Page 1


Published by Tuttle Publishing, an imprint of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

www.tuttlepublishin g.com Copyright @ 2009 Michael LaFosse and Richard Alexander.

All rights reseryed. No part of this publication may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanica[, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission from the publisher., Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data LaFosse, Michael G, Money origami : make the most of your dollar! Richard L. Alexander. -- 1st ed.

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Michael G. LaFosse,

rr870.L234245 2009 736'.982--dc22

llet "Eye" Ring

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2048043s21

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tsBN 978-0-8048-4026-2

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Distributed by

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lntrod u ction X-Wa

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P.cm. lncludes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-8048-4026-2 (kit : alk. paper) 1. Origami.2. Money in art. l. Alexander; Richard L., 1953- ll. Title.

com www.tuttlepubl ish i n g. com i

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First edition

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Printed in Hong Kong Diagrams by Michael G. LaFosse Photography by Richard L. Alexander

Video instructicins for folding many other origami projects are available on DVD from the Origamido Studio website, www.origamido.com. TUTTLE PUBLISH ING@ is a registered trademark of Tuttle Publishing, a division of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

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Stand-Up Shirt Angel Ornament Four-Dollar Tall Box Haverhill High-Top Shoe Five-Pointed, Five-Dollar Star Dollar Bill Butterfly Cube Box With Lid Monkey Face Ring Jumping Frog (With Eyes) George Napkin Ring Business Card Holder Paper Airplane Rectangular Box With Lid Lightning Bolt Favor Chinese Dragon/Sea Serpent Th istle Three-Dollar Step Pyramid Wheel Of Fortune Mr. Bi!! Green


i Symbols Key

Obverse (Front)

Reverse (Back)

trodrrction For over ten years, the Origamido Studio in Haverhill, Massachusetts played host to many who stopped by to see the origami works on display. There was a modest collection of folded dollar bills on display, mostly gifts from friends, and the regulars would bring in their friends and relatives specifically to see that case. For several years, we also demonstrated origami at the Topsfield Fair, just north of Boston, and despite magnificent origami works on display, there would be an inordinate fascination with origaml from dollar bllls.

-

Mountain Fold

There are sevcral reasons dollar bill origami modcls are so popular: o

Folding ths durable paper is nondcetructlve, and even if you don't give it as a gift or tip, you can reuse it or spend it.

. The engraving patterns and symbols are intricate, beautiful and interesting, and can be incorporat-

ed cleverly into hundreds of designs.

. Of all the paper money in use

^

Fold & Unfold

Fold in Front

around the world, the US Dollar bills are relatively inexpensive, and are readily available.

Fold to the back

. Often when you have time to kill,

>>tu Move or Push

unexpectedly waiting for something or someone, there is no other folding paper available.

Fan Fold

o

Every project has guaranteed value!

For many people, dollar bill models were some of the first origami they learned, thanks to the early work of

Florence Temko, a prolific origami designer, author, teacher, performer, and mentor to many other origami professionals in Great Britain and the USA. ln fact, this book began as an idea for a collection of early models chosen by Joyce Saler, a dear friend, and an advanced origami enthusiast from Concord, Massachusetts, who confided that she found the most enjoyment from a few, simple origami models she learned many years ago-models that children could remember easily. Your local bank is the source for crisp, clean, new dollar bills-if you ask. For hygiene's sake, you will want to use brand new bills whenever using money to decorate your table (napkin rings, place holders, etc.). Since most paper currency is made

from long, strong fibers, you often can wash, dry, and gently iron circulated bills to make them crisp and cJean, but they will never look quite as nice as newly printed currency.

To delve deeper into the world of money origami, explore the works of Stephen Weiss of Florida, John Montroll of Maryland, Marc Sky of New Jersey, and Won Park, and Jodi Fukumoto of Hawaii. We trust that this book will help

you to more thoroughly enjoy the contents of your wallet. These tokens have inherent value, and whether the recipient cherishes the gift, or simply unfolds and spends it, you know it won't be thrown away!


x

."

Begin obverse side up. Fold the right edge up to match the top edge and the left edge down to the

Fold in half. Look ahead at figure three for the shape.

bottom edge.

Make another so that you two identical units.

Assemble by inserting the top, back corner of each unit into the top front corner of each.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This simple, 2-piece design is my handy way to hide the majority of a generous cash tip, while making a neat,

decorative presentation. Despite its simplicity we are amazed by the number of people who learn it, only to forget how to place the third fold, so do practice this fold! You will need two crisp dollar bills for this project. You can insert more cash, a note or other small item.

Close

completely and turn over.

The X-Wallet.


Begin obverse side up. Fold half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold up along the center crease.

in

Fold the bottom edge up to

the crease.

Fold in the left side top and bottom corners to form a square point.

Based upon a ring design by Ranana Benjamin

Modified by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This design takes advantage of the mysterious eye atop the pyramid on the back etching of the dollar. ! adapted this ring to use a dollar bill from a ring design I learned from Joyce Saler, who learned it from Ranana Benjamin. This general design can be used to make belts, interlocked chain links, and earring loops.

Fold the bottom edge up to

the top.

Fold the right, square end over to the left. Use the letter "1" in "lN GOD WE TRUSI" as a guide

for the position of the crease.


Fold the top edge of the front strip down and to the right. Align with the short edge at the right to form a square corner.

Tuck the folded end of the

(1) Fold up a small margin at the bottom of the front strip. (2) Mountain-fold the front strip up and to the back.

f O

rurn over.

strip into the triangle-shaped pocket in front.

Based upon a design popularized by Florence Temko

Modified by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 Form the band by bringing

the pointed end around the back of the ring and tucking it into the buckle.

The "Eye" Ring.

This is a modification of a classic that many learned from a book by Florence Temko, and is a particularly good way to make a distinctive gift ornament When you are giving a shirt. You can also use it as a place card, business card holder, or as a tip for an outstanding dry cleaner.


Begin reverse side up,

upside 2

down. Fold in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold the tong edges in to the center crease.

Mountain-fold a small margin of the right edge to the back. Fold out the free corners at the left. Use the letter "N" in "UNITED" as a

4, Fotd the top and bottom risht corners to meet ln front at the split, Be sure to leave a gap at the middle of the rlght edge. Look at figure

guide.

five for the shape.

Fold the wide end up the bottom edges of the collar. to

Turn over.

Your dollar should look like this. Fold the top layer down. Use George's nose as a guide (see figure eight).

Fold the overlap up. Keep the layers tightly together to make an even shape.

Turn over.

Fold the bottom edge up and tuck collar.

it under the corners of the

The Stand-Up Shirt. Now see if you can invent some stand up pants!


Begin with the obverse side up. Fold in half, short edge to short edge. Unfold.

Have the long folded edge

at the bottom. Fold up the bottom left and right corners. Notice that the creases span from the center of the folded edge to the upper outer corners.

Fold in half, long edge to on9 edge.

Your dollar should look like

this. Unfold.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 Angels are welcome gifts any time of year. lncorporate them into a greeting card, or sprinkle them around the curtains in a sunny window. They make excellent Christmas tree decorations and this little angel design is a perfect way to transform a bunch of crisp new bills into a novel gift for your other little angels around the holidays.

,-O\

Turn over.

You are now looking at the other side of the folded bill. Use the creases to fold up the bottom left and right corners. This re-folding of the creases bends them the other way, making them flexible

and easy to use in the next step.


Open the layers of each

folded triangle shape, forming a cone, and squash-fold flat to form a narrow kite shape. Try to make the kites symmetrical.

Spread the bill open, in the middle at "A" and "8." Bring together the left and right ends and flatten the paper to resemble

B

Your dollar should look like

this. Turn over.

ro

Fold the topmost layers up so that the horizontal bottom edge aligns with the top edge.

Fold the top corner down. Use corners "A" and "8" as a guide.

15 lnside-reverse fold the top edge as you fold the ange! in half. This will form a V-shaped separation between the wings.

Your dollar should look like this. Turn over.

Fold out the middle corners for hands. Lower the feet.

Fold out the top corners, to the left and right, to form the wings.

Open the angel to view

the front.

figure ten.

Fold the

top corners down so that they cross in the middle. Notice that the thick area at the

top remains visible. Fold up the bottom front corners for the feet.

The Angel Ornament.


..fJ

Begin with the reverse side up. Fold

in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

,,',.

:-' ' Fold the two top corners in half. The folds should touch the long

ii '\ri\

"iii Fold the two bottom corners up to the crease.

horizontal crease. Unfold.

/A.\\\Y'IT;\

\J/-L\

rrrr

,1,,

Fold the left and right edges in. Use the vertical edges of the lower triangles guides. Unfold.

Based upon a box designed Tomoko Fuse

as

the bill at a right

Fold the triangular flaps against the box sides, left and right. Fold the other bills in the same manner so that you will have four units ready

angle.

for assembly.

Study the creases carefully. Form a box shape by folding the top corners in half

and setting the top and bottom halves of

for rectangles by

Modified for the dollar bill by Richard L. Alexander, 2OO5 The units fit This four-piece modular container is based upon a common interlocking feature made famous by the boxes designed by Tomoko Fuse. The decorative whorls on the dollar bill form

together by sliding the bottom edge of one into the top edge of

interesting patterns when the ends are interwoven. This box is perfect for little samples of perfume, special candies, and other favors.

another. The triangle flaps weave together on the outside.

You may build

two halves and put them together, or you may add successive

units until all four are in place.

The Four-Dollar

Tall Box.


Begin with the reverse side up, upside down. Fold

Fold the two long edges to meet at the center.

in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold a portion of the bottom edge up, perpendicular to itself. Use the right edge of the letter "E" in the

word "STATES" as a guide.

t Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 I derived this design from a simple dollar bill boot that Michael and I learned from an Arizona cowboy, during a trip to teach origami at a Japanese Festival (Matsuri) in Phoenix. lf you leave a pair of these as a tip, you can also roll other singles, and insert them into each boot. Holiday versions can be hung on the tree as Santa's Elf's Boots.

Fotd the ansted

right-side edge to match the vertical edge.

Fold the

bottom left edge to match the crease you made in step five.

Fold the bottom left edge to match the outermost edge on the right.

Use the crease to fold the left side over.

Your bill should

look like this. Unfold the last step.

Fold in half.


trr I I

I

rhe

l2

shorter I

Fordthetop

half of the front layer

half should be in front. Fold the top edge of the short half to match the left edge, forming

to the left so that it passes between itself and the pointed layer behind. Look at step

a pointed end.

1

3 for the shape.

,-O\ Tuck the

point flap into the pocketed layer in front. This will form the heel.

Turn over.

f5

openthe shoe at the top and push forward, forming a crimp at the front of the ankle. Separate the heel with a small

dent at the bottom. Crimp the end of the

toe up. The

Haverhill High-Top

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 When you fold the units, be aware that roughly half of the model will show, while the other half will be tucked inside an adjacent piece, and not show at all. Since the side that will be tucked in must be smaller, pay particular attention to stay within the edges and margins as you make the folds on the hidden end.

Shoe.

You will need five crisp dollar bills.


Begin with the obverse side up. Fold the short left-side edge up to the top long edge. Unfold.

Fold the left

and 5

the top edges to meet at the crease.

Fold the left corner in half, along the

Unfold the

Use the crease

to collapse the bill into

crease.

front left flap.

the shape shown in figure ten. Notice that a crirnp is made at the

assemble.

center, where the dashed mountain and valley lines occur.

Mountain-fold

the larger, right-side portion around the back. Use the vertical edge of paper of the

Your bill should look like this. Unfold the last step.

Fold in half by bringing the left corner over to the upper

right corner.

ffi When the

Rotate one

unit so that the open flap is at the bottom. lnsert the kite-shaped

top layer as a guide.

m

Yourbitt should look like this. Fold the other bills so that you have five completed units to

half of another unit into the pocket of the first unit.

Your model

two units have been brought together, fold the free flap over the point to keep them

should look like this. Add the other units in

together.

collapse and pinch the "filled" points, holding them completely closed, until you connect the loose ends to

the same way. As you assemble, be sure to

close the star. You Valley and

Mountain-fold the lower triangular flap to make it fit within the area of the top flap.

Open the paper so that it resembles figure nine.

The FivePointed, Five-Dollar Star.

should fold each star point in half sharply to give the model a crisp appearance. Turn over.


Begin obverse side up. Fold in half, short edge to short edge.

Fold the short edge of the top layer over to the right edge. Unfold.

(A) Fold up the

bottom folded edge so that the new crease is at the level of the bottom end of the crease formed in the last step. Unfold. (B) Open the bill.

Designed by Michael G. LaFosse, first diagrammed in 1993 Michae! LaFosse adapted his Butterfly for Alice Gray to the dollar bill in the late 1970s. It makes an excellent gift or tip that looks as elegant when folded from either side of the bill. The symmetry of the one dollar bill makes it particularly satisfying.

Look carefully at the creases in the middle of the bill. Mountain-fold the

Fold in half.

Squash-fold the

right half

.

outermost creases and move them to meet at the center crease.

Use a single, crisp dollar bill that has the printing well-centered, with an even border.

Your paper should look like this. Turn over.

Squash-fold.

Fold the bottom corner up along the line between the white

border and the printed edge. Unfold.


ffi

One side at time, squash-fold the upper left and right halves of the model. Be sure that the squash is firmly made down to the crease line formed in the previous step.

Swivel the middle corner over to the crease line on the lower right wing.

Open the

a

and

Mountain

valley-fold along the indicated lines for each wing. The area of

Wing detail: lnside-reverse fold the indicated corner make it appear rounded.

the bottom wings will roll over and upward as you do this.

Fold the

teft t 5

wing over to match the right.

The Dollar Bill Butterfly.

Fotd in the

indicated corners of

the lower wing to make it appear rounded. Narrow the underside of the body by folding the corners in.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2OO5 By paying attention to the initial orientation, and making one slightly larger, two open cubes make an attractive box with a telescoping lid.


/o\ Begin with the reverse side

facing up, upside down. Fold in

Fold the long edges

to meet

at the center.

half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold the right edge over, With the words "THE UNITED at the point where the the botbeginning STATES OF AMERICA" at crease touches the bottom edge. tom, fold the right edg6 up to the Fold over and over, dividing the bill top edge. Unfold. into five segments. The first four segments will be squares, the last segment will be narrower.

Unfold the bill completely.

Study the creases carefully. Crimp the bottom set of creases to form overlapping square corners. Follow the crease at the red "A" to see how it is moved to meet the long horizontal crease line nearby. Do this to each segment.

Repeat the crimps along the opposite edge of the bill. Rotate the paper, right side up.

The narrowest of the five segments should be on the right (highlighted). Use the crimps and creases to close the box. Tuck the narrow segment into the box.

Push in the

The Cube Box.

top of a

Cube Box to make an Open Cube.

ne Open Cube can fit over another, making it a Cube Box

with

Lidl


Begin with the obverse side up. Fold in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006

Fold the long edges to meet at the middle.

Turn over.

Mountain-fold along the open edge of

Mountain-fold along the midline of the

the letter "E" in "ONE." Move the folded edge

letter "O" in "ONE." Move the folded edge up to the level indicated by the red line in the drawing, just up to the horizontal line of the letter " E. "

up to the level indicated by the red line in the drawing, just below the two eye-like scrolls.

This version of the funny face is a crowd pleaser (especially if your crowd is very young, and they are getting wise to the "l've got your nose!" trick). Use this talking monkey ring to

practice your ventriloquism. (Hint: The farther you hold the ring from your mouth, the more successful your performance will be!)

Form the band by tucking the bottom end

into the top.

The Monkey Face Ring.


,-c-\

/-o-\

Fold in the left and right edges by matching corners marked "A" to the crease ends at "B." Unfold and

To make best use of the color

to end up with eyes on your frog, begin with the obverse side up. Fold a short edge of the bill up to the top, long edge and unfold. and

turn over.

Fold the same short edge down the bottom Iong edge. Unfold. Repeat with the other short edge of the

bill. Turn over.

Z-O\ Designed by Michael G. LaFosse and Richard L. Alexander, 2OO5 This version of the jumping frog is one that Michael and l worked out together. We wanted to make a simple frog that jumped well, and still sported a pair of distinctive eyes. You can continue to refine the shape, folding more details into this design to make exquisite renditions that perform better than the currency from which it's folded.

Using the installed creases collapse each end of the bill into

t

Your bill should look like this.

Turn over.

triangle shapes.

,-O-\ With the bill positioned as shown, fold the bottom point up at the level of the lower left and right corners.

Fold the top Your bill should right corner flap over look like this. Turn over.

to the left.


Fold the right edge in to the center.

Return the top flap to the right.

1

Repeat

stepsTthrough9on the left.

Georde

Fold the

fold ht

bottom edge up to

of

the level indicated by the red line in the

Napkin

drawing.

/-C\ Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 Fold the indi-

The Jumping

Turn over.

on the rump with your

Use clean new bills to form these easy, secure, napkin rings. Place George's face toward your guest's. You'll find many

the bottom edge. Leave

finger to make him

other uses for this useful, yet simple fold.

a small distance between

jump!

cated edge downward, but not all the way to

these edges.

Frog, with eyes! Press


To ensure that George's face appears on the outside of the ring, begin with the reverse side up. Fold the short right edge up to the top edge. Fold the left short edge down to the bottom edge.

Your bill should look like this. Fold the long left edge of the paper over to match the right long edge.

Notice the green rectangle in the middle of the paper. Fold the short, bottom edge of this rectangle up to match the left-side long edge of the green rectangle.

You will have a long, narrow

strip like this. Bend the lower end up toward the opposite end.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 Your business card will stand out on the next banquet table at a fundraiser, mixer, or networking event with this simple holder folded from a single dollar bill. Combinations of this clever fold can be stacked when offset 90 degrees to make distinctive, ornamental holders for a variety of favors, such as coin or candy holders.

,-O\ Tuck the narrower corner into the layers of the wider end. Turn over to see George's face.

The George Napkin Ring.


Begin with the obverse side up. Fold in half, edge to edge, each of both ways. Unfold after each.

Fold each of the four corners in, matching the short edges to the long center crease.

Fold each of the four folded edges to meet at the long center

Notice the square diamond outlined in the center of the bill. Valley-fold along each of the four edges of the outline. Valley-fold the left and right long corners in half and form the bill into a diamondshaped dish.

The Business Holder.

Designed by Michae! G. LaFossG, 1977 This simple glider by Michael LaFosse is easy to remember and fun to fly, that is, if you're comfortable throwing money around! There are more detailed planes you can fold from money, but this mode! has an interesting shape, and good flight characteristics. For best results, use a crisp bill, and sharpen your creases with the back of a spoon.


Fold the left half

Begin with either side of the bill facing up. Fold the short, right side up to the top edge. Unfold.

Fold the bottom edge up

to the top edge.

of the squashed flap over to the right.

left folded edge the center crease. Repeat behind.

10 Fold a portion of the right side over to the left. Use the top end of the crease line as a guide.

left half of the model.

Fold the bottom, folded edge of the front flap up to match the right edge of the paper.

Rearranse

tho flaps so that both of the shorter ones are in the front and the longer ones are

I

Fordthetop

edge of the front flap down to the level indicated by the red line in the drawing.

12

Fordthe

indicated flap down, forming the "Canard" or front wings.

behind.

Replace the layer to the

bottom.

Squash-fold the top flaP.

15

Fordinharr,

lengthwise.

I

eFordthe

wing sets down on each side of the body (fuselage). Set the wings out to the side to prepare for flight!

The Paper Airplane.


Bill "A" begins obverse side up. Fold in half each of both ways, unfolding after

Fold the top and bottom long edges to meet at the center of the bill.

Bill "A" will look like this.

each.

Based upon a design popularized by Florence Temko

Modified for the dollar bill by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This handy box is derived from the popular, simple, twopiece design normally folded from rectangular pieces of magazine pages, and so is often known as the "Magazine Box." Dollar bills make excellent boxes for giving precious keepsakes. You will need two crisp dollar bills. I have Iabeled the bills A (bottom) and B (lid).

Bill "B" begins reverse side up. Fold in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Place bill "A"

over the center of bill "B." Fold the long edges of bill "8" over the long edges of bill U

Notice the gap between the long edges of bill "8." Unfold both bills.

4,"

Fold the short edges of bill "A" to meet at the vertical center crease. Place folded bill "A" over the center of bill "B." Fold the short edges of bill "B" over to cover bill "A."


Slide bill "A"

out to separate the two. Leave both folded. Perform steps 9 through 13 on both bills "A" and "B."

Fold the indicated corners over.

Fold each of the four corners in to nearest crease.

Fold the innermost edges over to hold the folded

triangles in place.

X

Fotd the innermost edges outward to match the vertical edges of the folded triangles.

Based upon a design by Michael G. LaFosse, 2003

t ;

open the

box by lifting the short sides up and folding the long sides in. Pinch the corners square. Box "B" should

fit

box "A."

neatly over

Modified for the dollar bill by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 Mlchael developed this party favor from four squares several yearr 690, for an Origami Puzzles book for kids, but this adaptatlon, folded from three dollar bills, makes kids' eyes light up even before they discover candy inside. You will need three crisp dollar bills.

Rectangular Box

with

Lid.


Begin with the obverse side up in the orientation shown. Fold in half by matching the bottom left and the top right corners of the bill. lt is important that you use these same two corners each time for each of the three bills. Otherwise, you will not be able to assemble the project.

Fold the other bills in the same manner so that you will have three units ready to assemble. Notice the two "Blank" edges and the two "Fan" edges. The Fan

edges of one unit will overlap the Blank edges of another.

Contrasting, solid colored papers are used here for the assembly demonstration. Hold two of the folded units together so that the fan-folded edges are overlapping the blank edges and are displayed on the outside of the model.

z-C\

Fold the left corner of the back layer over the front.

Fan-fold the right edge of the front flap.

Your bill will look like this. Turn over.

I O Turn the construction over in your hand so that it resembles a boat hull, Hold carefully to keep the two pieces together. You may add gmall ltemc lnto the favor at this stage. lnsert the third piece to close the box. Be cure that all of the fan-folded edges show outside of the box.

The Lightning Bolt Favor. Fold the left corner of the back layer over the front.

Fan-fold the

right edge of the front flap.

Open the bill.


Begin with the obverse side up. Fold

in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold the top and bottom right-side corners to the crease.

Fold the square corner of each triangle to touch the middle of

its opposite edge.

l; t,

Designed by Michael G. LaFosse, 2OO2

rii

Fold the

tip of

Your bill should

the right corner over

look like this. Turn

for a nose.

over,

top to bottom.

Fold the top and bottom corners of the left edge to

the crease.

One of the twelve characters in the Chinese zodiac is the dragon. Michael LaFosse designed this cute little dollar bill baby dragon for the Origami Activities book by Tuttle. Too small to be scary, they look great on greeting cards, place cards, and can make a distinctive tip without a great investment in time or money.

, Fold the long edges to meet at the middle.

Fold the left edges in to meet at

the middle, making the corner narrow.

Fold in half, lengthwise.


11

lnside-reverse fold the entire length of paper behind the head.

Usins a series

of inside-reverse folds, form an undulating body and tail.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This centerpiece decoration is a fun way to give a bunch of bills. The cone is structurally rigid, and sports several layers and slits for inserting name cards, other bills (folded or not), etc.

the

Fold up

the lt

Brins up two triangle flaps for

bottom edges of the

horns.

jaw-line for whiskers.

The Chinese Dragon Serpent.

You will need six do!!ar bills for this project. New, crisp bills

You may

adjust the angle of the head and form other details, such as sharper horns.

/

stay together nicely, and the tips can be curled to form wild, funky, almost otherworldly plant blossoms.

Sea


Begin with the reverse

side up, with the dollar oriented as shown in the illustration. Fold in half by matching the bottom left and the top right corners of the bill. lt is important that you use these same two corners each time for each of the six bills. Otherwise, you will not be able to assemble the project.

bft

Pull open the and right flaps.

Fold the left

corner of the back layer over the front.

IO

Fordthe other five bills so that you have a total of six folded units ready for assembly. Open one

unit and orient it vertically.

11

Ptace another

unit over the upper half of the first. Be sure that the proper ceases are aligned before you close the bottom layer of the first unit over the new unit.

Fold the right edge of the front flap

to match the left, folded edge.

Fold the indicated right edge to match the left side of the model.

Fold the left edge of the top layer

to match the right edge of the model.

Notice the layer marked with an "X" in the diagram. Cover this corner area with layer "A" by swapping them in place. Look at

Layer "A" covers the corner area marked "X." Add new

units, one at a time, in the same manner until all six bills are in place.

flgure 13 for the result.

Form a closed umbrella shape by joining the ends at the gap. Look ahead at figure 15. The model will be tall and conical. This is the closed thistle.

,-C\ Open and vtew

look like this. Turn over.

the front again.

Gently

pull out the indicated layers one

at a time to make the thistle bloom.

Thistle.


Begin with the reverse side up, upslde down. Fold in half, short edge to short edge. Unfold.

2 Fotd the teft and 5 Fotd the top right halves of the bot- remnant edges down, up to the flush with the edge

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behind.

Fold up the bottom edge. Use the rectangle at the back as a

Turn over.

guide.

Based upon a design by Ethan Plaut, 1998

Modified by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 A taller step pyramid from three squares, developed by Ethan Plaut, inspired this three-piece, modular construction. The resulting equilatera! triangles can be joined with others to make interesting tetrahedra, pyramids, and other more complex polygons. You will need three crisp dollar bills for this project.

Fold up.

Turn over.

Turn over.


Fold the top edge down to the level of the top edge of the rectangle, behind. The red line indicates the correct level in the

Unfold completely.

drawing.

Study the creases carefully. Mountain and valley fold, as indicated in the drawing, to form a fan-pleated unit. Some of the creases will need to be reversed.

. This is a finished unit. Notice that it has been adjusted to approximate one third of an equilateral triangle. Fold the remaining bills so that you will have three units ready to assemble.

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This shape is familiar to thousands of students of our popular Classic Cardinal DVD. The flat origami multi-piece rings designed by Mette Peterson formed the inspiration for a The three units must be woven together to complete the puzzle. Notice that the left half of each unit will overlap the right half

of another.

The Three-Dollar Step

three-dimensional "water wheel" experiment by Paulo Basceta, carried to extremes by Michael LaFosse, Satoshi Kamiya, and Christine Clement at the Origamido Studio.

Pyramid.

You will need eight crisp dollar bills for this project.


--\-

,,.O\

up.

Begin with the obverse side Fold the bottom edge up to

Turn over.

George Washington's mouth.

Fold in the top corners of thc back layer as far as they will go. Look at figure seven for the

Mountain-fold the left and right sides to stand perpendicular to the rectangular area that

shape.

displays George's face.

,,-O\

Fold the bottom, folded

edge 4

Turn over.

up to the filigree design above the

word "ONE."

Fold the indicated portions of the bottom edge up so that each frames the word "STATES."

This is a finished unit. Fold the other bills so that you have eight units ready to assemble.

t

Units are joined by inserting the rectangular tabs on one piece into the pockets of another.

Two units joined. Eight

units form a nice wheel. You may use as many as ten units.


,t1l

,iT

Begin with the obverse side up. Fold in half, long edge to long edge. Unfold.

Fold the long edges to meet at the middle.

,'i1: -.5.,,r. l:il I ':.

.

,,

Mountain-fold along the open edge

Designed by Richard L. Alexander, 2006 This face jumped out at me from the symmetry of the letters when I held the bill sideways. There are many

permutations and combinations, and even an action version that appears to talk! These funny faces liven up mundane items, such as pencil erasers. Slip its mouth under the rubber band whenever you give something rolled.

of the letter "E" in "ONE." Move the loleled edge up to the Iovol indicated by the red line in the drawing, just below the two eye-like scrolls.

Turn over.

along the midline of the letter "O" in "ONE." Move the folded edge up to the level indicated by the red line in the drawing, just up to the horizontal line of

the letter "E."

';,-..:il Unfo d comp etely.


I

Re-fold along the horizontal creases.

Re-fold along

the vertical creases.

Fold up the

bottom edge to the bottom of the "smile." Fold the two top corners down to form a single point at the

top of the head.

Fold the tip of the head point to the back. Fold the two free corners of Bill's shirt down to form

the collar.

Fold up the two free corners at

the top of the head (optional). Try different "hair styles!"

Meet Mr. Bill Green!

Money origami, by michael lafosse and richard alexander  
Money origami, by michael lafosse and richard alexander  
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