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Brooke SHIELDS


SOPHIE ELGORT, CATHERINE JEONG,

GREGORY THORNBURY, ZACHARY WEISS

LILY QIAN , GIDEON FINK SHAPIRO,

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on cover : brooke shields photographed by sophie elgort , pictured : “ reflected in a city ,” luke baggot mfa 2019 this page : brooke shields photographed by sophie elgort , pictured : studio of madison haws , MFA 2019; ny public library ; the odeon

PUBLISHER C 3 GB

EDITOR IN CHIEF PETER DAVIS

CREATIVE DIRECTOR DEAN QUIGLEY

JOSEPH MANGHISE

COPY EDITOR

CONTRIBUTORS


A few decades ago, Tribeca – an acronym for the “triangle below Canal Street” – was a mostly desolate neighborhood of warehouses and office buildings. Today those one-time industrial structures have been transformed into the most coveted luxury apartments in New York. The open-air charm and laid-back privacy of Tribeca now counts mega-celebrities like Jay-Z and Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, Ed Burns and Christy Turlington and many others, as residents. Before the fabulous and famous moved to Tribeca, the creative class was already claiming turf. The Odeon, a French-bistro style restaurant founded almost four decades ago by Lynn Wagenknecht and Keith McNally, is as popular today as in the 1980s, when Andy Warhol, the cast of Saturday Night Live and lit-pack stars like Jay McInerney hung out at The Odeon as if it was their own private after-hours club. Writer Zachary Weiss spoke to Wagenknecht about The Odeon’s rich history and a slew of regulars recall their favorite (and sometimes scandalous) moments for a definitive oral history of one of New York’s landmark restaurants. Another vital creative stalwart in Tribeca is the New York Academy of Art (NYAA), which was co-founded by Warhol and implements a rigorous figurative art study program with alumni that include Will Cotton, and a roster of bold-face supporters like Julianne Moore, Mark Ruffalo and our cover star Brooke Shields, who not only curates shows for the Academy but also sits for students and has collected many pieces by artists enrolled at the Academy. Sophie Elgort shot Shields in various artist studios and workspaces at the Academy and Gregory Thornbury, NYAA's V.P. of Development, asked students to explain why the NYAA is a unique and important program and a launch pad for an illustrious career in the fine arts. Speaking of art, we also chatted with Shields and NYAA supporter, art star Eric Fischl who did a dramatic series of paintings in which Shields portrays polar-opposite twin sisters. Tribeca has truly morphed into New York’s premiere neighborhood – the ideal melting pot of creativity, family-friendly luxury living, only-in-Tribeca stores and restaurants (clip our shopping and dining guide for the best of the best) and some of the most breathtaking, architecturally important structures in the city like the landmarked ornate Renaissance Revival “Clock Tower” building, designed by McKim, Mead & White, which is now a luxurious state-ofthe-art residential building at 108 Leonard Street. Originally the headquarters of the New York Life Insurance Company, 108 Leonard, like much of Tribeca has re-invented itself and is one of the most sought-after addresses in New York. Writer Gideon Fink Shapiro charts the fascinating history and stunning transformation of this historical masterpiece. From its industrial roots to what has been dubbed “Hollywood on the Hudson,” Tribeca continues to evolve with new restaurants, galleries and shops opening constantly. And thankfully, old-school institutions like The Odeon just keep getting better with age.

PETER DAVIS 03


“KING OF THE FOREST,” DANICA LUNDY, CHUBB FELLOW 2018

SCHOOLED THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF ART, CO-FOUNDED BY ANDY WARHOL, IS AN ART STAR FACTORY IN THE HEART OF TRIBECA. BY GREGORY THORNBURY

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photography courtesy of nyaa

SARAH SAGER (MFA 2018) WITH ARTIST AMY SHERALD


“WARHOL SERVED ON THE FOUNDING BOARD OF TRUSTEES, ATTENDING ACADEMY FUNDRAISERS AND CLASSES, ALWAYS EQUIPPED WITH HIS POLAROID CAMERA TO DOCUMENT EVERYTHING.”

W

hat happens when you

ber. Brooke Shields, one of the most

combine the genius of

photographed and rendered faces on

Andy Warhol with the

the planet, has sat for artists at Take

most rigorously trained contemporary

Home a Nude. “I’m on the board,”

artists in New York City? You get the

says Shields, “I am present at most of

New York Academy of Art at 111 Franklin

their events. I organize my schedule

Street in Tribeca.

around what their big events are.” At Tribeca Ball, serious art buyers

Founded in 1982 by artists, scholars

rub shoulders with celebrities, such

and patrons of the arts, including

as Academy trustee Naomi Watts,

Warhol, the New York Academy of

Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo,

Art is a graduate school and cultural

as they tour through artist’s studios

institution that combines intensive

with cocktails and find pieces from

technical training in the fine arts with

emerging artists to buy. The evening,

active critical discourse. Found-

which sees the whole building magi-

ers of the school, such as Warhol,

cally transformed by Van Cleef and

Francis Cunningham, Stuart Pivar

Arpels, ends with a dinner cooked

and Russell Wilkinson, had become

by Daniel Boulud. Each Tribeca Ball

concerned that a generation of artists

honors a star in the art world, with

was emerging who had not mastered

past recipients including Jane Holzer,

the demanding skills required to

John Currin, Robert De Niro and

produce quality painting, drawing

Mickalene Thomas.

ALONSA GUEVERA, CHUBB FELLOW 2015

photography courtesy of nyaa

and sculpture of the human figure. Warhol served on the founding board

The Academy consistently attracts

of trustees, attending Academy fund-

famous faces and loads of glamour

raisers and classes, always equipped

(the Take Home a Nude event was

with his Polaroid camera to docu-

called “the sexiest auction of the

ment everything.

year” by Vogue), but what’s truly

GREG UNIS, BROOKE SHIELDS, ACADEMY PRESIDENT DAVID KRATZ

exceptional is the students who go If New York society knows anything

on to successful careers. The school

about the Academy, it’s that it throws

counts among its alumni some of

spectacular parties, such as the

the most sought-after painters and

Tribeca Ball in April and Take Home

sculptors in the world, including Ali

a Nude, hosted at Sotheby’s in Octo-

Banisadr and Will Cotton.

KRISTY CLARK

ALAIN BERNARD IPPOLITA ROSTAGNO PADMA LAKSHMI

ZANI GUGELMANN

DONNA KARAN

05 DEBORAH FURNNESS


WILL COTTON, BOB O’LEARY, ALYSSA MONKS, AMY HUGHES (MFA2016)


BELOW MEET SOME ACADEMY GRADUATES AND FUTURE ART WORLD STARS.

“Some of the best decisions I’ve made in my life have been to choose to be an artist, decide to move to the U.S. and join the MFA program at the New York Academy of Art. The NYAA not only gave me the tools to make the paintings that I make nowadays but also offered me a range of opportunities that helped me launch my art career. And

“REFLECTIVE DIMENSIONS,” DENG SHIQING, CHUBB FELLOW 2019

most importantly, it surrounded me with a group of talented, loving and creative people that I’m lucky enough to call friends now.” —ALONSA GUEVARA, 4 , FELLOW 5 MFA

201

201

“I came from an art school where, after two years, most of the teach-

“MISS,” ATALANTA XANTHE, CHUBB FELLOW 2019

photography courtesy of nyaa

ers didn’t recognize my face. The president and dean of the Academy

important, but finding my community

sustain me in my life as an artist. They

knew my name within a week. The

has been crucial. Coming here was the

will encourage and challenge, provide

amount of effort the Academy puts

best thing I could ever have done.”

critiques, keep me up and moving, drag

into making its students successful is

me out of creative slumps…and that’s

crazy—trustees bring collectors and

—ATALANTA XANTHE, 8, CHUBB FELLOW MFA

curators round the building; some of

my favorite living artists have come

“The Academy is an institutional

—DANICA LUNDY, 7 , CHUBB FELLOW MFA

here to give workshops; and we get

force intent on perpetuating rigorous

lectures on anatomy and tax returns. I

thinking and thoughtful making. For

“Coming from Beijing to New York

even found my apartment through the

me, it provided a safe space to wrestle

City, I had a breakthrough in my

school. There is a widespread myth

with the discomfort and recognize the

painting after I came to the Academy.

that learning to draw naturalistically

importance of doing both those things,

The variety of work from my fel-

will destroy an artist’s creativity; a

with a community of bright people

low students is impressive. It’s also

walk through the academy shows the

devoted to doing the same. The school

unique due to it being a school, which

opposite is true. I’ve only been able to

taught me vital technique and pragma-

honors the tradition of figurative art

start making the paintings I dreamed

tism—how to compress the spectrum

in painting, which is rare in America

of since I came here and learned about

of light into the spectrum of paint, how

now. That’s why I came. The intensive,

perspective, under painting and tonal

to set up my studio, how to take my

creative atmosphere helps me push

composition. At the Academy, I met

first baby steps into the art world. But

myself to take risks.”

people who became my art peers. It’s

honestly, even one year out of the pro-

not something I’d expected to be so

gram I know that it’s my peers who will

—SHIQING “DEMO” DENG, MFA 8, CHUBB FELLOW

201

201 9

the best thing I could ask for.”

201

201

201 8

2019.” 07


WHEN ERIC MET BROOKE… PAINTINGS BY ERIC FISCHL

N

ew York Academy of Art

ton Arts Center. “If you were to ask me

producer Chris Henchy, won an auction

board members, painter

which is the most exciting art school

prize—a photo shoot with Fischl—at

Eric Fischl and actress

in this country today, I would say

the Parrish Art Museum in Southamp-

Brooke Shields have made a commit-

hands down, no hesitation, the New

ton. What could have been just a one-off

ment to support the Academy above

York Academy of Arts,” Fischl raves.

sitting (Fischl photographs his subjects

and beyond just lending their name to

“It competes at the highest levels and

then incorporates them into paint-

party invite committees. Last summer,

its students embrace the reality that

ings), evolved into a collaboration that

in a conversation moderated by Acad-

they are the future.”

has resulted in a multitude of dramatic

emy President David Kratz, Fischl and

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paintings in which Shields is more ac-

Shields discussed the role of the muse

Artist Eric Fischl first met actress

tress than muse—taking on the roles of

in contemporary art at the Southamp-

Brooke Shields when Shields’ husband,

starkly different twins.


ERIC FISCHL: I had no idea at the

while and called him and said, “I’m

I arrived. Brooke greeted me at the

time who had the winning bid, so you

the one who won.” He said, “Why

door wearing a T-shirt with an image

can imagine my delight and surprise

don’t you come over to the studio and

of a flower and the words “Ravenous

when I found out it was to be Brooke

see what I’ve been working on?” I sat

Youth” printed on it. Her hair was

Shields. Once we set the date of the

there for a couple of hours and we

pulled up somewhat haphazardly,

shoot—it took a year for Brooke to

just talked about acting and adopting

and her face was smeared in a shiny

contact me and thank God she did,

other people’s postures and lives, and

mask of what looked like molasses.

I’d forgotten—Brooke told me she

I said it would be kind of interesting

I’d never met her before and first

would put together her team: stylists

if I volunteered for you to be a subject

impression: Bride of Freddie. While

who would take care of hair, makeup

so you can make this a little more

watching her person blow-dry her

and clothes. Already this shoot had

substantial. To find a way to make it

hair, I was transfixed by how com-

scaled up to a professional level I

a collaboration rather than him just

pletely she became a different kind of

was not anticipating or hoping for.

going over to some woman’s house

person, a different type of character,

I thought I’d go to her house, take a

who won an auction item.

just by moving her hair from one shoulder to the other. That was

few pics and go home. BROOKE SHIELDS: I waited a little

EF: The day we did the shoot was a

when I suggested the idea of twins to

beautiful Hamptons’ summer day.

her and she immediately got it and

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10


suggested that, though identical,

It just became an acting exercise and a

tographs. It’s not about making the

one twin “got” it and the other was

fun way to collaborate.

clothes look good, it’s about creating

“clueless” when it came to the social

the body language of a character— EF: Brooke is a consummate actor. I

how does this woman cross her legs,

was amazed by the depth and nuance

how would she hold her tissue if she

BS: I said, I’m a Gemini and can never

she brought to her characters and

were crying—little things like that

decide who I want to be. He explained

how quickly she could transition

became studies. There was more time

to me that it would be a great idea to

from an emotionally dark place to

thinking about the character. A lot of

depict a series of twins, one sort of

one of playful abandon. She seemed

modeling is just selling something.

being the more polished and the other

to intimately know each of the

being the white-trash version. I just

characters she was inhabiting—their

EF: The amount of material I gathered

kept making up different costumes

small gestures, their body language.

from these few hours photographing her

and doing different hairstyles, and

It was such a privilege and an educa-

is staggering. Not only did she change

we created this story of different

tion to watch her work.

her clothes, her hair, her makeup and her

conventions of their milieu.

costume, but each time she also seemed

scenarios and areas in which twins would have to come back together and

BS: With Eric, it’s all done with

to change her body and her age. When I

you see how starkly different they are.

photography. Eric works from pho-

go back through my photos, whole new

11


“I APOLOGIZED TO BROOKE FOR NOT BEING ABLE TO CAPTURE HER BEAUTY AND SHE DISMISSED MY CONCERN WITH A WAVE OF HER HAND. ‘I’M AN ACTRESS.’” characters, new situations, new narra-

to capture her beauty and she dismissed

paintings. He incorporated other people

tives are evoked. Though I’ve painted

my concern with a wave of her hand. “I’m

from other photo shoots and collaged

her into many paintings since our shoot,

an actress.”

everything together. He mixes and melds

I have never painted her as beautiful as

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different parts of images he finds and

she is. Her characters intercede. They

BS: Eric is still using images from that

gets inspiration from. He said to me: “I’m

come with all their warts and baggage. I

photo shoot and incorporating these

still putting you in. I have so many differ-

apologized to Brooke for not being able

different ladies I played into various

ent characters from you.”


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SOPHIE

ELGORT

STYLING BY ASHLEY PRUITT HAIR BY TIM NOLAN MAKEUP BY MEREDITH BARAF PHOTOGRAPHED IN THE STUDIOS OF MADISON HAWS AND ZACHARY SITRIN, MFA 2019

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15


DANNY FANG, MFA 2019

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ILLUSTRATION BY LILY QIAN


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RENAISSANCE REDUX

THE ARCHITECTURAL LEGACY OF 108 LEONARD

W

20

ith its white marble

a treasure ship anchored in Lower

city acquired the property and used

façades and distinctly

Manhattan. It was built to impress:

it for offices and courts. In 1982, 108

Classical features, 108

Completed in 1898 for the New York

Leonard (originally 346 Broadway)

Leonard Street stands as a strik-

Life Insurance Company, one of the

was listed on the National Register

ing example of Renaissance Revival

nation’s oldest insurers, the building

of Historic Places, and in 1987 it was

architecture and craftsmanship. The

projects a sense of timeless prestige.

designated a New York City landmark.

long, slender structure, punctuated

After the company decamped for

Today, midway through an ambitious

by an iconic clock tower, calls to mind

Madison Square Park in 1928, the

restoration and conversion campaign,

new york public library

BY GIDEON FINK SHAPIRO


“THE RENAISSANCE STYLE OF 108 LEONARD MAKES IT A FORERUNNER TO SOME OF NEW YORK’S MOST STORIED APARTMENT BUILDINGS.” 108 Leonard begins its third incarna-

renovated the White House (1902–03)

tion as an elegant residential address.

under President Theodore Roosevelt and created sumptuous country houses

The building’s historic significance is

in Newport, Rhode Island, among other

linked to architects McKim, Mead &

memorable works. Leading artists and

White, a firm that dramatically influ-

artisans frequently embellished the

enced the course of American archi-

firm’s architecture.

new york public library

tecture—and the image of New York City. Partners Charles Follen McKim,

The Renaissance style of 108 Leonard

William Rutherford Mead and Stanford

makes it a forerunner to some of New

White established their practice in New

York’s most storied apartment build-

York in 1879. After finding early success

ings. In fact, McKim, Mead & White also

designing country homes, they rose to

designed 998 Fifth Avenue, the first

national prominence by creating civic,

top-tier luxury apartment house in the

residential and commercial structures

city, faced in pale limestone, to resemble

that stood out as the finest monuments

an Italian palazzo. The 12-story building

in America’s rapidly growing cities.

at the corner of East 81st Street was

The firm was at the height of its creative

They made their mark on New York

completed in 1912, more than a decade

powers when it inherited the com-

above all—often by reviving Italian

before Rosario Candela emerged as the

mission to design the home office of

Renaissance forms and details.

go-to architect of upscale co-op build-

New York Life—today’s 108 Leonard.

ings on the Upper East Side. The devel-

The original design brief called for an

From their stately designs for the Vil-

oper was James T. Lee, grandfather of

addition to the company’s preexisting

lard Houses on Madison Avenue (1882–

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Members

headquarters on Broadway, a white

86), the Century Association Club-

of the prominent Guggenheim, Root,

marble Italianate building dating to 1870

house (1891), the Washington Square

Morton, Fearing, Shepard and Dicker-

that had been topped with a Mansard

Arch (1892), the Metropolitan Club

man families, among others, leased

roof in 1879. A limited design competi-

(1894), the University Club (1899), the

apartments at then-unfathomable rates,

tion was held, and New York architect

Payne Whitney House (1906) and the

signaling a decisive shift among the

Stephen D. Hatch won the commission

J.P. Morgan Library (1906) to large-

city’s elite from standalone mansions to

for the new building, extending east

scale works like Columbia University’s

posh apartments. The stately exte-

to Lafayette Street, in 1893. His design

Morningside Campus (1897) and the

rior of 998 Fifth Avenue initially drew

was under construction when he died

majestic original Penn Station (1910,

comparisons to a bank or a private club.

in 1894 at the age of 55. Faced with a

demolished 1963), the firm created bea-

That is partly because McKim, Mead &

predicament, New York Life tapped the

cons of beauty in the urban landscape.

White had already given their Neoclas-

more prestigious (and more expensive)

Outside New York, they designed

sical treatment to numerous Manhattan

McKim, Mead & White to take over. The

the Boston Public Library (1888–95),

social and cultural landmarks.

firm had already designed two of the 11

21


regal office buildings that New York Life built during a national and international expansion in the 1880s, and supervised the design of other New York Life properties, such as the original Plaza Hotel in 1890 (restored and converted by Elad Group, who is also the team managing the current restoration and development of 108 Leonard). For the New York Life headquarters project, partner William Mead and Henry Bacon, a talented younger architect at the firm, took the lead on design. The project soon expanded in scope. New York Life asked McKim, Mead & White not just to finish the new building already begun by Hatch, but to double its size by designing an extension to Broadway, thereby occupying the entire trapezoidal block. This meant razing and replacing the older headquarters. Construction of the eastern part of the building was completed in May 1896, according to Hatch’s design with certain modifications by McKim, Mead & White, especially to the lavish interiors. Vermont marble was upgraded

22

grand banking hall was embellished

and seamlessly joined to its counter-

in Westchester County as the white

with veined Pavonazzo marble and a

part. Strong cornice lines and paired

marble of the Washington Square

gilt coffered ceiling. The fourth-floor

windows visually unify the elongated

Arch and the Metropolitan Club.

President’s suite dazzled visitors with

structure, which rises 12 stories on

a red Numidian marble mantle, Acajou

Broadway (coincidentally, the same

McKim, Mead & White recognized

marble facings and hearth, mahogany

number as 998 Fifth Avenue) and 13

that the building needed a focal

woodwork and a leather-covered wall.

stories on Lafayette Street, accom-

point, and they provided a power-

The top two floors served as the new

modating the slope of the block. That

ful one in the form of the square

home of the Merchants Club, with

made the building a skyscraper in its

clock-tower entrance pavilion on

handsomely appointed dining rooms

day—a marvel of modern technol-

Broadway. Standing out slightly from

commanding views east to Brooklyn.

ogy sheathed in art. The finely

the rest of the building, the tower is

worked white Tuckahoe marble on

organized vertically in three parts,

The new, western portion of the

the building’s exterior was most

just like a Renaissance palazzo. The

building was completed in April 1898

likely sourced from the same quarry

base is dominated by the portico

new york public library

to Italian marble, for example, and the


“THE SPACIOUS LEONARD STREET LOBBY, WITH ITS GRACEFUL DOUBLE STAIR, RECAPTURES THE BUILDING’S NEOCLASSICAL OPULENCE WITH CONTEMPORARY SOPHISTICATION.” entrance, the middle part continues

The rhythm of paired windows and

was removed decades ago, the original

the use of smooth rusticated marble

strong cornice lines wraps all the way

marble eagles continue to stand guard

and horizontally paired windows, and

around the building. A second, subtler

on the upper balustrade. These eagles

the upper part culminates in round

clock tower pavilion bookends the

appear to have been conserved from

arched windows and a deep cornice

eastern end, and a mid-block entrance

New York Life’s previous headquarters building on Broadway. Remarkably, the interior architecture of 108 Leonard is as richly distinguished as its exterior. The present development effort has uncovered the lost glory of the marble-columned banking hall and brought the remaining historic spaces to a level of polish not seen since the building opened 120 years ago. The spacious Leonard Street lobby, with its graceful double stair, recaptures the building’s Neoclassical opulence with contemporary sophistication. New elevators lead upstairs to the 167 residences with interiors designed by Jeffrey Beers International, which pair modern simplicity with traditional romance, taking advantage of ceiling heights of up to 15 feet. Plush new amenities fit right in with the building’s vintage opulence. And the sense of history ripples out

new york public library

into the city. The boldly Classical and balustrade. The prominence

pavilion on Leonard Street has be-

design of 108 Leonard evokes not just

of the upper cornice, supported

come the new grand entrance, with its

the prominent firm that once called

by ornate modillions (brackets),

double-height round arched doorway.

it home, but also the prestigious

recalls that of the Metropolitan Club.

Additional ornamental flourishes in-

clubs and inspiring civic monuments

Crowning all this is a mechanically

clude the elaborate Ionic column capi-

designed by McKim, Mead & White

wound, four-sided clock with 12-foot

tals, sculptural modillions (brackets),

that still dot Manhattan—or, like the

faces and a 5,000-pound bell, which

and carved acanthus foliage and lion

old Penn Station, that vanished too

gave the building its erstwhile nick-

heads. Although the bronze sculpture

soon. Old New York appears to have a

name, the Clock Tower Building.

that once surmounted the clock tower

promising future.

23


THE

ODEON F

24

or 38 years, The Odeon—with

done any sort of business. I was in the

infamous bathroom where late-night

its Art Deco lines and unmis-

arts, and he was writing and had done

party hijinks often ensued—going

takable red neon sign—has

theater, but they gave us a great lease, so

mostly unnoticed by the staff, who were

been the center of gravity for Tribeca,

it didn’t seem like a big commitment. It

busy upstairs with food service. “We

and it’s all thanks to one couple,

was probably six of us who did everything

certainly didn’t take part in it, and it all

Lynn Wagenknecht and Keith McNally.

ourselves. I think everyone thought we

just seemed a little bit normal at the

On a fateful day in 1980, they took a

were foolish, but we knew there were

time,” Wagenknecht says with a laugh.

leap of faith on the lease of the Towers

people interested in coming to a place

“I’ve heard great stories. We stayed

Cafeteria, a lunch counter that once

like the one we were thinking of. There

focused on what we were trying to do,

catered to the workers in the neigh-

were really just coffee shops or unaf-

but still have fun.”

borhood fueled by ample coffee and

fordable fancy places that you didn’t

Tales like Caroline Kennedy’s Japanese

greasy-spoon diner food. When a new

necessarily want to go to. We needed an

ambassador celebration and more than

eatery opened its doors with the same

interesting place to spend our time.”

a few Saturday Night Live cast parties

globe light fixtures and flooring in place,

It turns out, they were right. Beginning

are what have cemented the palpable

all that would change.

with a slew of creative masters, chiefly

mystique of The Odeon for newcomers

“It was serendipity really,” The Odeon’s

gallery owners in the neighborhood

and regulars alike, but perhaps most

de facto den mother Wagenknecht re-

looking for affordable rent, The Odeon

of all, they come seeking a reliable

calls one afternoon at a corner table

quickly became a nightly canteen for the

comfort. “What’s magical for me are the

next to a group of designer-decked-out

likes of Andy Warhol, who frequently

regulars here,” Roya Shanks, a Yale-

gallerists collectively perusing a catalog

snapped photos of his guests in the

educated actress and maître’d who has

of artworks. “Neither Keith nor I had

basement next to the restaurant’s

been a constant welcoming presence at

photograph courtesy of the odeon

BY ZACH WEISS


“THE ODEON QUICKLY BECAME A NIGHTLY CANTEEN FOR THE LIKES OF ANDY WARHOL, WHO FREQUENTLY SNAPPED PHOTOS OF HIS GUESTS IN THE BASEMENT NEXT TO THE RESTAURANT’S INFAMOUS BATHROOM WHERE LATE-NIGHT PARTY HIJINKS OFTEN ENSUED.” The Odeon for nearly 17 years, explains.

there, that would have strained my

I thought I was back in Paris at La

“These people eat here every week, year

budget, but I’d take a seat at the bar

Coupole or somewhere else where I

in and year out. They celebrate special

around 11 p.m. or so, sometimes alone

couldn’t quite place my memory. But

occasions here, and I see the kids in the

and sometimes with friends, and have

it was brand-new! A lot of times you

neighborhood grow up. It’s like host-

a couple of drinks before moving on

would know so many people eating

ing a party every night for my friends.

to the Mudd Club after midnight. The

there, it was like a big party, dragging

There’s something magical about it.”

people-watching was great; there was

chairs around and table hopping; it

Now, as the clientele has matured,

almost inevitably a woman who piqued

was so much fun! There was a late-

so has The Odeon itself. The menu is

my interest at the bar and at the tables

night menu; early or late I loved the

now mostly fixed, save for a few daily

you’d see the Saturday Night Live cast,

frisée salad with bacon lardons. I don’t

specials, and late-night service rol-

Warhol and his crew. One night I liter-

know…there was just something about

licking until 4 a.m. has been traded for

ally ran into John Belushi in the down-

that salad, the slightly bitter frisée

early-morning breakfast where politi-

stairs bathroom where we discovered a

lettuce and those chewy salty cubes. It

cians, financiers, fashion editors and

common interest.

was exactly perfect.

place is sort of like a house for me, and

CHRISTY TURLINGTON BURNS/ MODEL/ACTIVIST

LAURIE PIKE/FORMER ODEON WAITRESS/WRITER

very close to my heart,” Wagenknecht

My earliest memories of New York

In 1988, four Odeon employees and

declares. “So I’d like to see The Odeon

involve The Odeon. It was as much of a

I formed a social cabal called Girls

go on forever.”

landmark for downtown as the Wool-

Club. We ran around New York

the steadfast coterie of artists still keep the eatery at a constant bustle. “This

worth Building or the Twin Towers. With

basically terrorizing people with our

ROYA SHANKS/MAITRE’D AT THE ODEON

each decade I have lived here, I have

fabulousness. Late one night at work

moved myself closer and closer to The

we started circling, like hawks, the

The D.A. used to come in here all the

Odeon and live just blocks away now. I

table of painter Donald Sultan and

time, and in 2008 before the civil war,

used to come in late night after parties,

friends. We badgered him into buy-

I went to Syria on a trip and I told him

nightclubs and fashion shows. But I have

ing us a bottle of the most expensive

I was going, and he said, “If you get

also celebrated family graduations and

champagne on the wine list. (I think

into trouble, you send me a wire.” This

first communions, and somehow those

it was Dom Pérignon.) He obliged,

sweet 85-year-old D.A!

occasions are the most vivid.

and each Girls Club member had a glass of bubbly. Then we submit-

JAY MCINERNEY/AUTHOR

TAMA JANOWITZ/AUTHOR

ted the bill to him—with the 20

I first started going to The Odeon in

When I first went there, I couldn’t

percent tip that holders of Odeon

the fall of 1980, not long after I’d been

believe it hadn’t always been there.

house accounts were obliged to pay.

fired from my job as a fact-checker at

It had such a permanent, established

Never have I tasted more delicious

The New Yorker. I didn’t actually eat

ambience, from a much earlier era.

champagne!

25


MARY BOONE/GALLERY OWNER

MICHAEL MUSTO/WRITER

epic and huge. I served only French fries

I remember it was the fall of 1981, and

I appreciate Odeon as a landmark that

and chocolate pudding and champagne,

The Odeon had just opened. I was

pioneered the Tribeca landscape and is

my Odeon favorites, to my 200 guests.

having a dinner party there with my

a miracle of longevity. When the show-

But the one night that really stands out

favorite artists to celebrate my 30th

biz types were going to the Russian

to me was after 9/11. Paper offices were

birthday. Julian Schnabel was definite-

Tea Room, the art world was at Odeon,

on Franklin Street at the time, and our

ly the instigator, but I can’t remember

showing each other their etchings.

neighborhood was destroyed both

who he took down with him. In those

26

KIM HASTREITER /PAPER MAGAZINE FOUNDER

ber walking down the cut-off streets to

in the sprinkler pipes that were close to the ceiling. Julian and maybe Jean-

I’ve dined there with everyone from

was reopened. They had been feeding

Michel [Basquiat] or maybe it was Jeff

Pete Townsend to Harvey Keitel to John

firefighters and rescue workers for free

[Koons], or Ross [Bleckner], or David

Waters to Divine to Cindy Sherman to

as they were so close to Ground Zero.

[Salle] went down to the bathroom

Brooke Shields to Quentin Crisp to Joey

We talked about how devastating it was

and soaked the toilet paper until it was

Arias and so many more. I hosted some

for the businesses in the neighborhood,

just a pile of mush. Together they were

major dinner parties there. One of my

and Lynn and I cooked up a scheme for

throwing these kind of “snowballs” of

favorites was a huge dinner for 100+ I

Paper to throw a party at The Odeon that

soaking-wet toilet paper against the

threw for my friend Pedro Almodóvar. I

week for everyone living and working in

beautiful tile walls in the restroom

remember we also threw a fifth birthday

the neighborhood, to cheer everyone up.

area, downstairs at The Odeon. It

for Paper with The B-52’s, who were on

The party was amazing. Lynn provided

seemed fun at the time, although we

our cover and performed after dinner.

French fries and drinks, and I got lots of

were understandably asked to leave

I even took over the whole restaurant

my friends from the neighborhood to

before we even had birthday cake.

for my 40th-birthday party, which was

perform music and read poetry. It was a

visit Lynn at The Odeon once the street

photography courtesy of the odeon

days, Lynn and Keith kept toilet paper

physically and emotionally. I remem-


special moment. The Odeon is a special

kitchen who was funny and loud and at

was very popular giving them away? As

place. I simply would, and still do, always

times he would argue.

it was such a melting pot, I met many

go there. Whether because someone’s

people there who became friends and

died, or had a baby, or graduated, or

TAMA JANOWITZ/AUTHOR

when someone came to town, or had

Me, Paige Powell and Andy Warhol

a birthday or an anniversary, a fashion

used to eat there quite often. To go

show, a book launch, an award that was

to the bathroom, you had to navigate

KIM HASTREITER /PAPER MAGAZINE FOUNDER

won. It’s just that kind of place.

a flight of stairs to the basement.

I actually attended the opening-night

Once when I came back Andy said,

party for The Odeon in 1980. The party

TAMA JANOWITZ/AUTHOR

“Oh, gee, every time Tama goes to the

was packed with the artists living in the

I think Odeon had opened quite

lavatory when she comes back her

neighborhood. I was living a few blocks

recently, it was 1981 or ’82, I was

hair is bigger!” I think he was kind of

north in those days on Lispenard Street

standing at the bar with a couple of

insinuating I was taking drugs in that

and was working as the style editor of

artists and someone sent over word

bathroom, but he knew I wasn’t. Andy

the SoHo Weekly News. Downtown

that Johnny Thunders wanted me to

was happy in that place. He was always

below Houston Street was still the Wild

join him at his table. “No, no, no!” the

saying, “Oh, gee, there’s Barbara Eden!

West when Odeon opened, no shops

guys I was with sternly told me, “you

Doesn’t she look great?” That kind of

or restaurants yet, only a few bars like

can’t go over there. He is very danger-

stuff made him happy. Then we would

the Spring Street Bar, Broome Street

ous!” So I didn’t go. Later I realized,

walk over to Area. We went there fre-

Bar and Fanelli’s. The community was

okay, he did look kind of dangerous,

quently, but especially on the day each

mostly all artists who were homestead-

but what was he going to do to me in

month when the “theme” changed.

ing the buildings. Galleries began invad-

the middle of a restaurant?

ing Soho and artists then began pioneerNADINE JOHNSON/PUBLICIST

ing loft living below Canal Street. They

NADINE JOHNSON/PUBLICIST

The food was quite good. Did I men-

started calling it “Tribeca” when The

Even though it felt so far away and

tion that the owner at times would

Odeon opened; it immediately became a

the streets were so deserted and

send me drinks, but I did not drink so I

local artist hangout for the hood.  

dark and scary at night, I always loved to go there as the music was so good and Odeon always made you feel good and welcome. It reminded me of La Coupole in Paris as the design, a bit retro, was so well done and different from any other places in New York. You felt so free at The Odeon. People would hop from table to table, and the photograph courtesy of the odeon

are still part of my life.

place was always full of impossibly clever and cerebral artists. I did not understand (my English was poor) sitting with impossibly glamorous and sultry downtown girls who were going to the bathroom a lot…a real scene at the lower level. There was also a large African-American cook/chef in the


cutest waitstaff. I felt like we

season of 1986. I was still a newbie

had our very own La Coupole

to the Downtown scene and was so

on lower West Broadway. Lynn

thrilled to have been invited to this

and Keith bartered with us for

early Christmas Party; so it was hardly

advertising in Paper, and so

a surprise that my first response was

that is where I hung out and

to find a seat alone, be as unobtrusive

ate dinner most nights. My

as possible at the front of The Odeon

memories of walking every

and watch the hip, fabulous New York-

night from Lispenard Street

ers as they swanned into the party. I

past the Baby Doll strip club to The

remember the moment Andy [Warhol]

TAMA JANOWITZ/AUTHOR

Odeon, and the amazing antics and

arrived like it was yesterday. As always,

After 9/11, lower Manhattan was

crazy dinners I had there are endless.

when Andy arrived at any gathering,

deserted. The Odeon was really strug-

The other magazine they bartered with

the room took immediate electricity,

gling (along with all other businesses,

was Interview, so there was literally

an immediate charge. The atmosphere

residents, of course), so a magazine

a party there every night—either us

heightened with excitement because

threw an event at The Odeon to

throwing a Paper dinner or Paige Pow-

Andy was here! And wherever Andy

bring back people and business. I

ell throwing a dinner with Andy Warhol

was, was well, it was the only place to

will never forget that night; it was in

and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

be. Andy walked in to Odeon and was immediately the center of attention.

mid-December or thereabouts and the

As he waded through the chic scrum

mild summer evening, but the ash was

LAURIE PIKE/FORMER ODEON WAITRESS/WRITER

still everywhere—the very specific,

Though we didn’t really make much

noticing two homeless-looking folk

peculiar odor of the tragedy—the

money as waiters, it was a great com-

pressing their tongues to the glass of

air permeated with a smell of fires of

pany to work for. Many of us were in our

the restaurant and making childish,

rubbish and trash and perhaps dung,

twenties, recent to NYC, and making

ridiculous faces as they peered into

you felt like you were breathing the air

our first stabs at jobs in our chosen

the proceedings. How annoying and

in India or the Moroccan desert. And

professions. I left The Odeon to work at

ridiculous, I remember thinking. But

being back at The Odeon while all the

MTV, but Keith McNally pulled me aside

as I peered a bit closer I soon realized:

streets around were abandoned must

and said, “Hey, if the job doesn’t work

Shit, that’s Jean-Michel Basquiat and

have been somewhat similar to some

out, you can always come back.” That

Tina Chow! Both were clearly high as

celebration in a bombed-out part of

was super generous of him and in fact

a kite and clearly getting off on their

Berlin after WWII.

I did go back, but I wanted non-res-

childish antics. The bug-eyed Jean-

28

that night, I remember looking out and

taurant work, so he set me up at Nell’s

Michel kept rapping on the window

KIM HASTREITER /PAPER MAGAZINE FOUNDER

answering phones.

as the stylishly disheveled Tina Chow

After I started Paper in my house on

GEORGE WAYNE/AUTHOR

from inside Odeon of the two prank-

Lispenard Street in 1984, we became a

I have experienced a few mirth-filled

sters who then scurried off into that

part of this community, and I met Lynn

dinner parties at Odeon in my time. But

frosty Manhattan night. They never did

and Keith, who owned Odeon. They

my strongest and most indelible Odeon

come into Odeon that night. And that

really understood how to integrate into

moment is a rather sad and poignant

was the last time I ever saw Tina Chow

the community, making Odeon a truly

one. The restaurant was sequestered

alive and for that matter Jean-Michel

special watering hole filled with artists,

for a private party the night in question,

Basquiat. Andy himself would be dead

writers, musicians, designers and the

this at the height of the festive holiday

two months later.

looked on laughing. I snapped a picture photograph courtesy of the odeon

weather was so warm, it was like a


FOOD

TRIBECA RESTAURANT GUIDE brandy library

chef Markus Glocker, maître d’ John Winterman and restaurateur Drew Nieporent. Located in the heart of Tribeca, Bâtard showcases several French classics, imaginatively interpreted through chef Glocker’s Austrian heritage. Think venison and foie gras terrine, roasted quail, duck breast, and a dreamy chocolate and praline dessert. The menu changes frequently and is solely available prix-fixe style: two courses ($65), three courses ($85) and four courses ($95). A stunning list of Burgundies is impressive, although BYOB is welcomed at Bâtard every Monday. 212-219-2777 / BATARDTRIBECA.COM

BRANDY LIBRARY / 5 NORTH MOORE STREET

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For those who tipple à la mode, Brandy Library is the spot. The all-encompassing knowledge of their “spirit sommeliers” is astounding. The extensive repertoire of high-end spirits is at your disposal, and the barkeepers fetch a bottle of your choice from a shelf, using a ladder, just like an old-school library. Hesitant to choose just one? Opt for “Tasting Flights,” a special menu, neatly priced at $38–$592, providing a ½ oz. sample of each of six different bottles, whether it is whiskey, rum or cognac. Enjoy the fine art of drinking and unwind at this beautifully designed lounge full of brown spirits. 212-226-5545 / BRANDYLIBRARY.COM augustine

photograph by eric medsker ; photograph by charles steinberg ; photography courtesy of augustine

racines

AMERICAN CUT / 3 6 3 GREENWICH STREET A sleek steakhouse, American Cut is one of the big hits by “Iron Chef” Marc Forgione, in collaboration with LDV Hospitality. A modern take on your grandfather’s favorite chophouse—Art Deco accents, black leather banquettes and copper ceilings—it might make you feel like you’re in an episode of Mad Men. After all, American Cut is often buzzing with dapper bankers in bespoke suits, eager to get a juicy bite of a 30-day dry-aged tomahawk chop.

est brainchild of legendary restaurateur Keith McNally, the man behind hot spots Balthazar and Minetta Tavern. Opened in 2016, Augustine received two stars from Eater critic Ryan Sutton and is already making its mark in the über-competitive NYC culinary scenes with chef/partner Daniel Markus Glocker of Michelin-starred Bâtard. The brasserie offers French fare with a twist: Roasted bone marrow, monkfish “à la Bouillabaisse” and dry-aged côte de boeuf are all worth ordering. The desserts are not to be skipped—artfully created by pastry chef Regis Beauregard from Balthazar in London. With warm globe light fixtures, vintage mirrors and Art Nouveau tiles, Augustine is like visiting Paris without ever leaving New York. 212-375-0010 / AUGUSTINENY.COM

212-226-4736 / AMERICANCUTSTEAKHOUSE.COM

AUGUSTINE/ 5 BEEKMAN STREET Augustine, a haute French restaurant nestled inside the five-star Beekman Hotel, is the lat-

BÂTARD / 39 WEST BROADWAY

2

Awarded with a Michelin star, Bâtard is a modern European restaurant, founded by

1 20

BUBBY’S/ HUDSON STREET A local landmark and favorite of celebrities, Bubby’s is a diner-style American eatery with a selection of simple, fresh comfort food, made with locally sourced ingredients. With a vision for a cozy brunch spot, Chef Ron Silver opened Bubby’s in Tribeca on Thanksgiving Day in 1990. Bubby’s flaky buttermilk biscuits, baked with sweet Southern charm, have been praised as the “best biscuits in town.” Also try the pancakes, the overstuffed green omelet, huevos rancheros, fried chicken and Bubby’s burger. And always leave room for Bubby’s long list of homemade pies. 212-219-0666 / BUBBYS.COM

EDWARD’S RESTAURANT / 3 6 WEST BROADWAY

1

The whimsical façade of Edward’s feels sort of like a Cincinnati diner, yet the menu displays an eclectic list of dishes with multinational imprints, like guacamole with chips, huevos rancheros, Nicoise salad,

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212-233-6436 / EDWARDSNYC.COM

FRENCHETTE / 4 WEST BROADWAY

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Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr founded Frenchette in a conscious effort to differentiate the brasserie from Keith McNally’s spots and further venture into the world of French cuisine. Chefs Hanson and Nasr change the menu daily, using the best local farm-found seasonal ingredients. Hence, the food here is fresh and always surprising. Approach with a carpe diem attitude, and be as spontaneous as the menu itself. Come early, as Frenchette is always packed. If you prefer to skip the line, go for lunch, a new feature of Frenchette. With hors d’oeuvres and entrées served à la carte, the lunch menu offers a perfect preview to the full Frenchette experience. Coming soon: The bistro will serve breakfast and brunch as well.

food” in rustic ambience embellished with wine barrels hanging from the ceiling, chestnut-color leather banquettes, sturdy wooden tables and dim lighting. Emphasizing authenticity, The Greek serves Mediterranean plates with an influence of northern Greek cuisines: keftedes (aka, grandma’s stove-top meatballs), souvlaki and moussaka. The cuisine is prepared with local, non-GMO, organic products from Greece. With a glass of Macedonian wine, you will be transported to Corfu in a fashionable flash.

chef Andrew Carmellini, the restaurant definitely lives up to its reputation and hardto-score reservations. Highly recommended: mushroom frittata, hand-cut tagliatelle, fire-roasted garlic chicken and wood-fired carrots. Locanda Verde also boasts one of the best-curated Italian wine selections in New York, and a glass of Barolo is a must. Also of note: Locanda Verde is one of the best places to dine amongst the famous and fashionable.

646-476-3941 / THEGREEKTRIBECA.COM

MARC FORGIONE / 34 READE STREET

GUNBAE/6 7 MURRAY STREET

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Did someone say Korean BBQ and karaoke? Save a trip to K-Town and head to Gunbae, the first Korean barbecue restaurant in the heart of Tribeca, for an unparalleled sizzling experience. Gunbae, an old-school expression for “cheers” in Korean, offers a variety of meats, both traditional and modern, for tableside cooking by its skillful grill masters. Or you can grill everything yourself for a more immersive experience. Two dine-in specials are noteworthy: Monday–Thursday happy hours (11:30 a.m.–7 p.m.) and BBQ Hansang for three to four guests. After savoring a hearty meaty Korean meal, don’t forget to slip downstairs for a soulful K-pop karaoke session, microphone included.

Marc Forgione is the eponymous restaurant from Michelin-starred chef Marc Forgione, a winner of the Food Network’s Next Iron Chef in 2010. Influenced by his father, chef Larry Forgione of An American Place, the “Godfather of American Cuisine,” Marc Forgione showcases innovative New American dining with seasonal local ingredients. For a hearty, rustic meal, have the winter citrus kale salad, Pennsylvania veal or Snowdance Farms chicken under a brick. Designed to resemble a countryside barn, the room is dimly lit by glass-box chandeliers. Added bonus: The everchanging wine list is attentively curated by sommelier Matthew Conway, a Zagat’s “30 under 30” winner.

THE GREEK / 45 8 GREENWICH STREET

212-321-2500 / GUNBAETRIBECA.COM

212-941-9401/ MARCFORGIONE.COM

Founded in 2013, The Greek is a taverna situated by the Hudson River. The restaurant flaunts “a new way to enjoy traditional Greek

LITTLE PARK /8 5 WEST BROADWAY

MR. CHOW/ HUDSON STREET One of the chicest Chinese restaurants in town, Mr. Chow has always attracted the beautiful people from London to New York. It is no secret that the Beatles, the Stones, Andy Warhol, David Hockney and Yoko Ono all frequented Mr. Chow, whether in Knightsbridge or Midtown. After the 57th Street location opened in 1979 (praised by designer Hubert de Givenchy as a “precious jewel box”), the second Mr. Chow opened in Tribeca. The menu is a tasty mix of authentic Beijing cuisine and Mr. Chow’s original recipes, such as chicken satay and Ma Mignon. And of course, the signature crispy Beijing Duck—the most famous item on the menu.

212-334-3883 / FRENCHETTENYC.COM

frenchette

Helmed by chef Andrew Carmellini, Little Park is an all-day American restaurant in the posh Smyth Hotel. The eatery focuses on farm-to-table plates with fresh seasonal ingredients, leveraging Carmellini’s longtime friendships with local farmers, fishermen, butchers and vintners. You can’t go wrong with the squash soup, big eye tuna tartare and grass-fed sirloin coulette. Little Park’s cocktail menu, created by seasoned mixologist Anne Robinson, is whimsical and tasteful—sip on Hot Tin Roof, Magic Hour and Old Soul. With plush, comfortable booths and wide wooden tables, Little Park is also perfect for families with herds of hungry kids.

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212-965-9500 / MRCHOW.COM

212-220-4110 / LITTLEPARK.COM

NOBU DOWNTOWN / 95 BROADWAY

LOCANDA VERDE / 377 GREENWICH STREET

Chef Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, the celebrity Japanese chef and restaurateur, has been opening five-star restaurants and hotels from London to Ibiza—in addition to multiple outposts of his namesake eat-

Nestled inside the Greenwich Hotel, Locanda Verde is a stylishly casual Italian eatery with soul-satisfying food. Helmed by famed

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212-925-3797/ LOCANDAVERDENYC.COM

1

photograph by melanie dunea

pepper yellowfin tuna with sushi rice and sesame-soy sauce, and Maryland crab cakes. The most popular items are the all-natural “LaFrieda” hamburger and “Dr. Praeger” veggie burger (vegan and gluten free). The last Monday of every month is “Cincinnati Night” at Edward’s, aka “Big Red feast,” with the mouthwatering special of Skyline Chili.


SMITH & MILLS / 7 NORTH MOORE STREET

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Smith & Mills is an under-the-radar bar and restaurant, founded by Employees Only owners Matt Abramcyk and Akiva Elstein. Located discreetly in a former carriage house on North Moore Street, facing Locanda Verde and the Greenwich Hotel, behind the rusted industrial doors, the laid-back interior immediately feels like your favorite local spot. The food is fresh and unfussy: oysters on the half shell, a sumptuous butcher’s plate, salmon crudo, the market salad bowl and a burger that’s already gained a cult following. Don’t miss a trip to the loo: The bathroom is housed in an old elevator car from 1902. 212-226-2515/ SMITHANDMILLS.COM    

locande verde

ery Nobu. The first partnership with actor/ director Robert De Niro and restaurateur Drew Nieporent, Nobu Downtown was the beginning of this now global empire. After a 23-year residence on Hudson Street, the flagship Nobu moved farther down to the bustling World Trade Center area in 2017 and is now nestled in the former AT&T landmark building. Magnificently redesigned by the Rockwell Group, the location offers a forest of Botticino marble columns where you can savor Nobu’s iconic Japanese-Peruvian plates: lobster ceviche, salmon tataki yuzu miso, Colorado lamb chop with anticucho miso and the highly addictive Nobu tacos. 212-219-0500 / NOBURESTAURANTS.COM

THE ODEON / 45 WEST BROADWAY photography by noah fecks

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The Odeon, a beloved New York classic that’s hosted everyone over the decades, including Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Diane Von Furstenberg, is a seminal piece of Tribeca’s original creative class DNA. The iconic red neon-lit sign has been igniting excitement since the 1980s and famously ended up on the cover of Jay

McInerney’s novel Bright Lights, Big City. The retro-chic bistro serves French-American fare: country frisée salad, French onion soup gratinée, croque monsieur, duck bolognese and moules frites. With the recent relocation of Condé Nast, The Odeon has become a kind of Condé cafeteria. Slide into the leather burgundy banquettes to mingle with the 21st-century’s Great Gatsby–esque crowd. 212-233-0507 / THEODEONRESTAURANT.COM

RACINES/ 94 CHAMBERS STREET Racines, the American offshoot of the original Parisian bistro located inside the picture-perfect arcade of the 2nd arrondissement, is a homey bistrots-a-vins (“a bistro specializing in wines”) serving contemporary French food and organic/ biodynamic wines from boutique French vintners and small estates. The restaurant was transported to Chambers Street— thanks to the successful collaboration among restaurateur David Lanher, Chamber Street Wine’s owner David Lillie, sommelier Arnaud Tronche and Michelin-starred chef Frédéric Duca. Currently helmed by executive chef-in-residence Paul Liebrandt, the kitchen creates meticulously executed French dishes with a touch of Provençal flavors: buckwheat with uni and smoked carrot, the garden salad, monkfish with chestnut dashi and sudachi. Whether you’re a wine geek or not, the vino list at Racine’s deserves full attention. 212-227-3400 / RACINESNY.COM 

SUSHI OF GARI / 3 WEST BROADWAY

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Sushi of Gari, founded by sushi chef Masatoshi “Gari” Sugio, has been pioneering the high-end Japanese culinary scene in New York for the past two decades. The very first Sushi of Gari opened its door on the Upper East Side in 1997 with the chef ’s vision to enhance the sushi tasting experience with a variety of creative sauces and garnishes. The Tribeca location is the fifth outpost of Chef Sugio’s establishments in New York. The first floor is a dining room of 26 seats and the second floor features a sushi bar exclusively preserved for Gari’s signature omakase (aka chef ’s choice) experience, often cited as one of the best of its kind in town. 212-285-0130 / SUSHIOFGARI.COM

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TAKAHACHI/ 45 DUANE STREET Japanese restaurant Takahachi is a steadfast sushi spot for Tribeca locals, procuring the freshest fish possible. Other Japanese home-cooked basics should not be overlooked like Hijiki Shira-ae, rock shrimp tempura, Una Don, curry chicken and soft shell crabs. No surprise that Takahachi is bustling during lunch hour with the whitecollar business set craving the “quality-toprice ratio.” Afterward, explore the world of Japanese pastries at Takahachi Bakery at 25 Murray Street. 212-571-1830 / TAKAHACHI.NET

TAMARIND TRIBECA / 99 HUDSON STREET Tamarind Tribeca, located in a stunning Art Deco building on Hudson Street, serves

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sophisticated Indian cuisine from various regions—Punjab, Hyderabad, Goa, Madras, Lucknow and Kolkata—all with an updated, modern twist. The dinner menu displays a wide range of imaginative Indian plates: vegetable samosa, she crab soup, lobster masala, Tandoori mixed grill, wild mushroom and truffle oil nan, and chutney tastings.

(the duck with cabbage slaw is a must) and chef Masa Takayama’s first-ever burger in a trendy environment with dark, flattering lighting, an open kitchen and an 18-seat counter made from a single Bubinga wood tree. For a more intimate experience, book a seat downstairs at Tetsu’s Raw Bar. 212-207-2370 / TETSUNYC.COM

212-775-9000 / TAMARINDTRIBECA.COM

TINY’S & THE BAR UPSTAIRS / 35 WEST BROADWAY

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2

Founded by sommelier Paul Grieco (dubbed a “prophet of Riesling”), Terroir Tribeca is a wine lover’s heaven. The chaotic and extensive wine list, encased in a three-ring binder, illustrates Grieco’s thoughts on pop culture, politics and Greek mythology, while also reflecting on his affinity toward white grape varieties—“the Summer of Riesling.” The rundown on the tapas food goes: chicken liver mousse, lamb meatballs, fried rabbit sandwich, short ribs over pork sausage cassoulet, and cheese and charcuterie plates. For the winter season, opt for a cup of vin chaud (mulled wine) or apple cider. 212-625-9463 / WINEISTERROIR.COM

TETSU/ 7 8 LEONARD STREET Tetsu, which means “iron” in Japanese, is the downtown, more laid-back sibling of Columbus Circle’s über-pricey Masa (which can run $600 per person). Tetsu serves delicious Japanese robata cuisine: sizzling Tokachi beef, fresh sushi, healthy salads

Housed in a three-story landmark townhouse on West Broadway that dates back to 1810, Tiny’s & the Bar Upstairs beautifully preserved every detail, adding unusual antique pieces wherever the eye wanders. Tiny’s is the magical outcome of a collaboration among restaurateur Matt Abramcyk, who is behind Employees Only and The Beatrice Inn, and his siblings, Jack and Ana. Their goal was a cozy one-stop for “eat, drink and/or talk”—and the crowd feels like fashionable regulars from all over the city. The menu focuses on New American dishes, made from local ingredients, with a hint of French and Italian flavors: heirloom tomato salad, wild mushroom risotto and Griggstown half chicken. 212-374-1135 / TINYSNYC.COM

Co-owned by actor Robert De Niro and restaurateur Drew Nieporent, the now-legendary Tribeca Grill is a downtown mainstay for New American cuisine and amazing peoplewatching. The signature dishes are French onion soup, pan-roasted salmon and New York strip steak sided by cloud-like whipped Yukon Gold potatoes. With an impressive 2,000-selection and 25,000-bottle list, Tribeca Grill has received the Grand Award from Wine Spectator magazine, a feat only 10 establishments in New York have achieved. The country club atmosphere makes it suitable for both business power lunches and family dinners.

TUTTO IL GIORNO / 4 FRANKLIN STREET

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Already famous in the Hamptons, Tutto il Giorno, “one of Manhattan’s best-kept secrets,” is celebrity central, attracting everyone from Calvin Klein to Sarah Jessica Parker. Opened by husband-and-wife duo Gianpaolo de Felice and Gabby Karan de Felice (designer Donna Karan’s daughter), the restaurant serves meticulously executed modern Italian

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fare. The menu focuses on simple Southern Italian cuisine and is seafood-heavy: lobster Caprese, polpo, clam linguine, branzino, and a delicious cioppino, the classic Neapolitan seafood stew. The high sky-lit ceiling, calming Urban Zen–inspired décor and art work by Donna Karan’s late husband, Stephan Weiss, make this place ideal for special occasions and romantic dates. 212-274-8100 / TUTTOILGIORNO.COM

TRIBECA GRILL / 375 GREENWICH STREET

212-941-3900 / MYRIADRESTAURANTGROUP.COM

terroir tribeca

tetsu

TWO HANDS / 5 CHURCH STREET

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The Church Street outpost of Aussie café Two Hands knows a photogenic, Instagramfriendly avocado toast never goes out of fashion. The eatery’s newly added dinner menu, exclusive to this location, offers a full Australian cuisine experience with blistered shisito peppers and braised chicken. Make sure to arrive early, so you can beat the queue full of social media–savvy hipsters and post–Y7 Yoga Lululemon-clad mamas, hungry for healthy food. TWOHANDSNYC.COM

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WEATHER UP/ 59 DUANE STREET Owner Kathryn Weatherup’s nighttime watering hole is a spin-off of her already popular bar in Brooklyn. Subway tiled walls and a ridiculously attractive staff give Weather Up its cool factor, but the main attraction is the cocktails by mixologist Richard Boccato of Dutch Kills. Pair your booze with fancy bar food, like truffled cheese toast (egg, Taleggio and truffle oil) and Reuben sliders (housecured pastrami, Gruyere and sauerkraut) by Tyler Kord of No. 7 fame. 212-766-3202 / WEATHERUPNYC.COM

photograph courtesy of terroir tribeca ; photograph by dacia pierson

TERROIR TRIBECA / 4 HARRISON STREET


best made co.

issey miyake

SHOP

TRIBECA STORE GUIDE THE ARMOURY / 68 DUANE STREET

photograph by adrian gaut ; photograph by paul warchol

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With the bright vision to become a global men’s haberdasher of immaculate craftsmanship, The Armoury has sailed from Hong Kong, where it was founded by Alan See, Mark Cho and Ethan Newton. The brand initially made a name for itself as the Hong Kongese gentlemen’s discreet outfitters. Here in Tribeca, the store promises to deliver world-class menswear from under-the-radar labels with a certain sartorial elegance. The Armoury’s clientele includes globe-trotting business executives and finance professionals whose demands come down to high quality, exclusivity and customization. Selected must-haves are a Liverano & Liverano green corduroy suit, Ascot Chang tuxedo shirts, Carmina suede loafers and Rimowa Topas luggage. 646-613-7613/ THEARMOURY.COM

BEST MADE CO. / 3 6 WHITE STREET Founded by Peter Buchanan-Smith, an erst-

while NYT art director and Paper magazine creative director, Best Made Co. evokes one’s primal instincts with axes, folding knives, deer-skin gloves and shearling vests. Definitely not your typical outdoor brand; so don’t think North Face or Patagonia. The brand strives to bring quality outdoor products to the city with a mission to inspire people to “reconnect with their hands and the nature.” Hence, functionality is another key factor considered with each Best Made collection. The Tribeca store carries everything from clothing and bags to accessories (axes and hatchets included). 646-478-7092 / BESTMADECO.COM

and more high-end labels. Reflecting the interior aesthetic of Wang’s family estate in Oxford, England, the boutique was designed by co-owner and interior designer Ryan Korban to resemble the ambience of a snug British bookshop. 212-431-3890/ EDONMANOR.COM

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GOLDISH/ 7 MURRAY STREET This family surely has a thing for jewelry. Yafit Goldfarb, having co-founded Seasonal Whispers with her mother, Esther Lixenberg, has now partnered with her daughter, Tyler Goldfarb, for Goldish, to empower and bring women together. Each piece is handmade in New York with love and intention to serve its purpose as a modern talisman. The duo seeks to build connections among the Goldish wearers by hosting gatherings at this flagship store and other magical places around the world— whether that is sound meditations, healing workshops, collaborative art projects or conversations. 212-233-8690 / BEGOLDISH.COM

EDON MANOR / 39 GREENWICH STREET

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“For me, a big part of personal style is with the shoes,” says Davinia Wang, a co-owner and chief curator of Edon Manor, which specializes in luxury women’s shoes and accessories. Think Balenciaga, Chloé, Giambattista Valli, Sergio Rossi, Valentino

ISSEY MIYAKE / 9 HUDSON STREET

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Based on his geometric interests and engineering-based approaches, Japanese fashion design legend Issey Miyake is widely known for his iconic pleated garments and asymmetrical lines. The gallery-like Tribeca flag-

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as well. Find this museum of illuminated memories and neon wonderland below the ever-bustling Canal Street. 212-226-4883 / LETTHEREBENEON.COM

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ship, with Frank Gehry’s titanium “tornado” installation, surely provides an idiosyncratic shopping experience. Miyake’s runway lines—from Issey Miyake, Pleats Please, Cauliflower and Bao Bao to HaaT—are all housed in the store, a perfect chance for a Miyake overview of his extensive work. 212-226-0100/ ISSEYMIYAKEUSA.COM

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JACADI/ 6 READE STREET The timeless influence of French fashion is never to be underestimated. Jacadi, a premium children’s brand hailing from Paris, encapsulates the commitment to French savoir-faire and the artisan heritage of tailoring. In 1988, Jacadi opened its first U.S. store on the Upper East Side. This is its sixth outpost in Manhattan. The classic yet modernized “French schoolgirl dresses” and lovely rompers for boys and girls are some of the most trending items. In no time, your kids will ask for their own café au lait and croissant from the Arcade Bakery, a block away at 220 Church Street. 212-267-2517 / JACADI.US

toward Stella McCartney, Marc Jacobs and European luxury kidswear, like Scotch & Soda and Petit Bateau. The store carries sizes newborn to 14.

646-858 0805 / LIVLYCLOTHING.COM

212-791-6915 / KOHS-KIDS.MYSHOPIFY.COM

My Little Sunshine Tribeca, situated on a quiet block of Hudson Street, prides itself as being a one-stop shop with well-curated offerings to meet all your kid’s needs and wants—including clothing, books and toys. The store is named after the noted song, “You Are My Sunshine,” a favorite of founder Tara Figotin for her firstborn daughter, Kai. Brands include Stella McCartney, Tocoto Vintage, Bobo Choses and Rylee + Cru. What’s especially different about My Little Sunshine? Voilà, your little ones can get fresh new hairdos on top of brand-new toy cars.

LA GARÇONNE / 4 6 5 GREENWICH STREET According to founder and creative director Kris Kim, La Garçonne is “fashion for the thinking woman.” And just when we thought the 21st century is bringing the end of retail stores, this online fashion destination opened its brick-and-mortar storefront on Greenwich Street. The shop was designed by Swedish architect Solveig Fernlund, reflecting Kim’s brand ethos for minimalistic design and thoughtful androgynous women’s style. After all, La Garçonne means “tomboy” in French. Imagine the clean white walls lit by the warm Noguchi lamps along with a carefully curated selection of Lemaire sweaters, Jacquemus dresses, Acne Studios denim and Common Project sneakers. 646-553-3303/ LAGARCONNE.COM

KOH’S KIDS / 3 GREENWICH STREET

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To answer the question, “Where do artsy parents grab discreetly chic clothes for their juniors?” here is Koh’s Kids, founded by Tribeca’s own resident designer Grace Koh. As Greenwich Street’s retail landscape grows rapidly, Koh’s store has stayed and remained a neighborhood institution with its unwavering loyal customers. Koh’s whimsical taste and hand-knit sweaters instantly won the hearts of Tribeca moms. The selection is international, and geared

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LET THERE BE NEON / 3 8 WHITE STREET Let There Be Neon on White Street was there even before Instagram turned neon signs into a must-have home accessory and social media craze. Since 1972, this store has been supplying new and vintage neon signs. The production of Kiehl’s neon logo, Nam June Paik’s video installation and Tracey Emin’s “I Never Wanted To Leave You” sign are all credited to the studio. Custom designs are available upon request

MY LITTLE SUNSHINE / 45 HUDSON STREET

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212-966-8840 / MYLITTLESUNSHINENYC.COM

NILI LOTAN / 88 DUANE STREET

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Nili Lotan, a critically acclaimed Israeli designer’s namesake brand, presents sophisticated and elegant style in homage to powerful women leading busy urban lives. Lotan’s sublime design doesn’t seek splashy spotlights. The attention naturally grabs the brand, demonstrated by a list of devoted female celebrities, including Gigi Hadid, Jennifer Lawrence and Kendall Jenner. The first sign welcoming you to the Tribeca store is the wall-stenciled design philosophy, “Neither loud nor aggressive, clothes should be clean and sophisticated.” Sumptuous cashmere sweaters, sleek black leather blazers and front lace-up wool pants are meticulously arranged alongside art and film books belonging to the designer. 212-219-8794 / NILILOTAN.COM

photograph courtesy of la garçonne

la garçonne

LIVLY/ 8 READE STREET Swedish children’s clothing brand Livly opened its first U.S. store on Reade Street in December 2015. A gang of celebrity super moms, like Sarah Jessica Parker and Miranda Kerr, love to dress their kids in the brand. Princess Gabriella of Monaco is also a fan. Designer Lisa Carrol started the apparel line while raising her twin daughters, Liv and Lilly, who are hyperallergic and could wear only cotton clothing. Livly dreams of an “empire of soft, one at a time” and produces most pieces from luxe pima cotton. The store caters to both boys and girls, from sizes newborn to 12.


PATRON OF THE NEW / 5 FRANKLIN STREET

Joe Hill, as well as the customized Stormtrooper costume gifted by Lucasfilm.

TED MUEHLING / 5 WHITE STREET

Founded by mother-and-son duo Lisa and Jonathan Pak, Patron of the New is a multibrand, avant-garde lifestyle boutique with an industrial warehouse facade. Expect to run into the likes of Justin Bieber, Nick Jonas, Ariana Grande and Wiz Khalifa, and two security guards are positioned at the front, considering the five- to six-figure price tags dangling on the racks. The list of its brands includes Amiri, Enfants Riches Déprimés, Fear of God, Off-White, Rhude and Vetements, among others. To step up its retail game, the Paks have been hosting exclusive pop-up shops, events and other projects with partnering brands. This store blew up from word of mouth and is known to actively engage with its global clientele via Instagram.

646-277-8362 / RAG-BONE.COM

Ted Muehling, dubbed “the intellectual’s jeweler,” is all about simple, elegant and refined designs. Since his graduation from Pratt Institute, with a degree in industrial design, Muehling has been making exquisite jewelry and objects. His jewelry line is influenced by and designed after organic shapes of “rice grains, olive branches, pine cones and insect wings.” The very pair of amethyst earrings Jennifer Aniston gushed about in Harper’s Bazaar is Muehling’s. Head to 52 White Street for his nature-inspired earrings, porcelain, candleholders and the works of other jewelers, like Gabriella Kiss, Lee Hale and Axel Russmeyer.

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212-966-7144/ PATRONOFTHENEW.US

R & COMPANY /8 FRANKLIN STREET

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R & Company, New York’s prominent gallery for historical and contemporary designs, was founded by Evan Snyderman and Zesty Meyers, the glassblowers and performance artists of the 1990s. The gallery now has two locations in Tribeca: the original on 82 Franklin Street and the newly added 64 White Street, which opened its doors early last year. This lofty tri-level gallery, seamlessly connected by marble steps, manifests the boundless ambition of Snyderman and Meyers in the contemporary marketplace. Check out works by the Haas Brothers, Rogan Gregory, Renate Müller, Wendell Castle and Johnny Swing. 212-343-7979 / R-AND-COMPANY.COM

RAG & BONE / 8 WEST BROADWAY

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Fashion-wise, the rite of passage for a true New Yorker comes down to claiming ownership of a pair of edgy jeans from Rag & Bone. Founded in 2002 by British duo Marcus Wainwright and Nathan Bogle, this cult brand has become a synonym for the grungy yet sleek downtown NYC aesthetic. The Tribeca outpost, tucked away on West Broadway, is Rag & Bone’s 10th location in Manhattan and focuses heavily on the men’s collection—from a functional navy pea coat to sharp black razor suits. Don’t forget to check out the special graffiti installations created by Wainwright’s “Houston Wall” street artists squad of Alex Diaz (aka La Pandilla), Boy Kong and

ROBERTA ROLLER RABBIT / 7 6 DUANE STREET

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Roberta Roller Rabbit, designer Roberta Freymann’s eponymous label, finds its inspiration from her magical trip to India—hence, the dedication to the resort and home line. Signature styles include tassel-trim tunics, colorful kurtas, printed pajamas and quilted blankets. Play with bright tropical colors and jaunty patterns while exploring your inner wanderlust. A majority of the pieces are made in India. This is the second New York location, after the one on the Upper East Side, and the store’s uplifting yellow walls are adorned with a theme of flowers and birds by Wassong Lange Studio, of which Freymann’s sister, Lisa Wassong, is a partner. 212-966-0076 / ROLLERRABBIT.COM

SHINOLA / 77 FRANKLIN STREET

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Shinola, built in Detroit, has been pioneering the way of American luxury with its exceptional commitment to the job creation and revival of the Midwest manufacturing heritage. Its Midwestern roots and top-notch craftsmanship underpin the brand’s sleek modern American aesthetic. Opened in 2013, Shinola Tribeca was the first store after their headquarters in Detroit. Check out a wide range of Shinola’s product line—from luxury watches, leather and stationery goods to handassembled bicycles. Former President Bill Clinton is known to own more than 10 Shinola watches in addition to his oftenphotographed Runwell 47mm.

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212-431-3825 / TEDMUEHLING.COM

THOM BROWNE / HUDSON STREET

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Thom Browne’s flagship store is subtle yet superbly designed, just like his fashion brainchild. Browne can be easily credited for reviving urban preppy fashion and making men’s tailoring cool again. His line is planning to further expand to “proper athletic-wear” in conjunction with the FC Barcelona partnership (#athleisure). Thom Brown’s signature red-white-and-blue grosgrain stripe has become as identifiable as Ralph Lauren’s polo player insignia. The Tribeca outpost is the only stand-alone Thom Browne store in America, which happens to be home for its headquarters. Upon entrance, you might mistake it for a banker’s office with white louvered shades and gray stonewalls. This place is your best bet to secure some of Thom Browne’s coveted pieces that have sold out at Barneys and Dover Street Market. 212-633-1197 / THOMBROWNE.COM

917-728-3000/ SHINOLA.COM

TODD MERRILL STUDIO /8 LAFAYETTE STREET

STEVEN ALAN / 3 FRANKLIN STREET Steven Alan, a New York–based concept store, carries a smartly selected collection of apparel, accessories and apothecary. When founder Steven Alan Grossman opened his first Wooster Street store in 1994, the notion of a multibrand retailer showcasing emerging designers hardly existed. Alan has cultivated a new path for the global fashion market; he’s even created his own namesake product line, which is also available at Barneys New York.

A leader in post-war design, Todd Merrill Studio eschews mass-manufactured furniture and focuses on curating unique, eclectic objects and 20th-century American and European work, including furniture, lighting and sculpture. For almost two decades, the gallery has been at the forefront of modernist and postmodernist studio artisans such as Paul Laszlo, Arthur Elrod, Paul Evans, Karl Springer and many others. Lenny Kravitz, one of the gallery’s many famous collectors, raves of Merrill: “His taste is impeccable— he’s absolutely the best at what he does.”

212-343-0692/ STEVENALAN.COM

212-673-0531 / TODDMERRILLSTUDIO.COM

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Profile for Original Tribeca

Original Tribeca  

Original Tribeca – a magazine created to showcase the cultural and culinary attractions that helped establish Tribeca as one of the most ven...

Original Tribeca  

Original Tribeca – a magazine created to showcase the cultural and culinary attractions that helped establish Tribeca as one of the most ven...