutlery or something new and revolutionary. Also we print the fabrics in Herttoniemi. Then, you have to meet a lot of media and travel, which I persistently try to refuse from. So work includes all kinds of things, and one working day can consist of a mind-boggling amount of odd events, like having the your car washed... (I have a classic car, so it may end up used as a prop in a fashion show) ...or something else equally mysterious. A day at work can include strange things, but that keeps work interesting. When I risk getting bored, I ask myself: “Erja, do you want to be a supermarket cashier?” And the answer is: “maybe not”, so suddenly work starts to feel interesting again. Originally I was supposed to become a silver smith, but I ended up dropping out, even though it’s a really interesting discipline. I’ve also played records, as a DJ. That started a bit like design: first you listen to music by yourself, then you want to start playing it to others, because you also want them to experience it. I want to give other people a bit of what’s inside my head, add some soul. When I’m designing, and right now


HANNU KÄHÖNEN I’ve been drawing animals, I tend to think very precisely about how they behave, what’s the animal thinking right now when it’s laying like that, is it languishing or how is it? I dwell so deep into the objects reality that I start living through it. That’s probably where my own style comes from, that puts me apart from others. Maybe it’s a bit animistic, I think that even a rock has thoughts. About this profession, this combination of art and manufacturing... Taideteollisuus [industrial art], that’s what it originally was called! I’d like people in Finland to start using the term taideteollisuus. It is such a sensible term compared to disain [English word: design]. What does disain even mean? It’s such a shit word and I’m extremely annoyed by it. All kinds of things are now called disain, just for the sake of it, and because it’s such an easy term to use, without thinking or knowing what they are talking about.

I’m an industrial designer by education. For me the profession has evolved into acting as a link between the client and the end user, trying to fit together both of their needs in the best possible way. I believe that I and my office know quite well this user side, and we are able to define what aspects a product needs to work in the user situation. It’s important to recognize the user’s needs on a broad scale– not just the physical. Nowadays we talk more and more about experiences and enjoying stories. Tailoring for individual needs is on the rise and will be even more important in the future. It requires dwelling even further into the end users’ situation. Combining these things gives you the end result. But in the end, as designers, our greatest skill is concretization. We used to be about of drawing, building models and prototypes, process management, etc. This is still important, but now that we’ve moved into a virtualized world, there’s even more emphasis on understanding and utilizing new tools and techniques.


SAARA LEPOKORPI

HARRI KOSKINEN

There are two sides my work: on one side ideas are being refined until they are valuable enough to be realised, and on the other side they are executed, put into concrete form. These two aspects of work develop side by side, and I never process an idea all the way without starting to realize it. This act of giving concrete form to an idea drives the process. At some point I can evaluate again if it’s worth to keep to work on it, and then step by step continue to condense it. It’s a cyclical process: reevaluate and realise, again and again. At the end, when you get a feeling that this is it, then the process is over. For me the most challenging part is controlling this process so it ends when I’m supposed to finish the collection or a unique piece, because that moment is determined externally... Yes, deadlines do exist. I’m interested in a materialbased working process, and a kind of return to the past. Like, for example if you consider how valuable national costumes are, or were to their wearers. Traditionally you would start with weaving the fabrics by hand. It makes you respect the material a lot more than you’d pick it up at a fabric shop. This automatically changes your attitude and how you treat the material, and it affects the whole process. It’s an interesting aspect and something that I want to follow or advance with my own practice; return to that way of thinking.

A designers work is very diverse, there aren’t many days that look the same. If you ask tomorrow what a designer does, you’ll get a different answer than today. It’s built up of so many different things. A designer’s job is to seek solutions to varied things, things that may even be problems to some people. By using my best knowledge, and our office’s best knowledge, we consider these issues, and in collaboration with the client we try to find the best answers to these burning questions. If we receive a request to start to think about something... someone calls or comes in through the door with this great idea they want to develop, then we might instantly have a great solution for how to advance and things just start rolling from there. But these things are often quite complicated. In those cases all of us here at the office gather around this table or go out for a walk around the pier and discuss it: “Now that we have this kind of problem, how should we start to progress?”. Then at some point, even after several years, all the pieces just fit in place. Some times it’s just plain form-giving, the client has the technology and clientèle set up, and we update old products with a bit of ergonomics or change the material, or then we do something totally different... surprising, sometimes even something appropriate or desired.

I’m forced to divide my mind into two separate parts, because form giving, design and process management is a totally different universe compared to external activities like marketing my own label, taking care of sales and acquisitions, not to mention running a company. They are so far apart in my mind that I have a hard time even thinking about them on the same day. I have to split up my work by just doing a single thing per day. And then, designing for one or more days with my phone switched off and not reading emails. It feels a bit schizophrenic at times.

As a designer– and design company– you try to create a sensible whole for the client, even if it’s total chaos inside your head or at the office for quite a long time. Of course, in this profession there are some procedures and ways of working. First you make up a schedule, then you gather material, filter and trim it down, and on day X you make a decision. After that we again have a certain amount of time to prepare for the next meeting. During this process the client is able to see how the work progresses according to the schedule and how our ideas develop. At it’s best, this co-operation incorporates the client


LINDA BERGROTH very closely in the chain of events, and at it’s worst the deadline just keeps on approaching and everything is muddled, until you have to throw something together during the last night. Sometimes the end result is brilliant, and at other times it can be irritating, as the best ideas, missing from the presentation material, only come out when you’re actually sitting in the meeting. At that point, a competent guy just has to row it home. In this line of work, sometimes you hope the client is be flexible, because this creative work is seldom linear, as the best solutions might not appear on Tuesday, but you have to wait until Thursday. I’ve never liked the idea that you have to do things according to a set form. I’ve also kept my own company’s activities very much self-guided. There are no set routines or fixed methods, but we seek and look at things in different ways. Except if there is a lot to do and the schedule is tight, then yo have to fall back and be more sensible. Every client is of course different and they have different needs. Sometimes we create things from nothing and other times, we build new things on top of the existing.

I’m a designer, and I work with a wide spectrum of things: product design, interior design, set design and styling. By education I’m a furniture designer, and in Finland it’s usually seen in relation to the human body and ergonomics. All of that’s quite obvious, but I’m interested in exploring the relationship between furniture and space, and that’s why I’ve also studied architecture. I see the differences in scale between interior design, set design and styling, you can go from a larger whole into details, like designing gingerbreads. My idea is to be able to try out different experimental structures and compositions in temporary things and then to utilize those in larger permanent projects and in this way have them support each other. If I’d have to define what’s special about my work, then it would probably be that all the things I work on more or less intersect with each other. If I do interior design, then it’s always comprehensive, so I will also design the furniture or vice versa, so that they always intersect. Bringing joy to others and myself is probably what drives me. I experience all atmospheric spaces as thrilling, even a good party with the right framework, defined by the space, furniture, form and people you meet. That’s what drives me to design special spaces where I can adjust the atmosphere and give people delight. I’ve noticed, that even though I’m very interested in product– and furniture design, that it’s quite seldom that a chair changes my life. I’ve travelled more towards a post-materialistic view where the experience and community are more meaningful for me.


AAMU SONG & JOHAN OLIN / COMPANY

OLLI ERKKILÄ & TIMO HYPPÖNEN / PELAGO BICYCLES

It’s vital that you understand what the whole process is, if you are designing something. You need to know the setting you are doing it in. I think it’s a natural process. Because other people are doing it that way, we feel that maybe this way is needed in society and we’ll do that. We show them a little bit of a different taste.

Maybe we could start from why we do what we do. If we talk about these bicycles for example, then it comes through our own user experiences or needs. We wanted a certain type of bike, and if it wasn’t available, we would start making it by ourselves. This work that we do, includes so many things beside design. Its contradictory to say that we are designing bicycles or even components, as we do this on a quite small scale, but not that small that we would individually handcraft each bicycle. After all, we also want to build bicycles for other people, not just ourselves. And in order to realize that, we have to use a lot of components and parts by other manufacturers... it becomes production mangement. This way of working involves so many challenges that are not design-related, like where to get financing etc. You also have to get creative with these things, developing our way of working, and to enable us delivering bicycles to the shop, that people can buy and ride them. Production quantities may not be that large, especially related to this cargo bike project, that we could spend years designing it. The design has to follow all along, as part of the process.

The starting point [for our work] is dependent, we learn from different factories, as we are not talented in making things. We go and meet them as we think that they might need us as well. That’s how we operate, we go there, get to know them, we learn how they do things, and based on that, develop something. When we meet somebody, or see the place that is going to host what ever we are doing, we very quickly come up with plans and discuss them then and there or on the way back. After that we just try to stick with the plan and make as little compromises as possible on the way. At least this is quite often how it has worked out. I think that what we do is divided into two. One is a very luxurious job where we decide to do this or that or throw in the next big idea. The second part is to be a slave for that [idea] and being responsible for it and working really hard to realise it.

Keeping expenses low and reasonable is a form of art. As human labour is so expensive... You can either make a product exactly like you want, by hand and using a lot of time and effort. This process is expensive, but you get a custom made, high quality product that is an exclusive, crafted individual piece. Maybe it becomes art, if you want to take it that far. Or, you could start manufacturing serially the same product, and comply to huge minimum orders for factory parts. Begin forging moulds for your own cranks and manchons, and then we are talking about orders of 10,000 bikes or something. So when you talk about series of a few hundred, then that automatically sets some limits that you have to navigate and work with.


VILLE KOKKONEN

In the end, we make products that have personality, and justify our existence. Being part of the bicycle industry, it’s easy to stand up for green values. What we really do is produce tools, all our products are things that people need for doing something. And in the city a bicycle is just so easy and fast, regardless of whether its ecological or not. It’s just a convenient tool that takes you swiftly from one place to the other, and if you need to transport something, then the cargo bicycle just adds to the carrying capacity.

In design work it’s very important to– and in fact I mainly do product design in scales where you are able to– create 1:1 size prototypes. They may be cardboard or paper, but building models is extremely important for getting a feel for the product. A quickly taped together mock-up or dysfunctional prototype can provide the best learning process, if it helps you notice what’s wrong and what works. I have a bit of a fixation for using white cardboard, and that’s one of the main materials I use for prototypes, whatever the product’s final material is. I also do some exhibition design together with architects, with whom we do scale models and some material tests. The past few years we’ve designed a collection of light fixtures here in the studio. For that, I researched different types of translucent material: plexiglass, glass, plastics, screens, anything that transmits or reflected light. And testing those with different light sources, from sun light to light bulbs, fluorescent tubes and LED-lights. Research and testing is not necessarily design, but a large part of it. Trying new materials, technical solutions and their properties compared to exiting solutions... That’s one of the major– and most enjoyable– aspects of the design process. It gets quite close to the scientific method. If we go a step further, towards a more complex and enjoyable part of this work, then you find collaboration with different types of experts. We might work with a specialist on injection moulding or technician who knows about circuit board design, or some expert who knows everything about reflecting materials. It’s a lot of internal team work, but nourishing a rich network of connections is also essential. You can’t work alone.


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PRODUCTS

DESIGNER / ORGANISATION YEAR

SUGGESTED BY

BATCHER FORTUNA GAME PADLOCK SISU-PASTILLES KAUPUNKI TAIDELUOMANA NYKYAJAN ILMOITUSREKLAAMI RAKENNUS TAIDELUOMANA MITEN SISUSTAN KOTINI KOTIMAISIN ESINEIN KUTOKAA ITSE KANKAANNE WALLPAPER LAMP JUKKA ASKARE ACTIVITY TOY MOCHA CUP SALT SHAKER TABLE LAMP DRINKIG GLASS AURI TORCH INTERIOR, KAIVOTALO CLOCK, ETELÄRANTA 10 ASHTRAY BEEHIVE-LAMP KILTA COLLECTION TIPPA SALT SHAKER VELLIKELLO JOKAPOIKA SHIRT PEHTOORI JUG BIRDS HIIDENNYRKKI FINNLINE CUTLERY FLYING SAUCER WATER TAP ENSO HOUSEHOLD BOX JERRY CONTAINER MAJURI HANGER ACRYLIC JEWELLERY SILVER JEWELLERY ORNAMO-GLOBE FISKARS SCISSORS

ARABIA JUHO JUSSILA LTD. ABLOY LTD. ARNOLD TILGMANN GUSTAF STRENGELL

KATARIINA SARIMO OUTI MARTIKAINEN HANNU KÄHÖNEN KATJA HYNNINEN

KULTAVANNE CUP JOPO HELLE-DRESS MYLLYNKIVI DRESS RIIKINKUKKO HELSINKI DESIGN LAB PUBLICATION 42. COPPER

1906–1935 1920’s 1920’s 1928 1923 1924 1929 1933

ESTER PERHEENTUPA

1934

KATJA HYNNINEN

LISA JOHANSSON-PAPE JUHO JUSSILA LTD.

1930’s 1940’s 1948

ERJA HIRVI LENA STRÖMBERG DANIEL PALILLO

1948 1940’s 1950’s 1950’s

TAUNO TARNA

KAJ FRANCK MARITA LYBECK PAAVO TYNELL SAARA HOPEA G.W. SOHLBERG LTD. ILMARI TAPIOVAARA STORBJÖRN ANDERS MICHAEL SCHILKIN ALVAR AALTO KAJ FRANCK KAJ FRANCK VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI ANTTI NURMESNIEMI KAJ FRANCK TIMO SARPANEVA BERTEL GARDBERG KYLLIKKI SALMENHAARA EERO RISLAKKI ENSO GUTZEIT EERO RISLAKKI OLAVI ARJAS OLLI TAMMINEN PAULA HÄIVÄOJA TIMO SARPANEVA OLOF BÄCKSTRÖM OLAVI LINDÉN GÖRAN BÄCK EERO HELKAMA VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI DORA JUNG

UHRA SIMBERG-EHRSTRÖM

ANNA-MARI VIERIKKO 1952 1952 1950’s 1953 1953–75 1950’s 1955 1955 1956 1957 1958 1957 1957 1958 1960’s 1960’s 1960’s 1960’s 1960–69 1961 1961 1964–1972 1964 1964 1964 1968 1968 1968

ARIADNA DONNER VILLE KOKKONEN

VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI HELENA HERNBERG

TEEMU JÄRVI

ORNAMO KATJA HYNNINEN MAIJA PUOSKARI PELAGO BICYCLES

OK DO


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PRODUCTS

DESIGNER / ORGANISATION YEAR

KATRILLI COLLECTION RS18, RS21 RADIOSONDES XYLITOL CHEWING GUM JUG SMALL BAG GREEN GLASS FACES-NECKLACE TRADITIONAL VASE PALASET MATKURI VOIMA OP-3 PARATIISI EXPORT-KNITWEAR COLLECTION PALLOSHAKKI SALORA TV MARK1 CLOTHES HANGER RELIEF RUG EXHAUST PIPE PAPER KNIFE HUSKY BEANIE MINK COAT KNITTED SWEATER MOBIRA CITYMAN

TAUNO TARNA VAISALA LTD.

67. 50 MARK NOTE 68. MOREENI / BEBOP 69. KNIFE 70. KIRPPU, ENTTEN TENTTEN-SERIES 71. TRANSVERSE FLUTE 72. BLOCK LAMP 73. TOWEL DRYING RACK 74. FLY 75. UNIQUE VASE 76. SEIREENI 77. KARPALO AND VANAMO JEWELLERY 78. LEHTI 79. BROOCH 80. ABLOY KEYS 81. ECOLOGICAL FASHION 82. NORDIC WALKING POLES 83. SERPENT DILDO 84. VILLE KARVAKUONO 85. LITTLE PLATE 86. GIANT TIPPA SALT SHAKER REPLICA 87. YEAR CUBE 88. A4 PAPER

ANNA-MARIA OSIPOW POHJAN AKKA HEIKKI KALLIO EILA MINKKINEN REINO TAMMINEN RISTOMATTI RATIA RISTOMATTI RATIA YRJÖ TURKKA OIVA TOIKKA SVANHILD ÅBONDE KAIJA AARIKKA JORMA PITKONEN MARKE JALKANEN VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI AIRI SNELLMAN-HÄNNINEN EERO RISLAKKI TAPIO WIRKKALA TUA RAHIKAINEN MARJA SUNA MATTI MAKKONEN/ JORMA PITKONEN TORSTEN EKSTRÖM/ ERIK BRUUN HEIKKI ORVOLA EERO HAIKALA KIRSI KAARNA

1969–1973 1970’s 1970’s 1970’s 1970’s 1970’s 1970’s 1970’s 1970 1971 1971 1971 1972–89

SUGGESTED BY

VAISALA VILLE KOKKONEN PÄIKKI PRIHA PÄIKKI PRIHA PÄIKKI PRIHA PÄIKKI PRIHA ANRI TENHUNEN

AIVAN

1975 1978 1979 1976 1980’s 1980’s 1980’s 1980’s 1980’s 1986

LAURA PAKARINEN

HEIKKI RUOHO

1986 1992–96 1992 1994–95

MATTI KÄHÖNEN HARRI KOSKINEN YRJÖ TURKKA SUSAN ELO DORRIT VON FIEANDT KIRSTI DOUKAS MAISA TURUNEN-WIKLUND

1994 1996 1997 1997 1990’s 1990’s 2000

ILONA RISTA

MARIA JAUHIAINEN RAIJA RASTAS HANNU KÄHÖNEN ANNE LINNONMAA MARIMEKKO STEFAN LINDFORS EEVALIISA HOLMAKINNUNEN KATARIINA SARIMO CATHARINA KAJANDER

2001 2007 2002–2006 1991–2007 2004 LEENA LILJESTRÖM-PUNTANEN 2004 2009

OIVA TOIKKA UPM KYMMENE

2012 2012

2009 2011

JOUKO KÄRKKÄINEN


JUG by ANNA-MARIA OSIPOW, 1970’s, suggested by PÄIKKI PRIHA


JUKKA ASKARE ACTIVITY TOY by JUHO JUSSILA LTD., 1948, suggested by DANIEL PALILLO

BATCHER by ARABIA, 1906-1935, suggested by KATARIINA SARIMO

VELLIKELLO by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI, 1955


KILTA COLLECTION by KAJ FRANCK, 1953–75

SALT SHAKER by MARITA LYBECK, 1940’s


EXPORT-KNITWEAR COLLECTION by SVANHILD ÅBONDE, 1972–89

TIPPA SALT SHAKER by KAJ FRANCK, 1950’s


KATRILLI COLLECTION by TAUNO TARNA, 1969–1973

DRINKIG GLASS by SAARA HOPEA, 1950’s


ACRYLIC JEWELLERY by OLLI TAMMINEN, 1960’s

WATER TAP by EERO RISLAKKI, 1958

SISU-PASTILLES by ARNOLD TILGMANN, 1928, suggested by KATJA HYNNINEN

XYLITOL CHEWING GUM, 1970’s, suggested by VILLE KOKKONEN

INTERIOR, KAIVOTALO by ILMARI TAPIOVAARA, 1952


LITTLE PLATE by KATARIINA SARIMO, 2009

FINNLINE CUTLERY by BERTEL GARDBERG, 1957

CLOCK in ETELÄRANTA 10 by STORBJÖRN ANDERS, 1952


MITEN SISUSTAN KOTINI KOTIMAISIN ESINEIN, 1933 KAUPUNKI TAIDELUOMANA by GUSTAF STRENGELL, 1923 NYKYAJAN ILMOITUSREKLAAMI, 1924 RAKENNUS TAIDELUOMANA, 1929

KNIFE by EERO HAIKALA, 1992

HIIDENNYRKKI by TIMO SARPANEVA, 1958

YEAR CUBE by OIVA TOIKKA, 2012

FISKARS SCISSORS by OLOF BÄCKSTRÖM & OLAVI LINDÉN, 1961, suggested by KATJA HYNNINEN


MARK1 by MARKE JALKANEN

KUTOKAA ITSE KANKAANNE by ESTER PERHEENTUPA, 1934, suggested by KATJA HYNNINEN

ORNAMO-GLOBE by TIMO SARPANEVA, 1961, suggested by ORNAMO

PAPER KNIFE by TAPIO WIRKKALA, 1980’s

SERPENT DILDO by STEFAN LINDFORS, 2004

PADLOCK by ABLOY LTD., 1920’s, suggested by HANNU KÄHÖNEN

ABLOY KEYS by HANNU KÄHÖNEN, 2002–2006

50 MARK NOTE by TORSTEN EKSTRÖM & ERIK BRUUN, 1986


TOWEL DRYING RACK by YRJÖ TURKKA, 1997

LEHTI by MARIA JAUHIAINEN, 2001

FACES-NECKLACE by EILA MINKKINEN, 1970’s

MOREENI / BEBOP by HEIKKI ORVOLA, 1992–96

WALLPAPER, 1930’s, suggested by ERJA HIRVI


BIRDS by KAJ FRANCK, 1957, suggested by HELENA HERNBERG

BROOCH by RAIJA RASTAS, 2007

RIIKINKUKKO by DORA JUNG, 1968

MOCHA CUP by KAJ FRANCK, 1948, suggested by TAUNO TARNA


VILLE KARVAKUONO by EEVALIISA HOLMA-KINNUNEN, 2009

PALLOSHAKKI by KAIJA AARIKKA, 1975


HUSKY BEANIE by HUSKY LTD., 1980’s, suggested by LAURA PAKARINEN

PEHTOORI JUG by ANTTI NURMESNIEMI, 1956 suggested by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI

FORTUNA GAME by JUHO JUSSILA LTD., 1920’s, suggested by OUTI MARTIKAINEN


EXHAUST PIPE by EERO RISLAKKI, 1980’s


TRADITIONAL VASE by REINO TAMMINEN, 1970’s, suggested by ANRI TENHUNEN


SILVER JEWELLERY by PAULA HÄIVÄOJA, 1960–69

ASHTRAY by MICHAEL SCHILKIN, 1950’s, suggested by ARIADNA DONNER

HELSINKI DESIGN LAB PUBLICATION by ESKO MIETTINEN, 1968, suggested by OK DO

ECOLOGICAL FASHION by ANNE LINNONMAA, 1991–2007

MATKURI by RISTOMATTI RATIA, 1971


MAJURI HANGER by OLAVI ARJAS, 1960’s

KULTAVANNE CUP by GÖRAN BÄCK, 1964–1972, suggested by MAIJA PUOSKARI

FLY by SUSAN ELO, 1997


JERRY CONTAINER by EERO RISLAKKI, 1960’s


GIANT TIPPA SALT SHAKER REPLICA by CATHARINA KAJANDER, 2011


NORDIC WALKING POLES by MARIMEKKO, 2004, suggested by LEENA LILJESTRÖM-PUNTANEN


BEEHIVE-LAMP by ALVAR AALTO, 1953, suggested by VILLE KOKKONEN


MOBIRA CITYMAN by MATTI MAKKONEN & JORMA PITKONEN, 1986, suggested by HEIKKI RUOHO

KIRPPU by KIRSI KAARNA, 1994–95

KNITTED SWEATER by MARJA SUNA, 1980’s


MINK COAT by TUA RAHIKAINEN, 1980’s UNIQUE VASE by DORRIT VON FIEANDT, 1990’s

SMALL BAG by POHJAN AKKA, 1970’s suggested by PÄIKKI PRIHA

CLOTHES HANGER by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI, 1979

MYLLYNKIVI DRESS by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI, 1964 HELLE-DRESS by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI, 1964


A4 PAPER by UPM KYMMENE, 2012, suggested by JOUKO KÄRKKÄINEN


TRANSVERSE FLUTE by MATTI KÄHÖNEN, 1994, suggested by ILONA RISTA

SEIREENI by KIRSTI DOUKAS, 1990’s

RS18 RADIOSONDES by VAISALA LTD., 1970’s, suggested by VAISALA


FLYING SAUCER by KYLLIKKI SALMENHAARA,1957

VOIMARADIO OP-3, by YRJÖ TURKKA, 1971, suggested by AIVAN


SALORA TV by JORMA PITKONEN, 1978

TABLE LAMP by PAAVO TYNELL, 1950’s


PALASET by RISTOMATTI RATIA, 1970

JOKAPOIKA SHIRT by VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI, 1955

COPPER by UHRA SIMBERG-EHRSTRÖM, 1968


ENSO HOUSEHOLD BOX by ENSO GUTZEIT, 1960’s, suggested by TEEMU JÄRVI

RELIEF RUG by AIRI SNELLMAN-HÄNNINEN, 1976


KARPALO AND VANAMO JEWELLERY by MAISA TURUNEN-WIKLUND, 2000


JOPO by EERO HELKAMA, 1964, suggested by PELAGO BICYCLES


KARIN WIDNĂ„S / For Savoy A sixteen-piece dinner service designed and made by ceramicist KARIN WIDNĂ„S for the Restaurant Savoy, celebrating its 75th anniversary.


VAISALA / RS-radiosondes VAISALA’s RS-radiosondes, their sensors and the data they collect, represent an uninterrupted, ongoing legacy of product development and research that started more than 80 years ago. The data they have accumulated provide the basis for predicting changes in weather and climate– both for the coming weekend and for the next century.


ILONA RISTA / M채ntymets채sein채 A wall element with reflective and refractive acoustic qualities by ILONA RISTA consists of layered CNC-milled birch panels.


AIVAN / Siilo A ceramic, wireless multi-channel speaker, produced by start-up company Unmonday, established by the designers to develop, manufacture and sell their new product.


LINDA BERGROTH & AHONEN & LAMBERG / Trabendo A new Parisian concert venue situated in the Parc de la Villette, in one of Bernard Tschumi’s red architectural follies. LINDA BERGROTH collaborated with AHONEN & LAMBERG to design its visual and spatial identity.


OK DO / OK Do 2009–2012 Anthology A retrospective compendium of articles and projects by ANNI PUOLAKKA and JENNA SUTELA is presented in digital and paper formats. Visitors can print selected items and bind their own publications to go.


AAMU SONG & JOHAN OLIN (COMPANY) / Factory After establishing a design studio, Company; starting their own shop, Salakauppa; and expanding their network of small manufacturers all over the world, now AAMU SONG and JOHAN OLIN are dreaming of starting their own factory.


JOUKO KÄRKKÄINEN / Metsuri In the hands of JOUKO KÄRKKÄINEN, a chainsaw transforms massive logs, removing the excess and revealing simple archetypal shapes of furniture.


ERJA HIRVI / Ikkunaprinssi ERJA HIRVI’s paintings and drawings serve as starting points for her fabric designs. In the case of Ikkunaprinssi, the pattern is populated with portraits of her houseplants, that have multiplied to take their new positions on window curtains all over cities, suburbs, villages and cottages.


MAIJA PUOSKARI / Kulmio The hexagonal wall tiles investigate optical and illusory effects, creating minimalist ceramic topographies.


HARRI KOSKINEN / Savotta-back bag HARRI KOSKINEN has worked with Savotta on creating a lighter, stronger and easier to manufacture metal frame for an updated version of the modular rucksack developed for Finnish paratroopers.


KATJA HYNNINEN / Classic car fabric Through painstaking rounds of reverse-engineering, material research and experiments, KATJA HYNNINEN has developed a method to replicate exactly woven seat fabrics of the 1963 Renault Dauphine.


TEEMU JÄRVI & HEIKKI RUOHO / Kasaa & Kenno TEEMU JÄRVI and HEIKKI RUOHO have investigated new composite cardboard and created a family of furnishings based on the properties and possibilities of this material.


ANNA-MARI VIERIKKO / K채py A collection of hand-crafted paper luminaires by ANNA-MARI VIERIKKO. The organic geometries are created by repetitive manual folding.


PELAGO BICYCLES / Linahammar A locally manufactured cargo bicycle. Its unique geometry lifts the cargo pallet on top of a BMX-scale front wheel, making the frame shorter and easier to maneuver.


DANIEL PALILLO / Daniel Palillo Kids A new collection for kids employs Palillo’s signature motifs such as skulls, eyes and monsters, but rendering them in a more colorful and playful, yet persistently unsettling style.


LAURA PAKARINEN / Sasta Takamaat LAURA PAKARINEN developed a collection of clothes for demanding backcountry conditions in collaboration with telemark skiier ANTTE LAUHAMAA.


MUOTOHIOMO / Peltopylv채s A new high voltage field pylon fulfilling the hardest technical and security standards, its design aims for efficient erection, reliable servicing and minimising the obstructions to cultivation and landuse around its immediate base.


HANNU KÄHÖNEN / Baltic Mermaid Considering the environmental impacts of leaking small outboard motors on thousads of small boats that are used only a few times every summer, docked on the city piers led HANNU KÄHÖNEN to imagine– and propose – a boat service of shared electric vessels enabling the multitude to enjoy the Helsinki’s archipelago and waterways.


TAPIO LAUKKANEN / Planmed Verity The world’s first mobile computer tomography orthopedic 3D imaging device, Verity is a new device typology, offering low dose extremity imaging for quicker, easier and more accurate diagnosis at the point-of-care. TAPIO LAUKKANEN’s task was to give the device its shape and consider its user experience both from the perspective of healthcare professional and patient.


SAARA LEPOKORPI / S/S12 Collection In her collection SAARA LEPOKORPI combines highly crafted materials with elaborate techniques and treatments, producing unique pieces with bold geometric and structural silhouettes.


VILLE KOKKONEN / Bright Light Artek’s new archetype by VILLE KOKKONEN: an adjustable bright light source with medical benefits, housed in a simple wooden box with considered details and reduced elements.


OUTI MARTIKAINEN / Climbing Nets OUTI MARTIKAINEN’s material research on nets, knots and weaves has led her to conceive large-scale installations and pieces that transform urban space by rendering facades and fences into climbable lace.


2

15

14 1

3 23 21

11.

20

22

18 17

13 9

5 10 8

4

16 6

12

7

19


1

AIVAN / Siilo

2

ERJA HIRVI / Ikkunaprinssi

3

OK DO / OK Do 2009–2012 -Antology

4

OUTI MARTIKAINEN / Climbing Net

5

HANNU KÄHÖNEN / Baltic Mermaid

6

ANNA-MARI VIERIKKO / Käpy

7

VILLE KOKKONEN / Bright Light

8

TAPIO LAUKKANEN / Planmed Verity

9

AAMU SONG & JOHAN OLIN (COMPANY) / Factory

10

KATJA HYNNINEN / Classic car fabric

11

PELAGO BICYCLES / Linahammar

12

JOUKO KÄRKKÄINEN / Metsuri

13

DANIEL PALILLO / Daniel Palillo Kids

14

MUOTOHIOMO / Peltopylväs

15

LINDA BERGROTH, AHONEN & LAMBERG / Trabendo

16

LAURA PAKARINEN / Sasta Takamaat

17

ILONA RISTA / Mäntymetsä

18

KARIN WIDNÄS / For Savoy

19

TEEMU JÄRVI & HEIKKI RUOHO / Kasaa & Kenno

20

HARRI KOSKINEN / Savotta-back bag

21

VAISALA / Radiosonde RS92

22

MAIJA PUOSKARI / Kulmio

23

SAARA LEPOKORPI / S/S12 Collection


2

1


15

23

3


14


22

11


21


18


10


9


17

20


5


13


4

8


6

19


16


7

12


Curator, exhibition architect

TUOMAS TOIVONEN Exhibition team

CATHARINA KAJANDER LENA STRÖMBERG PEKKA HARNI Exhibition technicians

TUOMAS LAATIKAINEN & TEAM / KUNSTHALLE HELSINKI JESSE PIETILÄ / ORNAMO MATTI SEPPÄLÄ / ORNAMO PASI RUOKONEN / ORNAMO Cinematographer, photographer, translator

NIKLAS KULLSTRÖM Graphic designer

NENE TSUBOI Producer

ELINA PEKKALA Project manager

PETRA ILONEN Project assistant

LAURA RAUTIAINEN Communications

MINNA BORG / ORNAMO MARKETTA VILJASAARI / KUNSTHALLE HELSINKI SANNA KANGASLUOMA / KUNSTHALLE HELSINKI PAULA KARLSSON / WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL HELSINKI 2012 Thank you:

ESPERANTO ASSOCIATION OF FINLAND VUOKKO NURMESNIEMI Supported by

ARTS COUNCIL OF FINLAND FINNISH CULTURAL FOUNDATION FINNISH SOCIETY OF CRAFTS AND DESIGN ORNAMO FOUNDATION SWEDISH CULTURAL FOUNDATION IN FINLAND WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL HELSINKI 2012 This exhibition was part of the World Design Capital Helsinki 2012 program.


TULEVAN PERINNE / HANDS THAT DRAW THE FUTURE  

Catalogue published by ORNAMO, Finnish Association of Designers on the occasion of the exhibition TULEVAN PERINNE / HANDS THAT DRAW THE FUTU...

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