Page 1

08 THE FAMILY TREE PHENOMENON 14

LOOKING FOR SIGNS

20 SPIT AND POLISH 22

LIFE AND LIMB

28 THE GRUB HUB WINTER MAGAZINE TWO THOUSAND AND FOURTEEN - FIFTEEN

38 GEAR ESSENTIALS


A stunning stopover to and from the slopes. Located within a mile from Boston’s Logan International Airport, Hyatt Boston Harbor is the ideal place to stay during your winter travels. The hotel offers the convenience of a complimentary 24-hour shuttle to and from airport terminals and car rental facilities. With close proximity to the INTERSTATE system and all freeways headed north to Jay Peak Resort and other New England ski areas, this luxury waterfront hotel combines premier accommodations with incredible accessibility. Use code WNTR14 for stays November 23, 2014–March 31, 2015 and receive a discounted rate of $149 per night including breakfast for two and complimentary high-speed Internet access. Hyatt. You’re More Than Welcome.

HYATT BOSTON HARBOR 101 Harborside Drive Boston, Massachusetts 02128 T + (617) 568 1234 F + (617) 567 8856 bostonharbor.hyatt.com

Qualifying rooms must be booked for stays between November 23, 2014 and March 31, 2015 using promotional code WNTR14. All promotion inclusions noted above. For complete Hyatt Gold Passport terms and conditions visit https://goldpassport.hyatt.com/gp/en/benefits/join.jsp. Blackout dates may apply. May not be combined with other offers. Void where prohibited. Hyatt reserves the right to alter or withdraw these offers at any time without notice. Not valid for previous bookings. Hyatt and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. ©2014 Hyatt Corporation. All Rights Reserved


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OTTERCREEKBREWING.COM


4

FIRST CHAIR

Illogical ramblings and surreal revelations.

7

GO FIGURE

Crunching numbers.

12

THE RESCUE


A heroic march of the red coats.

18

EVOLUTIONARY PROOF

Inside Stateside’s new rec center.

25

STARRS AND STRIPES

Greg Starr’s civic duty to ski powder.

33

IN DEFENSE OF WANDERING

Meagan Robidoux is trained for this kind of thing.

34

HOOK, LINE AND SINKER

Fishing for stories on Q Burke’s J-Bar.

36 Forget the latest Top 10 list and How-To article. If you really want to optimize your life, look for our simple hacks to live by. Or, as we like to call it: common sense.

PUT HER ON ICE

Cold therapy and straight talk with the Ice Queen.

38

08 14 20 22 28

GEAR ESSENTIALS

Dock the pod and pick your pocket stuff well.

THE FAMILY TREE PHENOMENON Sowing roots with the McAllister family.

40

RAISED JAY OR NOT

Eight ways to spot a Jayer even when they’re not packing papers.

42

MUSIC THERAPY + RHYTHMIC Rx

We’re still awaiting approval from the FDA.

LOOKING FOR SIGNS One mountain host finds meaning.

44

HOW TO WIN FACEBOOK FRIENDS AND INSTAGRAM PEOPLE

The 10 commandments of not being a social mouth breather.

SPIT AND POLISH Tween critics storm the spa to jam about toe-jam.

46

TAILS FROM STATESIDE

Is that junk in your trunk, or are you just happy to tailgate?

50

MIND YOUR MOMENTS

Infographic proof that you need another ski day, now.

LIFE AND LIMB High risk, zero reward.

51

PHOTO BOOK

Memories. Now in the analog edition.

57

THE GUIDE BOOK

Study up. You’ll be quizzed.

THE GRUB HUB What’s tasty on your waist-y.

80

PARTING THOUGHT

If you can’t be a poet, be the poem.

3


F I R S T

Hot August

C H A I R

rain is hammering away as we

put together random pieces of conscious and unconscious thought here in Jay

Peak Winter

Magazine World. Designers have suggested we run stories , images and layouts through the prism of surrealism; the definition of which goes something like this: the creative potential found in the unconscious mind and through the irrational juxtaposition of words, ideas and images. Irrational?

This is something we can get behind.

Surrealists, as goes their philosophy, believed that ordinary and depictive expressions are vital and important, but that the sense of their arrangement must be open to the full range of imagination according to the Hegelian Dialectic. Before things get too Greek here, let’s explain that as the construct of an argument passing through a negative filter on its way toward mediation (sort of how the more delicately educated have argued against our fundraising approaches as of late). The Surrealists sought to resolve the contradictory conditions of dream and reality and they embraced idiosyncrasies and rejected the idea that, for instance, you’d have to be mad to paint a green apple across the face of a man in a bowler hat (Magritte) or put a 60,000-square-foot waterpark dab smack in the middle of a ski resort (Stenger). The small space created by the opposing forces of dream and reality is where, they believed, lived the truth. Ruth. Oddly connected thoughts and images aside, the 2014-15 version of a Jay Peak Winter vacation is as surreal as ever and is perfectly evidenced by our lineup of features just a few pages forward. Check out what happens when fantasy crashes headlong into reality in The Rescue on page 12 and the metaphorically surreal layout of our new Stateside Recreation Center on page 18. Meagan Robidoux testifies as to her realities on page 33 across our In Defense of Wandering piece and for those that navigate the altogether unreal spaces of social media, page 44 will net you a look at How To Win Facebook Friends and Instagram People. In between we offer loosely connected scraps of moment minding, Jay Peak finding, and the easiest way to book a vacation you’ll both remember and never forget. We’re still not sure of the nuance between the two, but it’s probably important. We hope you like the magazine and enjoy whatever moments you get to spend here this season. BY STEVE WRIGHT 4


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PUBLISHER Bill Stenger, President, CEO & Co-Owner Ariel Quiros, Chairman of the Board & Co-Owner E D I TO R Steve Wright, Chief Marketing Officer, Jay Peak D E S I G N & C O N T E N T D E V E LO P M E N T

origindesign.ca

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N Janalee Budge Origin Design + Communications

D E S I G N & I L LU S T R AT I O N Guy Paolaggi, Cato Pulleyblank Origin Design + Communications

P RO D U C T I O N & C O O R D I NAT I O N Kim Hewitt, Jay Peak Marketing Manager Marie-Josée Legault, Joanie Faucher Origin Design + Communications

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Steve Wright, Lisa Richardson, Stephanie Nitsch, Andrew Lanoue and Ryan Devane C O N T R I B U T I N G P H OTO G R A P H E R S Justin Cash, Lenny Christopher, Frédéric Coulombe, Tim Fater, Andrew Lanoue, Guy Paolaggi, Illusive Minds Media AD SALES JJ Toland, Director of Communications + Partnerships PRINTER Norecob 340 rue Principale, Saint-Jules, Qc, Canada, G0N 1R0 norecob.com

CONNECT Facebook : facebook.com/JayPeakFan Twitter : twitter.com/jaypeakresort Youtube : youtube.com/jaypeakresort Flickr : flickr.com/jaypeak Tumblr: jaypeakresort.tumblr.com Instagram: #jaypeakresort

C O N TAC T JAY PEAK RESORT jaypeakresort.com - info@jaypeakresort.com

Reservations : (800) 451-4449 / Snow Phone : (802) 988-9601

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7


The Family Tree Phenomenon

Laying Down Roots with the

McALLISTER FAMILY Longevity is key for the McAllister family. From nursery rhymes to retirement parties, Jay Peak has been a part of the McAllisters’ lives every step of the way. With a rock-solid love for skiing, introduced by Arnold and Rejeanne McAllister in the early days of the resort, the McAllister offspring were Raised Jay in the most iconic of ways, learning a lifetime of personal and professional lessons hidden among tree runs, powder stashes and pint glasses. Now the McAllisters, many of whom still work on the mountain, reveal how they’ve carried on the Jay legacy across four generations and continue to find new inspiration in an old, familiar place. BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

On becoming part of the clan

On earning your turns

« I’m the newcomer to the family. I learned to ski just to keep up with all of them. We’re proud of what we have here at Jay. »

« People say that the lifts here are too slow, but it doesn’t matter. You’re not walking up and down the mountain like we did growing up. If we wanted to ski, we’d go up and cut the trails with our skis on. That’s how we earned our lift tickets. That’s why we have a lot of love for the mountain, because we did it the old fashioned way. »

Frank’s wife / Real Estate

• JOAN •

Son / Village Chair

• FRANK • On being Raised Jay

Grandson / Son of Frank and Joan / Taxi Chair

• ADAM •

8

« I’m thankful I grew up in this area. Coming here gave me more confidence and self-esteem to go out in the city or to go to Europe and be real with people, find common ground with people. Jay taught me to be who you are, and that you don’t have to be fake. »


On loving your job

On establishing family tradition

« I enjoy working with my family. I’ve done everything up here. Mason work, carpenter work, grain operator. You name it, I’ve done it. Built the first fireplace, set towers with a crane. I’ve done most everything up here over the years. I started working on the Village Chair 13 years ago and I’ve been there ever since. »

« My mother was always happy when she worked at Jay. Greeting people, talking French with them in housekeeping… In the cafeteria, she was always happy. She’s still happy today. She skied up here. She raised a good family. » as told by Lyse

Father / Village Chair

• ARNOLD •

Mother / Retired

• REJEANNE •

On the brighter side

On having a tough skin

« Even though there are cold days up here, I can’t say I’ve ever really been cold. I’ve been cold many a time deer hunting. But skiing, you’re moving around and you’re having fun. So what if it’s windy and cold? »

« This can be the best place to ski, or it can be the worst place to ski. When the wind is howling and it’s 20 below zero and you’re getting frostbitten and it’s a one-run day, it’s nasty. But when you get a big dump and the powder is up to your knees, it’s the best day. You do have to be hardcore. »

Son / Ski Patrol

• MIKE •

Mike’s wife / Ski Patrol

• D ONNA •

JAY-ISM: “You know it’s cold outside when you go outside and it’s cold.”

On the East v. West

• MARC •

On respecting the past

Son / Mountain Host

Daughter / Village Chair

« I remember when we grew up here, the snow drifts would come up and over the car. And we’d finally get up here and nothing was working because they’d have to shovel out the bullwheel to get the lift going. But if you can ski the East, you can ski anywhere else. »

« If people only knew the history of this mountain and how it started and became what it is today. People see it as a resort, but when we started, it was a ski area. You took what there was. It was au naturel. »

• LYSE •

9


BY ANDREW LANOUE AND RYAN DEVANE

JAY-ISM: “Many times we pick the dumbest possible option.”

12


S K I

P A T R O L

THE RESCUE

Fresh powder can do funny things to children of the snow. As the chemistry aligns to form a perfect balance of weather, our chemical imbalance tips even further toward what some may consider a concern for social well-being. Racing the sunrise through a blizzard or trekking beyond the end of a trail, we know the

feeling that awaits our arrival: freedom. A chance to put the first brush strokes on a fresh, white canvas. Words fall short, and sometimes so do we. Hard-set on getting the goods in the backcountry, a group of us overlooked better judgement and put our lives—along with the lives of others—in danger.

FEBRUARY, FINALLY

A WALK IN THE WOODS

After last year’s unusually generous early season and historic holiday ice storm, the dry, arctic conditions in January were a dismal time to take turns. When the calendar flipped to February, winter got its shit together and snow began to fall. Midway through the month, the area was served a large dose of pow. It hit heavily throughout one day, and tracks from the previous run were hidden as if it never happened. Five of us decided to end the afternoon in an untouched part of this powdery playground, so we hopped a tram and departed for Big Jay’s summit at 3:30 p.m. This was our first mistake.

Bliss was replaced with concern as the reality of our situation crept in. We were well-prepared for an adventure, but ill-prepared for a rescue. This was our greatest mistake. Coordinating a medical evacuation would require us to haul our friend several miles downhill and out of the woods. With the light waning and the snow piling up, the task became more sobering by the minute. We called emergency services to arrange for help at the trail’s end, then got to work rigging a splint and sled. With no direct exit, we marched slowly into the darkness, towing our friend through ledges, gullies and fallen trees along the way.

SIGN LANGUAGE

CALL IN THE CAVALRY

Exploring the surrounding backcountry is a beautiful way to spend time off the beaten path, but being in the wild presents new challenges of its own. Preparation and planning can make the difference between having the time of your life or having the last time of your life. Layers, food, water and tools are basic essentials to pack, but there’s one item that’s often overlooked: time. Having plenty of daylight hours is helpful in case your stay becomes an extended one. Jay Peak’s policy also states “no backcountry after 12 p.m.,” and although it was mid-February, access to the backcountry was technically still closed. This was our second mistake.

Headlamps and cellphones illuminated our exit path as remnants of the day’s storm gently fell from the sky. After several hours of towing, we saw lights bouncing in the dark distance. To our relief, it was the familiar faces of Ski Patrol. They had intercepted us just under half a mile from Route 242. We rejoiced with exhausted cheers and high fives, followed by the sharp guilt of necessitating a night rescue.

GO BIG OR GO HOME As we trudged out of bounds, each step deeper than the last, we found ourselves dreaming of cliff drops and face shots usually reserved for the movies. When it came time to send it, our dreams were realized. The snow was bottomless, the drops were effortless and the howls of joy pierced the driving snow. We were having an all-time run—until overconfidence got the best of us. Although we were all highly seasoned skiers and riders, one friend took a drop too hard and couldn’t hold on to his landing. His momentum carried him into a tree, where his left leg took the brunt of the impact, breaking his fibula well after 4 p.m. Daylight was fading fast.

Ski Patrol provides the only uphill rescue service in the area, so no matter when you call for help, they will get dispatched for a rescue in the surrounding backcountry. Watching them work together to rescue our friend was a reminder of their professionalism and dedication to the people and the area. Ski Patrol set into action and took control of the situation, wrapping our friend in a warm, sliding plastic taco and towing him to an ambulance waiting nearby. Jay Peak Security was also waiting for rest of us with a warm ride back to the resort.

LESSON LEARNED This experience reminded us that while we have these mountains to enjoy at our disposal, it is our responsibility to respect it and to measure risk versus reward. The consequences of our actions can affect many. We’d like to thank Jay Peak Ski Patrol for greeting us with smiles and reassurance after an arduous but easily avoidable mishap. Thank you. 13


BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

LOOKING FOR SIGNS JAY PEOPLE

« The beer cooler is huge. Have you seen it? »

A FIRST TIMER’S PRACTICAL GUIDE TO JAY PEAK

[ PROVISIONS GENERAL STORE ]

C

hic Schaefer has been here a while. You’ve probably seen him, looking like a hopeful tangerine in his puffy jacket, turn-ofsome-century toque, and a countenance both bearded and bedraggled. He is the everyman and the no-man, directing longtimers and never-evers across a campus map that even he can barely keep up with. Like he says, no matter where you go, it’s either Stateside or Tramside. And if you’re at neither, well, you’re probably somewhere else (like Yogi Berra’s living room, for instance). Chic is Jay Peak’s senior Mountain Host and is most often mistaken for both Kris Kringle and a somewhat more sated version of Gandalf the Grey. He generally knows where to go, which at times can be a problem as he’s likely to tell you, in no uncertain terms. Still, he loves guests, loves interacting, and loves turning people on to what’s been filling his glass for more than 30 years. He can be seen standing in front of Tramside Customer Service most mornings and is happy to talk.

« This new entrance is terrific. There are good signs so you’re not gonna get lost. Before Stateside, they never really had good signs.» [ STATESIDE ENTRANCE ]

14


« They sell all the tickets you want to buy. If you’re from Vermont, you get a deal. If you have a season pass from somewhere else, you get a deal. If you’re lame, you don’t get a deal. The lost and found is here. I found my wife in here. » [ TRAMSIDE CUSTOMER SERVICE ]

« I like to snowshoe. You just put one foot in front of the other. You don’t

wanna do it when the golf season is here because you’ll get hit in the head with a golf ball. » [ NORDIC CENTER ]

« You don’t want to fall in love with your masseuse. » [ TAIGA SPA ]

STATESIDE

« It’s a very busy bar on the weekends. Get here early. Every Tuesday, they have trivia night. It shows you how dumb you are. » [ TOWER BAR ]

TRAMSIDE 15


« The pizza is so good, you have to order it ahead of time. Especially on weekends. » [ MOUNTAIN DICK’S PIZZA ]

« The early birds get the worms. But who likes worms? » [ CLUBHOUSE GRILLE ]

GUEST-ISM: “Windy? Not by our standards.” Brian E.

« They have all sorts of muffins and things you shouldn’t eat. They’re very good, but they’re not good for you. » [ AROMA COFFEE SHOP ]

For first-time visitors and self-described locals alike, Chic’s helpful tips are cleverly disguised as practical life philosophy that transcends the ski resort boundaries. And following his advice, you’ll be wont to ponder one of Chic’s favorite maxims no matter what you’re doing. But the next time you’re rounding the corner and spot the summit of Jay Peak punching through the clouds and awaiting your arrival, ask yourself this: “What else do you need in life?”

See more of Chic in action at jaypeakresort.com/FirstTimers

16


BY LISA RICHARDSON

EVOLUTIONARY PROOF STATESIDE’S NEW RECREATION CENTER WILL BE THE ARGUMENT TO END ALL ARGUMENTS.

There’s no point in upping the sleep comfort quotient at Jay Peak (as we did with the new Stateside Hotel) if you don’t also provide activities to wear the kids out and places for teens to “finesse the development of their brains and ensure the survival of the human species”—which is apparently what neurologists now think adolescence is designed for. Otherwise, you’re just shelling out cash to stay in a confined space with your hyperactive sprogs and challenging teens.

S

ORJAM CLIMB DO RIDE RAPIDS

INVERT TUCK

HUCK

18

That’s why Stateside’s grand scheme fits evolution’s Grand Scheme: survival of the most endangered species, also known as the happy family. The all-important phase of the hotel’s development, now that the beds are made, is the Recreation Center, featuring climbing walls, an independent movie theatre and a gaming arcade, all coming Winter 2015-16.


GUEST-ISM: “I hate both complainers and all people.” Allison S.

COMING WINTER 2015-16 Think of it as parenting jujitsu. The way of yielding. As in: a kid is programmed by centuries of evolutionary biology to court danger, throw things, jump off things and expend energy (i.e., do stupid things). A teen is programmed to scowl, moodswing, disappear behind oversized headphones and micro screens and dream up ridiculous and reckless challenges to enact on social media.

STATESIDE

INDOOR REC CENTER

Instead of battling the immovable object, learn to channel this unstoppable force, after hours, inside the new Stateside Recreation Center and into the dark of a big-screen theatre, or up the very walls themselves.

7,500 SQUARE

145SEAT THEATRE

HORIZONTAL ROPE COURSE ARCADE GAMES 19


BY LISA RICHARDSON

Imagine your first spa experience. Now put a cameraman in the room. And your mom. And your best friend’s mom. Maeve and Keaton take one for the team and discover that getting pamperized is hard work. Relaxation is anathema to a nine-year-old. What’s to destress from? The biggest challenge is 1. not falling asleep as you’re getting your feet rubbed, and 2. failing to anticipate how ticklish it could be. Also, narrowing down the 40+ selections of nail polish to just one. (For the record, there was nothing narrow about the final results that involved three fingers painted with coconut palm trees, three in zebra stripes, one in lime green, one in magenta, and 10 in leopard print.) Too smart to have become Vanity’s handmaidens cramming their feet into ill-fitting shoes, too fresh-faced to need their pores opened and scrubbed out, and too in-the-moment-every-single-moment to benefit from the enforced Zen of a distraction-free space, Maeve and Keaton’s foray into the serenity oasis of the Taiga Spa was ultimately all about their fingers. Yes, the Taiga Spa offers Swedish, Deep Tissue, Sports and Shiatsu massage, as well as manicures, pedicures and facials, so you can reboot your body after all it’s been weathering out on the hill, but when you’re nine, the high point of any self-maintenance session or beauty regime is getting your nails done. In fact, the sum total of your beauty regime is getting your nails done, and the biggest hassle you face is being forced to choose just one colour polish for all 10 nails. I DON’T KNOW ABOUT THE DRAMA PART, BUT I SURE AM A QUEEN. OFFICIAL CRITIC. RAISED JAY.

20

Waah! I look crazy. KEATON.


I’m totally not going to be the stinkiest kid in the class. KEATON.

Camera-guy, post foot-scrub: “Are you happy to be toe-jam free now, Maeve?” Maeve: “Girls never have toe jam.” Therapist: (giggling) “I disagree. I’ve seen some serious toes in my profession.” Fruit pieces floating in iced water doesn’t smack particularly to Maeve and Keaton of getting your wellness glow on. What would make the experience better, in Keaton’s view, is “food. And pink. And if people in my class were here so they could be jealous.”

It’s really disgusting having mud put on your face. MAEVE.

The Taiga Spa staff are not so cruel nor heavy-handed. Mothers, apparently, are. And more. “Mom doesn’t let me do my nails in the mornings before school,” says Keaton, who tries to freshen up her fingernails every other day. “One time I tried to sneak to do my nails before school, but mom caught me.”

Maeve jumps in with some food suggestions, too, you know, if a spa day came with room service. The offerings do read a lot like a menu. And the facial scrubs (at least the one that didn’t smell like mud) smell disarmingly of cocoa. It’s natural that would work up an appetite. For? “Pork chops. And frozen yogurt, ice cream, cake, cupcakes, cake pops, and brownie pops for my dessert.” The final word on a day at the spa? Says Keaton, “I’m totally not going to be the stinkiest kid in the class.”

The confessional nature of the nail table elicits similar woes from Maeve: “My mom always cuts my nails. I wish they were long. My mom doesn’t let me do it alone because once I spilled red nail polish all over the rug. I blamed it on my sister.” It’s confessional meets casino. The sound of nail polish bottles in burnt orange, tan, fuschia, and lilac, clinking against a glass table is the nine-year-old’s equivalent of a jackpot pouring out the slots - a far more thrilling sound than the chimes, tinkly water fountains and pan pipes that others relax to. For most, going to the spa is about shedding layers—daily woes, callouses, dead skin, accumulated stress. Nine-year-olds don’t have anything like that, and they magnanimously assume everyone is the same.

Girls never have toe jam. MAEVE.

I CAN BARELY RELAX WITH THE CAMERA RIGHT HERE. OFFICIAL CRITIC. RAISED JAY. Customize your spa day at jaypeakresort.com/taiga 21


BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

LIFE LIMB LIMB • JACKIE •

To simply call Jackie Tutor an ambitious 12-yearold girl is a wild understatement. The junior lifeguard at Jay Peak’s Pump House Indoor Waterpark has proved herself as one of the most esteemed and reliable staff members on the 100-person-or-so crew.

But while Jackie has established herself as a valued staff member of the lifeguard patrol, some critics might argue that she’s unfit for such a crucial role. And for valid concerns. You see, Jackie Tutor is a mannequin. She can’t swim, she can’t talk, she can’t perform CPR, even if she tried. But Jackie’s intent silence comes with a loud responsibility. Jackie’s official role at the Pump House Indoor Waterpark is “visual awareness test dummy,” keeping the 21 lifeguards on duty at any given time on their toes during each shift, testing their amphibious water-rescue skills and ensuring their watchful eyes are always on the lookout for public safety. To call Ms. Tutor a tutor for her fellow lifeguards is a fortuitous but fitting coincidence. Even during the waterpark’s busiest hours between 12 – 4 p.m., Jackie dives right into the deep end (literally and figuratively speaking), never hesitating to act on the call of duty. Though she doesn’t exactly have a choice. Jackie’s boss—and appointed guardian—Scott Rubin will pluck her from her favorite hangout spot (just behind the rock climbing pool) and toss her into the water without much of a warning. She lacks the ability to swim and splash on her own, so every few hours, you’ll find Jackie floating listlessly at the bottom of La Chute or drifting the Lazy River, sometimes face down. 22

It’s only when an attentive lifeguard spots her bobbing lifelessly in the water and quickly pulls her to safety that you understand that this lifeguard-in-training has a ways to go until graduating to a more senior position. The lifeguard dummy, however, is no dumdum. At the young age of 12 years old, she’s niched herself into a career that has assured her long-term job security—a savvy move for a such a mature tweenager who can’t even put on her own swimsuit. It’s a job normally reserved for someone aged 15 or older who floats more often than sinks, but Jackie’s strength as a “dead weight” is the exact reason she was brought to the Pump House posse in the first place: to be the cornerstone of rescue training scenarios. Jackie’s role as visual awareness expert is so vital, in fact, that she is the only permanent tenant to live in the Pump House Indoor Waterpark. Yes, the 50,000-square-foot facility might get a little lonely for one adolescent girl after hours, but she’s on call anywhere from 80–150 times per month. And given her workload, she is habitually too exhausted to think much about her solitude when the park’s acoustics are reduced to a trickle of water. It is a dream job for anyone her age who lives, eats and breathes the scent of chlorine and water slides. But because Jackie neither lives, eats nor breathes, her job is more of a metaphysical testament to existing in the here and now, concerned only with the present moment. Nevertheless, Jackie has risen above her pundit naysayers by simply showing up, day after day, and proving that dedication and commitment will always keep dreams afloat.


N OT A L L T R I V IA I S WORT H K N OW I N G .

Who really cares that there are 118 ridges around the edge of a dime? Save your finite brain cells for more useful and practical stuff. Like when you’re standing at the top of La Chute and wondering if it’s too late to back out. (Answer: Yes. It’s faster to take the slide down than it is to take the stairs.) • With indoor access to the Pump House from Hotel Jay and Tram Haus Lodge, the bar, restaurants and hotel rooms endorse flip-flops and board shorts year-round. • A single ride on La Chute racks up 65 feet of vertical drop in 6 seconds flat. • The waterpark’s retractable roof slides open in the summer, while the glass ceiling filters in sunlight in the winter. • Daily temperatures at the waterpark average 86 degrees, resulting in Vermont’s only tropical microclimate phenomenon. • Elevation 1851’ Family Arcade is named after the elevation at which it stands. For tickets and more info visit jaypeakresort.com/pumphouse 23


BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

You could say that Greg Starr is proud of his Jay Peak patriotism. And understandably. After 40-plus years of enduring the winters at Jay, the guy isn’t known for taking many shortcuts. Especially when you factor in his lawful job with the US Customs and Border Protection at an undisclosed airport. While the 51-year-young Newport native, father of two and husband of one spends his working days interrogating the unsuspecting, I turned the table to ask Greg the stern,

Explain the intention of your visits to Jay. Purely for fun.

[STEPHANIE NITSCH] [GREG STARR] [SN] [GS]

What kind of fun do you do? A lot of good skiing and meet a lot of good friends there.

How did you meet these friends? Some I grew up with. Some of the people I met up there throughout the years. [SN]

[GS]

How long have you been coming here? going when I was really young. I skied at Chamberlin Birch in Newport when I was five or six years old and graduated to Jay at nine or ten. I used to do ski racing there before it was the official race team they have now. Back then, it was pretty simple. You’d just show up on Saturday morning and there’d be some gates, and if you won something, you’d get a little medal. [SN]

[GS] Started

Can you declare the value of this medal? Priceless when I was ten years old. It seemed like I always came in second place for a long time, but I did get one gold. [SN]

monotonous and threatening questions that border agents are wont to ask. Or at least I tried to. Turns out, an interrogation loses some of its intimidation factor when you’re speaking by phone—especially when the person on the other end is lounging by a lakeshore on a summer weekday, mostly out of cell service and seemingly enjoying my nervous attempt to outsmart the very guy who makes a living calling bull on people who try to outsmart the law. Consider the bull called.

I see a lot of people going to exciting places, but when I know that I’m gonna be going on vacation to Jay, it’s not so bad. [GS]

You know, I think I’m gonna scratch this interrogation tactic altogether. It’s just not really working like I hoped. [GS] Good idea. [SN]

Thanks. As a Vermonter, how do you handle the winter weather? I visited Jay this winter from Utah, and I kind of wussed out on those really wicked days. I think Utah has turned me soft. [GS] We’ve got pretty hearty kids. My wife and I taught them how to ski on the little trail next to the Tram, so they’re pretty used to it. Lots of times, we’d get up on not-so-nice days, but we’d always stay until the end. Very rarely would we leave before last chair. Of course, we’d go in for hot chocolate stops, but we’d wish we could ski for another hour after four o’clock. [SN]

It’s just that good, huh? tried other mountains, but we always come back to Jay. The entire family likes it. I even tried to get them to go to Burke last winter. It didn’t work out. I’ll get them to go there eventually. [SN]

[GS]

[GS] We’ve

What’s the duration of your trip[s] to Jay? Sometimes it’s just a weekend. Sometimes it’s as long as two weeks. Or a week.

[SN]

[SN] [GS]

[SN, PAUSE] I’m [GS]

not being very intimidating with this interrogation, huh? No. [Laughs]

It’s harder than it sounds. You gotta be on your game for this stuff. I don’t think I’d pass the test if I went through your border patrol line at the airport. But speaking of, you must encounter a lot of people going on vacation when you’re working. Are you ever in possession of a case of wanderlust? [SN]

Until that happens, what are you up to right now? 90 degrees right now. We’re kind of enjoying ourselves this week on the lake. [Pause] So, you’re gonna send this interview to me before it prints, right? [GS] It’s

[SN] [GS] [SN] [GS]

No. I wasn’t planning on it. Oh, okay. Yeah…Alright. Well, you’re free to go. Goodbye.

25


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GUEST-ISM: “People that grind on Jay Peak have never been happy with the naked version of themselves.” Eric B.

Food. It’s what’s for dinner. And lunch. And breakfast. And probably another meal or two throughout the day. But then comes the specifics: dine in vs. take out? Finger food vs. steak knife? Libations vs. lunch?

With over a dozen different restaurants around Jay Peak, we’ll help you put an end to the most annoying question ever asked: What do you wanna eat?

Alice’s Table

Farm fresh | Sit-down Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Reservations encouraged. $$$

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(802) 327-2323

Alice’s Table named after Alice Lewis, a Jay Peak legend known for her generous hospitality, serves up the casual comforts of the kitchen, fat steaks, short ribs and pork chops, seasoned with local & international flavors to appeal to any palate. A great place for families, groups and gatherings, large or small.

Clubhouse Grille Fine cuisine | Date night

Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Reservations encouraged. $$$

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(802) 988-2770

Floor-to-ceiling windows wrap the Clubhouse Grille like a winter wonderland snow globe perched on the edge of Jay Peak’s Nordic skiing track. A small, intimate dining room and a contemporary menu lend themselves to an upscale, fine dining setting. Low key and just down the road from Hotel Jay.

The Foundry Pub & Grille American bistro | Late-night Breakfast, lunch, dinner. $$

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(802) 988-2715

The Foundry Pub & Grille is a three-square-meals-a-day kind of place inside Hotel Jay—that is, if the grand breakfast buffet doesn’t tide you over until tomorrow. Victuals from The Foundry’s hand-built ceramic oven include chewy, fire-grilled flatbreads and bubbling casseroles during lunch and dinner. A limited hearth menu and full bar service cater to the late-night crowd. Good for groups and families.

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Howie’s

Home-cookin’ | Sit-down Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Reservations accepted. $$

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(802) 988-2748

Located in the Stateside Hotel, Howie’s is our loose interpretation of an upscale greasy spoon diner. Hot and hearty breakfast staples like egg skillets or biscuits and gravy stick to your ribs like Vermont ice on Jay’s Tram cables. As the day gets going, line cooks express their love of grub by means of chicken-fried steak, pot pies and mac ‘n’ cheese. If only truck stops were this lucky.

Tower Bar Pints | Burgers

Lunch, après, dinner. $$

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(802) 327-2324

With massive windows overlooking the Flyer Express Quad, this ski-in, stumble-out après bar is packed when last chair becomes a pseudonym for last call. Catch your favorite sporting event inside, where beers and beverages are almost as plentiful as the number of potential build-your-own-burger combinations. Located inside the Tram Haus Lodge, the Tower Bar is appropriately constructed from lift towers and sheave wheels from the old Green Mountain Lift. All ages welcome.

The Bullwheel Bar Après | Live music Après. $$

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(802) 988-2736

It’s hard to tell if people come to the Bullwheel Bar for its eccentric décor, live entertainment or energetic post-skiing scene. But the truth is, it’s the only après bar at the Stateside Baselodge, and that makes it popular enough to covet a bar seat, get cozy and keep the drinks flowing for a few hours. All ages welcome.

Mountain Dick’s Pizza ‘Za | Take-out Lunch, dinner. $$

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(802) 988-2740

From subs to slices, Mountain Dick’s Pizza fills the void created by that ravenous monster lodged deep inside your stomach. Whole pies are hand-tossed and loaded with essential food groups cleverly disguised as pizza toppings, and individual calzones are stuffed so thick they’re bursting at the doughy seams. Latenight hours on weekends are practically meant for carbo-loading after an evening surf session at the Pump House Indoor Waterpark, just down the hallway.

Aroma Coffee Shop Espresso | Sweet treats Breakfast, snack. $

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(802) 327-2325

Lingering over a sit-down breakfast is no reason to miss first Tram. Grab a green chili breakfast burrito or a flakey, homemade pastry to go from the Aroma Coffee Shop in the Tram Haus Lodge and indulge in a portable morning meal to the envy of your fellow Tram-mates. Complete your A.M. ritual with a soupedup espresso drink before unleashing your caffeine buzz on Green Beret.

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The Drink

Cocktails | Mocktails Après. $

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(802) 988-2720

Wrap your pruney fingers around a Fuzzy Bermuda Beachcomber frozen cocktail and revel in the paradoxical tropical ski vacation in which you’ve found yourself. You’ll witness snow bums mingling among surf bums at The Drink, located at the Pump House Indoor Waterpark, and dueling blenders pulsating to the tune of Margaritaville. Aerial views above the waterpark offer VIP seating for Double Barrel FlowRider wipeouts, and plenty of adult libations will quell your tidal appetite. Tiki umbrellas optional.

Buddy’s Mug Coffee Shop Beans & bites Breakfast, snack. $

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(802) 327-2325

Former Mountain Operations Manager Buddy Loux preferred his coffee without any bells and whistles, and the philosophy behind Buddy’s Mug follows suit. Sure, you can order a specialty, half-caff, half-and-half, extra foamy jamocha java, but the regular black coffee is just as delicious. So are the grab-and-go baked goods. Located next to Hotel Jay’s front desk.

Warming Shelter Snack Bar Snack attack | Ice cream Lunch, snack, dinner. $

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(802) 988-2730

No shoes, no shirt, no problem. With kid-friendly cuisine, the Warming Shelter Snack Bar inside the Pump House Indoor Waterpark boasts an über-casual dress attire. Chicken fingers, salads, sandwiches, taco salad, cheesesteak, pizza and ice cream rule the menu—that is, if there are any rules at all.

Ice Haus Snack Bar and Café Finger food | Snack shack Lunch, snack. $

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(802) 988-2728

The Ice Haus Snack Bar and Café is not your little league concession stand. The heated snack shack offers spectators and ice skaters rink-side treats, poutine and the best popcorn on the mountain. Kids will find energy in a hot dog, while adults will find patience in a cold beer or a glass of pinot noir.

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Sky Haus Deli

Slopeside sandwiches | Salads Lunch. $$

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(802) 327-2070

You’ll need a lift ticket to dine at the Sky Haus Deli, located at the top of the Tram, but the views up here are money. Cozy up to hearty soups, made-to-order salads and sandwiches like the smoked meat on rye before facing off to the Face Chutes.

Provisions General Store Groceries | Deli

Breakfast, lunch, snack, dinner. $$

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(802) 327-2090

A scaled-down version of one-stop shopping, Provisions General Store is stocked with all the essentials (and then some) to cook up a feast in your own room or tailgate at your car. Load up on produce, eggs, snacks, maple-flavored anything and plenty of other edibles, or replenish your dwindling ration of beer, wine and basic sundries, including Vermont-made souvenirs and Jay Peak gifts. Or leave the prep work up to our deli and dig into an enormous pastrami-on-rye from the made-to-order sandwich board.

Tram Haus Cafeteria Burgers | Grill Breakfast, lunch. $$

(802) 327-2231

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Refuel your gut between Tram laps at the Tram Haus Cafeteria. Hamburgers, chili, à la carte items and rotating daily specials tackle hungry appetites just below the docking station.

Stateside Cafeteria À la carte | From the fryer Breakfast, lunch. $$

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(802) 327-2230

Break away from the formal sit-down dining scene at the Stateside Cafeteria. Affordable bites like duck poutine, risotto, sushi and burritos push the envelope of cafeteria dining without straying too far from your favorite runs.

Feast your eyes on more goodies at jaypeakresort.com/restaurants 31


INTERVIEWED BY STEVE WRIGHT

• MEAGAN •

LOBSTER CAKES WITH JAY PEAK NORDIC CENTER MANAGER MEAGAN ROBIDOUX Meagan Robidoux is the Nordic Skiing Manager at Jay Peak. She has been a group sales person, a hiking guide, a mountain bike guide, a landscaper and a waitress at several Jay Peak restaurants. She’s also a wife, a mother and someone who beams no particular affection toward creamed soups. “Actually, I don’t really ever eat them, but

I probably would—like them, I mean—if I did.” Here, we get her thoughts on the development at Jay Peak, how she went from there-to-here, and learn what hikers call her on the trail. Afterwards, she will leave with several poked-upon lobster cakes, which will land in the lap of her husband, Corbin, delivery yet unverified.

[STEVE WRIGHT] I know you [MEAGAN ROBIDOUX] Yes.

[MR] The

well, so this is strange.

That’s why I thought lunch would be good. I will probably get the Cobb Salad but without eggs. [MR] You don’t like eggs? [SW]

[SW] [MR]

No, I love eggs. Oh.

You should get something expensive like lobster because we’re going to comp your meal. [MR TO WAITRESS] I’ll have the lobster cakes. And your hair smells so awesome. [WAITRESS, BEMUSED] Well thank you. I just washed it. [SW]

[SW] So why Jay Peak? Why not someplace else? [MR] I’ve tried all the somewhere elses there are. Tahoe,

Jackson Hole, Stowe, Maine, the Long Trail, Crested Butte, Alaska, New Mexico, shit I’ve been to a lotta places. Belmont, New Hampshire even. Belmont, New Hampshire even? I went to high school there and played volleyball. I pretty much moved to Vermont thinking I was going to be a volleyball player forever. [SW] [MR]

[SW] Knowing you, and I’m not [MR] I know right? I mean, look

100% sure why, this seems strange. at me.

[SW, LOOKING] You

could be a player. A setter maybe. Do they have setters in volleyball? People that set, I mean? [MR] Yes. I was a defensive specialist though. I’d dive all over the place. Make saves. It was super fun. You have a young family now and with all the mania that comes with that, how do you find time for Jay Peak? [SW]

Find nordic tracks at jaypeakresort.com/nordic

resort, and my work here, is a big part of the family. The lines cut across lots of different areas. Managing the Nordic Center, I have the kids out multiple times a week, all weather conditions, even gnarly stuff. [SW] The

growth here has provided more options for families and I know you’ve been able to take advantage of that. [MR] Yeah, I mean the waterpark isn’t always our first choice because it’s generally pretty busy, but the kids love it when they get in there. I just have to parcel out our trips so they don’t get, you know, too comfortable. [SW] I guess [MR] When I

comfortable is relative. lived in Tahoe City I worked at a place called New Moon Natural Health Foods, and there was a guy that lived out front in sort of a snowcave/cardboard box structure. I figured he was always cold, but he said he was comfortable. He made his own mead though, so maybe that was it. [SW] You

hiked a good portion of The Long Trail (Vermont’s end-toend trail that finishes just about at Jay Peak). What was that like? [MR] Fun. It started with, like, seven of us and ended up with less. My trail mates called me Spills because, you know, I’d fall a lot. I made it more than halfway, then I had to split because my parents were throwing me a graduation party and thought I should go. Thoughtful. Yeah. Part of the deal with them was that I’d finish school after my wandering was done.

[SW] [MR]

And then you wandered yourself here. I love it. It’s different here. People need jobs because they need jobs—they’re not working here for season passes, they’re here to support themselves and their families. There’s a cool urgency in that; it comes across in the way we treat the guests I think. [SW] [MR]

[SW] There doesn’t appear to be [MR] Corbin will be pumped.

much urgency with those lobster cakes.

33


BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

HOOK, LINE AND SINKER Herman Hoyt has been getting skiers and snowboarders hooked on Q Burke Resort since 1980. Literally. Four days a week throughout the winter, the 87-year-old liftie from East Burke stands at the controls of the J-Bar surface lift and helps burgeoning snow sliders hitch a ride uphill. But Hoyt knows that not everyone gets hooked right away, and he can see it coming well before they’ve latched onto the J hook. “You can tell when there’s a first timer by the way they’re handling their skis,” says Hoyt. “We don’t load them until we tell them how to hook, how to stand. People are prone to sit on the J-Bar. No. It’s meant to pull you. Once they get that idea straight, they get it pretty quickly.”

34

Sure, there’s the occasional uphill yard sale, often a result of catching an unfortunate edge, but more often than not, even the most abashed snow slider eventually overcomes their fear of going up and down. “I’m tootin’ my own horn here, but a few years back, we had a couple here,” recalls Hoyt. “She was a Bosnian and was talked into trying to ski. She got started on the J-Bar, and today she loves me. [She’ll say] ‘Oh, you taught me how to ski.’


INVESTMENTS HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER

GRAND OPENING 2015-16

A SHELL OF ITS FUTURE SELF You might notice something new brewing at Q Burke Resort this winter. If you don’t, well, [ahem] the razed construction zone is pretty hard to miss. The skeletal structure of concrete and timber might not look like much now, but come December 2015-16, the plot of dirt will morph into a 180,000 squarefoot lodge with 116 rooms and suites and all the slopeside amenities one needs to eat, sleep and breathe Burke life. Developed by Peak Construction Management, the Q Burke Mountain Resort Hotel & Conference Center will debut with a restaurant and après bar that overlooks Willoughby Gap, a ski shop and arcade for incidentals and entertainment, and an outdoor pool and hot tub to soak it all up so you can do it again the next day. Staying true to the Northeast Kingdom character, the lodge will also feature indigenous Vermont materials made or harvested by local craftsmen for that extra homegrown touch.

No, I didn’t. You taught yourself how to ski. But we had quite the job getting her up the mountain, up the lift. Eventually, she had the ability. You can’t help but feel good afterward.” Actually, it doesn’t matter whether it’s before or after the fact. Hoyt takes pleasure in his post on the beginner’s slope around the clock. “It’s where I’m needed,” he says. “I’ve enjoyed working [on the J-Bar] because it’s always about the kids. It’s kinda fun to know that they really do appreciate ya.” Then again, it’s hard not to appreciate an octogenarian who spoils his pseudo-grandkids rotten with plenty of high-fives. “Some of these little kids—the little fellas—will know there’s a high-five coming up,” Hoyt says. “There’ll be a whole string of six or eight of them that’ll put their hands out. I’ll be like ‘Oowwww!’ and make ‘em think that they hurt me. They get a kick out of it.” And while Hoyt gets just as much of a kick from manning the J-Bar, his demeanor turns serious when asked about, say, the changes happening at Q Burke these days. “I’ve seen a change in the [ski] attire. For the better,” he says. “It was in tough shape four or five years ago. Belt buckles were halfway to their knees. That’s not the way it should be. But that’s beside the point.”

Explore what’s happening at Q Burke this season at skiburke.com 35


• KRISTA BOULANGER • The Queen

Put Her On

BY LISA RICHARDSON

Explore all the skating programs at jaypeakresort.com/icehaus 36


Cold Therapy & Straight Talk with the Ice Queen of Jay Peak Don’t let her fresh face and ability to spin fool you. Krista Boulanger, the Skating Director at Jay Peak Resort, is no dizzy ingénue. The certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and Sports Medicine grad came on board at Jay Peak to run the skating program at the Ice Haus when it first opened. She had 16 years of competitive figure-skating under her blades—eight in Canada and another eight in Connecticut. Boulanger was running the Learn to Skate program and coaching young figure skaters when Ice Haus Manager, Dennis Himes, asked her to learn to drive the Zamboni to boost her part-time hours. So she did. She also sharpens skates, cleans Haus, vets inappropriate music choices from the kids she coaches and knows the precise moment when you’ve shifted from anaerobic to aerobic output.

We found out why she thinks hockey is boring (too much time on the bench), what the best performance enhancing food is (chocolate) and why skaters have the edge over skiers in maintaining a youthful complexion.

I spend more time at the rink than at my house. There’s research about the potential cryogenic effect from being in the ice rink so much. It’s not like skiing where you’re getting all weathered. A lot of people say I look ridiculously young, but I’m 27. That can be a hindrance. A lot of people don’t take me seriously at first. I’m young to be a skating director running all the programs. And I’m a figure skater in a mostly hockey environment. But I do know how to skate.

of misconceptions about skating—that it’s easy, girly or frilly. It’s actually really hard, and people realize that once they try it. It is a sport. A recreational skater who does laps around the rink isn’t a figure skater. It’s partly to blame on the outfits and the choreography. The point of figure skating is to make it look easy. It’s hard to show emotion and move your arms around. It’s a show sport. And we’ve made it look too easy, so people don’t think much of it.

I’m hoping to get into grad school next year to do my doctorate of physical therapy. My mom is handicapped. She got polio when she was a year old and has had over 20 surgeries in her lifetime. I’m drawn to physical therapy because I want to help people. I did the certificate in strength training so I could help prevent injuries for my students.

Your anaerobic energy system will work for two minutes, but a program for figure skating for senior women is four minutes— that’s an intense workout.

I’m a really big klutz. I can skate. But I can’t walk. All my bruises, and there are a lot of them, are from walking. I walk into walls, bounce off door casings, trip into doors. I rolled my ankle coming out of my house this week. Most people who know me were pretty surprised when I was allowed to drive the Zamboni, but I haven’t crashed it into anything. I did get my finger jammed in it. And I got a fat lip from it. The best part of my job is the kids. Teaching. I learn so much from them. More than they learn from me, I sometimes think. You can see different learning styles, the way a kid processes stuff, you learn new ways to word things, how to get through to someone if they’re shy. I work with all ages. I really like them around seven years old. From seven up to 16. Once they start to have a personality and talk to you. I try to be on their level, not talk down to them. I’m the goof. I can rein it in if I need to. But I want them to have fun. That’s the whole point. And to be out doing something that moves your whole body. There are a lot

It’s hard and competitive. I was never into competing. I enjoy the show. I can’t talk in front of a crowd, can’t give a speech. If I have to do a presentation in front of a class, I’m the one who goes all red and runs out of the room. But I can skate in front of people. And I actually don’t get as nervous speaking in front of a crowd if I’m on the ice. With my skates on. I have my skates on my feet at least once a day. I’m pretty sure there’s been more days in my life I’ve had skates on than not. I never slept with them on. I did sleep in my skating dress when I was little. And I’ve slept in my skating clothes so I was ready to go to the rink early and could sleep a little longer. I am not a person who likes 6 a.m. classes. I don’t wear dresses when I’m teaching. Only when I’m performing. Mostly, I teach in my snow pants. You want to wear clothing you can move in because you don’t want to split your pants open. I’ve done that three times. Once I was wearing jeans and I did a split jump. I didn’t think I was doing that much of a split. I was like, Oh no. I have to get off the ice now. The third time I did it, it was more, Oh no, not again. I really should keep a spare pair of pants in my office. 37


G E A R

E S S E N T I A L S

S E L F

H E L P

Sure, your phone lets you call for help, listen to music, identify the constellations overhead, find a recipe for chocolate brownies and take a selfie of your dying ass (provided you’re dropping large for the full data plan). But it can’t keep you warm or dry, it doesn’t taste like chocolate and it doesn’t gloss your chapped lips. So, while we won’t judge you for what you put your faith in when you’re out in the backwoods, we will say you can take the measure of any mountain man or woman by taking a peek at what’s in their pockets.

The Fundamentals + Energ y + Repairs / G ear + Protection + Guidance

GUEST-ISM: “20% less likely to divorce when married in the mountains.” Howie G.

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… oops …

V


G E A R

S

E S S E N T I A L S

H E L P

S E L F

Before there was an app for this, that and every other thing, there was a widely available yet massively underutilized supercomputer known as The Brain. Unplugging means sometimes firing that rusty beast back up, and being prepared to manifest your own fortune by taking the day into your own hands.

The Fundamentals

JAY PEAK SEASON PASS

Energ y

MOOSE HEAD SHAPED MAPLE-FLAVORED CANDY

GRADE A MAPLE SYRUP

THE SHUVIT FLOWBOARD

DUCT TAPE

BACKFILL

(ROAD CREW CRUNCH)

Repairs / G ear

SNOWB OARD MULTITOOL (LEATHERMAN)

(SHUVIT-38)

Protection

FACE BALM

(VERMONT BEE BALM)

BOARDSHORTS + SHORT SLEEVE RASHGUARD (UNDER ARMOR)

Guidance

WINTER OUTER LAYER

(ARC’TERYX - THORIUM AR HOODY)

HELMET

(BERN - BRIGHTON WITH VISOR)

WOODSHED WISDOM B OOK BY JOHN W. STEVENS

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R A I S E D

J A Y

. . .

V

V

V 40


S

. . .

O R

N O T

S

GUEST-ISM: “Bad days are like pennies; I pretty much just throw that shit away.” Louise M.

S 41


MUSIC THERAPY

+

RHYTHMIC

RX

AITING APPROVAL FROM T HE FD STILL AW A WE’RE

42


A HEADY INTERVIEW WITH MUSIC AFICIONADO BRYAN SMITH BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

Scientific research has shown that music has a direct influence over the mind and body, but you don’t need a team of highly educated specialists to know that a good rhythm is the antidote for a bad day, and Mastodonic decibels can drown out whatever emotional juju is brewing inside you. That hasn’t stopped Jay’s own team of expert audiophiles,

however, from doling out equally obvious advice after years of self-medicating with various forms of musical therapy. “Music is our passion,” says Bryan Smith, Events Manager at Jay Peak, who notes that it’s an obsession practically necessary when you work under the wing of Steve Wright.

“Music has been important during the snowless months here,” says Smith, though it’s playing an increasingly more important and year-round role with every show that’s plugged in around the resort.

The same can be said for the musicians themselves, who play in close quarters at Jay’s two venues. The 500-person capacity at the Foeger Ballroom touts the acoustics of an intimate stage. Even the Stateside Amphitheater, the only major music venue within a one-and-a-half-hour radius of Jay, has the distinct coziness that comes with nuzzling up inside a gently sloped bowl at the foot of a mountain amongst 2,999 of your fellow music fans. “We’ve evolved in our ability to execute large music events that, eventually, will put us in the class of large performing-art centers,” says Smith.

“Our first-ever show in the Foeger Ballroom was welcomed by the community in great numbers and fueled us for the long journey to where we are today with our music,” he says. The test drug? None other than The Wailers, Bob Marley’s Rastafarian cohorts, who performed in front of a fortuitous 420-person crowd in August (sadly not April) 2012. Since then, almost 40 bands with names like North Mississippi All-Stars, Bruce Hornsby and Rusted Root have performed between Hotel Jay’s Foeger Ballroom and the new outdoor Stateside Amphitheater, which debuted in July with nine bands during the inaugural Jeezum Crow Festival. That doesn’t count the regular winter jams that have filled the après scene for years or the decade-longstanding August West Festival, a summer celebration of Grateful Dead tunes. In the past, incoming bands have been chosen by a shootfrom-the-hip methodology, often involving a musician making frequent appearances on a playlist from somewhere in Jay’s marketing office. But the waxing popularity of the concerts has turned the rogue system into more of a crowd-sourced event these days, culling suggestions from guests and looking at which musicians bring out the best energy. “There is great local response with every concert,” says Smith. “We often reach out to guests for suggestions and discussions on upcoming acts, so the community has a close connection to each of these events as well.”

It’s not often, though, that the musicians get a close connection with the mountain itself, their downtime dictated by busy touring schedules rather than the latest snow conditions. But when they do manage to unwind at Jay, they’re likely to party like the very rockstars they are. “JJ Grey & Mofro, who performed this past summer, definitely had the best stories,” recalls Smith. “A few members played—or attempted to play—a round of golf, but it turned into a skinny-dipping fest with their tech crew on the second hole. They also had a few issues on a Tram ride. There were some white knuckles and borderline sickness.” Fortunately music is a universal remedy for any ailment, whether it inflicts artist or audience, and the prescription is as straightforward as adding more cowbell to your diet.

JAY-ISM: “Go really fast. If something gets in your way, turn.”

For a schedule of upcoming shows, check out jaypeakresort.com/music

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BY LISA RICHARDSON

HOW TO WIN

FACEBOOK FRIENDS & INSTAGRAM PEOPLE NOW WITH 18% FEWER SELFIES

Get more fans! Write better updates! Boost your shares! Promote your photos! When it comes to improving your social media clout, there are infinite tactics that promise the comings of a new digital life. And while your free entry into the global popularity contest might have you queuing up for the next latest-and-greatest trend, just don’t expect any of it to change your analog outlook. The average person only actually knows 100 people. (Dunbar’s number states that, provided you have an average human-sized brain, you are only capable of sustaining meaningful social interaction with 148 people.) So if you can get over 600 likes on a pun, post, selfie or a photo, your sense of popularity soars beyond anything you could experience IRL. Hence, the addictive artifice of the virtual social construct.

44

We scrolled through Jay’s social channels to see if we could tap the secrets to social success and formulate a “formula for eminent likability.” Based on a comprehensive data-mine of Jay Peak’s prolific social media channels, populated by approximately 70,000 fans, we feel confident that we can tell you what posts kill it and what shank it. Absolute paydirt? If you can include cows, while skewering sacred cows (i.e., combine two or more elements of visual inspiration), a shit-ton of snow, a deft dab of humor and one perfect hashtag. Good luck in the monkeysphere. It’s a jungle out there.


I

II

III

IV

Avoid referring to yourself as a ninja, maven, guru, or jedi. Unless you have the belt to prove it. Or are at the Ice Haus Halloween Costume Skate.

No one cares what you ate for breakfast. Except your Mom. (BTW, call her. She’d love to go for breakfast.)

No one cares what your cat just did. (Unless you’re a hipster or work in marketing or coding. In which case, they care, but are simultaneously making fun of you.)

Friends don’t let friends use #too #many #hashtags.

V Ensure that your post contains one of the elements in the following chart : Epic Storms { 778 Likes }

First Tracks { 822 Likes }

Sky Porn { 702 Likes }

Pun + Cows { 524 likes }

Classic Elements { 765 Likes }

“mus’ve herd about us.”

Shenanigans { 646 Likes }

Deep Action { 785 Likes }

Out of Body Experiences { 674 Likes }

JayPeakFan |

jaypeakresort |

jaypeakresort |

jaypeak |

jaypeakresort |

jaypeakresort.tumblr.com 45


FROM BY STEPHANIE NITSCH

46


Try all you want, but you can’t shortcut your way through a winter in Vermont. Nor can you manifest spring to come any faster. The best you can do is roll with the weather, and hope you come out relatively unscathed on the other end.

GUEST-ISM: “I don’t know what I’m doing but I like it.” Max E.

So when you find yourself standing in a parking lot wearing a pair of jorts and ski boots, drinking beer and eating meat on a stick with an inflatable pink flamingo lawn ornament peering over your shoulder, it’s a sure sign that you’ve made it. “You’ve spent the past 110 days freezing your ass off with all these people that you don’t recognize because it’s too bloody cold to show any part of your face,” says JJ Toland, Director of Events and perpetuator of Jay Peak’s annual Tailgate Party, an end-of-the-season parking lot blowout that’s been running on crowd enthusiasm for a decade or so. “Whatever is the mood of the crowd dictates what the crowd does.” Inevitably, on the first Saturday of every April, the Stateside parking lot transforms into a breeding ground of hoopla, hula hoops and the aforementioned ornamental lawn decorations—perhaps a subliminal nod to the encroaching landscape season, but most definitely a tribute to the legendary shenanigans that Stateside is known for. Upwards of 300 people congregate around 25 participating tailgate vehicles, many of which have been pimped and retrofitted with tailgating necessities, and celebrate the triumphant procession of spring’s arrival over an elaborate, slopeside cookout.

Shrimp kebobs and RV kitchens take the place of frozen burgers and Coleman grills. White linens and fancy pepper grinders contrast against red-and-white checkered tablecloths and plastic Solo cups. Some beverages come garnished with a cocktail tiki umbrella, but most are served with the distinct undertones of a crisp Busch Light. “You don’t want to be too ostentatious and show up with Budweiser,” says Toland. “Maybe bring a case of Hamm’s.” As one of the few lucky Jay staffers to moderate the tailgate cook-off, Toland has “ownership to go around and eat people’s food”—all in the name of crowning a tailgating victor. Winners from four categories are chosen based on the most creative tailgate camp, the best food, the best drink and the best spread. There is no sanctioned rulebook, and your odds of winning are merely based on how quickly you can get the judges to chow down. “It’s best to be judged at the beginning when people’s taste buds are still sharp,” says Toland. No matter. The Little League model applies, where everyone comes out a winner and a place on the podium is a tribute to team effort and thick, winter skin. Because, as Toland reminds us, “You’re not doing it for the swag, you’re doing it for the swagger.”

Mark your calendar with other events at jaypeakresort.com/events

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DISCONNECTING FROM IT ALL BEGINS AT A CELLULAR LEVEL

MIND YOUR MOMENTS and make them count this winter at

jaypeakresort.com/disconnect


IN A WORLD AWASH IN SLOGANS, INSPIRING QUOTES AND SCIENTIFIC SNIPPETS, HOW DO WE DISTILL WISDOM FROM THE BULLSHIT AND BRING THE ABSTRACT DOWN TO EARTH? WE PUT THE LIFE OF A REGULAR PERSON INTO A GRID MADE UP OF THE WEEKS AND YEARS OF THE AVERAGE LIFE *SPAN.* FEWER THAN 5,000 LITTLE BOXES IS THE SUM TOTAL OF *OUR DAYS.* HOW WE FILL THE BOXES IS ENTIRELY UP TO US. BUT HERE’S ONE THING THAT JUMPS OUT: PLAYING HOOKY TO TAKE A SKI DAY WILL NEVER BE SOMETHING YOU REGRET. MAYBE IT’S TIME TO RECLAIM THE CIGARETTE BREAK AND REALLY TAKE A MOMENT. WEEKS OF THE YEAR AGE

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THE AGE A KID CAN JOIN THE JAY PEAK FREE SKI OR FREE RIDE TEAM

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

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MIDDLE SCHOOL

15

HIGH SCHOOL AVERAGE AGE A KID GETS THEIR OWN CELL PHONE

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GRADUATE SCHOOL

25 TIME YOU ARE ABLE TO HAVE THE MOST LASTING INFLUENCE ON YOUR KIDS

AVERAGE WEEK A WOMAN HAS HER FIRST CHILD

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CAREER

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Inspired by Waitbywhy.com

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» ANDREW LANOUE JAY PEAK TRAM SHOT | TAKEN DURING THE SUNRISE EASTER SERVICE, 2014

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» ANDREW LANOUE FACE SHOT | SKIER: DUANE WHEELER | LOCATION: UNDISCLOSED UNMARKED TREES 52

POW SILHOUETTE | RIDER: LUKE SUSSDORFF | LOCATION: NORTH GLADE


JAY-ISM: “The man who has skied knows that he has skied nothing at all.�

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» ANDREW LANOUE 54

TREE SMASH | RIDER: CHARLES PLANTE | LOCATION: DOG PATCH


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A u r é l i e n D u c r o z , Wo r l d C h a m p i o n Fr e e r i d e S k i e r

HELLY HANSEN CATWALK

OFFICIAL BASELAYER OF THE U.S. ALPINE SKI TEAM

AVAILABLE AT:

THE GEAR SHOP THE MOUNTAIN SHOP

KEEP ON SKIING WITH

HH Active Flow LS

Supercharged drying! Lifa® Flow delivers super quick drying next-toskin, so you can keep on training. Scandinavian Design is the cornerstone in all Helly Hansen gear. The optimal combination of purposeful design, protection and style; this is why professional athletes, patrollers and discerning enthusiasts choose Helly Hansen. HEL LY H A NSEN . COM / B A SEL AY ER

CONFIDENT WHEN IT MATTERS


GUIDEBOOK Because everyone needs a good plan

GET OUTTA DODGE AND GET INTO JAY The official guide to your Jay Peak getaway You don’t need an expert to tell you when to have fun, but a little guidance never hurts. Book a lodging package at Jay Peak, and make your moments count while you’re on vacation—not when you’re planning it. Simply show up and focus on the stuff that really matters. Like finding the best powder stashes, sampling all the beer taps, splashing in the Pump House Indoor Waterpark or lounging in Taiga Spa. Whatever matters most to you, just be sure to own every second of it. Call (800)

451-4449 or visit jaypeakresort.com to book your stay.

57


LODGING From opening day through the end of the season All vacations of 2 days or more include a

Book now & GET MORE THAN

FREE

200

$

LIFT TICKET AND / OR WATERPARK PASS on day of arrival

in vacation extras Look for this icon for a sampling of what’s included in the coupon book.

(depending on your package)

FAMILY FUN VACATION PACKAGES INCLUDE: Lodging for kids 14 & under Waterpark access for kids 3 & under Daycare for kids ages 2–7 Access to the Ice Haus Indoor Arena during Public Skate hours

Book online easily and quickly at

jaypeakresort.com or call (800) 451-4449 EARLY NOVEMBER 21 – DECEMBER 25, 2014

HOLIDAY DECEMBER 26 – JANUARY 1, 2015

VALUE JANUARY 2 – MARCH 28, 2015

LATE MARCH 29 – MAY 11, 2015

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SKI / RIDE + WATERPARK VACATION A FAMILY OF 4 CAN SKI + SPLASH + STAY from just

296

$

per night

PACKAGES INCLUDE: Lodging Daily lift tickets Daily access to the Pump House Indoor Waterpark Daycare for kids ages 2-7

SKI / RIDE VACATION A FAMILY OF 4 CAN SKI + STAY from just

220

$

per night

PACKAGES INCLUDE: Lodging Daily lift tickets Daycare for kids ages 2-7

WATERPARK VACATION A FAMILY OF 4 CAN SPLASH + STAY from just

208

$

per night

PACKAGES INCLUDE: Lodging Daily access to the Pump House Indoor Waterpark Daycare for kids ages 2-7

DON’T YOU LET THAT DEAL GO DOWN For deals and discounts: jaypeakresort.com/deals

All from rates are based on a room in the Stateside Hotel during late season. Other lodging options and rates are available.

59


CATCH SOME Z’S Everything you need & nothing you don’t at Jay Peak’s Stateside Hotel A conveniently located and family-friendly vacation doesn’t have to break the bank. The 85-room Stateside Hotel is Jay’s newest—and most affordable— lodging option around the resort. The hotel features restaurants and eateries, an après bar, ski-in/ski-out access, and a soon-to-open state-of-the-art rec center (coming Winter 2015-16). Part of a $43 million revitalization at Stateside, the 80,000-square-foot lodge also includes amenities like an equipment rental center, a revamped resort entrance and 84 mountain cottages. Tour all of Jay Peak’s properties at

jaypeakresort.com/lodging

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THE PUMP HOUSE Indoor Waterpark

GET PUMPED AT THE PUMP HOUSE Off-hill entertainment, Jay style

PUMP HOUSE RATES Day Pass Rates

The Pump House Indoor Waterpark is 60,000 glorious square feet of watery heaven, with thrills like the 65’ drop of La Chute and the Double Barrel FlowRider that were listed as the top ten coolest waterpark rides ever by The Travel Channel. Or if you prefer your liquid in a glass, head to the The Drink poolside bar or the Warming Shelter Snack Bar for the best views in the house. Be sure to drop a few tokens in the Elevation 1851’ Family Arcade before calling it a day.

GET SIX TOKENS at the Elevation 1851’ Family Arcade ($6 value) & $10 OFF an Adult or Junior day pass to the Pump House Indoor Waterpark with a lodging package.

Adult (15+)

$35

Junior (4–14)

$25

3 & under

Free

Supervision

$10

(access to the park but not the features)

Standard locker

$4

Family lockers

$9

Cabanas (3hr rentals) Monday – Friday & non-holiday

$100

Saturday – Sunday & holidays

$150

Please call (802) 988-2710 for more information

PUMP UP THE (BIRTHDAY) PARTY Kids ain’t easy. But planning their birthday parties is when you’ve got the Pump House Indoor Waterpark.

from

SURF’S UP Catch a lesson the Double Barrel FlowRider

35/hr

$

SAVE $20 & get 1hr of surf instruction for $15 with a lodging package.

More information: call (802) 988-2710 or email

pumphouse@jaypeakresort.com

249

$ MAKE IT A GROUP EFFORT Groups of 20+ get great discounts jaypeakresort.com/groups To book your group:

groups@jaypeakresort.com or call (802) 988-2765

for up to 10 people

PARTIES INCLUDE: Waterpark access 3hr Private Cabana rental (Includes private lounge area, TV and fridge) $2 worth of tokens per child for the Elevation 1851’ Family Arcade Small gift for birthday kid

More information:

groups@jaypeakresort.com or call (802) 988-2765 61


NORDIC CENTER A true Nordic experience

NORDIC CENTER RATES Trail fees

1/2-DAY

1-DAY

Adult (19+)

$8

$12

Junior (6–18)

$5

$8

Toddler

Jay Peak’s Nordic Center offers everything needed to take on our extensive network of cross country ski trails. Based in the Clubhouse and featuring easy access to the trails that wind throughout the golf course, this is where our dedicated staff makes sure you have the high-end rental gear and focused programs to get you on snow happily and quickly. The trail network features 12 miles of groomed trails for classic and skate skiing for novices and experts.

THE ICE HAUS Indoor skating arena

ICE HAUS RATES

(5 & under)

Free with paying adult

Rental

1/2-DAY

1-DAY

FULL (Skis/boots/poles)

$17

$25*

Skis only

-

$15

Boots only

-

$9

Poles only

-

$5

*For extra days + $10/day

FREE DAY PASS included with a lodging package.

Visit jaypeakresort.com/nordic

TAIGA Spa

Public Skate Adult (15+)

$6

Junior (4–14)

$4

3 & under

free

Stick & Puck (all ages)

$6

Helmet required (full visor for kids 17 & under)

The fact that it’s based at the base of our mountain means it’s also the best. Play a little shinny, practice your crossovers, or just wobble your way around the ice with your family.

Rentals Skates

$3

Helmets

$3

Stick

$2

Sharpening

$5

Private Rentals (for parties, reunions etc.)

FREE ADMISSION to Public Skate and Stick & Puck (based on availability) with any lodging package.

Per hour

$190

Contact Dennis Himes at:

dhimes@jaypeakresort.com

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The Taiga Spa, located in the Tram Haus Lodge, offers a full range of massage and spa treatments, so you can fill the time between your more strenuous endeavors and get-yourhands-dirty kind of adventures. SPA DISCOUNTS included with a lodging package.

Visit: jaypeakresort.com/taiga


EVENT CALENDAR We want to make sure that you always have something planned More than just a mountain, Jay has a chock-full calendar all year: music, ski events and waterpark contests. Be sure to check jaypeakresort.com/events for exact dates, times and details.

December 2014

February 2015

13 DECEMBER

7 FEBRUARY

Season Pass Holders’ Party @ International Room 4–6pm

USASA Rail Jam @ Tramside Cafeteria

13 DECEMBER RAMP Demo Day @ Stateside

19 DECEMBER VSO Counterpoint Chorale Group @ The Foeger Ballroom 7:30pm

31 DECEMBER New Year’s Eve with The Grift @ the Foeger Ballroom and Fireworks on Tramside 9:30pm–1am

21 FEBRUARY RAMP Demo Day @ Stateside

22 FEBRUARY Hope on the Slopes Vertical Challenge @ Tower Bar

23 – 28 FEBRUARY 13th Annual Mardi Gras @ International Room

March 2015

7 MARCH January 2015

10 JANUARY USASA Skier/Boarder Cross @ Tramside Cafeteria

17 JANUARY Ski The East’s Junior Free Ski Qualifier @ International Room

24 JANUARY Mountain Dew Vertical Challenge @ Tramside Cafeteria

Rando Race @ Nordic Center / Clubhouse

7 MARCH Ride & Ski of New England Après Party

21 – 22 MARCH Ski The East’s Extreme Competition @ Tramside

28 MARCH 36th Annual Beach Party @ Pump House & Hotel Jay Courtyard

30 JANUARY Farmers’ Appreciation Day (resort wide) @ IR (registration) PH (après party)

April 2015

11 APRIL Pond Skimming @ Tramside

18 APRIL Tail Gate Spectacle @ Stateside Parking Lot

The Jay Peak

MUSIC SERIES at the Foeger Ballroom As we line up musicians for the Winter Music Series, take a peek at who’s coming so far. 24 October – Shawn Covin 6 December – Electric Hot Tuna with Donna the Buffalo Go to jaypeakresort.com/events to see the full Winter Music Series schedule.

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SKI & RIDE SCHOOL PRIVATE LESSONS Nothing beats the one-on-one attention of our private lessons. All ages. All abilities.

1-HOUR PRIVATE LESSON

2-HOUR PRIVATE LESSON

85

160

$

$

HALF-DAY (3 HOURS) PRIVATE LESSON

FULL-DAY (6 HOURS) PRIVATE LESSON

230

390

$

$

BURTON RIGLET PARK The Mountain Kids Adventure Center houses Jay Peak’s kids’ program for skiers and snowboarders aged 3–10 years. The center includes the Playtime Riglet Park created with Burton Snowboards and Disney.

HALF-DAY LESSONS start from

70

$

LEARN TO TURN WITH THE JAY DAY It’s never too late to start raising yourself Jay.

JAY DAY RENTAL + 2-HOUR GROUP LESSON just

45

$

(Ages 11+) Advance reservations are highly recommended for private and kids’ lessons. Email learn@jaypeakresort.com or call (802)

64

327-2186. For more information visit: jaypeakresort.com/learn.


Do I look like I want to get back in the car?

You know that when I get to where I’m going I just want to relax, kick off my booties and play, like in this oversized bed for instance. Oh, and I want to ski. Maybe even try snowboarding. And I want it all to be right outside our door. Of course I want you to come with and show me everything you’ve learned along the way. And when we get back to our place I want to destroy the play room while you sit around and drink your “grape juice.” And if you own a place at Bear Path, you won’t have to put me in the car to do it all.

The luxury ski-in/ski-out townhomes at Bear Path. The newest, most energy-efficient ski-in/ski out residences on Q Burke Mountain Resort. Keep your kids happy.

BEAR PATH TOWNHOMES

866-756-4771 / bearpathtownhomes.com


THE TRAIL MAP Directions to Jay Peak’s most coveted pow stashes and bump runs LEGEND

EASIEST

SLOW SKIING AREA

Caution: Jay Peak does not sweep all trails, glades

MORE DIFFICULT

X-COUNTRY TRAILS

and chutes - ski/ride with care and do not ski/ride

MOST DIFFICULT

FIRST AID STATION

alone. Map not to scale. For directional use only.

PARK

AREA BOUNDARY

Call Ski Patrol from your cell at (802) 988-2611

66


SKI AREA BOUNDARY POLICY

WOODS SKIING POLICY

• Check the Ski Area Boundary and ski or ride only on open trails and glades within the Ski Area Boundary. • You can be charged for any rescue which takes place on closed on-property glades or trails. • Woods and Backcountry areas beyond the Ski Area Boundary are not maintained or patrolled by Jay Peak Resort. • Do not leave the Ski Area Boundary unless you are prepared for wilderness survival. • Past the Ski Area Boundary, there is no way back to the Jay Peak Resort Base Area. When you pass beyond the Ski Area Boundary you leave the area of Ski Patrol Services. • You are responsible for your own actions, your own rescue and the cost of your rescue.

• Woods are not opened, closed or marked; they contain many hazards. • Woods are recommended for EXPERT skiers in groups of three or more. Please do not ski woods or chutes after 3 pm. • Woods skiers must enter and exit from an open trail and cannot ski under or around traffic controlling ropes or fences. * Dogs are not allowed on trails.

MOUNTAIN Statistics SUMMIT ELEVATION: 3,968 ft.

AVERAGE ANNUAL SNOWFALL: 378” 2,153 ft. vertical drop 78 trails, glades and chutes

9 LIFTS: Vermont’s only Aerial Tramway (60 passenger capacity) Northeast’s longest detachable quad (The Flyer) 3 Fixed-Grip Quads (Metro, Bonaventure, Taxi) 1 Double Chair (Village Chair) 1 Triple Chair (Jet Triple Chair) 2 Moving Carpets

BEGINNER ZONE: Includes 5 lifts (Metro, 2 Moving Carpets, Village Chair and Taxi Quad) serving 11 trails & introductory glades

3 TERRAIN PARKS SKIABLE ACREAGE: 385+

OFF-PISTE SKIING: 100+ acres

TRAIL DIFFICULTY RATINGS: 20% novice 40% intermediate 40% advanced

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RESORT MAP

1 2

68


GUEST-ISM: “Growing up, my dog was my best friend though, in all honesty, I never got the sense he liked me all that much.” Stephan N.

ATTRACTIONS & POINTS OF INTEREST 11 8

1

STATESIDE HOTEL

2

MOUNTAIN KIDS ADVENTURE CENTER

9

5

In property: Ski & Ride School, Daycare, Snack Bar

3 6

3

10

4

In property: Howie’s Restaurant, Stateside Cafeteria, The Bullwheel Bar, The Gear Shop, Rental/Repair, Ski & Ride School

3

INDOOR PARKING

4

ICE HAUS INDOOR ARENA

5

PUMP HOUSE INDOOR WATERPARK

Open year round. In property: Snack Bar, Retail

In property: The Drink, The Warming Shelter Snack Bar, The Wave Surf Shop

6

HOTEL JAY & CONFERENCE CENTER In property: Mountain Dick’s Pizza, The Foundry Pub & Grille, Buddy’s Mug Coffee Shop, The Mountain Shop, Elevation 1851’ Family Arcade, Fitness Centre, Pump House Indoor Waterpark, Conference Center

7 7

CLUBHOUSE

8

TRAMSIDE BASE LODGE

9

AUSTRIA HAUS

In property: Condo check-in, Clubhouse Grille, Nordic Ski + Snowshoe Center Access to the Tram In property: Ski & Ride School, Customer Service, Cafeteria. In property: International Room, Provisions General Store

10

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES, GROUP SALES

11

TRAM HAUS LODGE In property: Alice’s Table, The Tower Bar, Taiga Spa, Aroma Coffee Shop, Real Estate Sales, Rental/Repair 69


“ I REALIZED

Vermont is a state of mind.”

Experience the best of Vermont & Green Mountain Coffee® by visiting our Visitor Center and Café, 1 Rotarian Place, Waterbury, VT WaterburyStation.com

© 2011 GMCR

GreenMountainCoffee.com

At Green Mountain Coffee, we know how important it is to have a moment to focus on what really matters. That’s why we make delicious coffee worth savoring.


MADHE WIT REAL APPLE

S


In Newport, healthy active living comes with the territory. Home to pristine lakes and rivers, and miles of trails for cross-country skiing, hiking and biking against spectacular views, Newport has something for everyone in every season.

Only 25 minutes from Jay Peak. And miles away from anything you’ve ever experienced. Come and experience what the locals have enjoyed for years. If you are active by nature, come and discover Newport, Vermont.

DiscoverNewportVT.com


YOUR EXPERIENCE IS OUR PRIORITY.

For over 35 years, our team has been providing professional advice in the listing, selling, purchasing and renting of residential, commercial, vacation, lakefront, vacant land, farms, industrial and condominium real estate throughout Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. Contact either one of our two offices to find out how you can own a piece of the Vermont paradise. Right in the heart of Jay village: 802-988-4000 or in downtown Newport: 802-334-3400

jimcampbellrealestate.com


ROSSIGNOL_JAY_2014.indd 1

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Real Estate

Where the most snow in eastern North America meets year round amenities and vacation options. Indoor Skating Arena • Spa • Golf Clubhouse & Nordic Center • Restaurants & Bars The Pump House Indoor Waterpark • Hotel Jay & Conference Center • Riglet Park Mountain Kids Adventure Center

Woodshed Lodge Experience quiet country lodging in an authentically restored farmhouse just two miles from the mountain. Restful, laid back atmosphere, a great place to relax after a full day of outdoor recreation. Seven bedrooms, a TV/VCR room and a quiet sitting room/library. We welcome families, couples and small groups. Each stay includes a full country breakfast and the option of a hearty candle lit dinner by the glow of our wood stove. BYOB. Friendly, economical, offseason rates, open all year. MAP & B&B. For more information: 802.327.2100 jaypeakresort.com/realestate • realestate@jaypeakresort.com

Woodshed Road, Jay, VT 05859 802-988-4444 • 800-495-4445 • www.woodshedlodge.com


At Poulin Lumber, our experienced sales staff are here to advise with your new building projects or home renovations.

From start to finish, we can supply the products you need from the brands you can trust!

English Rose Inn

phone: 802.326.3232 toll free: 888.303.3232

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Visit a Poulin Lumber Showroom near you!

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Discounted Passes to Jay Peak’s Attractions Complimentary Deluxe Breakfast King and Queen Suites Double Twin and Triple Guest Rooms Jacuzzi Tubs–Fireplaces in Suites Inviting Down Comforters & Terry Robes Woodburning Fireplace in Guest Areas Afternoon Tea–Fresh Baked Delicacies Ski, Golf, and Water Park Packages

Paddington’s Restaurant World-class cuisine exclusively prepared and presented by the Inn’s own Award Winning Chefs. By Reservation: Saturday & Sunday 802.326.3232

Just 3 miles from Jay Peak! www.poulinlumber.com

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website: www.englishroseinnvermont.com email: stay@theenglishroseinn.com 195 Vermont Route 242, Montgomery Center, VT 05471


PA RT I N G T H O U G H T

Limericks, cinquains and iambic pentameters be damned. Poetic rhetoric is whatever you make of it.

80


“I D O N O T U N D E R STA N D W H Y, W H E N I A SK F O R A G R I L L E D L O B S T E R I N A R E STAU R A N T, I A M N EV E R SE RV E D A C O O K E D T E L E P HO N E .” SALVADOR DALI

8 3 0 JAY P EAK ROAD, JAY, VE R M ON T 05859 I N FO@JAY P EAKR E SORT.COM ( 8 02 ) 98 8 -2 61 1

Jay peak winter magazine 2014 15  

Jay peak winter magazine 2014 15

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