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THE GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS

A WA R D S 2 0 1 9


WELCOME TO THE 22ND GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS AWARDS It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to this year’s Guild Awards. This evening is unquestionably the highlight of the Guild calendar – our chance to celebrate with friends and colleagues the best in food writing and broadcasting – and we invite you to sit back and enjoy the parade of skill, dedication and talent about to dance before your eyes. There are many things that make our Guild awards exceptional. For a start, the Guild itself, born one April lunchtime in 1984; head of table was gravel-voiced broadcaster Derek Cooper, encircled by doyennes including Elizabeth David, Jane Grigson, Claudia Roden and Arabella Boxer. Since then, the Guild has grown into an association of nearly 500 professionals, who through their words and speech, in print, online and on air, exert untold power and influence over the world of food and drink. After 20 years as a member of the Guild – and now greatly honoured to be its President – I have come to think of our organisation as a sort of beehive. From outside, all appears placid and benign, and there is an agreeable scent of honey as committee members and special officers buzz about their various tasks. If only you knew what really goes on among the honeycombs! Networking, sharing, learning, events, bursaries and competitions… Workshops to hone your skills, mentoring for young writers, free legal advice when things go wrong… As these activities proliferate, so our membership continues to expand. There are many unique aspects to the Guild awards. First and foremost, they are judged by professional writers – namely, Guild members. These guys know their pastrami from their prosciutto, and their apostrophes from their semi-colons; after all, it’s how many of us earn our living. The judging process – honed to Sabatier sharpness over 21 years – is explained in detail over the page. Before the show goes on, a personal word of thanks from me. Outgoing President Xanthe Clay has spent the last five years tirelessly championing the Guild, bringing energy, new ideas and modernising influence. Outgoing Vice-President Clarissa Hyman will be equally missed, for her wise counsel and insight. Our Twitter and Instagram hashtag this evening is #gfwawards.

Orlando Murrin, President, Guild of Food Writers


WELCOME TO THE 22ND GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS AWARDS It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to this year’s Guild Awards. This evening is unquestionably the highlight of the Guild calendar – our chance to celebrate with friends and colleagues the best in food writing and broadcasting – and we invite you to sit back and enjoy the parade of skill, dedication and talent about to dance before your eyes. There are many things that make our Guild awards exceptional. For a start, the Guild itself, born one April lunchtime in 1984; head of table was gravel-voiced broadcaster Derek Cooper, encircled by doyennes including Elizabeth David, Jane Grigson, Claudia Roden and Arabella Boxer. Since then, the Guild has grown into an association of nearly 500 professionals, who through their words and speech, in print, online and on air, exert untold power and influence over the world of food and drink. After 20 years as a member of the Guild – and now greatly honoured to be its President – I have come to think of our organisation as a sort of beehive. From outside, all appears placid and benign, and there is an agreeable scent of honey as committee members and special officers buzz about their various tasks. If only you knew what really goes on among the honeycombs! Networking, sharing, learning, events, bursaries and competitions… Workshops to hone your skills, mentoring for young writers, free legal advice when things go wrong… As these activities proliferate, so our membership continues to expand. There are many unique aspects to the Guild awards. First and foremost, they are judged by professional writers – namely, Guild members. These guys know their pastrami from their prosciutto, and their apostrophes from their semi-colons; after all, it’s how many of us earn our living. The judging process – honed to Sabatier sharpness over 21 years – is explained in detail over the page. Before the show goes on, a personal word of thanks from me. Outgoing President Xanthe Clay has spent the last five years tirelessly championing the Guild, bringing energy, new ideas and modernising influence. Outgoing Vice-President Clarissa Hyman will be equally missed, for her wise counsel and insight. Our Twitter and Instagram hashtag this evening is #gfwawards.

Orlando Murrin, President, Guild of Food Writers


THIS YEAR’S JUDGES Susy Atkins, Kimiko Barber, Rosemary Barron, Amy Bates, Fiona Beckett, Katie Bishop, Galton Blackiston, Joyce Blake, Angela Boggiano, Mary Cadogan, Susan Campbell, Caroline Conran, Alan Coxon, Katie Dashwood, Roz Denny, Ralph Early, Hattie Ellis, Sarah Jane Evans, Sam Gates, Nicolas Ghirlando, Beverley Glock, Wendy Godfrey, Jason Goodwin, Amanda Grant, Henrietta Green, Fiona Hamilton-Fairley, Rich Harris, Phil Harriss, Michael Harwood, Ching He Huang, Humayun Hussain, Brooke Jackson, Holly Jones, Janet Laurence, Elaine Lemm,Valerie Mars, Maggie Mayhew, Kate McBain, Sue McMahon, Bruce McMichael, Patricia Michelson, Jennifer Middleton, Aine Morris, Charlotte Pike, Celia Plender, Thane Prince, Sarah Randell, Joan Ransley, Debora Robertson, Urvashi Roe, Alan Rosenthal, Camilla Schneideman, María José Sevilla, Kathy Slack, James Steen, Sumayya Usmani, Joanna Weinberg, Da-Hae West, Anthony Wild, Carol Wilson

Although the winners of the Guild Awards 2019 are not unveiled until this evening, the judging process behind them is absolutely transparent. The planning starts in autumn, when the Guild committee finalises the various categories; these are modified from year to year, according to what is happening in the fields of books, magazines, newspapers, online, TV and radio. Judging is performed exclusively by Guild members, who generally regard the opportunity – if and when it comes along – as a fascinating, even lifeenhancing experience. How it works is this. For each category, the committee selects a Chief Judge. This is often someone with long experience in the field, someone sage and steady, who will guide his or her judging panel to a unanimous and punctual outcome. Once Chief Judges are in place, the Judging Panels are chosen from the entire Guild membership, with the help of a website generating random numbers. After any conflicts of interest have been eliminated, each Chief Judge is now joined by a panel of four judges, who spend about six weeks whittling the entries in their category down to a shortlist of three, then a final winner. Every category is different, and has its own recommended judging criteria, which have been developed and refined over many years. All judges, however, are encouraged to treat their category as a blank slate, ignoring whether a writer has won prizes in the past, or achieved fame and glory. Book categories have a reputation for being particularly onerous to judge, requiring a colossal amount of reading and sifting; our judges invariably undertake their task diligently and discreetly. Sometimes it can be difficult to separate out the different components of an entry – writing, photography, design and production – but Guild judges look beyond the razzle dazzle; we are, after all, a Guild of Food Writers, and good writing is of pre-eminent importance. If an entry includes recipes, or is recipe-led, judges are encouraged to try out recipes (at the Guild’s expense), rather than rely on guesswork. By mid-April the judging is complete. The shortlists are announced with appropriate fanfare, this programme goes into production and trophies are engraved. Eight months in the planning, seven weeks of deliberation by 60 earnest judges, one evening of excitement and celebration – and (we hope) twelve lives changed forever.

AWARDS CATEGORIES

The only food writing awards judged by writers

FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD FOOD BROADCAST OR PODCAST AWARD RESTAURANT WRITING AWARD INVESTIGATIVE FOOD WORK AWARD FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD RECIPE WRITING AWARD FOOD WRITING AWARD INSPIRATION AWARD FIRST BOOK AWARD INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD FOOD BOOK AWARD GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD


THIS YEAR’S JUDGES Susy Atkins, Kimiko Barber, Rosemary Barron, Amy Bates, Fiona Beckett, Katie Bishop, Galton Blackiston, Joyce Blake, Angela Boggiano, Mary Cadogan, Susan Campbell, Caroline Conran, Alan Coxon, Katie Dashwood, Roz Denny, Ralph Early, Hattie Ellis, Sarah Jane Evans, Sam Gates, Nicolas Ghirlando, Beverley Glock, Wendy Godfrey, Jason Goodwin, Amanda Grant, Henrietta Green, Fiona Hamilton-Fairley, Rich Harris, Phil Harriss, Michael Harwood, Ching He Huang, Humayun Hussain, Brooke Jackson, Holly Jones, Janet Laurence, Elaine Lemm,Valerie Mars, Maggie Mayhew, Kate McBain, Sue McMahon, Bruce McMichael, Patricia Michelson, Jennifer Middleton, Aine Morris, Charlotte Pike, Celia Plender, Thane Prince, Sarah Randell, Joan Ransley, Debora Robertson, Urvashi Roe, Alan Rosenthal, Camilla Schneideman, María José Sevilla, Kathy Slack, James Steen, Sumayya Usmani, Joanna Weinberg, Da-Hae West, Anthony Wild, Carol Wilson

Although the winners of the Guild Awards 2019 are not unveiled until this evening, the judging process behind them is absolutely transparent. The planning starts in autumn, when the Guild committee finalises the various categories; these are modified from year to year, according to what is happening in the fields of books, magazines, newspapers, online, TV and radio. Judging is performed exclusively by Guild members, who generally regard the opportunity – if and when it comes along – as a fascinating, even lifeenhancing experience. How it works is this. For each category, the committee selects a Chief Judge. This is often someone with long experience in the field, someone sage and steady, who will guide his or her judging panel to a unanimous and punctual outcome. Once Chief Judges are in place, the Judging Panels are chosen from the entire Guild membership, with the help of a website generating random numbers. After any conflicts of interest have been eliminated, each Chief Judge is now joined by a panel of four judges, who spend about six weeks whittling the entries in their category down to a shortlist of three, then a final winner. Every category is different, and has its own recommended judging criteria, which have been developed and refined over many years. All judges, however, are encouraged to treat their category as a blank slate, ignoring whether a writer has won prizes in the past, or achieved fame and glory. Book categories have a reputation for being particularly onerous to judge, requiring a colossal amount of reading and sifting; our judges invariably undertake their task diligently and discreetly. Sometimes it can be difficult to separate out the different components of an entry – writing, photography, design and production – but Guild judges look beyond the razzle dazzle; we are, after all, a Guild of Food Writers, and good writing is of pre-eminent importance. If an entry includes recipes, or is recipe-led, judges are encouraged to try out recipes (at the Guild’s expense), rather than rely on guesswork. By mid-April the judging is complete. The shortlists are announced with appropriate fanfare, this programme goes into production and trophies are engraved. Eight months in the planning, seven weeks of deliberation by 60 earnest judges, one evening of excitement and celebration – and (we hope) twelve lives changed forever.

AWARDS CATEGORIES

The only food writing awards judged by writers

FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD FOOD BROADCAST OR PODCAST AWARD RESTAURANT WRITING AWARD INVESTIGATIVE FOOD WORK AWARD FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD RECIPE WRITING AWARD FOOD WRITING AWARD INSPIRATION AWARD FIRST BOOK AWARD INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD FOOD BOOK AWARD GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD


BITTEN & WRITTEN by Zeren Wilson (bittenandwritten.com)

CRUMBS ON THE TABLE by Laura Donohue (crumbsonthetable.co.uk)

GLUTS & GLUTTONY by Kathy Slack (glutsandgluttony.com)

Judges commented: Wilson navigates the difficult task of restaurant reviewing with confidence and humour. His writing thrums with excitement and draws you into the adventure, and he understands that the best restaurants are stories which bring together people, place and food. Judges felt that he wears his knowledge lightly, and admired his fluid style.

Judges commented: Whether she is writing about making caponata in Sicily or frying elderblossoms in her Cambridgeshire village, Donohue instantly captivates the reader. Her style is direct, engaging and lyrical. Perhaps her greatest gift is writing about food and memory: judges were genuinely touched by her tribute to the humble apple, linking her childhood in the United States with her little cottage in England. A distinct voice in today’s food writing scene.

Judges commented: ‘Like settling down in the kitchen with a dear friend to talk food over a cup of tea,’ is how one judge described this blog. Slack’s gentle humour engages and charms the reader, whether she is writing about making marmalade as a way to waste time, or dealing with a glut of spinach. ‘Fine writing that peers over the pots and pans to see the bigger picture.’

FOOD BROADCAST OR PODCAST AWARD THE FOOD CHAIN: WIDOWED: FOOD AFTER LOSS presented by Emily Thomas (BBC World Service)

Judges commented: An eye-opener to the rich complexities of grief, eating and cooking. Horrifying stories – of widows in Bengal who are no longer considered worthy of being fed nutritious food, and in Ghana who must drink the liquid their husband’s dead body has been bathed in – were sensitively juxtaposed with heartwarming ones, such as the octogenarian who learnt to cook using his daughter’s handwritten recipes. Tears and smiles guaranteed.

THE FOOD PROGRAMME: DOCTOR’S ORDERS presented by Sheila Dillon (BBC Radio 4)

Judges commented: A positive and upbeat programme that gets you thinking about the role medics can play in nutritional health and the importance of updating medical training for a changing society. One jawdropping story about a doctor whose child nearly died from vitamin deficiency was ‘enough to send a shiver down any parental spine’. A strong advertisement for culinary and preventive medicine.

THE KITCHEN CABINET presented by Jay Rayner (BBC Radio 4)

Judges commented: Judges described this series as ‘compelling and captivating’ – the Gardeners’ Question Time of the food world. Rayner is ‘a consummate pro, who moves the discussion along with authority, vigour and knowledge’, and the result is an enticing mix of science, history, nutrition and recipes.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 granddishes.com by Iska Lupton and Anastasia Miari 2017 thelittlelibrarycafe.com by Kate Young 2016 nutmegsseven.co.uk by Elly McCausland

2018 The Food Programme: Leah Chase:The Cook Who Changed America presented by Dan Saladino (BBC Radio 4) 2017 The Food Programme: Food Stories from Syria 2 presented by Dan Saladino (BBC Radio 4) 2016 Hugh’s War on Waste presented by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (KEO Films for BBC1)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD


BITTEN & WRITTEN by Zeren Wilson (bittenandwritten.com)

CRUMBS ON THE TABLE by Laura Donohue (crumbsonthetable.co.uk)

GLUTS & GLUTTONY by Kathy Slack (glutsandgluttony.com)

Judges commented: Wilson navigates the difficult task of restaurant reviewing with confidence and humour. His writing thrums with excitement and draws you into the adventure, and he understands that the best restaurants are stories which bring together people, place and food. Judges felt that he wears his knowledge lightly, and admired his fluid style.

Judges commented: Whether she is writing about making caponata in Sicily or frying elderblossoms in her Cambridgeshire village, Donohue instantly captivates the reader. Her style is direct, engaging and lyrical. Perhaps her greatest gift is writing about food and memory: judges were genuinely touched by her tribute to the humble apple, linking her childhood in the United States with her little cottage in England. A distinct voice in today’s food writing scene.

Judges commented: ‘Like settling down in the kitchen with a dear friend to talk food over a cup of tea,’ is how one judge described this blog. Slack’s gentle humour engages and charms the reader, whether she is writing about making marmalade as a way to waste time, or dealing with a glut of spinach. ‘Fine writing that peers over the pots and pans to see the bigger picture.’

FOOD BROADCAST OR PODCAST AWARD THE FOOD CHAIN: WIDOWED: FOOD AFTER LOSS presented by Emily Thomas (BBC World Service)

Judges commented: An eye-opener to the rich complexities of grief, eating and cooking. Horrifying stories – of widows in Bengal who are no longer considered worthy of being fed nutritious food, and in Ghana who must drink the liquid their husband’s dead body has been bathed in – were sensitively juxtaposed with heartwarming ones, such as the octogenarian who learnt to cook using his daughter’s handwritten recipes. Tears and smiles guaranteed.

THE FOOD PROGRAMME: DOCTOR’S ORDERS presented by Sheila Dillon (BBC Radio 4)

Judges commented: A positive and upbeat programme that gets you thinking about the role medics can play in nutritional health and the importance of updating medical training for a changing society. One jawdropping story about a doctor whose child nearly died from vitamin deficiency was ‘enough to send a shiver down any parental spine’. A strong advertisement for culinary and preventive medicine.

THE KITCHEN CABINET presented by Jay Rayner (BBC Radio 4)

Judges commented: Judges described this series as ‘compelling and captivating’ – the Gardeners’ Question Time of the food world. Rayner is ‘a consummate pro, who moves the discussion along with authority, vigour and knowledge’, and the result is an enticing mix of science, history, nutrition and recipes.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 granddishes.com by Iska Lupton and Anastasia Miari 2017 thelittlelibrarycafe.com by Kate Young 2016 nutmegsseven.co.uk by Elly McCausland

2018 The Food Programme: Leah Chase:The Cook Who Changed America presented by Dan Saladino (BBC Radio 4) 2017 The Food Programme: Food Stories from Syria 2 presented by Dan Saladino (BBC Radio 4) 2016 Hugh’s War on Waste presented by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (KEO Films for BBC1)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD


GUY DIMOND for work on businesstraveller.com

TIM HAYWARD for work in FT Weekend Magazine

TOM PARKER BOWLES for work in Event (Mail on Sunday)

Judges commented: In a useful format aimed at the business traveller, these reviews are split into easy-toread sections that expertly give not only the low-down on a restaurant’s food – even breakfast, in one case – but also its background, venue and drinks. This straightforward and deeply well-informed reviewing leaves the reader in no doubt over what to expect. Travellers will feel guided; diners fully briefed.

Judges commented: Honest, personal, boisterous, unflinchingly witty, these are reviews with a strong voice and opinions. A knowledgeable and experienced connoisseur, Hayward has the palate of an aficionado and the pen of a poet. His reviews are comprehensive but not wordy, learned but not lecturing and filled with a love of food and eating.

Judges commented: Parker Bowles is a musketeer of restaurant critics, flashing dishes with bravado and eating more than any man should; for his readers, indigestion is just around the corner but the restaurant remains in the memory. He is sharp witted, deliciously descriptive and writes with an immersive style that has a great sense of joy. Favouring flavour over fussy fittings, he is more than knowledgeable about the food of different cultures.

THE FOOD CHAIN: #METOO FOOD presented by Emily Thomas (BBC World Service)

REVEALED: THE MILLIONAIRES HOARDING UK FISHING RIGHTS by Crispin Dowler for unearthed.greenpeace.org

Judges commented: Judges found this episode informative and revelatory, bringing their attention to a subject that they had never considered previously. ‘A very strong programme which highlights an important issue in an engaging way,’ commented one judge, while another described the programme as ‘Fascinating listening, with a wide range of interviews that show a really thorough level of research.’

Judges commented: An in-depth investigation into a shocking story which might otherwise have never come under public scrutiny. Dowler’s report, which took five months to compile, was excellently written, carefully researched and held the attention throughout. One judge described its detailed examination of the evidence as ‘compelling,’ and supported the writer’s demand for urgent action.

YES, BACON REALLY IS KILLING US by Bee Wilson for The Guardian

Judges commented: An excellently written article about a staple that so many of us enjoy and has always been so central to the British food scene, but which is now embroiled in controversy. Judges found the level of research impressive, the science clearly explained, and Wilson’s argument persuasive and, above all, readable. One judge described this as a ‘must-read’.

PRESENTED IN MEMORY OF DEREK COOPER PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Tim Hayward for work in FT Weekend Magazine 2017 Marina O’Loughlin for work in The Guardian Weekend 2016 Marina O’Loughlin for work in The Guardian Weekend

2018 Foodism Issue 21, special issue on sustainability (Square Up Media) 2017 The Ethical Carnivore by Louise Gray (Bloomsbury Natural History) 2016 The Diet Myth by Tim Spector (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

RESTAURANT WRITING AWARD

INVESTIGATIVE FOOD WORK AWARD


GUY DIMOND for work on businesstraveller.com

TIM HAYWARD for work in FT Weekend Magazine

TOM PARKER BOWLES for work in Event (Mail on Sunday)

Judges commented: In a useful format aimed at the business traveller, these reviews are split into easy-toread sections that expertly give not only the low-down on a restaurant’s food – even breakfast, in one case – but also its background, venue and drinks. This straightforward and deeply well-informed reviewing leaves the reader in no doubt over what to expect. Travellers will feel guided; diners fully briefed.

Judges commented: Honest, personal, boisterous, unflinchingly witty, these are reviews with a strong voice and opinions. A knowledgeable and experienced connoisseur, Hayward has the palate of an aficionado and the pen of a poet. His reviews are comprehensive but not wordy, learned but not lecturing and filled with a love of food and eating.

Judges commented: Parker Bowles is a musketeer of restaurant critics, flashing dishes with bravado and eating more than any man should; for his readers, indigestion is just around the corner but the restaurant remains in the memory. He is sharp witted, deliciously descriptive and writes with an immersive style that has a great sense of joy. Favouring flavour over fussy fittings, he is more than knowledgeable about the food of different cultures.

THE FOOD CHAIN: #METOO FOOD presented by Emily Thomas (BBC World Service)

REVEALED: THE MILLIONAIRES HOARDING UK FISHING RIGHTS by Crispin Dowler for unearthed.greenpeace.org

Judges commented: Judges found this episode informative and revelatory, bringing their attention to a subject that they had never considered previously. ‘A very strong programme which highlights an important issue in an engaging way,’ commented one judge, while another described the programme as ‘Fascinating listening, with a wide range of interviews that show a really thorough level of research.’

Judges commented: An in-depth investigation into a shocking story which might otherwise have never come under public scrutiny. Dowler’s report, which took five months to compile, was excellently written, carefully researched and held the attention throughout. One judge described its detailed examination of the evidence as ‘compelling,’ and supported the writer’s demand for urgent action.

YES, BACON REALLY IS KILLING US by Bee Wilson for The Guardian

Judges commented: An excellently written article about a staple that so many of us enjoy and has always been so central to the British food scene, but which is now embroiled in controversy. Judges found the level of research impressive, the science clearly explained, and Wilson’s argument persuasive and, above all, readable. One judge described this as a ‘must-read’.

PRESENTED IN MEMORY OF DEREK COOPER PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Tim Hayward for work in FT Weekend Magazine 2017 Marina O’Loughlin for work in The Guardian Weekend 2016 Marina O’Loughlin for work in The Guardian Weekend

2018 Foodism Issue 21, special issue on sustainability (Square Up Media) 2017 The Ethical Carnivore by Louise Gray (Bloomsbury Natural History) 2016 The Diet Myth by Tim Spector (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

RESTAURANT WRITING AWARD

INVESTIGATIVE FOOD WORK AWARD


CHILTERNS FOOD MAGAZINE edited by Hugh Collins

INDY EATS edited by Emma Henderson (The Independent digital)

Judges commented: This magazine does an excellent job of showcasing local food and drink producers and retailers. Judges particularly liked the magazine’s clear simplicity, lovely look and feel and approachable recipes, and it made them long to visit the Chilterns as a foodie destination. The ‘Masterclass’ section was singled out for particular praise.

Judges commented: Everything about this online magazine was impressive: it was extremely well written and full of thought-provoking features. ‘An article on ethical dairy farming has changed the whole way I think about my consumption of dairy’, commented one judge. The recipes were practical and appealing.

MARKET LIFE edited by Mark Riddaway (Borough Market/ LSC Publishing)

Judges commented: A visually appealing, intelligent magazine with real depth. It contained many stand-out sections, including ‘Two of a Kind’ and ‘Edible History’, which made the judges plan visits to Borough Market as a matter of urgency. ‘You get a real sense of the characters working in the market’, commented one judge. Another praised the inventive, inviting recipes, making good use of less wellknown ingredients.

RECIPE WRITING AWARD DIANA HENRY for work in Stella (The Sunday Telegraph)

Judges commented: Henry is ‘like a reassuring friend in the kitchen’. She is a cook who loves words, and the warmth of her voice gently guides you through the recipes, each one a perfect match of flavours, peppered with astute asides. Every recipe was found to work, merit a repeat – and some became family favourites on the spot.

ANNA JONES for work in Guardian Feast

GILL MELLER for work in delicious. magazine

Judges commented: Jones’ recipes exhibit such brilliant matches of flavour and ingenuity that it is easy to forget they are also vegan or vegetarian. This is a writer who never preaches, instead offering a new and exciting direction for cookery, fresh and vibrant. One judge commented, ‘Her simple, tasty recipes speak for themselves.’

Judges commented: The backbone of Meller’s work is well-sourced ingredients and his strong principles shine through his writing. The recipes tempt the cook to try something new, and lead you to the unexpected in an uncomplicated, unfussy fashion. Judges were particularly impressed by his demystification of game, and praised his ‘quiet gusto in the kitchen’.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Market Life edited by Mark Riddaway 2017 delicious. magazine edited by Karen Barnes 2016 The Guardian Weekend’s food section edited by Bob Granleese

2018 Meera Sodha for work in The Guardian Weekend 2017 Rachel Roddy for work published in The Guardian Cook 2016 Stephen Harris for work published in The Telegraph Weekend

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD


CHILTERNS FOOD MAGAZINE edited by Hugh Collins

INDY EATS edited by Emma Henderson (The Independent digital)

Judges commented: This magazine does an excellent job of showcasing local food and drink producers and retailers. Judges particularly liked the magazine’s clear simplicity, lovely look and feel and approachable recipes, and it made them long to visit the Chilterns as a foodie destination. The ‘Masterclass’ section was singled out for particular praise.

Judges commented: Everything about this online magazine was impressive: it was extremely well written and full of thought-provoking features. ‘An article on ethical dairy farming has changed the whole way I think about my consumption of dairy’, commented one judge. The recipes were practical and appealing.

MARKET LIFE edited by Mark Riddaway (Borough Market/ LSC Publishing)

Judges commented: A visually appealing, intelligent magazine with real depth. It contained many stand-out sections, including ‘Two of a Kind’ and ‘Edible History’, which made the judges plan visits to Borough Market as a matter of urgency. ‘You get a real sense of the characters working in the market’, commented one judge. Another praised the inventive, inviting recipes, making good use of less wellknown ingredients.

RECIPE WRITING AWARD DIANA HENRY for work in Stella (The Sunday Telegraph)

Judges commented: Henry is ‘like a reassuring friend in the kitchen’. She is a cook who loves words, and the warmth of her voice gently guides you through the recipes, each one a perfect match of flavours, peppered with astute asides. Every recipe was found to work, merit a repeat – and some became family favourites on the spot.

ANNA JONES for work in Guardian Feast

GILL MELLER for work in delicious. magazine

Judges commented: Jones’ recipes exhibit such brilliant matches of flavour and ingenuity that it is easy to forget they are also vegan or vegetarian. This is a writer who never preaches, instead offering a new and exciting direction for cookery, fresh and vibrant. One judge commented, ‘Her simple, tasty recipes speak for themselves.’

Judges commented: The backbone of Meller’s work is well-sourced ingredients and his strong principles shine through his writing. The recipes tempt the cook to try something new, and lead you to the unexpected in an uncomplicated, unfussy fashion. Judges were particularly impressed by his demystification of game, and praised his ‘quiet gusto in the kitchen’.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Market Life edited by Mark Riddaway 2017 delicious. magazine edited by Karen Barnes 2016 The Guardian Weekend’s food section edited by Bob Granleese

2018 Meera Sodha for work in The Guardian Weekend 2017 Rachel Roddy for work published in The Guardian Cook 2016 Stephen Harris for work published in The Telegraph Weekend

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD


GRACE DENT for work in The Guardian

Judges commented: Dent’s writing uses humour to disarm the reader before hitting you with insightful and sometimes harsh facts. She has the rare ability to act like the class clown while getting right to the heart of the matter. Her piece on processed foods was ironic and funny, but at the same time politically supercharged.

ED SMITH for work in Market Life and on boroughmarket.com

Judges commented: Smith’s focus is on storecupboard ingredients, bringing the unusual into the mainstream and revisiting the familiar. One judge declared, ‘he has an easy but defined writing style that reminds me of AA Gill’. Another described his work as being witty, neat and accessible. Recipes were inventive and practical and the articles simply joyful to read.

BEE WILSON for work in The Guardian, The Observer, FT and Market Life

Judges commented: Wilson’s work is scholarly without a hint of pomposity; one judge described it as ‘intellectually rich, but easy to digest’. Her coverage is wide, including many subjects that are little known or out of the ordinary, but always approached with style, sincerity and engagement.

INSPIRATION AWARD

BOROUGH MARKET

Judges commented: The market’s mission is to ‘put every leftover piece of food or packaging to the best possible use – to see raw materials where others see refuse’. Surplus produce from many of the stalls is distributed to local charities, and food waste goes into an anaerobic digestion plant which converts it into power, fertiliser and water. None of the Market’s rubbish goes to landfill: it is all recycled.

THE COMMUNITY FRIDGE

Judges commented: Described as ‘a simple way of sharing good food that would otherwise go to waste’, this scheme was launched in Derbyshire in 2016 and has now been rolled out to 50 Community Fridges throughout the UK, extending from Falmouth to Mull. Each fridge distributes an average of half a tonne of food a month.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Joanna Blythman for work in The Guardian and Sunday Herald 2017 Rachel Roddy for work in The Guardian Cook 2016 Bee Wilson for work in the TLS, The Happy Reader, Stella, Intelligent Life and The Observer

2017 Kalpna Woolf, 91 Ways 2016 Carmel McConnell MBE, Magic Breakfast

DOM’S FOOD MISSION

Judges commented: Dom Warren feeds over 4,500 homeless and vulnerable people in Hastings each week – no matter the weather, 365 days of the year – from waste food donated by supermarkets and food outlets. Every evening his volunteers fill a Transit van with food and deliver it to community centres, schools, women’s safe houses, hostels and an open-air area where the homeless are fed once a week, cooked in schools under the tutelage of Dom’s wife Alexandria. His dream is to roll out his scheme nationally.

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD WRITING AWARD


GRACE DENT for work in The Guardian

Judges commented: Dent’s writing uses humour to disarm the reader before hitting you with insightful and sometimes harsh facts. She has the rare ability to act like the class clown while getting right to the heart of the matter. Her piece on processed foods was ironic and funny, but at the same time politically supercharged.

ED SMITH for work in Market Life and on boroughmarket.com

Judges commented: Smith’s focus is on storecupboard ingredients, bringing the unusual into the mainstream and revisiting the familiar. One judge declared, ‘he has an easy but defined writing style that reminds me of AA Gill’. Another described his work as being witty, neat and accessible. Recipes were inventive and practical and the articles simply joyful to read.

BEE WILSON for work in The Guardian, The Observer, FT and Market Life

Judges commented: Wilson’s work is scholarly without a hint of pomposity; one judge described it as ‘intellectually rich, but easy to digest’. Her coverage is wide, including many subjects that are little known or out of the ordinary, but always approached with style, sincerity and engagement.

INSPIRATION AWARD

BOROUGH MARKET

Judges commented: The market’s mission is to ‘put every leftover piece of food or packaging to the best possible use – to see raw materials where others see refuse’. Surplus produce from many of the stalls is distributed to local charities, and food waste goes into an anaerobic digestion plant which converts it into power, fertiliser and water. None of the Market’s rubbish goes to landfill: it is all recycled.

THE COMMUNITY FRIDGE

Judges commented: Described as ‘a simple way of sharing good food that would otherwise go to waste’, this scheme was launched in Derbyshire in 2016 and has now been rolled out to 50 Community Fridges throughout the UK, extending from Falmouth to Mull. Each fridge distributes an average of half a tonne of food a month.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 Joanna Blythman for work in The Guardian and Sunday Herald 2017 Rachel Roddy for work in The Guardian Cook 2016 Bee Wilson for work in the TLS, The Happy Reader, Stella, Intelligent Life and The Observer

2017 Kalpna Woolf, 91 Ways 2016 Carmel McConnell MBE, Magic Breakfast

DOM’S FOOD MISSION

Judges commented: Dom Warren feeds over 4,500 homeless and vulnerable people in Hastings each week – no matter the weather, 365 days of the year – from waste food donated by supermarkets and food outlets. Every evening his volunteers fill a Transit van with food and deliver it to community centres, schools, women’s safe houses, hostels and an open-air area where the homeless are fed once a week, cooked in schools under the tutelage of Dom’s wife Alexandria. His dream is to roll out his scheme nationally.

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FOOD WRITING AWARD


THE NEW ART OF COOKING A Modern Guide to Preparing and Styling Delicious Food by Frankie Unsworth (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Judges commented: An attractive and wide-ranging book full of the recipes and ideas that make simple food jump off the pages and beg to be cooked. Even for those who do not photograph what they eat, arranging and plating food in a way that makes it look good adds so much to your enjoyment. Ambitious and thought-provoking.

NIGHTINGALES AND ROSES Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Maryam Sinaiee (Head of Zeus)

Judges commented: A beautiful evocation of Persian cooking, and a memoir of a beloved country. The judges were inspired by well explained, evocative recipes which drew them into the kitchen. The chapter on the basics of Persian cookery was clear and well described, and the appealing design helped this book get its message across.

INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD

THE READING CURE How Books Restored My Appetite by Laura Freeman (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

COPENHAGEN FOOD Stories, Traditions and Recipes by Trine Hahnemann (Quadrille)

ETHIOPIA Recipes and Traditions from the Horn of Africa by Yohanis Gebreyesus (Kyle Books)

STRUDELS, NOODLES AND DUMPLINGS The New Taste of German Cooking by Anja Dunk (4th Estate)

Judges commented: A riveting account of a young woman’s recovery from anorexia, thanks to a programme of reading. References were wide ranging, from Dickens via Virginia Woolf to J K Rowling, with one or two cookery writers thrown in. Judges described it as eye opening and beautifully written; despite the traumatic subject matter, a book to read for pleasure.

Judges commented: Immaculately researched and beautifully written, this book takes you to the heart of the city, to the waterfront and the woods. It transports you to morning coffee with the famous pastries, and so much more. Judges found the recipes offered a good combination of traditional and new, were easy to follow and, most important, worked in the kitchen.

Judges commented: A daring and original book exploring one of Africa’s great cuisines. Ethiopia has 3000 years of culinary legacy, and its recipes (many vegetarian, many using unusual spices) make fascinating reading. A complex cuisine that deserves wider exposure, and this book is a pioneer in its field.

Judges commented: A book with a strong identity and relaxed vibe, which judges felt gave them a window into the writer’s world, home and kitchen. They were pleased to discover more about German cooking traditions as well as discover new ideas and influences, and the recipes were a clever blend of approachable and inspiring.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Palestinian Table by Reem Kassis (Phaidon) 2017 The Allotment Cookbook by Pete Lawrence (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 2016 Five Quarters by Rachel Roddy (Saltyard Books)

2018 Tasting Georgia by Carla Capalbo (Pallas Athene) 2017 Samarkand by Caroline Eden and Eleanor Ford (Kyle Books) 2016 Spuntino by Russell Norman (Bloomsbury Publishing)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FIRST BOOK AWARD


THE NEW ART OF COOKING A Modern Guide to Preparing and Styling Delicious Food by Frankie Unsworth (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Judges commented: An attractive and wide-ranging book full of the recipes and ideas that make simple food jump off the pages and beg to be cooked. Even for those who do not photograph what they eat, arranging and plating food in a way that makes it look good adds so much to your enjoyment. Ambitious and thought-provoking.

NIGHTINGALES AND ROSES Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Maryam Sinaiee (Head of Zeus)

Judges commented: A beautiful evocation of Persian cooking, and a memoir of a beloved country. The judges were inspired by well explained, evocative recipes which drew them into the kitchen. The chapter on the basics of Persian cookery was clear and well described, and the appealing design helped this book get its message across.

INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD

THE READING CURE How Books Restored My Appetite by Laura Freeman (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

COPENHAGEN FOOD Stories, Traditions and Recipes by Trine Hahnemann (Quadrille)

ETHIOPIA Recipes and Traditions from the Horn of Africa by Yohanis Gebreyesus (Kyle Books)

STRUDELS, NOODLES AND DUMPLINGS The New Taste of German Cooking by Anja Dunk (4th Estate)

Judges commented: A riveting account of a young woman’s recovery from anorexia, thanks to a programme of reading. References were wide ranging, from Dickens via Virginia Woolf to J K Rowling, with one or two cookery writers thrown in. Judges described it as eye opening and beautifully written; despite the traumatic subject matter, a book to read for pleasure.

Judges commented: Immaculately researched and beautifully written, this book takes you to the heart of the city, to the waterfront and the woods. It transports you to morning coffee with the famous pastries, and so much more. Judges found the recipes offered a good combination of traditional and new, were easy to follow and, most important, worked in the kitchen.

Judges commented: A daring and original book exploring one of Africa’s great cuisines. Ethiopia has 3000 years of culinary legacy, and its recipes (many vegetarian, many using unusual spices) make fascinating reading. A complex cuisine that deserves wider exposure, and this book is a pioneer in its field.

Judges commented: A book with a strong identity and relaxed vibe, which judges felt gave them a window into the writer’s world, home and kitchen. They were pleased to discover more about German cooking traditions as well as discover new ideas and influences, and the recipes were a clever blend of approachable and inspiring.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Palestinian Table by Reem Kassis (Phaidon) 2017 The Allotment Cookbook by Pete Lawrence (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 2016 Five Quarters by Rachel Roddy (Saltyard Books)

2018 Tasting Georgia by Carla Capalbo (Pallas Athene) 2017 Samarkand by Caroline Eden and Eleanor Ford (Kyle Books) 2016 Spuntino by Russell Norman (Bloomsbury Publishing)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

FIRST BOOK AWARD


BREAD & BUTTER History, Culture, Recipes by Richard Snapes, Grant Harrington and Eve Hemingway (Quadrille)

Judges commented: This book has everything. It is at the same time fascinating, clever, witty and scholarly, and the story behind it – a chance encounter at Maltby Street Market – makes it all the more remarkable. One judge commented, ‘All the recipes worked magnificently, and on my kitchen work surface or bedside table, this book is an absolute joy.’

FIVE SEASONS OF JAM by Lillie O’Brien (Kyle Books)

Judges commented: A lucidly written book in which O’Brien proves there is not a day in the year when a seasonal preserve cannot be made. Judges admired the simplicity of her writing, her straightforward approach and, above all, the recipes, which according to one judge ‘worked like a dream’. Another judge commented, ‘This is book I shall keep very close and dip into frequently.’

FOOD BOOK AWARD

GOAT Cooking and Eating by James Whetlor (Quadrille)

BLACK SEA Dispatches and Recipes – Through Darkness and Light by Caroline Eden (Quadrille)

Judges commented: A charming, beautifully written book packed with delicious, appealing and easy-to-follow recipes. Judges were impressed by Whetlor’s dedication to his subject and his intelligent, thoughtprovoking argument in favour of eating goat. As one judge put it, ‘A simply splendid hymn to the greatness of goat.’

Judges commented: Eden’s evocative journal of her travels around the Black Sea captivated all the judges. Her ability to distil the essence of the region’s charms, idiosyncrasies, history, and, of course, food, made them feel they were on the very same journey alongside her. ‘A discovery and an inspiration’, declared one judge.

LATERAL COOKING by Niki Segnit (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Judges commented: A brilliantly crafted work, full of clever insight into how recipes and cooking styles are intrinsically linked. Segnit’s encyclopaedic knowledge of food and cooking coupled with her humorous writing style, overflowing with charming anecdotes, left all the judges impressed. One judge declared the book a potential ‘timeless classic’ whilst another found the book ‘completely addictive’.

THE READING CURE How Books Restored My Appetite by Laura Freeman (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

Judges commented: This deeply personal and powerful account of an emotional and physical journey through anorexia was deemed incredibly thought-provoking, and demonstrated a ‘staggering level of self-awareness and understanding’. One judge declared the quality of prose ‘outstanding’ and another, whilst acknowledging the tough nature of the subject matter, recognised that, at its heart, this book is a true expression of nourishment through food and human relationships.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Hungry Empire by Lizzie Collingham (Bodley Head) 2017 The Ethical Carnivore by Louise Gray (Bloomsbury Natural History) 2016 The Book of Pears by Joan Morgan (Ebury Press)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD


BREAD & BUTTER History, Culture, Recipes by Richard Snapes, Grant Harrington and Eve Hemingway (Quadrille)

Judges commented: This book has everything. It is at the same time fascinating, clever, witty and scholarly, and the story behind it – a chance encounter at Maltby Street Market – makes it all the more remarkable. One judge commented, ‘All the recipes worked magnificently, and on my kitchen work surface or bedside table, this book is an absolute joy.’

FIVE SEASONS OF JAM by Lillie O’Brien (Kyle Books)

Judges commented: A lucidly written book in which O’Brien proves there is not a day in the year when a seasonal preserve cannot be made. Judges admired the simplicity of her writing, her straightforward approach and, above all, the recipes, which according to one judge ‘worked like a dream’. Another judge commented, ‘This is book I shall keep very close and dip into frequently.’

FOOD BOOK AWARD

GOAT Cooking and Eating by James Whetlor (Quadrille)

BLACK SEA Dispatches and Recipes – Through Darkness and Light by Caroline Eden (Quadrille)

Judges commented: A charming, beautifully written book packed with delicious, appealing and easy-to-follow recipes. Judges were impressed by Whetlor’s dedication to his subject and his intelligent, thoughtprovoking argument in favour of eating goat. As one judge put it, ‘A simply splendid hymn to the greatness of goat.’

Judges commented: Eden’s evocative journal of her travels around the Black Sea captivated all the judges. Her ability to distil the essence of the region’s charms, idiosyncrasies, history, and, of course, food, made them feel they were on the very same journey alongside her. ‘A discovery and an inspiration’, declared one judge.

LATERAL COOKING by Niki Segnit (Bloomsbury Publishing)

Judges commented: A brilliantly crafted work, full of clever insight into how recipes and cooking styles are intrinsically linked. Segnit’s encyclopaedic knowledge of food and cooking coupled with her humorous writing style, overflowing with charming anecdotes, left all the judges impressed. One judge declared the book a potential ‘timeless classic’ whilst another found the book ‘completely addictive’.

THE READING CURE How Books Restored My Appetite by Laura Freeman (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

Judges commented: This deeply personal and powerful account of an emotional and physical journey through anorexia was deemed incredibly thought-provoking, and demonstrated a ‘staggering level of self-awareness and understanding’. One judge declared the quality of prose ‘outstanding’ and another, whilst acknowledging the tough nature of the subject matter, recognised that, at its heart, this book is a true expression of nourishment through food and human relationships.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Hungry Empire by Lizzie Collingham (Bodley Head) 2017 The Ethical Carnivore by Louise Gray (Bloomsbury Natural History) 2016 The Book of Pears by Joan Morgan (Ebury Press)

SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST

SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD


SHORTLIST

GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD A LONG AND MESSY BUSINESS by Rowley Leigh (Unbound)

Judges commented: A culinary page-turner. One judge commented: ‘this has reminded me of everything I really love about cooking’: another, ‘this is a book that will become well-worn over the years, one that you won’t be lending to your friends’. The recipes speak of a ‘passion for life, doing things properly and treating food and the people you cook for with the respect they deserve’.

ROGAN The Cookbook by Simon Rogan (HarperCollins)

Judges commented: This is a deeply personal and original book, which draws you into Rogan’s world and encourages you to approach food and cooking in a quite different way. It is also a paean to the beauty of Cumbria. While the recipes may be ambitious and out of the reach of some cooks, this book is so honest and heartfelt that the judges found it deeply affecting.

TIME A Year and A Day in the Kitchen by Gill Meller (Quadrille)

Judges commented: ‘There’s a sense of fun here, a joyousness in creating good food from the season’s bounty. It’s a book that makes you want to get into the kitchen and cook, then call your friends over to share your table.’ Meller excels at the rustic chic cuisine that appeals to all keen cooks who try to bring authenticity and above all flavour to food, and his charm is infectious.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Modern Cook’s Year by Anna Jones (4th Estate) 2017 Land of Fish and Rice by Fuchsia Dunlop (Bloomsbury Publishing) 2016 Honey & Co by Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich (Saltyard Books)

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD This award is given at the discretion of the Guild committee, and is our ultimate accolade for someone who has made a significant and lasting impression on the food world. It is not given every year – but we are delighted to have someone in our midst tonight who will be receiving this honour.

2018

2017

2016

2015

ANNE WILLAN

SRI OWEN

ELISABETH LUARD

RICK STEIN OBE

2014

2013

2012

2011

JILL NORMAN

DARINA ALLEN

CLAUDIA RODEN

ANNA DEL CONTE

2010

2009

2009

2008

COLIN SPENCER

MARY BERRY CBE

EGON RONAY

KATIE STEWART


SHORTLIST

GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD A LONG AND MESSY BUSINESS by Rowley Leigh (Unbound)

Judges commented: A culinary page-turner. One judge commented: ‘this has reminded me of everything I really love about cooking’: another, ‘this is a book that will become well-worn over the years, one that you won’t be lending to your friends’. The recipes speak of a ‘passion for life, doing things properly and treating food and the people you cook for with the respect they deserve’.

ROGAN The Cookbook by Simon Rogan (HarperCollins)

Judges commented: This is a deeply personal and original book, which draws you into Rogan’s world and encourages you to approach food and cooking in a quite different way. It is also a paean to the beauty of Cumbria. While the recipes may be ambitious and out of the reach of some cooks, this book is so honest and heartfelt that the judges found it deeply affecting.

TIME A Year and A Day in the Kitchen by Gill Meller (Quadrille)

Judges commented: ‘There’s a sense of fun here, a joyousness in creating good food from the season’s bounty. It’s a book that makes you want to get into the kitchen and cook, then call your friends over to share your table.’ Meller excels at the rustic chic cuisine that appeals to all keen cooks who try to bring authenticity and above all flavour to food, and his charm is infectious.

PREVIOUS WINNERS

2018 The Modern Cook’s Year by Anna Jones (4th Estate) 2017 Land of Fish and Rice by Fuchsia Dunlop (Bloomsbury Publishing) 2016 Honey & Co by Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich (Saltyard Books)

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD This award is given at the discretion of the Guild committee, and is our ultimate accolade for someone who has made a significant and lasting impression on the food world. It is not given every year – but we are delighted to have someone in our midst tonight who will be receiving this honour.

2018

2017

2016

2015

ANNE WILLAN

SRI OWEN

ELISABETH LUARD

RICK STEIN OBE

2014

2013

2012

2011

JILL NORMAN

DARINA ALLEN

CLAUDIA RODEN

ANNA DEL CONTE

2010

2009

2009

2008

COLIN SPENCER

MARY BERRY CBE

EGON RONAY

KATIE STEWART


The Guild is a not-for-profit organisation, and everything we undertake has to pay its way. Without the support of our sponsors, your ticket this evening would cost approximately £167, and there would be hardly anyone here. So who are our sponsors, and why do we choose to work with them? In a nutshell, they are companies or organisations who – in the words of a certain supermarket chain – ‘share our values’. These are people whom Guild members have worked with, or written about, or simply admire, and we are proud to showcase them here. We would particularly like to thank Tenderstem® – our main sponsor once again this year – for their invaluable support of these Awards, and the prestige that their presence bestows upon this occasion. If you are a sponsor reading this now, we hope you will feel that working with the Guild has been a good and worthwhile experience at every level. The fact that many sponsors stay with us over the course of many years suggests this must often be the case. Our door is, however, always open, and no one could be more friendly and approachable than our sponsorship team. If you, or someone you know, might like to join our select list of sponsors next time round, do get in touch with our Sponsorship Team, Charlotte Pike (charlotte@charlottepike.co.uk) and Polly Robinson (polly@pollyrobinson.co.uk).

AWARDS SPONSORS

The sponsors who made this evening possible

TENDERSTEM® AC GOATHAM & SON ASPALL BERRYWORLD® THE FOODTALK SHOW GOLD TOP LAKELAND PUKKA HERBS SEAFISH SHELLFISH ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN THERMAPEN® WESTMORLAND


The Guild is a not-for-profit organisation, and everything we undertake has to pay its way. Without the support of our sponsors, your ticket this evening would cost approximately £167, and there would be hardly anyone here. So who are our sponsors, and why do we choose to work with them? In a nutshell, they are companies or organisations who – in the words of a certain supermarket chain – ‘share our values’. These are people whom Guild members have worked with, or written about, or simply admire, and we are proud to showcase them here. We would particularly like to thank Tenderstem® – our main sponsor once again this year – for their invaluable support of these Awards, and the prestige that their presence bestows upon this occasion. If you are a sponsor reading this now, we hope you will feel that working with the Guild has been a good and worthwhile experience at every level. The fact that many sponsors stay with us over the course of many years suggests this must often be the case. Our door is, however, always open, and no one could be more friendly and approachable than our sponsorship team. If you, or someone you know, might like to join our select list of sponsors next time round, do get in touch with our Sponsorship Team, Charlotte Pike (charlotte@charlottepike.co.uk) and Polly Robinson (polly@pollyrobinson.co.uk).

AWARDS SPONSORS

The sponsors who made this evening possible

TENDERSTEM® AC GOATHAM & SON ASPALL BERRYWORLD® THE FOODTALK SHOW GOLD TOP LAKELAND PUKKA HERBS SEAFISH SHELLFISH ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN THERMAPEN® WESTMORLAND


MAIN SPONSOR OF THE AWARDS

Go green with ® Tenderstem

Discover how this wonder vegetable is good for the planet, as well as your palate Food has the ability to connect people across continents and cultures but also to write the environmental, economic and social agenda. Food waste and plastic food packaging are two of the most pressing environmental issues facing our planet today. Consumers are increasingly making purchasing decisions and menu choices based on the environmental credentials of products and brands as well as their own health and wellbeing priorities. Therefore, products which can deliver on a ‘no waste’ agenda while championing nutritional benefits are making all the headlines. Tenderstem® is the ultimate ‘no waste’ food that appeals to those switching to a plant-based diet. You can eat all of our tender stems – from the top of the floret to the tip of the stem, with no chopping or cutting involved. It’s also convenient: it goes straight into the wok, pan or oven and has universal appeal. There’s no waste, it’s easy to prepare and cook and it looks great on the plate. The versatile and vitamin-rich vegetable also taps into the growing consumer appetite for exciting feel-good food. Tenderstem® is benefiting from the rise and popularity of veggie and vegan

cuisine which has seen vegetables move from the supporting role to becoming the headline ingredient. Busy consumers tell us they want quality ingredients and easy-to-cook recipes that encourage them to be adventurous in the kitchen. In short, health-conscious consumers have a real hunger for feel-good food that delivers an exciting eating experience, conveniently. We hope that is the inspiration we are providing with our new Tenderstem® ‘World of Adventure’ campaign. Our aim is simple: to show people how they can spice up their cooking by using Tenderstem® in different cuisines, pairing it with spices from around the world, to create dishes full of personality and flavour. We have got together with food writers to develop mouth-watering recipes rooted in African, Middle Eastern, Indian and Asian cuisine. Our latest collaboration is with Guild member Meera Sodha (winner of last year’s Cookery Writing Award). It showcases new recipes that use a special spice mix we have produced

with Rooted Spices, and you will find both Tenderstem® and the spice mix in your goody bag tonight – plus, over the page, Meera’s recipe. So take this programme home and try the recipe out tomorrow on family and friends. Then why not send us a message or a tweet to say how it went? Times and tastes are ever evolving, and we want Tenderstem® to be one of the leading voices in the vegetable revolution. It’s no accident that Tenderstem® is now the second biggest fresh produce brand in the UK. Helping people understand more about the ‘no waste’ credentials, by providing inspiration that resonates with consumers through innovative industry collaborations, Tenderstem® is also working hard with retailers, suppliers and licensees to reduce the amount of plastic used in its product packaging. Going green in the kitchen is good news for the planet as well as our palates. tenderstem.co.uk • Twitter @tenderstem


MAIN SPONSOR OF THE AWARDS

Go green with ® Tenderstem

Discover how this wonder vegetable is good for the planet, as well as your palate Food has the ability to connect people across continents and cultures but also to write the environmental, economic and social agenda. Food waste and plastic food packaging are two of the most pressing environmental issues facing our planet today. Consumers are increasingly making purchasing decisions and menu choices based on the environmental credentials of products and brands as well as their own health and wellbeing priorities. Therefore, products which can deliver on a ‘no waste’ agenda while championing nutritional benefits are making all the headlines. Tenderstem® is the ultimate ‘no waste’ food that appeals to those switching to a plant-based diet. You can eat all of our tender stems – from the top of the floret to the tip of the stem, with no chopping or cutting involved. It’s also convenient: it goes straight into the wok, pan or oven and has universal appeal. There’s no waste, it’s easy to prepare and cook and it looks great on the plate. The versatile and vitamin-rich vegetable also taps into the growing consumer appetite for exciting feel-good food. Tenderstem® is benefiting from the rise and popularity of veggie and vegan

cuisine which has seen vegetables move from the supporting role to becoming the headline ingredient. Busy consumers tell us they want quality ingredients and easy-to-cook recipes that encourage them to be adventurous in the kitchen. In short, health-conscious consumers have a real hunger for feel-good food that delivers an exciting eating experience, conveniently. We hope that is the inspiration we are providing with our new Tenderstem® ‘World of Adventure’ campaign. Our aim is simple: to show people how they can spice up their cooking by using Tenderstem® in different cuisines, pairing it with spices from around the world, to create dishes full of personality and flavour. We have got together with food writers to develop mouth-watering recipes rooted in African, Middle Eastern, Indian and Asian cuisine. Our latest collaboration is with Guild member Meera Sodha (winner of last year’s Cookery Writing Award). It showcases new recipes that use a special spice mix we have produced

with Rooted Spices, and you will find both Tenderstem® and the spice mix in your goody bag tonight – plus, over the page, Meera’s recipe. So take this programme home and try the recipe out tomorrow on family and friends. Then why not send us a message or a tweet to say how it went? Times and tastes are ever evolving, and we want Tenderstem® to be one of the leading voices in the vegetable revolution. It’s no accident that Tenderstem® is now the second biggest fresh produce brand in the UK. Helping people understand more about the ‘no waste’ credentials, by providing inspiration that resonates with consumers through innovative industry collaborations, Tenderstem® is also working hard with retailers, suppliers and licensees to reduce the amount of plastic used in its product packaging. Going green in the kitchen is good news for the planet as well as our palates. tenderstem.co.uk • Twitter @tenderstem


SPONSORS Tenderstem® has partnered with Rooted Spices to create the ultimate spice blend, made from a tantalising blend of spices such as Kashmiri chilli, cumin, turmeric and nigella seeds. You will find a sachet of ‘Brassica Blend’ in tonight’s goody bag; next time you need it – and we’re sure you will – buy it direct through rootedspices.com. Meera Sodha has taken inspiration from Rajasthan for this fresh dish, known in India as ‘Maharani Salad’. An important ingredient is a large mixing bowl, which you will use (no need to wash) for steps 1, 2 and 3. INGREDIENTS Rapeseed oil 1 tbsp Rooted Spices ‘Brassica Blend’ 650g cauliflower (from 1kg cauliflower, leaves and stem removed), broken into florets 1 red onion, peeled and cut into 2cm wedges 400g beetroot (no need to peel), scrubbed and cut into 2cm wedges 300g Tenderstem® 250g paneer, cut into 1cm slices 100g blanched almonds, chopped 100g pea shoots or mixed salad leaves Juice of ½ a lemon

SERVES 4 – 20 MINUTES TO PREPARE, 50 MINUTES TO COOK

1

Pour 3 tbsp of oil into a large mixing bowl and mix in 2 tsp of Brassica Blend and ½ tsp salt. Add the cauliflower, red onion and beetroot and toss to coat in the spice oil. Turn out onto a roasting tray large enough to contain the veg in a single layer and roast in an oven heated to 180 fan for 30 minutes. Do not wash bowl.

2

Add the Tenderstem®, paneer and almonds to the bowl with 2 tbsp oil, the remaining tsp of Brassica Blend and ½ tsp of salt and toss with your hands. Turn this out onto a second tray (do not wash bowl) and roast for 10 minutes.

3

Once the vegetables are roasted, leave to cool for 5 minutes. Tip the cooled vegetables and paneer back into the bowl and toss together with the salad leaves, lemon juice and ¼ teaspoon of salt. Spoon the salad out onto a pretty platter and serve.

AC Goatham & Son is the largest top fruit grower in the UK, growing one in every four British apples and one in every three British Conference pears eaten in the UK each year. Our business is located on the Hoo Peninsula and has 28 farms across Kent growing 14 different varieties of apples, including a brand new variety due to be launched this autumn and three varieties of pears. We have just finished an extensive planting programme of nearly 250,000 new fruit trees, helping to secure the future for British top fruit for years to come. We are one of the first British growers to offer ripe and ready British Conference and Comice pears, helping to introduce a new audience to this tasty, delicious and healthy snack. Our family business was founded in 1947 and has grown to be a multi-award-winning fruit growing business which has changed the

AC Goatham & Son have transformed the UK’s apple and pear industry approach to growing apples and pears in the UK. We lead the industry with new technological advances including state-of-the-art packing facilities, which allow thousands of perfectly produced apples and pears to be moved each day for supermarket and retail clients.’ acgoatham.com • Twitter @ACGoatham

ASPALL SPONSOR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD

Meera Sodha’s Indian-spiced Salad with Tenderstem®, paneer and beetroot

SPONSOR OF THE INSPIRATION AWARD

AC GOATHAM & SON

At Aspall, we never compromise. We’ve been pioneers for nearly 300 years, starting in 1728 with Clement Chevallier, planting apple trees while others ploughed the land. Today we continue to keep his pioneering spirit alive through everything we do. Our business is steeped in heritage, but we’re not set in our ways. We are innovative cyder and vinegar

Aspall is steeped in heritage, but we’re not set in our ways makers, embracing new ideas and technologies while upholding the same exacting standards set by Clement hundreds of years ago. Now a part of the Molson Coors global family, Barry and Henry Chevallier Guild, the eighth generation of the family, are still involved with the Aspall business today. We are passionately protective of our legacy, the provenance of our cyders and vinegars and dedicated to forging our own path. Creativity and a deep love of food and drink are at the heart of everything we do at Aspall. Sponsoring these awards and being able to honour those writers who share our passion is a great pleasure and we’d like to congratulate all of the deserving finalists.’ aspall.co.uk • Twitter @aspall and @AspallVinegar


SPONSORS Tenderstem® has partnered with Rooted Spices to create the ultimate spice blend, made from a tantalising blend of spices such as Kashmiri chilli, cumin, turmeric and nigella seeds. You will find a sachet of ‘Brassica Blend’ in tonight’s goody bag; next time you need it – and we’re sure you will – buy it direct through rootedspices.com. Meera Sodha has taken inspiration from Rajasthan for this fresh dish, known in India as ‘Maharani Salad’. An important ingredient is a large mixing bowl, which you will use (no need to wash) for steps 1, 2 and 3. INGREDIENTS Rapeseed oil 1 tbsp Rooted Spices ‘Brassica Blend’ 650g cauliflower (from 1kg cauliflower, leaves and stem removed), broken into florets 1 red onion, peeled and cut into 2cm wedges 400g beetroot (no need to peel), scrubbed and cut into 2cm wedges 300g Tenderstem® 250g paneer, cut into 1cm slices 100g blanched almonds, chopped 100g pea shoots or mixed salad leaves Juice of ½ a lemon

SERVES 4 – 20 MINUTES TO PREPARE, 50 MINUTES TO COOK

1

Pour 3 tbsp of oil into a large mixing bowl and mix in 2 tsp of Brassica Blend and ½ tsp salt. Add the cauliflower, red onion and beetroot and toss to coat in the spice oil. Turn out onto a roasting tray large enough to contain the veg in a single layer and roast in an oven heated to 180 fan for 30 minutes. Do not wash bowl.

2

Add the Tenderstem®, paneer and almonds to the bowl with 2 tbsp oil, the remaining tsp of Brassica Blend and ½ tsp of salt and toss with your hands. Turn this out onto a second tray (do not wash bowl) and roast for 10 minutes.

3

Once the vegetables are roasted, leave to cool for 5 minutes. Tip the cooled vegetables and paneer back into the bowl and toss together with the salad leaves, lemon juice and ¼ teaspoon of salt. Spoon the salad out onto a pretty platter and serve.

AC Goatham & Son is the largest top fruit grower in the UK, growing one in every four British apples and one in every three British Conference pears eaten in the UK each year. Our business is located on the Hoo Peninsula and has 28 farms across Kent growing 14 different varieties of apples, including a brand new variety due to be launched this autumn and three varieties of pears. We have just finished an extensive planting programme of nearly 250,000 new fruit trees, helping to secure the future for British top fruit for years to come. We are one of the first British growers to offer ripe and ready British Conference and Comice pears, helping to introduce a new audience to this tasty, delicious and healthy snack. Our family business was founded in 1947 and has grown to be a multi-award-winning fruit growing business which has changed the

AC Goatham & Son have transformed the UK’s apple and pear industry approach to growing apples and pears in the UK. We lead the industry with new technological advances including state-of-the-art packing facilities, which allow thousands of perfectly produced apples and pears to be moved each day for supermarket and retail clients.’ acgoatham.com • Twitter @ACGoatham

ASPALL SPONSOR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OR REGIONAL COOKBOOK AWARD

Meera Sodha’s Indian-spiced Salad with Tenderstem®, paneer and beetroot

SPONSOR OF THE INSPIRATION AWARD

AC GOATHAM & SON

At Aspall, we never compromise. We’ve been pioneers for nearly 300 years, starting in 1728 with Clement Chevallier, planting apple trees while others ploughed the land. Today we continue to keep his pioneering spirit alive through everything we do. Our business is steeped in heritage, but we’re not set in our ways. We are innovative cyder and vinegar

Aspall is steeped in heritage, but we’re not set in our ways makers, embracing new ideas and technologies while upholding the same exacting standards set by Clement hundreds of years ago. Now a part of the Molson Coors global family, Barry and Henry Chevallier Guild, the eighth generation of the family, are still involved with the Aspall business today. We are passionately protective of our legacy, the provenance of our cyders and vinegars and dedicated to forging our own path. Creativity and a deep love of food and drink are at the heart of everything we do at Aspall. Sponsoring these awards and being able to honour those writers who share our passion is a great pleasure and we’d like to congratulate all of the deserving finalists.’ aspall.co.uk • Twitter @aspall and @AspallVinegar


We want to make consumers smile every time they eat our berries 2 million varieties to make sure our berries are always delicious. And we don’t stop there. We want every BerryWorld berry to be bursting with goodness. That means bred, grown, picked with care and packed with flavour, for an experience that satisfies taste buds and consciences across the world. “We are passionate about providing premium, fresh berries,” explains Charlotte Knowles, Head of Brand & Marketing at BerryWorld. “We want to make consumers smile every time they eat our berries, whatever the season.” So, whether you’re craving gorgeously glossy strawberries, subtly sweet raspberries, plump perky blueberries, or dark decadent blackberries – the choice should always be BerryWorld.’ berryworld.com • Twitter @HelloBerryWorld

The FoodTalk Radio Show is a must-listen for every food lover 2018 there were 77,000 podcast downloads and 65,000 listeners per week via syndicated radio stations across the UK, in California, Michigan and Malta. There were also a combined 104,800 Twitter followers and 218,000 Facebook fans via FoodTalk, Speciality Food and Great British Chefs.’ foodtalk.co.uk • Twitter @foodtalkshow

Once you’ve explored the Gold Top range, there’s no turning back evolved and expanded, and we now make a whole range of delicious dairy products under the Gold Top brand. At the forefront of our business is, naturally, Gold Top milk (easily spotted by its gold top), which is widely available in supermarkets, independent food outlets and farm shops. It comes in two delicious variants: with the cream on top (in the traditional way), or Gold Top Smooth (with the cream evenly blended through the bottle). Gold Top doesn’t just taste richer and creamier than normal milk – it’s also higher in protein and energy, providing valuable vitamins A, B, D and E, and of course calcium. And Gold Top doesn’t stop there: we also produce butter – freshly churned from Jersey and Guernsey cows’ milk, with a richer flavour, more golden colour and naturally softer texture than other butters – cream, and ice cream. We are confident that once you’ve explored our range, there’s no turning back. Our long association with the Guild of Food Writers, and specifically tonight’s Recipe Writing Award, is something that gives QMP immense pride, and this evening is a highlight of our calendar.’ goldtopmilk.co.uk

LAKELAND At Lakeland we’re passionate about all things cooking, baking, cleaning and laundry. Our company was founded over 50 years ago in the heart of the Lake District and from humble beginnings our family-owned business is now multi-national as well as multi-channel. Our buyers are constantly searching the world for ground-breaking innovations and ideas to add to our carefully curated range of can’tlive-without products, always working closely with our customers to ensure they have everything they need to create delicious, healthy meals at home as well as inspiring them with handy time savers that make life just that little bit easier. Customers can shop with us via the Lakeland website, catalogue, by phone, or by visiting one of our 67 stores up and down the country. Customers can find over 500 free recipes online

For 50 years Lakeland has been offering millions of customers can’t-livewithout products for the kitchen and home and we hold regular demonstrations across our 67 stores where you can get hands-on with many of our products. No matter how you shop, our friendly and knowledgeable staff are always on hand to offer expert advice and ideas. Plus of course all our products are backed by Lakeland’s unrivalled 3 year guarantee.’ lakeland.co.uk • Twitter @lakelandUK

SPONSORS

The FoodTalk Radio Show was founded by Sue Nelson, CEO of The Breakthrough Group and author of Foodtech UK. Food and drink experts from around the country are invited as guests to discuss the latest trends in everything from distribution and delivery, to taste profiles and tech innovation. Sue has appeared on nearly every national radio programme in the UK from the Today programme and Jeremy Vine to Radio 4’s Food Programme and Farming Today. Formerly CEO of NW Fine Foods, she has been a regular guest on television programmes as diverse as Trisha and The Culture Show. She is also author of the NW Fine Food Guide with Simon Rimmer of Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch. Fellow presenters are Ollie Lloyd and Holly Shackleton. Podcasts are available on the FoodTalk and Great British Chefs websites and on iTunes, Spotify, PodBean, Stitcher, PlayerFM, TuneIn and the Podcast app, and sent to our syndicated radio stations on Thursday each week at 4pm. For

Remember the way milk used to taste? Well, that’s Gold Top for you. Our story goes back over 50 years, when a group of enterprising Jersey and Guernsey cow farmers in England, Scotland and Wales agreed to combine their skills and resources by forming a new cooperative. And so QMP – Quality Milk Producers – was born. Since then we have

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD

Berries are sensational things. For us, they literally are our world. We have an appetite to bring food lovers worldwide the very best berries; ones that not only taste great but are sustainable for our growers too. Great berries, for future generations; truly sustainalicious. Since 1994 we’ve worked with experts to breed and grow great berries. Collectively, they have developed, tried and tested over

THE FOODTALK SHOW SPONSOR OF THE FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD

SPONSOR OF THE FIRST BOOK AWARD

BERRYWORLD®

SPONSOR OF THE RECIPE WRITING AWARD

GOLD TOP


We want to make consumers smile every time they eat our berries 2 million varieties to make sure our berries are always delicious. And we don’t stop there. We want every BerryWorld berry to be bursting with goodness. That means bred, grown, picked with care and packed with flavour, for an experience that satisfies taste buds and consciences across the world. “We are passionate about providing premium, fresh berries,” explains Charlotte Knowles, Head of Brand & Marketing at BerryWorld. “We want to make consumers smile every time they eat our berries, whatever the season.” So, whether you’re craving gorgeously glossy strawberries, subtly sweet raspberries, plump perky blueberries, or dark decadent blackberries – the choice should always be BerryWorld.’ berryworld.com • Twitter @HelloBerryWorld

The FoodTalk Radio Show is a must-listen for every food lover 2018 there were 77,000 podcast downloads and 65,000 listeners per week via syndicated radio stations across the UK, in California, Michigan and Malta. There were also a combined 104,800 Twitter followers and 218,000 Facebook fans via FoodTalk, Speciality Food and Great British Chefs.’ foodtalk.co.uk • Twitter @foodtalkshow

Once you’ve explored the Gold Top range, there’s no turning back evolved and expanded, and we now make a whole range of delicious dairy products under the Gold Top brand. At the forefront of our business is, naturally, Gold Top milk (easily spotted by its gold top), which is widely available in supermarkets, independent food outlets and farm shops. It comes in two delicious variants: with the cream on top (in the traditional way), or Gold Top Smooth (with the cream evenly blended through the bottle). Gold Top doesn’t just taste richer and creamier than normal milk – it’s also higher in protein and energy, providing valuable vitamins A, B, D and E, and of course calcium. And Gold Top doesn’t stop there: we also produce butter – freshly churned from Jersey and Guernsey cows’ milk, with a richer flavour, more golden colour and naturally softer texture than other butters – cream, and ice cream. We are confident that once you’ve explored our range, there’s no turning back. Our long association with the Guild of Food Writers, and specifically tonight’s Recipe Writing Award, is something that gives QMP immense pride, and this evening is a highlight of our calendar.’ goldtopmilk.co.uk

LAKELAND At Lakeland we’re passionate about all things cooking, baking, cleaning and laundry. Our company was founded over 50 years ago in the heart of the Lake District and from humble beginnings our family-owned business is now multi-national as well as multi-channel. Our buyers are constantly searching the world for ground-breaking innovations and ideas to add to our carefully curated range of can’tlive-without products, always working closely with our customers to ensure they have everything they need to create delicious, healthy meals at home as well as inspiring them with handy time savers that make life just that little bit easier. Customers can shop with us via the Lakeland website, catalogue, by phone, or by visiting one of our 67 stores up and down the country. Customers can find over 500 free recipes online

For 50 years Lakeland has been offering millions of customers can’t-livewithout products for the kitchen and home and we hold regular demonstrations across our 67 stores where you can get hands-on with many of our products. No matter how you shop, our friendly and knowledgeable staff are always on hand to offer expert advice and ideas. Plus of course all our products are backed by Lakeland’s unrivalled 3 year guarantee.’ lakeland.co.uk • Twitter @lakelandUK

SPONSORS

The FoodTalk Radio Show was founded by Sue Nelson, CEO of The Breakthrough Group and author of Foodtech UK. Food and drink experts from around the country are invited as guests to discuss the latest trends in everything from distribution and delivery, to taste profiles and tech innovation. Sue has appeared on nearly every national radio programme in the UK from the Today programme and Jeremy Vine to Radio 4’s Food Programme and Farming Today. Formerly CEO of NW Fine Foods, she has been a regular guest on television programmes as diverse as Trisha and The Culture Show. She is also author of the NW Fine Food Guide with Simon Rimmer of Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch. Fellow presenters are Ollie Lloyd and Holly Shackleton. Podcasts are available on the FoodTalk and Great British Chefs websites and on iTunes, Spotify, PodBean, Stitcher, PlayerFM, TuneIn and the Podcast app, and sent to our syndicated radio stations on Thursday each week at 4pm. For

Remember the way milk used to taste? Well, that’s Gold Top for you. Our story goes back over 50 years, when a group of enterprising Jersey and Guernsey cow farmers in England, Scotland and Wales agreed to combine their skills and resources by forming a new cooperative. And so QMP – Quality Milk Producers – was born. Since then we have

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD MAGAZINE OR SECTION AWARD

Berries are sensational things. For us, they literally are our world. We have an appetite to bring food lovers worldwide the very best berries; ones that not only taste great but are sustainable for our growers too. Great berries, for future generations; truly sustainalicious. Since 1994 we’ve worked with experts to breed and grow great berries. Collectively, they have developed, tried and tested over

THE FOODTALK SHOW SPONSOR OF THE FOOD BLOG AND SOCIAL MEDIA AWARD

SPONSOR OF THE FIRST BOOK AWARD

BERRYWORLD®

SPONSOR OF THE RECIPE WRITING AWARD

GOLD TOP


Pukka’s mission is to create a world where plants play a central role in human health and wellbeing organically grown and fairly traded herbs and fruits, which is of vital importance to the man behind the blend, master herbsmith Sebastian Pole.’ pukkaherbs.com • Twitter @Pukkaherbs

SPONSORS SEAFISH

SHELLFISH ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN The Shellfish Association of Great Britain was founded as the Oyster Merchants’ and Planters’ Association in 1903, and is the industry’s trade body based at Fishmongers’ Hall. Our membership includes shellfish farmers, fishermen, fishermen’s associations, processors, commercial traders and retail companies including restaurants, many of the Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities, organisations such as Seafish, academics, scientists, consultants and anyone with a passion for shellfish. We actively promote the health benefits of eating shellfish, bringing together buyers and sellers of shellfish, and telling the story of this magnificent and historic industry to the public.’ shellfish.org.uk • Twitter @SAGB

WESTMORLAND

THERMAPEN® Thermapen is the flagship product of Electronic Temperature Instruments Ltd. We are a British, award-winning digital thermometer manufacturer, producing digital and infrared thermometers for food service and industry. Jointly owned by Miriam and Peter Webb, ETI was founded in 1983 when they identified an opportunity in the manufacturing market. The business has grown considerably over the past 36 years and this year saw the launch of the Thermapen First Foods thermometer, which was specifically designed for weaning parents. Thermapen is now the UK’s number one selling food thermometer and the digital thermometer of choice for professional chefs. Offering a combination of speed, accuracy

Thermapen takes the guesswork out of roasting, grilling, baking, BBQ and so much more and convenience of use, the Thermapen takes the guesswork out of roasting, grilling, baking, barbecuing and much more, ensuring cooking perfection every time.’ thermapen.co.uk • Twitter @thermapen_

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD BOOK AWARD

Seafish is the Non-Departmental Public Body set up to support the UK seafood industry. We work with everyone involved in the seafood journey, from when it’s caught to when it’s bought – fishermen, processors, wholesalers, food service, retailers and consumers. Among many interesting and newsworthy initiatives we support are the National Fish and Chip Awards, Seafood Week, Responsible Fishing Ports Scheme and Tools for Ethical Fish Sourcing. Fish the Dish is a campaign encouraging consumers to eat more seafood, more often.’ seafish.org • Twitter @seafishuk

SPONSOR OF THE GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD

Pukka Herbs harnesses the incredible power of nature through its award-winning, sustainably and ethically sourced organic herbal teas, all of which have been expertly blended to naturally support wellbeing. Founded in 2001 by Tim Westwell and practising herbalist Sebastian Pole, Pukka’s mission is to create a world where plants play a central role in human health and wellbeing. Pukka is a beacon for sustainable and ethical business. All Pukka’s teas are certified Fair for Life, one of the highest independent fair trade standards in the world, and many of its teas use FairWild herbs. Pukka is a B-Corp, signifying its ongoing commitment to support conservation through commerce. And over one percent of its sales are given to environmental causes around the world every year through 1% for the Planet. Pukka Herbs prides itself on not using any synthetic flavourings, only sustainably sourced,

CO-SPONSORS OF THE SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD WRITING AWARD

PUKKA HERBS

If we feel different, it’s because we are. Westmorland is a family business, and our original motorway service area grew out of our farm in Cumbria when the M6 was built through our land. Everything we do reflects those

We hope that when you pass through Tebay, Gloucester or Cairn Lodge Services, you feel you have arrived somewhere beginnings. In our kitchens we make our own food, honest and nourishing. In our farm shops, we work tirelessly to find small, exceptional producers, always starting locally. Above all, we hope that when you pass through, you feel you have arrived somewhere not anywhere; that you catch a glimpse of the place we are so proud to be part of – our environment, our produce and all the people we are lucky enough to work with. Connecting people with place – farming, food, people, place.’ westmorlandfamily.com gloucesterservices.com • Twitter @glouc_services tebayservices.com • Twitter @tebayservices cairnlodgeservices.com • Twitter @cairn_lodge


Pukka’s mission is to create a world where plants play a central role in human health and wellbeing organically grown and fairly traded herbs and fruits, which is of vital importance to the man behind the blend, master herbsmith Sebastian Pole.’ pukkaherbs.com • Twitter @Pukkaherbs

SPONSORS SEAFISH

SHELLFISH ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN The Shellfish Association of Great Britain was founded as the Oyster Merchants’ and Planters’ Association in 1903, and is the industry’s trade body based at Fishmongers’ Hall. Our membership includes shellfish farmers, fishermen, fishermen’s associations, processors, commercial traders and retail companies including restaurants, many of the Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authorities, organisations such as Seafish, academics, scientists, consultants and anyone with a passion for shellfish. We actively promote the health benefits of eating shellfish, bringing together buyers and sellers of shellfish, and telling the story of this magnificent and historic industry to the public.’ shellfish.org.uk • Twitter @SAGB

WESTMORLAND

THERMAPEN® Thermapen is the flagship product of Electronic Temperature Instruments Ltd. We are a British, award-winning digital thermometer manufacturer, producing digital and infrared thermometers for food service and industry. Jointly owned by Miriam and Peter Webb, ETI was founded in 1983 when they identified an opportunity in the manufacturing market. The business has grown considerably over the past 36 years and this year saw the launch of the Thermapen First Foods thermometer, which was specifically designed for weaning parents. Thermapen is now the UK’s number one selling food thermometer and the digital thermometer of choice for professional chefs. Offering a combination of speed, accuracy

Thermapen takes the guesswork out of roasting, grilling, baking, BBQ and so much more and convenience of use, the Thermapen takes the guesswork out of roasting, grilling, baking, barbecuing and much more, ensuring cooking perfection every time.’ thermapen.co.uk • Twitter @thermapen_

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD BOOK AWARD

Seafish is the Non-Departmental Public Body set up to support the UK seafood industry. We work with everyone involved in the seafood journey, from when it’s caught to when it’s bought – fishermen, processors, wholesalers, food service, retailers and consumers. Among many interesting and newsworthy initiatives we support are the National Fish and Chip Awards, Seafood Week, Responsible Fishing Ports Scheme and Tools for Ethical Fish Sourcing. Fish the Dish is a campaign encouraging consumers to eat more seafood, more often.’ seafish.org • Twitter @seafishuk

SPONSOR OF THE GENERAL COOKBOOK AWARD

Pukka Herbs harnesses the incredible power of nature through its award-winning, sustainably and ethically sourced organic herbal teas, all of which have been expertly blended to naturally support wellbeing. Founded in 2001 by Tim Westwell and practising herbalist Sebastian Pole, Pukka’s mission is to create a world where plants play a central role in human health and wellbeing. Pukka is a beacon for sustainable and ethical business. All Pukka’s teas are certified Fair for Life, one of the highest independent fair trade standards in the world, and many of its teas use FairWild herbs. Pukka is a B-Corp, signifying its ongoing commitment to support conservation through commerce. And over one percent of its sales are given to environmental causes around the world every year through 1% for the Planet. Pukka Herbs prides itself on not using any synthetic flavourings, only sustainably sourced,

CO-SPONSORS OF THE SPECIALIST OR SINGLE SUBJECT COOKBOOK AWARD

SPONSOR OF THE FOOD WRITING AWARD

PUKKA HERBS

If we feel different, it’s because we are. Westmorland is a family business, and our original motorway service area grew out of our farm in Cumbria when the M6 was built through our land. Everything we do reflects those

We hope that when you pass through Tebay, Gloucester or Cairn Lodge Services, you feel you have arrived somewhere beginnings. In our kitchens we make our own food, honest and nourishing. In our farm shops, we work tirelessly to find small, exceptional producers, always starting locally. Above all, we hope that when you pass through, you feel you have arrived somewhere not anywhere; that you catch a glimpse of the place we are so proud to be part of – our environment, our produce and all the people we are lucky enough to work with. Connecting people with place – farming, food, people, place.’ westmorlandfamily.com gloucesterservices.com • Twitter @glouc_services tebayservices.com • Twitter @tebayservices cairnlodgeservices.com • Twitter @cairn_lodge


A Year in the Life of the Guild If you ever wondered what the Guild of Food Writers was all about, you’re in for a big surprise. Here’s a tiny snapshot of what we’ve been up to during the last year

Carla Capalbo, Food and Travel Award 

 Lizzie Collingham, Food Book Award  Joanna Blythman, right, Food Writing Award

 Dan Saladino, Food Broadcast Award

 Sue Quinn, British Food Award

AND THE WINNERS WERE... Meera Sodha, right, Cookery Writing Award 

GUILD AWARDS 2018 The ceremony took place on 18 June last year, in the theatrical setting of Opera Holland Park. 299 Guild members, sponsors and guests, to say nothing of award-winners and nearly-awardwinners, spilled into the verdant surroundings of Holland Park to enjoy a balmy evening of chat and laughter, catching up with old friends and making new ones. The evening was warm and sunny – a harbinger of the heatwave that followed and lasted into September. Many attending judged the food the best ever, thanks to Jane Baxter and her Wild Artichokes team, who conjured up a total of 7,240 (yes, 7,240) canapés in 20 different variants, many based on ingredients supplied by our sponsors. And of course, the wine flowed…

 Tim Hayward, Restaurant Writing Award

 Mark Riddaway, left, Magazine or Section Award

A HELPING HAND FOR FOOD WRITERS…

Not many people know that the Guild operates a Benevolent Fund for members in need. The Guild Fellowship Fund is a new development born out of that scheme, intended to help finance Guild members’ research projects for which there is no other funding, or to supplement an existing project. To apply for this year’s scheme you will need to get your skates on – applications close on Wednesday 31 July. As ever, you’ll find more at gfw.co.uk. The first Fellowship Fund grants, which are overseen by a small and distinguished panel of Guild luminaries, were to Annabel Jackson, below right, for research into the food traditions of Malacca, Macau and the Portuguese influence in Asia, and Chloë King, far left, to further investigate the alheira de Mirandela, the Portuguese chorizo that once concealed a dangerous secret.

 Anne Willan, left, Lifetime Achievement Award

…AND A WATERING HOLE FOR FOODLOVERS It was late in coming, but last August a Guild Forum was established on Facebook, to give members a place to share what’s happening, ask for advice, show what they’ve been cooking and, well, chat. It has been a romping success, with almost a third of our membership now regularly visiting, and many thousands of interactions per month. Discussion veers from the erudite, obscure even, to the everyday, including frequent surprises. To give you some idea, ‘The Cray Twins’, above, was posted by Peter Evan Jones (who claims he later smoked the cigar).


A Year in the Life of the Guild If you ever wondered what the Guild of Food Writers was all about, you’re in for a big surprise. Here’s a tiny snapshot of what we’ve been up to during the last year

Carla Capalbo, Food and Travel Award 

 Lizzie Collingham, Food Book Award  Joanna Blythman, right, Food Writing Award

 Dan Saladino, Food Broadcast Award

 Sue Quinn, British Food Award

AND THE WINNERS WERE... Meera Sodha, right, Cookery Writing Award 

GUILD AWARDS 2018 The ceremony took place on 18 June last year, in the theatrical setting of Opera Holland Park. 299 Guild members, sponsors and guests, to say nothing of award-winners and nearly-awardwinners, spilled into the verdant surroundings of Holland Park to enjoy a balmy evening of chat and laughter, catching up with old friends and making new ones. The evening was warm and sunny – a harbinger of the heatwave that followed and lasted into September. Many attending judged the food the best ever, thanks to Jane Baxter and her Wild Artichokes team, who conjured up a total of 7,240 (yes, 7,240) canapés in 20 different variants, many based on ingredients supplied by our sponsors. And of course, the wine flowed…

 Tim Hayward, Restaurant Writing Award

 Mark Riddaway, left, Magazine or Section Award

A HELPING HAND FOR FOOD WRITERS…

Not many people know that the Guild operates a Benevolent Fund for members in need. The Guild Fellowship Fund is a new development born out of that scheme, intended to help finance Guild members’ research projects for which there is no other funding, or to supplement an existing project. To apply for this year’s scheme you will need to get your skates on – applications close on Wednesday 31 July. As ever, you’ll find more at gfw.co.uk. The first Fellowship Fund grants, which are overseen by a small and distinguished panel of Guild luminaries, were to Annabel Jackson, below right, for research into the food traditions of Malacca, Macau and the Portuguese influence in Asia, and Chloë King, far left, to further investigate the alheira de Mirandela, the Portuguese chorizo that once concealed a dangerous secret.

 Anne Willan, left, Lifetime Achievement Award

…AND A WATERING HOLE FOR FOODLOVERS It was late in coming, but last August a Guild Forum was established on Facebook, to give members a place to share what’s happening, ask for advice, show what they’ve been cooking and, well, chat. It has been a romping success, with almost a third of our membership now regularly visiting, and many thousands of interactions per month. Discussion veers from the erudite, obscure even, to the everyday, including frequent surprises. To give you some idea, ‘The Cray Twins’, above, was posted by Peter Evan Jones (who claims he later smoked the cigar).


A Year in the Life of the Guild FOOD WRITERS OF THE FUTURE

AN EXCITING CALENDAR OF EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS One of the great benefits of belonging to the Guild is the opportunity to extend your food knowledge, in the company of like-minded enthusiasts. The last year saw 12 workshops, a lecture, one masterclass and trips to Northern Ireland, Suffolk and Norfolk. As well as those featured here, workshops included The Indian Storecupboard, British Charcuterie, Make More Money From Your Work, Turkish Cuisine, Martini, Knife Skills, Squarespace, Vermouth, Urban Beekeeping, An Evening At The Devonshire Club, a visit to Overton Farm with Gold Top and a visit to Yorkshire’s hottest coffee roastery. EAT 30 PLANTS A WEEK

AGM WITH A DIFFERENCE

The words ‘annual general meeting’ send most people into a heavy slumber. Not the Guild’s, which in April was enlivened by a short talk by member Niki Segnit, above left, entitled ‘The food writer who fell to earth’ and refreshments cooked by members on the Lateral Cooking theme.

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR

Guild members voyaged down winding rural lanes to a Mongolian yurt in Somerset where Sebastian Pole of Pukka explained the Ayurvedic properties of herbal teas. After a scrumptious lunch and cocktails, each flavoured with a different herbal tea, the tour continued to Bart Ingredients for a sensory game and mesmerising factory tour.

THE ART OF PITCHING

Hachette’s sky terrace, with glorious views over London and the Thames, was the setting for a sell-out workshop on how to pitch yourself and your work. On the panel were magazine and newspaper editors, plus a top agent and publisher.

Serious science, delivered with a smile: this is how one Guild member described our Autumn Lecture, by Professor Tim Spector. He explained the results of his latest research project, into microbes and their effect on gut health, concluding that we should all try and eat 30 different varieties of plants a week.

For a third year the Guild has run Write It, a competition for young food writers, in collaboration with Pink Lady®. This operates on a separate timetable from the main Guild Awards, which means that the winners have just been announced as this programme goes to press. This year’s theme was Food for Sharing, and it attracted more entries than ever. Worth noting that there are more entries received for the 10 years and under, and 11-14 categories, than the 15-18 age group. So if you know a school or college that might encourage its students to have a go, please tell them about the competition. We normally call for entries in January, with a closing date of late April, which fits in well with the academic year. All the information on the Guild website, gfw.co.uk. This year’s judges were writer-presenter Lisa Faulkner, and successful author of children’s and young adult fiction Sherry Ashworth; plus three Guild members – Karen Barnes, editor of delicious. magazine; documentary maker and presenter Stefan Gates; and Kalpna Woolf, famous for her Bristol-based 91 Ways campaign. This year’s winners were Ariane Boyd, Noah Eyre and Charlotte Corrigan. Judge Karen Barnes commented, ‘We were so impressed by the quality of writing this year – we laughed, we cried and we were entertained. The future of food writing is bright.’ Pictured here are the winners of last year’s competition, enjoying their prizewinners’ lunch at Borough Market in July 2018 to such an extent that they became airborne. From left to right: Iris Stovell, Ella Tingley, Monica Alcover, Sohan Desai, Grace Williamson and Oliver Docherty.

MAKING FRIENDS WITH SHELLFISH

Over 80% of UK shellfish is shipped abroad something Guild members Cyrus Todiwala OBE, right, and Mike Warner are on a mission to change. They hosted a delectable and highly persuasive lunchtime workshop at Café Spice Namasté in London’s East End.

ART AND CHARCUTERIE IN SOMERSET Hauser & Wirth Somerset hosted 25 Guild members for an unforgettable lunch, talk and garden tour.

WHY NOT JOIN US?

Guild membership stands at almost 500 members, including some of the best known names in the food writing industry. Although ‘Guild’ sounds formal – perhaps even old-fashioned – we take a pride in being friendly, welcoming and supportive. Membership, which currently costs £85 per year, confers many benefits, including invitations to exclusive events and workshops, a listing in the online Guild Directory (the Who’s Who of the food writing world), monthly newsletter, access to our amazing online Food Forum and advice on professional issues. We welcome applications from anyone who is paid to write or broadcast about food. Among our membership you will find authors, journalists, columnists, bloggers, editors, publishers, ghost-writers, reviewers, critics, tasting and product experts, presenters, producers, broadcasters, researchers, academics, course leaders, experts in health and nutrition, home economics, recipe writing, cooks, chefs and restaurateurs. The work they produce appears in books, newspapers and magazines, in journals and industry publications, online and on air. The one thing that binds us all together is that we are committed to excellence in food writing, and are paid for our work. As with many professional organisations, we ask that prospective members are proposed and seconded by existing members, but nowadays this is something of a formality, and we are invariably pleased to hear from writers interested in finding out more about the Guild.

COMING SHORTLY

The next year looks set to be a bumper one for the Guild, with a strong emphasis on professional development. Workshops in the pipeline include ‘What’s the Next Big Thing?’, ‘How to Write a Recipe’ and ‘My Portfolio Career’. Trips are planned to the new Emily Estate and Montgomery Cheddar, both in Somerset, a workshop on vinegar and visit to Forman & Field in East London (below – a sample of their smoked salmon). We’re always looking for interesting ideas for workshops and events round the country, so if you or someone you know would like to host us, please drop a line to our Workshops Coordinator, Silvija Davidson (silvija@btinternet.com).


A Year in the Life of the Guild FOOD WRITERS OF THE FUTURE

AN EXCITING CALENDAR OF EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS One of the great benefits of belonging to the Guild is the opportunity to extend your food knowledge, in the company of like-minded enthusiasts. The last year saw 12 workshops, a lecture, one masterclass and trips to Northern Ireland, Suffolk and Norfolk. As well as those featured here, workshops included The Indian Storecupboard, British Charcuterie, Make More Money From Your Work, Turkish Cuisine, Martini, Knife Skills, Squarespace, Vermouth, Urban Beekeeping, An Evening At The Devonshire Club, a visit to Overton Farm with Gold Top and a visit to Yorkshire’s hottest coffee roastery. EAT 30 PLANTS A WEEK

AGM WITH A DIFFERENCE

The words ‘annual general meeting’ send most people into a heavy slumber. Not the Guild’s, which in April was enlivened by a short talk by member Niki Segnit, above left, entitled ‘The food writer who fell to earth’ and refreshments cooked by members on the Lateral Cooking theme.

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR

Guild members voyaged down winding rural lanes to a Mongolian yurt in Somerset where Sebastian Pole of Pukka explained the Ayurvedic properties of herbal teas. After a scrumptious lunch and cocktails, each flavoured with a different herbal tea, the tour continued to Bart Ingredients for a sensory game and mesmerising factory tour.

THE ART OF PITCHING

Hachette’s sky terrace, with glorious views over London and the Thames, was the setting for a sell-out workshop on how to pitch yourself and your work. On the panel were magazine and newspaper editors, plus a top agent and publisher.

Serious science, delivered with a smile: this is how one Guild member described our Autumn Lecture, by Professor Tim Spector. He explained the results of his latest research project, into microbes and their effect on gut health, concluding that we should all try and eat 30 different varieties of plants a week.

For a third year the Guild has run Write It, a competition for young food writers, in collaboration with Pink Lady®. This operates on a separate timetable from the main Guild Awards, which means that the winners have just been announced as this programme goes to press. This year’s theme was Food for Sharing, and it attracted more entries than ever. Worth noting that there are more entries received for the 10 years and under, and 11-14 categories, than the 15-18 age group. So if you know a school or college that might encourage its students to have a go, please tell them about the competition. We normally call for entries in January, with a closing date of late April, which fits in well with the academic year. All the information on the Guild website, gfw.co.uk. This year’s judges were writer-presenter Lisa Faulkner, and successful author of children’s and young adult fiction Sherry Ashworth; plus three Guild members – Karen Barnes, editor of delicious. magazine; documentary maker and presenter Stefan Gates; and Kalpna Woolf, famous for her Bristol-based 91 Ways campaign. This year’s winners were Ariane Boyd, Noah Eyre and Charlotte Corrigan. Judge Karen Barnes commented, ‘We were so impressed by the quality of writing this year – we laughed, we cried and we were entertained. The future of food writing is bright.’ Pictured here are the winners of last year’s competition, enjoying their prizewinners’ lunch at Borough Market in July 2018 to such an extent that they became airborne. From left to right: Iris Stovell, Ella Tingley, Monica Alcover, Sohan Desai, Grace Williamson and Oliver Docherty.

MAKING FRIENDS WITH SHELLFISH

Over 80% of UK shellfish is shipped abroad something Guild members Cyrus Todiwala OBE, right, and Mike Warner are on a mission to change. They hosted a delectable and highly persuasive lunchtime workshop at Café Spice Namasté in London’s East End.

ART AND CHARCUTERIE IN SOMERSET Hauser & Wirth Somerset hosted 25 Guild members for an unforgettable lunch, talk and garden tour.

WHY NOT JOIN US?

Guild membership stands at almost 500 members, including some of the best known names in the food writing industry. Although ‘Guild’ sounds formal – perhaps even old-fashioned – we take a pride in being friendly, welcoming and supportive. Membership, which currently costs £85 per year, confers many benefits, including invitations to exclusive events and workshops, a listing in the online Guild Directory (the Who’s Who of the food writing world), monthly newsletter, access to our amazing online Food Forum and advice on professional issues. We welcome applications from anyone who is paid to write or broadcast about food. Among our membership you will find authors, journalists, columnists, bloggers, editors, publishers, ghost-writers, reviewers, critics, tasting and product experts, presenters, producers, broadcasters, researchers, academics, course leaders, experts in health and nutrition, home economics, recipe writing, cooks, chefs and restaurateurs. The work they produce appears in books, newspapers and magazines, in journals and industry publications, online and on air. The one thing that binds us all together is that we are committed to excellence in food writing, and are paid for our work. As with many professional organisations, we ask that prospective members are proposed and seconded by existing members, but nowadays this is something of a formality, and we are invariably pleased to hear from writers interested in finding out more about the Guild.

COMING SHORTLY

The next year looks set to be a bumper one for the Guild, with a strong emphasis on professional development. Workshops in the pipeline include ‘What’s the Next Big Thing?’, ‘How to Write a Recipe’ and ‘My Portfolio Career’. Trips are planned to the new Emily Estate and Montgomery Cheddar, both in Somerset, a workshop on vinegar and visit to Forman & Field in East London (below – a sample of their smoked salmon). We’re always looking for interesting ideas for workshops and events round the country, so if you or someone you know would like to host us, please drop a line to our Workshops Coordinator, Silvija Davidson (silvija@btinternet.com).


THE GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS COMMITTEE

Orlando Murrin

President orlando.murrin@gmail.com

THANKS This evening would not be happening without the efforts of the dedicated Guild Committee, who work tirelessly, all-year-round and without reward for the good of our membership. Most of all our stalwart Awards Coordinators, SAMUEL GOLDSMITH and SAM BILTON, top left, who organise every last detail of the judging, the ceremony and after party. Behind every great evening there are generous sponsors, and that is down to our indefatigable Sponsorship Team, Charlotte Pike and Polly Robinson Before leaving you will receive a souvenir bag filled with gifts supplied by our sponsors. It is something of a tradition that these bags – hundreds of them – are filled by a production line of committee members earlier in the day, the process enlivened by anticipation of who will win what, and general banter.

Felicity Cloake

Genevieve Taylor

Vice-president felicity@felicitycloake.co.uk

Chair gen@genevievetaylor.co.uk

Sam Bilton

Samuel Goldsmith

Secretary & Awards sjfbilton@gmail.com

Treasurer & Awards samuelgoldsmith@hotmail.com

Sarah Beattie*

Sally Brown*

Charlotte Pike

Vice-chair charlotte@charlottepike.co.uk

All things Guild are kept on track by our genial, unflappable Administrator, JONATHAN WOODS, centre left; such is his diligence and eye for detail that there is a theory that there must be more than one of him. You can contact him – or them – via jonathan@gfw.co.uk, 020 8659 0422. Founded in 1874, THE WINE SOCIETY is a ‘cooperative company’ owned solely by its members, providing wines of the highest quality at the best possible prices. Its nine buyers travel the world to find producers who share their passion for quality. Tonight’s fizz is The Society’s Saumur Brut (NV), produced by Gratien and Meyer in the Loire.

Paul Bellchambers* Social media thelatechef@gmail.com

Established in Haro in the heart of Rioja Alta in 1924, RAMÓN BILBAO is today one of Spain’s most adventurous and innovative wine producers. The appointment of Rodolfo Bastida as Head Winemaker in 1999 marked a new era in the company’s history: Rioja born-and-bred, Bastida believes that the grapes he selects should be allowed to speak for themselves in his wines, and not be hidden by overageing and over-oaking. Ramón Bilbao sources Tempranillo and Garnacha grapes from its own180 hectares of vineyards, plus a further 900 hectares in Rioja for its red and rosé wines. For the last five years, Rodolfo has turned to neighbouring Rueda for its white grapes as the terroir here gives Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo with all the freshness and elegance he looks for in his wines.

Richard Ehrlich*

Website rmehrlich45@gmail.com

You may notice that this year’s Awards Programme has been radically redesigned, in line with the theme of this year’s Inspiration Award – the reduction of waste. We have saved paper by reducing page size by 22%, and pagination by 11%; and although this programme is fully recyclable, we hope on the contrary it is something you will keep for the future. The programme has been digitally printed by PARK LANE PRESS (motto: Environmentally Wise), a multi-award-winning company based in Corsham, Wiltshire, with impeccable eco-credentials. The plant is fitted with low energy lighting systems and a power perfector to reduce energy consumption. Park Lane recycles 97% of its waste. The paper in your hand has been certified by the the Forest Stewardship Council. parklanepress.co.uk. It was designed by CORINNA FARROW, top right.

Photograph credits: Orlando Murrin/Matt Austin. Chloë King/Karen Lacroix/Illustration School. Meera Sodha/David Loftus. Mary Berry/Georgia Glynn Smith. Felicity Cloake/Alastair Levy.

* Special officers

There cannot be many Awards Ceremonies at which the food is cooked by an actual member of the organisation. This is the fifth year that the WILD ARTICHOKES team, led by Guild member Jane Baxter and Samantha Miller, centre right, have worked their magic.

Clarissa Hyman*

Professional issues iamsarahbeattie@gmail.com

Kristen Frederickson

Sam Gates

Newsletter, Facebook Forum kristen.frederickson@gmail.com

Workshops & events sam@samgatesfood.co.uk

Stephanie Jackson

Justine Pattison*

Fellowship Fund, Write It clarissa@clarissahyman.co.uk

Special projects stephaniejacksonmedia@gmail.com

Joy Skipper

Kathy Slack*

joy@joyskipper.co.uk

Write It info@thepurplekitchen.com

Social media kathy@glutsandgluttony.com

Silvija Davidson*

Workshops & events silvija@btinternet.com

Helen Hokin

Workshops & events helenhokin@foodtripper.com

Polly Robinson

Autumn lecture mail@justbite.co.uk

Sponsorship, Social media polly@pollyrobinson.co.uk

Josh Sutton

Sumayya Usmani

Regional projects,Write It joshsutton@mac.com

Membership sumayya@sumayyausmani.com


THE GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS COMMITTEE

Orlando Murrin

President orlando.murrin@gmail.com

THANKS This evening would not be happening without the efforts of the dedicated Guild Committee, who work tirelessly, all-year-round and without reward for the good of our membership. Most of all our stalwart Awards Coordinators, SAMUEL GOLDSMITH and SAM BILTON, top left, who organise every last detail of the judging, the ceremony and after party. Behind every great evening there are generous sponsors, and that is down to our indefatigable Sponsorship Team, Charlotte Pike and Polly Robinson Before leaving you will receive a souvenir bag filled with gifts supplied by our sponsors. It is something of a tradition that these bags – hundreds of them – are filled by a production line of committee members earlier in the day, the process enlivened by anticipation of who will win what, and general banter.

Felicity Cloake

Genevieve Taylor

Vice-president felicity@felicitycloake.co.uk

Chair gen@genevievetaylor.co.uk

Sam Bilton

Samuel Goldsmith

Secretary & Awards sjfbilton@gmail.com

Treasurer & Awards samuelgoldsmith@hotmail.com

Sarah Beattie*

Sally Brown*

Charlotte Pike

Vice-chair charlotte@charlottepike.co.uk

All things Guild are kept on track by our genial, unflappable Administrator, JONATHAN WOODS, centre left; such is his diligence and eye for detail that there is a theory that there must be more than one of him. You can contact him – or them – via jonathan@gfw.co.uk, 020 8659 0422. Founded in 1874, THE WINE SOCIETY is a ‘cooperative company’ owned solely by its members, providing wines of the highest quality at the best possible prices. Its nine buyers travel the world to find producers who share their passion for quality. Tonight’s fizz is The Society’s Saumur Brut (NV), produced by Gratien and Meyer in the Loire.

Paul Bellchambers* Social media thelatechef@gmail.com

Established in Haro in the heart of Rioja Alta in 1924, RAMÓN BILBAO is today one of Spain’s most adventurous and innovative wine producers. The appointment of Rodolfo Bastida as Head Winemaker in 1999 marked a new era in the company’s history: Rioja born-and-bred, Bastida believes that the grapes he selects should be allowed to speak for themselves in his wines, and not be hidden by overageing and over-oaking. Ramón Bilbao sources Tempranillo and Garnacha grapes from its own180 hectares of vineyards, plus a further 900 hectares in Rioja for its red and rosé wines. For the last five years, Rodolfo has turned to neighbouring Rueda for its white grapes as the terroir here gives Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo with all the freshness and elegance he looks for in his wines.

Richard Ehrlich*

Website rmehrlich45@gmail.com

You may notice that this year’s Awards Programme has been radically redesigned, in line with the theme of this year’s Inspiration Award – the reduction of waste. We have saved paper by reducing page size by 22%, and pagination by 11%; and although this programme is fully recyclable, we hope on the contrary it is something you will keep for the future. The programme has been digitally printed by PARK LANE PRESS (motto: Environmentally Wise), a multi-award-winning company based in Corsham, Wiltshire, with impeccable eco-credentials. The plant is fitted with low energy lighting systems and a power perfector to reduce energy consumption. Park Lane recycles 97% of its waste. The paper in your hand has been certified by the the Forest Stewardship Council. parklanepress.co.uk. It was designed by CORINNA FARROW, top right.

Photograph credits: Orlando Murrin/Matt Austin. Chloë King/Karen Lacroix/Illustration School. Meera Sodha/David Loftus. Mary Berry/Georgia Glynn Smith. Felicity Cloake/Alastair Levy.

* Special officers

There cannot be many Awards Ceremonies at which the food is cooked by an actual member of the organisation. This is the fifth year that the WILD ARTICHOKES team, led by Guild member Jane Baxter and Samantha Miller, centre right, have worked their magic.

Clarissa Hyman*

Professional issues iamsarahbeattie@gmail.com

Kristen Frederickson

Sam Gates

Newsletter, Facebook Forum kristen.frederickson@gmail.com

Workshops & events sam@samgatesfood.co.uk

Stephanie Jackson

Justine Pattison*

Fellowship Fund, Write It clarissa@clarissahyman.co.uk

Special projects stephaniejacksonmedia@gmail.com

Joy Skipper

Kathy Slack*

joy@joyskipper.co.uk

Write It info@thepurplekitchen.com

Social media kathy@glutsandgluttony.com

Silvija Davidson*

Workshops & events silvija@btinternet.com

Helen Hokin

Workshops & events helenhokin@foodtripper.com

Polly Robinson

Autumn lecture mail@justbite.co.uk

Sponsorship, Social media polly@pollyrobinson.co.uk

Josh Sutton

Sumayya Usmani

Regional projects,Write It joshsutton@mac.com

Membership sumayya@sumayyausmani.com


MENU Before Smoked haddock rarebit croquetas Tenderstem® panzerotti Truffle doughnuts Tuna tartare on rice cracker Cumin lamb skewers Salpicon of seafood Chickpea fritters, goats’ curd and garlic Duck larb Langoustines with prawn mayo Fried cockles with chilli vinegar Grilled Tenderstem® with ‘world dips’ After Bombette with fennel and apple sauce Veal tonnato Crab and Courchamps brioche buns Tenderstem® and lardo on grilled sourdough Vegan pambazos Aubergine parmigiana toasts Mini salads Frittatine Spiced potatoes To finish Blackcurrant custard pavlovas Lemon tarts Tres leches cake Apple amaretti tart Raspberry friands To drink WINES

Sparkling – The Society’s Saumur Brut (NV) White – Ramón Bilbao Verdejo 2018, Rueda Rosé – Ramón Bilbao El Viaje de Ramón Rosado 2018, Rioja Red – Ramón Bilbao Viñedos de Altura 2015, Rioja Aspall Premier Cru Cyder and Peronelle’s Blush Suffolk Cyder Tebay Services Pale Ale, Cumbria

Profile for Guild of Food Writers

Guild of Food Writers Awards 2019  

This year's awards programme, including how the awards are judged, the full shortlists, sponsors and a round-up of Guild activities during t...

Guild of Food Writers Awards 2019  

This year's awards programme, including how the awards are judged, the full shortlists, sponsors and a round-up of Guild activities during t...

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