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2020: can it happen today?

creativity in a global market

it starts with just one. YOU!

the value of “Stuff� Designing a better world for our children FALL 2012

0720072211

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ARIZONA

INDIA

3003 north central avenue

E10, Mavji Rathod Society

sixteenth floor

Relief Road, Santa Cruz

phoenix, arizona 85012

West

602.257.1764 t

Mumbai 400 054

602.257.9029 f

tel 2 660 0704

SAN DIEGO 2150 w washington street san diego, california 92110 619.497.0577 t

Where can you PARTICIPATE? We see architecture as art. We are all creators of the places in which we work, live and play... we inspire the experiences that we, ourselves, and others have around us.

How do you IMPACT your world? Taking action... building a culture of empowerment... a place where balance meets hard work... and fun meets the bottomline. Sharing our lives...our talents and our ideas within our communities...

Who do you want to BECOME? “When I grow up I want to...� Saving the world comes one open door at a time...new faces, new ideas...new frontiers....when they all come together, they sustain us.

participate impact become


Fall 2012

designing for the world’s future one school at a time

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The Value of Stuff We

all have things that hold value to us that may appear to be junk to another. But “stuff ” holds a history in most cases. Can we show our students history through holding and seeing them, rather than through reading?

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2020. Is it possible today? We can all

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It starts with one... YOU. Change occurs

imagine what the future will hold. Even movies predict what the future will look like. But is it really that far off? Can what we see for future learning be a part of our classrooms and learning now? We think so!

Applied Learning.

Have you thought about how your students assimilate information. With the technology age comes the need for adjusting the way students learn and teachers teach... Imagine if teachers were able to have more hands-on learning through technology!

Creativity in a Global Market. How do your students learn when so much information is at their fingertips already? How can we stimulate your students each time they step into the classroom, or even the lunchroom?

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Designing a better world for our children.

It’s the simple things, really. Planting low water use plants, choosing a low-VOC paint, using recycled building materials or working with the local utility companies to place solar panels on your sites. These elements help us to design spaces that will help to sustain our environment for our children and their children as well.

through small steps and starts to affect others towards that cause. We’ve taken on the challenge to design each of our facilities with sustainable features, and if possible, LEED certification. Our passion for education and green design go hand in hand. Will you also follow? It could be as simple as a recycling program!

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Partners’ Corner This is a year of reflection at Orcutt | Winslow. As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year, we know that we have come a long way from drafting plans on ‘ink on linen” and “ink on mylar” and single-station CAD programs. But, some things haven’t changed in 40 years -our focus remains on creating learning environments that spark each student’s creativity, and as a result, creating successful future generations. No matter the current trends in design or learning styles, that focus is the one constant throughout our history. Each president, scientist, lawyer, teacher, and policeman has a story... a history of how they attained their success. More often than not, a student’s experience during their school years shapes and molds who they want to be. It’s such a privilege to be able to influence future generations! Let us help you ensure that each student is inspired to be the best they can possibly be and that their future holds a history worth telling.

Vispi Karanjia karanjia.v@owp.com

If We Know So Much, Why Are We Still In the Box?

Societal norms have, and will continue to change. Our knowledge base is exploding and technology is invading every part of our lives. Knowing this, we ask ourselves questions like, how will this affect teaching and learning? How can we apply what we have learned about learning styles, the physiology and social requirements of learning, advances in technology and new teaching strategies and use that knowledge to anticipate what is next? How can we provide the flexibility in facilities to support these recent and impending changes? These questions lead us to the ultimate query… How can we make a difference? In the first of this two-part workshop series, Paul Winslow, FAIA, focuses on current and near-future best practices, and new trends in education, including applied learning, teaming, social structure, varying learning styles, emotional characteristics and the impacts that each of these has on teaching, and learning environments. In session two, interactive discussions are directed toward the impact of current and projected utilization of technology and its anticipated advancements over the next 10-15 years on learning environments. The potential consequences on the social structure of campuses and facilities will also be explored. If your district is interested in hearing more, please call us at 602.257.1764 to schedule a complimentary workshop, with dialog and idea exchange initiated by these imminent issues facing our schools.

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Youngker High School Performing Arts

Thepowerofadramaticormusicalperformanceliesinitsabilityto transporttheaudiencetothealternaterealityofanothertimeandplace. orcutt | winslow education

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THINK EDUCATION

The value of “stuff” It’s an interesting thing about “stuff”. We all have it. Some of us have more than others. Some love it and some hate it. The difficulty is that we don’t seem to be able to agree on its value. Stuff can be clutter and stuff can be keepsakes. Stuff can be inspirational or stuff can be frustrating. In our society, there is “my” stuff and your “stuff” that holds different values. In our families, cities, and society, we collectively have stuff. What does “all of this” stuff do for us? Our stuff usually falls into a range of categories, some of which have significance or meaning while others are just an accumulation of artifacts. However, looking through our stuff usually brings back memories or can stimulate new thoughts. Looking at other’s stuff may leave one pondering if it has significance or value. It is the wonder of stuff that can make it so exciting, if we know the stories that go with it. If it is stuff that a grandparent has, it is intriguing to understand what it meant to them or what it might mean to us. It could have historic value, monetary value, and sentimental value or research value. Understanding that we are all intrigued by stuff at one point or another, what can we do to utilize that interest for stimulating the learning process? If we look at models of places where stuff exists, there are many exciting examples, some formally organized and some pretty casual. Hands on science museums or exploratoriums are a classic example. They seem to stimulate creative thinking in both children and adults alike.

To get in and “play” with science experiments usually leaves a lasting impression for many. On the other hand, visiting a junkyard, an electronic parts store or an art supply store will stir the creative juices of others. Art museums, aquariums, concert halls, zoos and many other places can also have an impact on many. Why can’t we provide this same kind of stimulation in our schools? Various learning spaces or centers might be littered with creative objects that relate to what might be learned there. An art room filled with objects to sketch, materials to build sculptures or make collages are obvious examples. Why not find ways to encourage the incorporation of stuff, whether formally organized in displays, informally organized in drawers or stashed on shelves in any and all learning spaces. Why not have the artifacts that students create put on display in areas outside the regular “classroom”. Large windows into learning spaces can allow others to vic ariously participate in what is going on in the formal learning spaces. Seeing students working on graphic displays as you walk down a corridor can be exciting. Seeing older students working on projects can inspire younger students to want to be “like them”. Creative problem solvers typically don’t work sitting at a fixed desk with no visual or tactile stimulation. Maybe we should start developing creative problem solvers in the kind of environment that supports those we are hoping they will become. orcutt | winslow education

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grand canyon university: college of arts & science orcutt | winslow education

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applied learning. Creating spaces for effective learning

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THINK EDUCATION

With more knowledge on how our brain processes information, learning and teaching styles have been adjusting over time to be more effective. And with technology at our finger tips, there are many new opportunities for teaching and learning. These opportunities allow teachers to create learning environments which can deviate from the traditional classroom and create spaces spur on learning and interaction. Access to the information through the internet, whether through computers or cell phones, continues to become more universal and less expensive. Any ten year old knows how to text you or use an MP3 player or Ipod. And, as cloud computing becomes commonplace, the need for expensive software will be reduced and what is available will be more accessible to more individuals. Will this change the way in which instruction is provided? We are already seeing where university professors and some high school teachers are providing, what had traditionally been classroom lectures, the textural information on podcasts and blogs and are using the in-class time for hands-on application of the topic. Imagine if your students were able to get more hands-on time in the classrooms rather than just teaching the textbooks! The impact that this has on the learning space is significant. If a large portion of the time spent there would be applying knowledge rather than just being presented knowledge, would that space not differ greatly depending upon the subject, the method of application or presentation of the results of the application? Potentially more hands-on workspace would be appropriate in some areas, or more elaborate presentation areas may be necessary in others. Often times, in the real world, the application of information means collaboration. Collaboration requires teams of people to work together, discover together, think and explore together and present together to other groups, many of which would be significantly larger than their own. Imagine if we were teaching our children that from an early age!

and should happen anywhere. This has led to the inclusion of wide spots in hallways and larger student lounge/study areas, knowing that students are “on-line” everywhere they can find a spot to sit and will gather in study groups in any convenient place. How might this same thinking be included into K-12 environments? Does it have a place and if so, how would it be supervised? With the utilization of applied learning, teaming and immediate access to information, what would this say about the need for traditional “classrooms” and how can spaces be created that are as flexible as practical and still provide supervision and access to mentoring, academic guidance and support? These questions have been the basis for a new generation of learning environments. Designing to meet the needs of specific developmental levels, learning styles and subject areas is becoming mandatory to ensure that we encourage each student to maximize their potential. The advantage is that it makes “school” more relevant to each student and can excite them and encourage them to see the fun and creativity that true and learning can provide. It takes extra effort to determine what is most appropriate to support the curriculum and, at the same time, create an environment that reaches out and compels students to be excited about “finding things out for themselves”. Through facilitated interactive brainstorming, led by a design team from Orcutt | Winslow, creative and new designs of educational spaces can be created. Orcutt | Winslow’s design teams have extensive knowledge of current educational strategies and space design, and understand the developing ideas and teaching concepts from around the country. We can assist you in creating facilities that stimulate your students to become self-directed and life-long learners.

A student’s exploration and collection of information is often cumulative. Again, how will this change the paradigm of what educational space is and where it is? Some would suggest that learning and retrieval of information could

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can a

building teach? Phoenix’ Bioscience High School is an immersion into exploration itself--designed as an evolving teaching tool, with the future of science and technology in mind. Through responsiveness to environment, culture, and urban context, a unique educational philosophy is supported by way of architecture. Fossils are cast into the large east and west facing concrete walls to tell the story of geological time relationships, and illustrate environmentally-appropriate orientation for solar exposure in the Sonoran desert, while finishes are designed to represent DNA strands and chromosomes, with signage in the style of the periodic table of the elements. Open to a diverse socio-economic student population, the building responds to the district’s program that emphasizes collaboration, team teaching, and independent learning.

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THINK EDUCATION

Creativity In A One of the strengths of our nation has been its ability to synthesize ideas and concepts and create new methods, systems and products. As we are having to compete more and more with others around the globe, that ability has served us well. But, as our economy has struggled over the past few years, our ability to maintain that edge has been challenged with greater frequency. At the same time, our reduction in spending on education has been reduced significantly. This has lead to reductions in many programs that have provided key elements in helping learn creative problem solving. Arts, music, athletics and numerous other traditional subject areas are no longer a part of the curriculum. This is at a time when as Peter Senge in his book, “Schools that Learn” suggests, we need to be stepping away from the “factory model” that has been the basis for most education since the World War II and be looking for project-based learning and teaming strategies. It has caused most of the educational systems around the world to be left-brain intensive. The idea of providing a balance between right and left-brain stimulation and exercise is assumed by many to be absolutely be necessary.

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This deficiency raises the question of how we incorporate these traditional foundational learning needs into the current pedagogy within the current financial constraints? The concepts of project-based learning, teaming and applied learning may provide avenues for learning creative problem solving skills. In addition, greater emphasis on understanding the diversity of learning styles may provide natural outlets for both right and left-brain development. What kind of learning environment will be required to accommodate this change in teaching and learning? There are several elements that run counter to traditional learning spaces. First, the potential to have “things” that inspire inquisitiveness would seem to be appropriate. A wonderful example is found in the Minneapolis “Zoo School’s” science classroom. It has a collection of snakes and other animals that instill curiosity just by entering the room. Similarly, their art classroom is filled with objects, including stuffed animals. The question of having subjects to sketch, photograph, sculpt or depict in any way is answered the minute one crosses the threshold.


Global Economy This approach to teaching and learning suggests that some spaces may require different thinking in terms of form and scale. It certainly suggests that four blank walls my also not be the answer. Places that invite exploration, areas that welcome small groups to look at, take apart, discuss or conjecture on relevance or opportunities provided might be part of larger spaces, provided in smaller alcoves, become part of a “corridor” or even be outside. There is not likely one answer that fits all and surely as time marches on, what seems relevant today may be outdated in just a few years. Adaptability, adjustability, mobility and any other method of being able to modify a space will be ever more necessary. How does one go about creating these spaces that speak to enhancing the art of creative problem solving. It takes a concerted effort to re-examine how we learn, what the specific environmental needs are that each activity should have to support it, and the size and composition of groups that might be most effective in this process. In addition, exploration of other models or environments where learning takes place, might provide new concepts appropriate for specific learning activities. If we use the term classroom, immediately we almost universally mentally picture a space that is rectangular and houses between 25-30 students sitting in desks or at tables. If we substitute the term “learning

space” for the word classroom, immediately we begin to picture a range of spaces, some of which might be outside under a tree. Exploring the concept of learning spaces with a fresh start can often lead to the creation of a new model that allows attention to be focused on new paradigms and releases us from traditional models. This does not mean that classrooms are not appropriate any more than that they are mandatory. Providing collections of learning spaces that support techniques focused on both right and left-brain stimulation may be a key to rethinking what schools should be. Every community is different, every educational program is unique and one size does not fit all. However, it may be appropriate to explore options and if nothing else, validate that current thinking within a district or school. Our experience and expertise in facilitation of both large and small groups has been able to lead many schools through a process to evaluate their needs in relation to the changing global paradigm. Some have made dramatic changes in their educational and facility direction and others have made small adjustments, clarifying specific needs and areas of support. We can help you in your endeavor to provide your children with the most effective learning environments.

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More than 400 students walk these stairs each day.

It only takes one to make a difference. T.G. Barr Elementary School • Phoenix, AZ

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THINK TECHNOLOGY

bringing your buildings to life... Building Information Modeling For nearly 20 years, Orcutt | Winslow has been a pioneer in the utilization of computer-aided 3D design and documentation. Recognized internationally as a world leader in this area, as indicated by the firm’s winning the first Building Information Model award at the American Institute of Architects National Convention, the firm has pioneered techniques that others are just beginning to understand. exactly what is bim? With the ability of computer aided design, buildings can be conceived and documented in three dimensions. This ability to create a “virtual building” means that all of the elements of a building are created much the same way the contractor traditionally built the building. Each element is created and fit together so that looking at the “virtual building” from any point, it would be as though you were standing in or around the actual building. You can walk through a door, look at a cabinet as it sits in the room and see how equipment will fit in space. You can also look at clearances between mechanical system elements and the structure. Virtually all elements of the building are modeled correctly before they are constructed. how does bim work, really? Each participant in the design and build process has their own role to play, though different from how they would have in the past. However, the most significant impacts are when groups are able to sit around a table and with real time projected images, look in detail at various elements of the design and make intelligent decisions by coming to agreement on the best solutions.

how does bim help the architect? The very beginning of the design process has changed because the design can be created in three dimensions from the beginning. Obviously, any three dimensional object can be viewed from overhead and appears as a plan.

The designer can design from within the building as well as from the exterior. Working with engineers, the ability to coordinate the location of systems or to utilize building systems as design elements is enhanced greatly. Understanding the scale of a space, the relative or specific values of colors and their impact, lighting level, the character of materials and textures are also benefits available. As the building envelope changes, quantities are automatically updated. Working with consultants and contractors using the 3D model, individual systems can be isolated or combined to help all understand the interface with each element. how does bim help the contractor? With their involvement early in the design process, the contractor has an intimate knowledge of both the intent of the design and the specifics of the building systems. Because they have the opportunity to provide input into the design of systems and materials, they can determine construction processes and sequences much more effectively. More effective cost control, better coordination of subcontractors and more effective scheduling. how does bim help the client? For many people, clearly understanding two dimensional drawings is difficult. With the “virtual building” model, the client can actually see the building, from either the interior or the exterior, from the beginning of the design process. The ability to make value judgements when you can virtually be in the space or see it as others would as you approach or walk through, allows for more intelligent decision making. It also allows you to understand the components and complexity of the building systems. You can then have a great deal more assurance that all elements are being considered and that the design is constructable and costs for unknown or contingency are minimized.

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chaparral high school redevelopment scottsdale, az 347,000 SF • 38 acres • Grades 9-12 • Completed 2008 • $50M

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every detail counts... orcutt | winslow education

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Classroom Log: Wednesday February 12, 2020 and 6th grade students are accessing their work plan, developed with their mentor/teachers at the beginning of the month, and updated on Monday of this week. Within the natural sciences learning space, the research team is able to find their specific seashell in the research wall collection and then view its counterparts in the holographic projection alcove. While listening to the explanation of its origin from the collection of essays from the biology specialists accessed on sound isolated speakers in that alcove, they can then explore the composition of the shell’s chemistry on their individual roll-up video displays. As they begin to assemble their presentation for the rest of their learning group, they each take responsibility for a part of the presentation’s creation. One will develop the background music, one will orchestrate the video and animation components while another writes the script outline. They each take a portion of the research. One looks at the history and geography, another at the chemical composition of the shell and find ways to distinguish it from others of similar character. Yet others look for information on the mollusk that created the shell and its life cycles and the impact they had as a food source on human development in the adjacent geography over time.

2020: is it possible today? When we place imaginary students in the future, we can create scenarios that sound very exciting and not unreasonable to achieve. When we try to put it in the reality of today, we have difficulty visualizing how it could happen. The question is, how do we start the transition to what we could imagine in the future. Of course, no matter what we picture, the future will be different because we cannot really imagine what will happen in the interim. When we look at the recent past and see what changes have happened with communications and information technology and the social changes it is fostered, making specific projections to the future will likely be short sighted. Each year, we collectively discover or invent such a wide range of things, and prepare students to adapt their lives to change would appear to be an essential element of our teaching and learning goal. One of the most impactful areas of knowledge expansion is in brain function research. In his book, “The Master and

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His Emissary”, Iain McGilchrist alludes to the idea that we have fostered left brain function, at the expense of the right brain in our education system of the past few decades. He suggests that the left-brain looks at a problem and tries to find a previous answer to solve that problem. Conversely, he suggests that the right-brain sees a problem and looks at all of the ways the problem might be solved. Of course this suggests that a balance of problem solving approaches is more appropriate. His suggestion would be that the balance should lean toward the right-brain approach to create “creative problem solvers”. This would point our educational strategies toward the areas where rightbrain development is encouraged. This would mean educating the whole child, specifically including the arts and music and other creative pursuits “Providing sensory-rich input - reducing the amount of low-sensory input materials and processes such as textbooks, worksheets, and working in isolation -


THINK TECHNOLOGY

moves instruction towards rigor and relevance” according to Willard Daggett and William Cassell in a recent article Peer Learner Engagement: Enhancing the Promise of School Improvement, for the International Center for Leadership in Education. They go on to point out the benefits of cooperative and applied learning in this regard. Group projects and peer mentoring are recognized as extremely effective ways of helping students achieve and excel. One key to helping students achieve their creative best is to allow them to develop at their own speed. That is a great goal but as a teacher, supporting a large number of students or as in a high school or college setting, where learning is often segregated into discreet subjects, administration of students’ progress and keeping them stimulated and applying themselves to targeted goals is a daunting task. With the ever increasing capability of technology and its ubiquitous use by students of all ages, strategies need to be and are being developed that will support individualized learning programs that will assist both the student and teacher/mentor. Until the cost of technology decreases to the point that it is universal this goal will be difficult to achieve. However, its anticipation should encourage the design of learning spaces that will support and enhance that possibility when it is practical.

feel the obligation to teach teachers how to teach in a more traditional fashion, since that is where the jobs are. Progressive schools have difficulty finding teachers that are comfortable allowing students more freedom and have difficulty encouraging group assignments. How in the world do you expect me to give someone a grade if they have been working with a group? All to often teaching strategies are crafted for the teacher rather than the student. Because of the rapid pace of change in knowledge, technology and social norms, students’ expectations often vary from those of the faculty. Changing the mind set to assume that given the opportunity to explore, discover, create and even to make a mistake, students will be far more capable of creative problem solving and of finding and discerning the quality of information than we have allowed them to be in the “traditional” classroom learning environment. Not only can we but we must allow them to do it and even more, encourage them to do it, that is be creative and take on more responsibility for their own education. Only time will tell if we gave them the tools to succeed in the year 2020 and beyond.

As stated above, the advances in technology and its pervasiveness in today’s culture has changed traditional social patterns and expectations. A frequent quote today is that “students need to dumb down” to go to school. That is at virtually all levels. Students are early adopters of new ideas or tools. This has fostered the idea that one can learn anywhere at any time. Having to carry large numbers of heavy textbooks is disappearing in lieu of on line access to information. This has spawned a sense that one can study by oneself or in a group, as they choose at that moment. It has also led to the habitation of any space that seems even the least conducive to sitting, laying or even standing as learning space. The need to be in the “classroom” or the “library” to study is becoming obsolete. It does not mean that formal learning spaces of some type, or libraries will not be needed but that there are many other learning space tools in the student’s arsenal of places to learn. Traditional teaching and learning followed the “factory model”, as Peter Senge says in the book Schools That Learn. He suggests that too many schools still utilize this model of administrative control and regimented learning by memorizing facts and figures or doing rote projects. Making the change of direction for both students and teachers comes down to the question “Will We Allow Them To Do It?”. Schools of education at many universities

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You can never have an impact on society if you have not changed yourself. Nelson Mandela

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THINK GREEN

it starts with just one...you. what

why

how

Sustainable design is the holistic approach to designing the built environment that includes the synergistic integration of architecture, engineering and construction. The synergy is such that the design creates a balance between environmental, economic and social aspects while paying special attention to conservation of resources.

• Human activities are changing the composition of Earth’s atmosphere (EPA website).

• Use a collaborative design approach that includes owners, end-users, architects, designers, engineers and contractors

A “sustainable” building places a high priority on community connectivity, resource conservation, health and wellbeing of its users over its life-cycle. The basic principles of sustainable design can be categorized under the following five categories:

• Buildings annually consume more than 30% of the total energy and more than 60% of the electricity used in the US and is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions (USGBC website).

is sustainable design?

1. Understanding the natural environment 2. Understanding local context (People & Place) 3. Understanding resources 4. Understanding health and well-being 5. Understanding regenerative approach to design

should we do it?

• The atmospheric buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is largely the result of human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels (EPA website). • Increasing greenhouse gas concentrations tend to warm the planet (EPA website).

• Each day 5 billion gallons of potable water is used solely to flush toilets (USGBC website).

should you go about it?

• Have a systems approach dialogue between all collaborating parties and talk about various ways to promote sustainability • Discuss design goal, issues, strategies to implementing sustainability • Ensure that every team member understands and buys into the concepts of implementing sustainability. • Evaluate these concepts at every phase of the project

• A typical north American commercial construction project generates up to 2.5 pounds of solid waste per square foot of completed floor space (USGBC website). • Sustainable design practices help create healthy environments with reduced utility and other operating costs, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions. So, why should we do it? Because we care about our environment and it’s the right thing to do.

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THINK

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GREEN

sustainability

in the desert

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Pendergast Elementary School Phoenix, AZ

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Designed and Registered for LEED for Schools Silver Certification

Murphy Wellness Center Phoenix, AZ Designed and Registered for LEED NC 2.2 Gold Certification

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Verrado High School Buckeye, AZ

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Sedona-Oak Creek Unified School DistrictPerforming Arts Center Sedona, AZ

LEED - NC 2.1 Silver Certified

Designed and Registered for LEED Gold Certification 5

Orcutt | Winslow Offices Phoenix, AZ

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Sun Life Health Clinic Eloy, AZ

LEED-CI 2.0 Gold Certified

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Designed for LEED NC Silver Certification

Sedona-Oak Creek Unified School District Office Sedona, AZ Designed and Registered for LEED-NC 3.0 Platinum certification 7

Estrella Mountain Community College Mariposa Hall Avondale, AZ LEED-NC 2.2 Gold Certification

TG Barr & Julian Elementary Schools Phoenix, AZ Designed for LEED for Schools Certification

Grand Canyon Bright Angel Remodel Designed and Registered for LEED-CI Platinum Certification

Westwind Intermediate School Phoenix, AZ Designed for LEED for Schools Silver Certification

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Green isn’t just a buzzword we like to throw around in our office because it sounds good. We integrate green principles into each of our buildings, even if they aren’t seeking LEED certification. It’s simply the way our firm has been from its inception... we speak about it nationally, and we’ve even received recognition for our efforts throughout the past 40 years. What we want you to understand is that we will work closely with you to integrate sustainable principles into your schools, to not only help current generations with improved testing scores and healthier environments for learning, but also the future generations who will benefit from us being conscientious of the resources we have now.

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THINK GREEN

“understanding that we

Can you imagine a world with healthy environments? I can! It’s my prerogative here at Orcutt | Winslow to direct each of the education teams in designing facilities that provide a better education for your students, whether it’s simple daylighting or a healthier environment with the carpets, paints, and materials we use. I have helped create a momentum within the office to integrate sustainability into each of our projects. And, it’s not always about LEED certification more, it’s about the understanding that we can help nurture the environment that we live in. What better way to do this than to infuse these elements into the schools we are designing!

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can help

And, what is even more exciting is that green design isn’t just for new schools. We’ve worked with clients on their existing buildings to bring in sustainable design elements, creating strategic plans for how to implement these with minimal costs. Imagine the possibility your school giving back to the environment! There are so many things that we can help you implement into your schools to make this world a better and healthier place! Join me in being a part of the legacy we leave for our children. Dr. Caroline Lobo, LEED-AP, AIA, Orcutt | Winslow Sustainability Expert


nurture the environment that we live in”

The following are some of the sustainable design principles we would recommend for healthy facilities: • Develop a maintenance program on-line that can monitor and notify the district when filter replacements are due, periodic maintenance activities, etc. • Add Energy Management Systems that monitor occupancy and control temperature and ventilation needs and more importantly track utilities. • Provide daylighting in all spaces. • Apply for energy efficiency grants from utility companies. Electrical companies will pay for portions of certain electrical lighting and efficient equipment upgrades. • Create an efficient building envelope with R-19 insulation for walls, Energy Star roofing systems with R-30 insulation for roofs.

• Use zero VOC (Volatile organic compounds) paints and low VOC adhesives for all interior finishes. • Use recycled materials such as carpets, wood cabinets/ doors, steel etc. whenever feasible. • Use low flow and high efficiency plumbing fixtures for water conservation. • Design for low maintenance of the exterior landscaped environment or Xeriscape landscaping. • Recycle gray water for landscape irrigation. • Design shaded windows on East, West and South façade of building walls. • Integrate solar power for water heating and generating electricity. • Implement a waste recycling program • Implement a green operations program

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THINK

42° 6' 4” |

GREEN

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28° 36' 26" | 77° 12' 17"

33° 26' 53” | -112° 4' 35”

41°

The 2030 Challenge Architecture 2030, a non-profit, non-partisan and independent organization, was established in response to the global-warming crisis by architect Edward Mazria in 2002. 2030’s mission is to rapidly transform the US and global Building Sector from being the major contributor of greenhouse gas emissions to being a central part of the solution to the global-warming crisis. To accomplish this, Architecture 2030 has issued The 2030 Challenge asking the global architecture and building community to adopt the following targets: All new buildings, developments and major renovations shall be designed to meet a fossil fuel, GHG emitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.


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21° 27' 14" | -158° 0' 27"

34° 3' 11” | -118° 14' 24"

61° 13' 3" | -149° 51' 27" At a minimum, an equal amount of existing building area will be renovated annually to meet a fossil fuel, GHGemitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type. The fossil fuel reduction standard for all new buildings and major renovations shall be increased to: • 60% in 2010 • 70% in 2015 • 80% in 2020 • 90% in 2025 • Carbon-neutral in 2030 (using no fossil fuel GHG emitting energy to operate).

Orcutt | Winslow has adopted the 2030 challenge and is committed to working with our clients on reducing the carbon footprint of each of their facilities. Visit www.architecture2030.org to find out more.


Pendergast Elementary School Designed and Registered for LEED for Schools Silver Certification 35% more efficient • 78,000 SF • 750 students

orcutt | winslow education

27


LEED for Schools 2007 Registered Project Checklist Project Name: PENDERGAST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Project Address: 3802 N. 91st Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85037

Category Yes

7

?

Requirements

Sustainable Sites

7

Status

Create and implement an Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) Plan. The Plan shall describe the measures implemented to accomplish the following objectives: ❑ Prevent loss of soil during construction by stormwater runoff and/or wind erosion, including protecting topsoil by stockpiling for reuse. ❑ Prevent sedimentation of storm sewer or receiving streams. ❑ Prevent polluting the air with dust and particulate matter.

Civil Engineer Denis Martin

Complete

SWPP Prepared as part of G & D plans

Conduct a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (as described in ASTM E1527-05) to determine if environmental contamination exists at the site. If contamination is suspected, conduct a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment (as described in ASTM E1903-97 (2002)).

ARC Environmental

Complete

Phase-1 and Phase-2 Environmental Surveys completed and no pesticide residues found

Notes

Prereq 1

16 Points Required

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

Y

Prereq 2

Required

Environmental Site Assessment

Y Credit 1

1

Site Selection

Do not develop buildings, hardscape, roads or parking areas on portions of sites that meet any one of the following criteria: ❑ Prime farmland as defined by the United States Department of Agriculture in the United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 7, Volume 6, Parts 400 to 699, Section 657.5 (citation 7CFR657.5) ❑ Previously undeveloped land whose elevation is lower than 5 feet above the elevation of the 100-year flood as defined by FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) ❑ Land that is specifically identified as habitat for any species on Federal or State threatened or endangered Requirements lists ❑ Within 100 feet of any wetlands as defined by United States Code of Federal Regulations 40 CFR, Parts 230-233 and Part 22, and isolated wetlands or areas of special concern identified by state or local rule, OR within setback distances from wetlands prescribed in state or local regulations, as defined by local or state rule or law, whichever is more stringent ❑ Previously undeveloped land that is within 50 feet of a water body, defined as seas, lakes, rivers, streams and tributaries which support or could support fish, recreation or industrial use, commissioning consistent withprocess the terminology Implement, or have a contract in place to implement, the following additional activities of in the Clean to Water Act addition the requirements of EA Prerequisite 1 and in accordance with this LEED for Schools Reference ❑ Guide: Land which prior to acquisition for the project was public parkland, unless land of equal or greater value as parkland trade by the public landowner (Park Authority projects areCommissioning exempt) 1. Prior is to accepted the start ofinthe construction documents phase, designate an independent Authority

Category

1

Responsible Party

No

Yes

?

No

3

Credit 2

Credit 3

Credit 2

Yes

?

Yes

?

Category No Development Density & Community Connectivity

Requirements (CxA) to lead, review and oversee the completion of all commissioning process activities. The CxA shall, at a minimum, perform Tasks 2, 3 and 6. Other team members may perform Tasks 4 and 5.

1

Prereq 1

Storage & Collection of Recyclables

Required

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 2.1

Building Reuse, Maintain 75% of Existing Walls, Floors & Roof Building Reuse, Maintain 100% of Existing Walls, Floors & Roof Building Reuse, Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural Elements Construction Waste Management, Divert 50% from Disposal

Y

1

1 1 1

1 1 Credit 3 Credit 4.1

1 1 1 1

1 1

Brownfield Redevelopment Credit 2.2 Construction Waste Management, Divert 75% from Disposal Alternative Transportation, Public Transportation Access

1

1 1

1

Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4.1

Materials Reuse, 5% Materials Reuse,10% Recycled Content, 10% (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer)

Category Yes

?

No

11

Credit 2

1

Increased Ventilation

Credit 4

Enhanced Refrigerant Management

Credit 3.1

1

Construction IAQ Management Plan, During Construction

1

1 Credit 3.2

Credit 5.1

Regional Materials, 10% Extracted, Processed & Manufactured

Alternative Transportation, Low-Emitting & Fuel-Efficient Vehicles 1

1 Credit 5.2

Regional Materials, 20% Extracted, Processed & Manufactured

Credit 6

Rapidly Renewable Materials Category

1

1 Credit 4

1

Yes

Credit 5

1 to 4

Certified Wood

Yes

?

No

Green Power 7Credit 6 12 Indoor Environmental Quality Prereq 1 IAQ Performance Pendergast Elementary # 07_046 1 K-8 School OW ProjectMinimum Credit 6.2

Controllability of Systems, Thermal Comfort Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control

Prereq 2 Prereq 3

Thermal Comfort, Design

Thermal Comfort, Verification Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring

Category Yes

1

Credit 5

3

?

No

Credit 10 Mold Prevention Daylight & Views, Daylighting 75% of classrooms (required for either points below) 90% of classrooms 75% of other spaces

Credit 8.1

Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control

Pendergast Elementary K-8 School OW Project # 07_046 1

Pendergast Elementary K-8 School OW Project # 07_046

Yes

?

No

2

3

1

1

Innovation & Design Process Credit 1.1

Innovation in Design: Green

Pending

Architect

Do not comply

because of the high dry-bulb temperature prevelant in AZ

Pending

Will need to estimate the recycled content by weight and determine the recycled content cost

adjustments to suitand individual needs and preferences. Operable be used lieu of comfort Prohibit smoking in the building locate task any exterior designated smoking areaswindows at least can 25 feet awayinfrom controls for occupants of areas that are 20 feet inside of and 10 feet to either side of the operable part of the entries, outdoor air intakes and operable windows. window. The areas of operable window must meet the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2004, paragraph 5.1,

1

Mechanical Engineer

students = 450 students. 5% = ~25 bicycles. Widen sidewalk to 10' along the south and dedicate 4' to a Engineer. Update: Mechanical engineer has bicycle Update: two completed thepath. calculations andpaths has are needed and 93rd avenue alignment may help at a later date. Will attempt point anyway. determined that

Compliance Certificate need from Mech Pending

Architect

-

OPTION 3 IS THE ONLY POSSIBLE SCENARIO. OPTION 2 doesn't apply since we do not have have two bus lines within a 1/4 mile of the school. The closest public bus line is on 91st and Thomas (Greenline Avondale). Need to determine if 80% of the students live within 3/4 mile of the school site.

Need to strictly enforce the stipulations Need and to dedicate two bicycle lanes, and storage within value during during construction shops review. construction. Need to document and prepare 200 yards of the school. 5% of the building staff and report. students above third grade = 15 classrooms x 30

Pending

Pending

WE DO NOT QUALIFY.

Alternate w/ additional 2 weeks of general Will need to estimate the regional material by conditions, MERV 13 filters and related Architect/JOC Pending weight and determine the regional material cost expenses to be priced separately.

value during construction and shops review.

Qunit =drop-off Coolingarea capacity of an individual or refrigeration unit (Tons) carpool for low-emitting andHVAC fuel-efficient vehicles. Requirements Use renewable building and products (made from plants that are withinthat a are either classified Qtotal = Total cooling of all HVAC orand refrigeration (Tons) For therapidly purposes of thiscapacity credit,materials low-emitting fuel-efficient vehicles aretypically definedharvested as vehicles OPTION 1—ADHESIVES & SEALANTS point) for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, ten-year cycle or(1shorter) as Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV) by the California Air Resources Board or haveon-site) achieved a minimum green score of All adhesives and installed in theimplement building interior (defined as inside of the weatherproofing system and appliedwith shallD: Calibrated 1on cost. 1 sealants ❑based and a Measurement &AND Verification (M&V) Plan consistent Option FORofADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES OTHER REGULARLY OCCUPIED SPACES onDevelop the American Council forDepartment an Energy Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle meet the testing and40 product requirements the California of Efficient Health Services Standard Practice for The Testing Of rating guide. Simulation (Savings Estimation Method 2) or Option B: Energy Measure Isolation, as 1 Provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants in workspaces tospecienable UseFrom a minimum of 50% of wood-based materials products, whichConservation arethe certified inentrance accordance ForVolatile Organic Emissions Various Sources Using Small-Scale “Preferred parking” refers to the parking spotsand that are closest to main of with the the project (exclusive of spaces fied in the International Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) Volume III: Concepts and adjustments to suit individual task and estincluding Stewardship Council’sPerformance (FSC) Principles andneeds Criteria, forpreferences. wood building components. These components Environmental Chambers, 2004 Addenda. designated for AND handicapped) or parking passes provided at a discounted price.

Required

Credit 7.2

Credit 1

Notes

Do not qualify

Commissioning Report will be provided by consultant.

Jim O' Connor Construction to coordinate. 50% achievable, 75% may be possible. Will need to attempt the two credits as a factor of safety to secure the certification

Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process.

Required

1

Pending

Pending

Pending

Architect/JOC

Design classrooms and other core learning spaces to meet the Reverberation Time (RT) requirements of ANSI OPTION 5—FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS (1 point) Natural Ventilation. Standard S12.60-2002, Acoustical Performance Design Requirements Classroom furniture including all student and teacher desks, tables and seatsCriteria, introduced into the project spaceand thatGuidelines has been for Schools. Also, AND manufactured, refurbished or refinished withinand one year prior to occupancy must meet ofSound the requirements below. Salvaged and design classrooms other core learning spaces meetone the Transmission (STC) requirements, Provide comfort system controls for alltoshared multi-occupant spaces to Class enable adjustments to suit group needs used furniture that is more than onewindows, year oldpreferences. atwhich the time of occupancy is rating of at least 35. excepting must meet an STC and excluded from the creditAND requirements. Conditions for thermal comfort are described in ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 to include the primary factors Method A: GREENGUARDTM Children Schools CertifiedSM (OR) OPTION 1 of& air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed and humidity. Comfort system control, for the purposes of Method B: Calculated indoor concentrations that are less than or equalBtothrough those established inStandard Table 1 for furniture systems and a maximum Usingairthe methodology D of over ANSIat achieve this credit,described is defined in asannexes the provision of control least oneS12.60-2002, of these primary factors in the occupant’s local seating determined by a procedure based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Technology Verification background noise level in classrooms and other primary learning spaces of 45 dBA. environment. (ETV) Large Chamber Test Protocol for Measuring Emissions of VOCs OR and Aldehydes (September 1999) 1 testing protocol conducted in an independent air quality testing laboratory. (OR) OPTION 2 Design HVAC systems and the building envelope to meet the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, Chemical Contaminant Emission Limits Emission Limits Thermal Conditions for using Human Occupancy. Demonstrate design in accordance Design classrooms andEnvironmental other core learning spaces the methodology listed in the 2003 compliance HVAC Applications Systems Furniture Seating with the Section 6.1.1 Documentation. ASHRAE TVOC 0.5 mg/m3 0.25 mg/m3 Handbook, Chapter 47 on Sound and Vibration Control, and achieve an RC (N) Mark II level of 37. per1billion 25 Formaldehyde 50 parts partstoper billion a thermal comfort survey of building occupants (all adults and students of grades 6 and Agree implement Total Aldehydes 50 parts per a billion above) within period of six to 18 months after occupancy. This survey should collect anonymous responses 1 100 parts per billion Install permanent monitoring systems that provide feedback on ventilation system performance to ensure that 4 – Phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH) 0.0065 0.00325 aboutmg/m3 thermal comfortmg/m3 in the building including an assessment of overall satisfaction with thermal performance ventilation systems maintain design minimum ventilation requirements. Configure all monitoring equipment Table 1: Indoor Air Concentrations and identification of thermal comfort-related problems. Agree to develop a plan for corrective action if the to generate ansurvey alarmresults when the conditions vary by frominsetpoint, viafurniture either a systems buildingand automation Method C: Calculated indoor air concentrations that are less than equalthan to 10% those established Table 1 for indicate thatormore 20%or ofmore occupants are dissatisfied with thermal comfort in the building. Requirements alarm to the building operator or via a visualtesting or audible alert to the building occupants. seating determined by asystem procedure based onplan BIFMA M7.1-2005 X7.1-2005 protocol conducted invariables an independent third areas in accordance with This should includeand measurement of relevant environmental in problem party air quality testing laboratory. FOR MECHANICALLY SPACES ASHRAE VENTILATED Standard 55-2004. 1 OPTION 6—CEILING AND WALL SYSTEMS (1 point) ❑ Monitor carbon dioxide concentrations within all densely occupied spaces (those with a design occupant 1 toacoustical 3 All gypsum board, insulation, ceiling systems and wall coverings installed in the building interior shall meet the testing and Project teams must achieve the following Through of the three optional methodologies, achieve daylighting incredits: the following: density greater than orone equal to 25 people per 1000 sq.ft.). CO2 monitoring locations shall be between 3 feet 1 above product requirements of and the California Department Health Services Standard Practice for (1 The Testing Of Management Volatile OrganicPlan: Emissions EQlearning Credit 3.1: Construction IAQ During Construction ❑ 75% allofclassroom and 1. core spaces point), or 6 feet the of floor. From Various Sources Using Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. 2 EQlearning Credit 7.1: Thermal Comfort: Design ❑ 90% of all classroom and 2. core spaces (2occupied points), or ❑ ForSmall-Scale each mechanical ventilation system serving non-densely spaces, provide a direct outdoor airflow

Y

Total of 225 sf of recycling stations distributed between the four buildings.

Commissioning Agent JOC

LCGWP: Lifecycle Direct Global Warming Potential (lbCO2/Ton-Year) AND provide dedicated bike lanes that as extend at least to the end of the school property in 2 or more different Excluded is reutilization materials of such rework,(0regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being GWPr: Global WarmingofPotential Refrigerant to 12,000 lbCO2/lbr) directions, ensuring that bike lanes have no barriers on school property (i.e. fences).

continued…

Minimum Acoustical Performance 1

Credit 7.1

Complete

relevant information. Civil Engineer will certify other requirements.

Udpate: 12+ KW system will give us 1 point.

Notes

District/Architect

building

Page 1 of 8

Y

Y

Architect

2. The Commissioning Authority shall conduct, at a minimum, one commissioning design review of the Owner’s ❑ 75% (2 points) Project Requirements (OPR),and Basis of Design (BOD) and and design documents prior to mid-construction docuof non-hazardous construction demolition debris. Develop implement a construction waste management ments phase back-check the review comments in thefrom subsequent design submission. plan that, at a and minimum, identifies the materials to be diverted disposal and whether the materials will be

for(1Determining Savings in New Construction, April,framing, 2003. flooring, sub-flooring, wood include, but are not limitedEnergy to, structural framing and general dimensional OPTION 2—PAINTS & Options COATINGS point) FOR CLASSROOMS LEARNING the chemistry All paints and installed in the building interior shall meet theCORE testing and product requirements theexception California of Department oflaboratories, art doors, finishes. 1 coatings ❑ The and M&V period shall cover aAND period of no less thanSPACES, one yearwith ofofpost-construction occupancy. OPTION 1 rooms, shops, music Organic rooms, and dance/exercise studios: Health Services Standard Practice foramaterials The Testing Of corrective Volatile Emissions Fromenergy Various Sources Using Small-Scale include permanently installed into the project. Furniture may be providing it is included ❑Only Provide process for ensure areincluded, realized if the results of the M&V plan Size parking capacity not exceedaction minimum local zoninginsavings requirements AND provide preferred Provide atoclassroom system that operates two modes: general illumination and A/V. parking for Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. consistently inenergy MR Credits 3–7.arelighting indicate savings nottotal being achieved Interior Designer carpools orthat vanpools for 5% of the parking OPTION 3—FLOORING SYSTEMS (1 ❑ point) In general illumination mode,provided achieve an averagespaces. illumination at the desk level of 35 to 50 footcandles with Vince All flooring elements installed building interior meet andpoint product requirements offrom theofCalifornia Department a minimum 25 footcandles any than 3 feet any 1 Need in tothe purchase greenofshall power forthe uptesting toat35% of themore electricity needs thewall. school for twoofconsecutive years. 20Services PointsStandard Practice for The Health Of Volatile Organic contribution Emissions From Sources Using Small-Scale ❑ InTesting A/V mode, not including fromVarious the teaching wall light, achieve an average illumination at Required Environmental Chambers, including 2004 theAddenda. desk level of between 10 and 20 footcandles for any 62.1-2004, point in the Ventilation room greater 3 feet from the side Meet the minimum requirements of Sections 4 through 7 of ASHRAE forthan Acceptable OPTION 4—COMPOSITE WOOD AGRIFIBER PRODUCTS (1 point) walls,Mechanical 10 feet from the front wall and 6shall feet be from the backusing wall,the while limiting vertical illumination Indoor Air &Quality. ventilation systems designed Ventilation Rate Procedure oron the All composite wood and agrifiber products installed in the building interior shall meet the testing and product requirements of the screen to no more than 7 footcandles at any point on the screen. the applicableprojection local code, whichever is more stringent. California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for The Testing Of Volatile Organic Emissions From Various Sources Naturally ventilated buildings shall comply with ASHRAE 62.1-2004, paragraph 5.1. 1 Chambers, Using Small-Scale Environmental including 2004 Addenda. Provide individual comfort controls for 50% (minimum) of the building occupants in workspaces to enable

Alternative Transportation, Parking Capacity 1

4

Status

OPTION 2 3.sorted The Commissioning Authority shallsoil review contractor submittals applicable being commissioned on-site or comingled. Excavated and land-clearing debris do not contributetotosystems this credit. Calculations Locate project within 1/4 mile of but one or more stops shall for two more public usable for with the and BOD. This review be or concurrent with or A/Ecampus reviewsbus andlines submitted to by building cancompliance be done by weight orOPR volume must be consistent throughout. school the designAteam andbus thesystem Owner. may count as one of these lines. 1 occupants. 4. Develop a systems manual that provides future operating staff the information needed to understand and 1 OR optimally the commissioned systems. 3 operate 1 OPTION Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the 5.pre-consumer Verify the requirements training personnel and building occupants are completed. Show that that the school where thefor project is operating located has an attendance boundary in which at least 80% of students content constitutes at least Requirements live Party Status 6.❑within Assure the involvement the for Commissioning Authority reviewing building operation9 within 10 months no more than 3/4by mile Grades 8 and below, in and 1-1/2 miles for Grades andResponsible above. In addition, 10% (1 point) after substantial withallows O&M pedestrian staff and occupants. a plan of neighborhoods outstanding ❑ 20% (2 points)completion locate the project on a site that access toInclude the site fromfor allresolution residential that house FOR MECHANICALLY commissioning-related SPACES issues. (based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project. theVENTILATED planned student population. ❑ Increase breathing zone air ventilation ratesoftoaall occupied spaces by at least 30% above the minimum Theoutdoor recycled content value material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the AND in all cases, provide dedicated or bike to the transit that extend from the school building at rates required by ASHRAE Standard as determined by walking EQassembly Prerequisite 1. routes the assembly is 62.1-2004, then multiplied by the cost of to eliminate determine value. 1 Select refrigerants and HVAC&R that minimize or the recycled emissioncontent of compounds that contribute to least to the end of the and school property in 2 or and more different directions, ensuring that routes Mechanical, electrical plumbing components specialty items such as elevators shall not walking bewith included in and bike ozone depletion and global warming. The building HVAC&R equipment shall comply the followDevelop and implement an Indoor Air Plan forbase the and pre-occupancy phases of the building lanes have noQuality barriers onManagement school property (i.e.construction fences). this calculation. Only(IAQ) include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included, provid-

reclaimed within the samePotential process that generated it.(0 to 0.2 lbCFC11/lbr) JOC OPTION 1—FLUSH-OUT ODPr: Ozone Depletion of Refrigerant prior to occupancy and with all interior installed, perform a building flush-out by supplying a total air ❑ After construction 1 ends, Lr: Refrigerant Leakage Rate (0.5% to 2.0%; default of 2% unlessor otherwise demonstrated) Regionally Use building materials or products thatfinishes have been extracted, harvested recovered as well as manufactured volume of 14,000 cu.ft. of outdoor air per sq.ft. of floor area while maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60oF and relative Mr: End-of-life Loss 10%; default of 10% unless otherwise demonstrated) within 500 milesRefrigerant of the project site (2% for a to minimum of humidity no1higher than 60%. 1 OPTION ❑ 10% (based on cost) of(0.5 the to total materials value (1 point). Rc: Refrigerant Charge 5.0 lbs of refrigerant per ton of cooling capacity) OR Develop and implement ayears; plan for the buses and maintenance vehicles serving the school to use 20% natural ❑prior 20% on cost) the total materials value (2 points). Life: Equipment Life default based on equipment type,delivery unlessof otherwise demonstrated) ❑ If occupancy is desired to(based completion of (10 theofflush-out, the space may be occupied following a minimum of 3,500 gas, propane, biodiesel or low-emitting and fuel-efficient If only fraction ofthe aofproduct or material is isextracted/harvested/recovered manufactured locally, then onlyshall be For multiple types equipment, weighted average of be allvehicles. base building level HVAC&R equipment cu.ft. of outdoor 1air per sq.ft. of a floor area to space. Once aaspace occupied, it shall ventilated atand a minimum rate of 0.30 Regionally that (byfollowing weight) contribute to the regional value. cfm/sq.ft. of outside OR air applied or thepercentage design minimum outside shall air rate using the formula: Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components specialty items such as elevators and equipment shall not determined in EQ Prerequisite 1,2whichever is greater. During each day of theand flush-out OPTION [ ∑ (LCGWP + LCODP x 105) x Qunit ] / Qtotal ≤ 100 period, ventilation shall begin a minimum of be included in this calculation. Only include materialsshall permanently installed the project. Furniture may be three hours prior to occupancy and continue during occupancy. These conditions be maintained until in a total of 14,000 cu.ft./sq.ft. Provide preferred parking for 5% of the total vehicle parking capacity of the site and at least one designated Where: of outside air has been delivered the space.it is included consistently in MR Credits 3–7. included,toproviding

Credit 6.1 & Verification Controllability of Systems, Lighting Measurement

1

Notes Phase-1 Environmental Survey has some of the

Pending Pending

Responsible Party

Pending

Architect

1

? No Low-Emitting Materials

Credit 7

1 1 Credit 4.4

1

1

Construction IAQ Management Plan, Before Occupancy

1 Credit 4.3

Architect

Provide an easily accessible area that serves the entire building and is dedicated to the collection and storage of AND with pedestrian theconstruction; building and the services. i.non-hazardous independent of theaccess work ofbetween designincluding and materials for recycling, (at a minimum) paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and Basic Services include, but be arededicated not limited to: they and ii.metals. not anAn employee of the firm, though maystorage be contracted through them; debris (trimmings), area should alsodesign to collection of plant-based landscaping 1) iii. Bank; 2) Place ofno Worship; 3) Convenience Care; 5) manager Cleaners;holding 6) Fireconstruction Station; 7) Beauty; 8) not an of, or contracted through, aGrocery; contractor4)orDay construction unless theemployee site has landscaping. Hardware; Laundry; 10) Library; 11) Medical/Dental; 12) Senior Care Facility; 13) Park; 14) Pharmacy; 15) contracts;9)and Post Office; Restaurant; 17) Other Schoolsoforthe Universities; 18) Supermarket; 19) Theater; 20) Community iv. (can be)16) a qualified employee or consultant Owner. c. The21) Commissioning Authority shall report results, findings and recommendations directly to the OwnCenter; Fitness Center; 22) Museum. er. Proximity is determined by drawing a 1/2-mile radius around any building entrance on a site map and counting Recycle and/or salvage at least This requirement hasradius. no deviation for project size. thed.❑50% services within that (1 point)

ing formula, which sets a maximum threshold for the combined contributions to ozone depletion and global as follows: ing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3–7. warming potential: ❑ During construction meet or exceed the recommended Control Measures of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors 1 1 Recycled content shall for be defined inBuildings accordance with the International Organization for Standardization docuNational Association (SMACNA) IAQ Guidelines under Construction, 1995, Chapter 3. LCGWP + LCODP x 105Occupied ≤ 100 ment, ISO 14021—Environmental anddamage. declarations—Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environ❑ Protect stored on-siteWhere: or installed absorptive materials fromlabels moisture Provide secure bicycle racks and/or storage (within 200 yards of a building entrance) for 5% or more of all mental labeling). ❑ If permanently installed air handlers are used during construction, filtration media with a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value LCODP = return [ODPr xgrille, (Lr xis Life +Mr) Rc]/Life and students grade level (measured atReplace peak periods). Post-consumer material defined asx waste material generated by households by commercial, (MERV) of 8 shall bestaff used at each airabove asthird determined by ASHRAE 52.2-1999. all filtrationor media immediately industrial and LCGWP = [GWPr x in (Lr x changing Life xfacilities Rc]/Life institutional facilities their role+Mr) as end-users of in thethe product, whichor can no longer usedofforaits intendedentrance, for prior to occupancy. AND provide shower and building, within 200 be yards building LCODP: Lifecycle Ozone Depletion Potential purpose. ❑ Prohibit smoking inside the and within 25 feet of(FTE) building entrances(lbCFC11/Ton-Year) once the building is closed. 0.5% ofbuilding Full-Time Equivalent staff.

Credit 4.2 Recycled Content, 20%Use (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer) Alternative Transportation, Bicycle

Credit 4.2

Status

Engineer/ARC Enviromental

building projects. 13 Points neighborhood withserving an average of 10 units per acre netbe— AND within 1/2 mile of at least 10 Basic Services b. The individual as thedensity Commissioning Authority shall

Materials & Resources

8

ResponsibleCivil Party

OPTION 2—COMMUNITY CONNECTIVITY a. The Commissioning Authority shall have documented commissioning authority experience in at least two Construct or renovate building on a previously developed site AND within 1/2 mile of a residential zone or

No

5

1

1 to 3 1 2 3 1

On-Site Renewable Energy 2.5% Renewable Energy 2 7.5% Renewable Energy 12.5% Renewable Energy Enhanced Commissioning

Responsible Party

Architect/JOC

Pending

Provided 4 ALT-FUEL preferred parking spaces. Designated portion of the parent drop-off as a designated carpool drop-off area. All of the is technically "carpool drop-off".

Status Notes drop-off Doubtful. Need to verifyparent if this applies

Pending

Doors, and other wood products we have. Have Need to verify andmay prove compliance through This be sought after completion if very little plywood inpoint the project. May be possible reports, simulations and measurements as

to have 50% ofneeded. the wood to be certified. be from zoning ordinances. School areMight exempt applicable. Update: All sites classrooms are better as an alternate. Pending Parking capacity needs justification. Need to Architect Electrical Engineer In Process designed for 35-50 fc average general ADHESIVES & SEALANTS, COATINGS, illumination, 10-20 fc AV mode. All and vanpool spaces min. 5% designate carpool FLOORING SYSTEMS, COMPOSITE WOOD

Mechanical Engineer

Complete

District/Architect

Pending

Mechanical Engineer

Acoustical Engineer

administrative spaces have individual lighting controls. Green power may be purchased after completion The building should have been designed to meet of the school for 2 Need consecutive years if needed. ASHRAE 62 Ventilation standard. compliance certificate from Mechanical Engineer

Need paperwork from district in this regard

In Process

Pending

Need to verify ASHRAE Standard 62 to verify if thermostat control currently designed in the project complies. Need to ascertain cost of additional measure required for compliance, if any.

Classroom ceiling tiles are high NRC tiles that will satisfy the pre-requisite.

Mechanical In Process compliance reports GREEN FURNITURE WILL BE USED Need TO SEEK Engineer AN INNOVATION POINT.

Possible point to go after if in dire need. Will Pending need addspecified. serv to set upneed interviews, compile CO2 Monitoring Will to get the Responsible Party Status results and file paperworkNotes necessary compliance certificates from the engineer. Update: We do not qualify for this Complete point since adding CO2 sensors for all classrooms will have been very expensive.

Mechanical Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

Do not comply.

❑device 75% of all other occupied spaces (1 additional point). Project teams canofonly a point for 3. EQ Credit 7.2:outdoor Thermal Comfort: 3 measurement capable of regularly measuring the minimum airflow rate Verification with an accuracy plusachieve or other minimum spaces if they have achieved at least one point62.1-2004. for classroom spaces. AND minus 15% ofthese the design outdoor airalso rate, as defined by ASHRAE

HVAC

Possible. Need to achieve EQ 3.1, EQ 7.1 & EA 7.2 prior to achieving. Need Mech Engineer

Design to minimize and control pollutant entry into buildings and later cross-contamination of regularly oc4 of 8and controls 4/12/10 OPTION 1—CALCULATION ProvidePage HVAC systems designed to limit space relative humidity to 60% or less during all load Pending Certification. Need building action plan for air Engineer/District/ cupied areas: This point will be attempted but we may notput together. Said reference Achieve a minimum glazing conditions, factor of 2%.both Theoccupied glazing factor is calculated as follows: and unoccupied. quality manitenance Architect ❑Employ permanent entryway systems at least six feet long in the primary direction of travel Page 5 of 8 to capture dirt and particulates from 4/12/10 OPTION 2—SIMULATION AND qualify for daylighting 75% of theinclassrooms entering the building at all entryways that are directly connected to the outdoors. Acceptable entryway systems include permanently is stored the LEED POINTS FOLDER. Demonstrate, through computer simulation, that a minimum daylight basis illumination of 25 footcandles has Develop and implement on an ongoing an IAQlevel management program for buildings based on the EPA @ 25 foot candles. Average classroom foot installed grates, grilles or slotted systems that allow for Need to verify plumbing and mechanical achieved. Modeling must demonstrate 25 horizontal footcandles under clearOwners skyorconditions, at noon, on the EPA Reference Number document “Building AirbyQuality: A Guide for Building and Facility Managers,” cleaning underneath. Roll-out mats arebeen only acceptable when maintained on a weekly basis a contracted service organization Architect Pending candles may be less than that in some areas. requirements. Need to assess additional costs equinox,are at 30 inches the floor. entry points 402-F-91-102, December, 1991.users. school maintenance staff. Qualifying entryways those that above serve as regular for building Field will be used to measure Interior 3—MEASUREMENT involved for required mesures, if any. May be measurements an ❑Where hazardous gases or chemicalsOPTION may be present or used (including garages, housekeeping/laundry areas, science Demonstrate, records of indoor light measurements, a minimum daylight illumination level of 25 this but we are not depending on this point. It Designer/Plumbin laboratories, prep rooms, art rooms, shops of any kindthrough and copying/printing rooms), exhaust each spacethat sufficiently to create negative alternate - finish floor plans to be revised footcandles has to been Measurements must be taken on a 10-foot grid for all occupied spaces andand must pressure with respect to adjacent spaces with the doors the achieved. room Pending g Engineer accordingly. Update: turned out to be will too be a bonus if we get it. 6 on Points be recorded building plans. partitions or a hard lid ceiling. The exhaust rate shall closed. For each of these spaces, provide self-closing doors and floor deck-to-deck Mechanical Housekeeping In all cases,The onlypressure the1square footagewith associated with thespaces portions of be rooms or spaces meeting the minimum ilbe at least 0.50 cfm/sq.ft., with no air re-circulation. differential the surrounding shall at least 5 Pa (0.02 expensive and so Engineer innovation point, the required project team will need to demonstrate that a comprehensive green cleaning/housekeeping inches of water gauge) on average andlumination 1 Pa (0.004requirements inches of canTo bereceive appliedan towards the calculation to qualify for this credit. is inand/or placeglare with clear performance goals, including: situations that could water) at a minimum when the doors toIn the closed.daylightprogram allrooms cases,are provide redirection control devices to avoid high-contrast 1. of Afor statement ofwith purpose describing whattothe is that trying to achieve a health and environmental standpoint, focusing on ❑In mechanically ventilated buildings, provide occupied areas theareas building air filtration media prior occupancy impederegularly visual tasks. Exceptions where tasks would be hindered bypolicy the use of daylight will be from considered cleaning chemicals custodial training a minimum. provides a Minimum Efficiency Reporting (MERV) of 13 or better. Filtration should beand applied to process bothatreturn and outside onValue their merits. 2. A contractual or procedural requirement for operations staff to comply with the guidelines, including a written program for training air that is to be delivered as supply air. 1 ❑Provide containment drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of hazardous liquid wastes in places where water and chemical Achieve direct line of sight toand theimplementation. outdoor environment via vision glazing between 2’6” and 7’6” above finish District/Architect Pending concentrate mixing occurs for laboratory purposes. 3. A clear set of acceptable performance level standards by which to measure progress or achievement, such as Green Seal

we do not

qualify

Credit 8.2

1

Daylight & Views, Views for 90% of Spaces

Pendergast Elementary K-8 School OW Project # 07_046

1

floor for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas. Determine the area with direct line of sight standard GS-37 (seethat www.greenseal.org) or criteria: California Code of Regulations, Title 17 Section 94509, VOC standards for cleaning May not be possible to achieve with all by totaling the regularly occupied square footage meets the following products to drawn www.calregs.com, click on ôCalifornia Page 6 the of 8 4/12/10 classroom windows at least 3'-4" to 4'-0" above ❑ In plan view, area is within sight(go lines from perimeter vision glazing. Code of Regulationsö and perform a keyword search for ô94509ö). 4. Documentation of the ❑ In section view, a direct sight line can be drawn fromprogramÆs the area to housekeeping perimeter visionpolicies glazing.and environmental cleaning solution specifications, including a list of AFF. Update: we don't have any classroom approved and prohibited chemicals and practices. thatofthe Line of sight may be drawn through interior glazing. For private offices, the entireDemonstrate square footage theproducts office used in the project are non-hazardous, have a low environmental impact, and the to criteria set forth in #3 above. can be counted if 75% or more of the area has direct linemeet of sight perimeter vision glazing. ForConcentrated classrooms cleaning products should be utilized when available. glazing below 4'-0". and other multi-occupant spaces, the actual square footage with direct line of sight to perimeter vision glazing 1 The functional goal of creating a collaborative, flexible and secure environment that provides engaging and immersive learning is counted. opportunities is approached from the perspective of engendering a heuristic. A heuristic (used as a noun) is enabling discovery or Design classrooms and other core learning spaces to meet the Reverberation Time (RT) Impact Insulation learning for oneself, objectified. Learning is not relegated to and the traditional confines of the building environment and to the broader Class (IIC) requirements of ANSI Standard Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements academic goalsS12.60-2002, for a K-8 school, but engages the site as a whole, especially on the integrated sustainable principles. and Guidelines for Schools. The Also notion designofclassrooms andisother core learning spaces to meet sustainability considered more holistically than the Sound stated Transmisgoal of achieving a LEED rating. The site is viewed as a sion Class (STC) requirements, excepting windows, which meet annegotiated STC ratingwith, of at not least container of manifestations of must energy to be as35. tabula rasa. Found conditions are treated as opportunities to ‘make Possible. Need to meet acoustical performace AND better’, and create amenity infrastructures consistent with sustainable design principles. The existing rows of mature pine trees prerequisite. This point may be piggy backed OPTION 1 therefore become ‘shade infrastructure’ and prime candidates to occupy focal points in outdoor space. Architect Pending be possible with the pre-req. Need to May determine any Using the methodology described in Standard S12.60-2002, achieve a maximum background noiserealm of ‘pictorial green space’ between built forms, Landscaping – represents the design process, not asunoccupied a noun in the conventional Acoustical level in classrooms and other primary learning spaces of: consultant costs involved. Update: will attempt but as a verb, a theoretical framework that symbolizes building a site. Walls, are viewed diagrammatically as limiting elements, and Pending Engineer 40 dBA (1 Point) broadly spoken don’t simply subtend buildings but program. Program represents not just spatial and functional intent but also to hire a consultant and see if we qualify if 35 dBA (2 Points) environmental and experiential, indoor and outdoor. The type of program primarily enabled is predisposed by orientation: north-south and only if we need a point or two to put us OPTION 2 walls traverse the site and are in essence ‘a landscape’ of shade infrastructure; east-west walls traverse the site and enable over a certain certification level. Design classrooms and other core learning spaces using the methodology in the 2003 Applications indoor/outdoor spatial and functional programslisted in addition. The HVAC dynamic interface of volumetric archetypes in such a landscape ASHRAE Handbook, Chapter 47 on Sound and Vibration Control, and achieve an RC level of:experiences constitutes the aesthetic of the project. heuristic, "place-form", resolved and detailed into moments and 32 (1 Point) 27 (2 Points) 1 May be possible

Don't qualify.

Credit 1.2 Credit 9

Innovation in Design: A Landscape Heuristic

Enhanced Acoustical Performance

1 2

1 1 1

Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 2 Credit 3

Innovation in Design: GreenGuard Certified Furniture Innovation in Design: >30% recycled content LEED® Accredited Professional School As A Teaching Tool

1 to 2

1 1 1

1

Yes

?

www.owp.com

A & E Team

Pending

No

31 5 40 Project Totals (pre-certification estimates) 79 Points Pendergast Elementary K-8 School OW Project # 07_046 Certified: 29-36 points, Silver: 37-43 points, Gold: 44-57 points, Platinum: 58-79 points

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May be possible Demonstration of thermodynamic principles and situatedness in design - the passive evaporative cool tower. Demonstration of sustainable design principles including a demonstration solar array, demonstrating strategies employed in reducing whole building energy use such as shaded windows, insulation, daylighting, lighting control devices, mechanical controls, efficient glazing. Demonstration of low impact interior finishes such as low voc paints, sealants, carpets. Demonstration of high recycled content materials including concrete, steel, carpets, gypsum board. Demonstration of water saving devices such as low flow faucets, sinks, urinals and water closets. Demonstration of landscape techniques.

Page 7 of 8

4/12/10

4/12/1


The Buzz:

1 Ruth Fisher Elementary School, Saddle Mountain Unified School District. 2 Papago Elementary School, Creighton Elementary School District. 3 Madison Traditional Academy, Madison Elementary School District. 4 District Office, Sedona Oak-Creek Unified School District. 5 Arizona School For the Arts Addition. 6 Roosevelt Culinary Center, Roosevelt Elementary School District

1

2

3

5

4

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Call our Education Director, Mike Sundberg, at 602.257.1764 or email him at sundberg.m@owp.com for more information.

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