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ENTERTAINMENT

Directional schools are seeing success

Vince Gill sings praises of group

Berry Tramel talks to LouisianaMonroe coach Todd Berry about the recent success of his team and other directional schools — like OSU’s next opponent.

Vince Gill says The Time Jumpers, of which he’s a member, celebrates country traditions. Gill will hold a benefit concert Sunday in Oklahoma City.

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THE OKLAHOMAN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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COVERING OKLAHOMA SINCE 1907 I

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Issuing cards instead of checks saves state money, officials say CAPITOL | LAWMAKER IS CONCERNED SOME CLIENTS, TAXPAYERS ARE BEING ASSESSED EXTRA FEES BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

State agencies that have switched to issuing debit cards instead of paper

checks to clients and taxpayers are saving Oklahoma millions of dollars a year, officials told a legislative committee Tuesday. But those same officials couldn’t come up with an

estimate whether the switch is costing clients and taxpayers extra fees by having to use debit cards instead of paper checks. “Right now there is a cloud of secrecy,” House

Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, told members of the House Government Modernization Committee. “The taxpayers are being told we’re saving mon-

INSIDE MILITARY

MISSING AIRMAN’S REMAINS IDENTIFIED The remains of an El Reno airman missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma. PAGE 11A

WEATHER

ey on the agency side, but in reality what it looks like is we’ve just shifted costs,” he said afterward. “Instead of the state agencies

WARM High: 94 Low: 65 PAGE 6B

SEE CARDS, PAGE 4A

11 YEARS LATER, REFLECTING ON 9/11

Sister says train victim was working as informant BY ANDREW KNITTLE Staff Writer aknittle@opubco.com

NORMAN — A 34-year-old woman killed by a train Saturday in Norman was mentally disturbed throughout her life and was working as an informant for the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control at the time of her death, her sister said Tuesday. A bureau spokesman said Susie Mae Cunningham was not an actual informant but confirmed that one of its agents had been in contact with her. Cunningham, who was identified by Norman police on Tuesday, SEE TRAIN, BACK PAGE

Paddled student’s mom files police report in Cordell

IN NEW YORK: Marine Neal Auricchio pays his respects Tuesday as he reads the names inscribed onto the walls of the north reflecting pool during a ceremony marking the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks at the National September 11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site in New York. Read the story on Page 2A. AP PHOTOS

BY MEGAN ROLLAND Staff Writer mrolland@opubco.com

To view a gallery of photos from 9/11 memorial services, scan the QR code or go to NewsOK.com.

12-year-old son came home from Cordell Elementary School with bruises from a paddling, she filed a police report against the principal even though her husband had given permission for the swats. “I expected his bottom to maybe be red, but he had a bruise that was 8 centimeters by 7 centimeters on each butt cheek and the bruises lasted for three days,” Drew said. “I feel that that was excessive force.”

We offer praise to You, dear God, for Your love and grace give us the hope of salvation. Amen. 5D 1B 1E 8E

FAMILY HEALTH COSTS CLIMB IN PENNSYLVANIA: Items in memory of Mark Bingham, one of the 40 passengers and crew of United Flight 93, are seen Tuesday at The Wall of Names at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa.

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AT THE PENTAGON: A woman wipes her eyes as President Barack Obama speaks Tuesday at the Pentagon Memorial in Washington, D.C., during a 9/11 anniversary service.

SEE CORDELL, PAGE 3A

Crossword Opinion Sports TV

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Volume 121, 251 Five sections Copyright 2012 The Oklahoma Publishing Co., Oklahoma City All rights reserved

A QUICK EXIT FOR CONGRESS? Congress members have only been back in session for a couple of days, but they were already anticipating a quick exit from Washington.

ONLINE

CORDELL — When Linda Drew’s

IN BRIEF

An annual survey shows that the nation’s problem of unaffordable medical care is anything but solved. PAGE 1B

ONLINE

Egyptian protesters storm U.S. Embassy

SCAN IT Scan the QR code below to view articles and related multimedia in this section.

Egyptian protesters on Tuesday climbed the walls of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo and brought down an American flag, replacing it with a black flag with an Islamic inscription. They were protesting a film they deemed offensive to Muslims. PAGE 6A AP PHOTO


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE

NEWS, TOO

FLAMING LIPS PLAN FREE SHOW Oklahoma City-based psychedelic rockers The Flaming Lips will play a free hometown show Oct. 26 at the Zoo Amphitheatre. “Freak Night” is touted as “the largest costume party in the Midwest.” New Fumes and Stardeath and White Dwarfs will share the bill with the Lips. The venue announced on Twitter (@ZooAmp) that it will be the last show of its 2012 season. The concert also is billed as a farewell party for Innervisions and Facilities Management, the companies that have booked and operated the amphitheater for the past decade. In June, Oklahoma City Zoo trustees approved negotiating a contract with 3Horse Productions, to take over operations of the Zoo Amphitheatre. For more information, go to www.zooamp.com. BRANDY MCDONNELL, ENTERTAINMENT WRITER

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EXTRA

Find these stories on The Oklahoman’s digital editions. These have been selected and added specifically for The Oklahoman’s digital readers. Because of space limitations, the full articles are not available in today’s printed editions. I Alzheimer drug may stabilize brain plaque, study finds I Nielsen shows how people use TV differently Construction of One World Trade Center in New York is seen Tuesday across the Hudson River as a runner glides his hand at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J., along the wall of “Empty Sky,” New Jersey’s memorial to the 749 people from the state lost in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. AP PHOTOS

Fewer 9/11 families attend 11th anniversary observance BY JENNIFER PELTZ Associated Press

Go to Oklahoman.com/subscribe to get access. It’s free for print subscribers.

NEWSOK POLL Results for the question: Do you participate in fantasy football? Yes: 19 percent No: 81 percent Wednesday’s question: Should the ex-SEAL who wrote the book on the bin Laden raid be punished? Scan the QR code at the right to vote, or go to NewsOK.com.

WEDNESDAY’S EXCLUSIVE DEALS

NEW YORK — Americans

marked the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks Tuesday in familiar but subdued ceremonies that put grieving families ahead of politicians and suggested it’s time to move on after a decade of remembrance. In past years, thousands gathered at the World Trade Center site in New York, the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pa., to read the names of nearly 3,000 victims killed in the worst terror attack in U.S. history. But many felt last year’s 10th anniversary was an emotional turning point for public mourning. For the first time, elected officials didn’t speak at events. Fewer families attended the ceremonies this year, and some cities canceled their remembrances. “I feel much more relaxed” this year, said Jane Pollicino, at ground zero Tuesday morning to mourn her husband, who was killed at the trade center. “After the ninth anniversary, that next day, you

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Memphis, Tenn., firefighter Kenneth Brown rolls up flags before the start of a short parade with Memphis-area first responders to start the annual September 11th Fire Services Memorial at the Fire Museum of Memphis on Tuesday.

started building up to the 10th year. This feels a lot different, in that regard.” As bagpipes played at the year-old Sept. 11 memorial in New York, families clutching balloons, flowers and photos of loved ones bowed silently at 8:46 a.m., the time the first hijacked jetliner crashed into the trade center’s north tower. Bells tolled to mark when planes crashed into the second tower, the Pentagon and a

Pennsylvania field, and when each tower fell. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama marked the moment in a ceremony on the White House’s south lawn, and then laid a white wreath at the Pentagon. A crowd of fewer than 200 in New York swelled to about 1,000 by late Tuesday morning. A few hundred attended ceremonies at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania.

Allied military forces marked the date at NATO’s headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan, with a tribute to more than 3,000 foreign troops killed in the decade-long war. For the election-year anniversary, Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney pulled negative ads and avoided campaign rallies. Romney met firefighters in Chicago and addressed National Guard members in Nevada.

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WHAT YOU’RE READING Top stories on NewsOK.com for the last 24 hours: 1. Thunder signing James Harden ‘might’ be impossible 2. UPDATE: A woman found dead in car crash in Oklahoma City identified 3. Oklahoma football: Defensive back Jesse Paulsen thrown into the fire 4. Soaring water bills anger residents of Oklahoma’s Logan County 5. Oklahoma football: Defensive tackle Casey Walker returns to practice 6. Oklahoma State football: Bill Young to the rescue? 7. Crashes, arrest follow police pursuit in northwest Oklahoma City 8. Edmond police identify man shot to death in home 9. Oklahoma City mother, daughter accused in illegal dentistry case turn themselves in 10. Oklahoma football: Justin Brown has a home in Oklahoma For a complete list of top viewed stories, go to NewsOK.com/top-ten.

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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Cordell: Oklahoma law allows for corporal punishment FROM PAGE 1A

The principal hit her son twice with a wooden paddle. The district attorney in the case didn’t bring charges, saying this instance of corporal punishment was clearly not against the law. Oklahoma is one of about 20 states to allow corporal punishment in schools. From a ruler across the knuckles to a wood paddle to the behind, every state school district drafts its own policy for corporal punishment. Some ban it, and some highly regulate it. Cordell Schools Superintendent Brad Overton said the district’s policy gives parents the choice to opt out of corporal punishment in the beginning of the year. If a student doesn’t have an opt-out form on file, Overton said parents are contacted before corporal punishment is administered and given options. Another certified teacher must be present for the punishment, he said. Overton said those policies were followed. Drew’s husband was given the option of “twoswats and be done with it,� Linda Drew said, or several days of detention or inschool suspension. He chose the swats. “I feel that my son needed to be punished and

shouldn’t be fighting in school, but he doesn’t need to be beat,� Linda Drew said. Drew said she took her son to Cordell Memorial Hospital, where they filed a police report against Paul Pankhurst, the junior high school principal who administered the corporal punishment.

volved we’re going to look at it, it doesn’t matter what ‌ but again the law is pretty specific. That’s allowed.â€? State statute specifically allows parents, teachers and other adults to use “ordinary force as a means of discipline, including but not limited to spanking, switching or paddling.â€?

DA finds no crime

DHS says it has no jurisdiction in case

District Attorney Dennis Smith, who oversees five counties including Washita County, where Drew’s son attends Cordell Public Schools, said his office reviewed the police report and found that no crime had been committed. “Everything was done within the law properly,� Smith said. “Anytime a child is in-

The Cordell police report said that in interviews with all faculty members involved, there “was no sign of excessive force during the administration of the punishment.� Determination of injury is the key when the Department of Human Services considers whether corporal punishment has crossed the line in a home,

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a department spokesman said. “Punishment crosses the line when an injury is involved,� said Mark Beutler, spokesman for DHS, emphasizing the department has no jurisdiction in the educational arena. “In a home situation, we look at several variables. Those include the age of the child, was an injury sustained, and if so, the location and severity of the

injury.� Overton said corporal punishment is one of several options that his staff uses. “It’s just another option as a consequence for students to try to correct behavior,� Overton said. “That’s what discipline is about, trying to correct behavior or inappropriate behavior.� Another state statute specifically prohibits the

state Education Board from interfering with a school’s disciplinary policy. So change either would have to occur locally or at the legislative level. Drew said she is going to take the issue of the district policy to the school board for consideration. “I realize it’s legal in the state, but the school district itself can change their policy,� she said.


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Cards: Legislator requests study FROM PAGE 1A

paying for it, the taxpayers are footing the bill for millions of dollars in unwanted fees and charges. So at the end of the day, they may actually be paying more than they were paying when the state agencies were paying to run their systems. I just want to shine a light on it and get to the bottom of this.”

New state law In the past, the Oklahoma Tax Commission has printed and mailed paper checks to those who don’t or can’t use direct deposit. But a state law that took effect this year requires all state transactions to be conducted electronically. A third-party vendor, chosen by competitive bidding, was selected for the debit cards. Xerox ACS has the contract for the Oklahoma Tax Commission, the Department of Human Services and the Employment Security Commission. Those who get the card can cash it in at some banks for free in most cases, but those who keep a balance on the card may incur fees. In most cases, the state doesn’t pay the cost for the debit cards, and the debit card company mails out the cards. But Inman said he is concerned about the cost to those who get the cards, such as in fees or in other costs passed on by the bank. Inman, who asked for the interim study on the issue, said he has been trying to find the cost to taxpayers for the past six months. “It should be readily available to say here’s how much money the banks made off the state of Oklahoma in the contract that they signed with them, but we can’t get that information,” he said Bobby Stem, a lobbyist for Xerox ACS, said he had been hired by the company recently and didn’t have

House Minority Leader Scott Inman

any figures to give to committee members. He later released a statement from Ken Ericson, director of corporate communications for Xerox ACS, in Washington, D.C: “The service that Xerox provides the state lets people receive their funds faster and more convenient than with paper checks and also offers multiple ways to access funds without incurring fees. We appreciate the discussion in today’s interim study and look forward to working with our partner agencies and the members of the Oklahoma Legislature to make sure the citizens of Oklahoma are best served.” Orland Olandese, of Del City, told committee members he didn’t like the debit card. He preferred getting a check; he apparently didn’t fill out a preference on his state income tax form, and the debit card is the default option. The other option is direct deposit. “Change it back to the way it was,” he said.

The options Tony Mastin, administrator of the Tax Commission, said the agency prefers taxpayers have refunds deposited directly to their bank accounts. “The direct deposit is the way to go,” he said. But Inman said about 10 percent of Oklahomans don’t have bank accounts, and they have no option. He asked whether the Tax Commission could give taxpayers a third option of having a check sent to them.

Martin said a paper check option would result in more taxpayers wanting paper checks. The Tax Commission is expected to save about $500,000 this year by offering only direct deposit or debit cards, he said. About 71 percent of the 1 million state taxpayers getting an income tax refund this year opted for direct deposit, he said. That compares with 52 percent a year ago. The debit card carries a MasterCard logo and is accepted by most retailers. Taxpayers also can go to any MasterCard member bank or credit union and perform one free transaction — such as getting their entire refund in cash, Mastin said. Oklahoma banks and credit unions are obligated under MasterCard rules to provide that one free cash transaction. The debit card also may be used at any automated teller machine in the MoneyPass network. While there are several of those ATMs in the Oklahoma City metro area, the network doesn’t cover all of Oklahoma, Inman said. Martin said taxpayers must activate the debit card by calling a toll-free number. Taxpayers are limited to three free calls to the debit card company; some taxpayers didn’t understand that and were charged for additional calls. Martin said the company has waived most of those charges. Martin said taxpayers who received paper checks would be charged to cash those checks at most grocery and retail stores, with fees ranging from a percentage of the check to a $3 flat fee.

Potential savings Committee members were told electronic distribution of state payments could save other state agencies an additional $2 million each year. John Miley, general

counsel for the Employment Security Commission, said the agency pays 20,000 to 30,000 claims a week. t’s been using debit cards for several years. Paper checks cost more to produce and mail, and it takes more state workers to process them, he said. The federal government, which hasn’t increased its allocation to the agency since 1982, has encouraged the agency to stop using checks because of the expense. The agency no longer has check-writing machines and paper, and going back to paper checks “would be extremely expensive,” he said. “The (debit card) system has worked very well for us,” Miley said. Few complaints have come from those receiving the debit cards, he said. The cards don’t get lost in the mail, and it’s easier to keep track of the funds. Jerry Davidson, director of electronic payment systems for DHS, said his agency issues debit cards for food assistance, child support, and child and adult day care. Money for families receiving temporary assistance also is distributed through debit cards. He said people have the option of either getting a debit card or having the money directly deposited into their banking accounts; about 73 percent choose the debit card. About 80 percent of those receiving child support payments get the money in debit cards, Davidson said. About 96 percent of those receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Family payments choose the cards. The cards also reduce fraud, especially in child care payments, he said. Going to electronic payments has reduced the number of agency employees who process the payment from 23 to seven, Davidson said.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

ANALYSIS

Lawmakers consider fast exit from D.C. BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Efforts in Congress to provide emergency drought aid to hard-hit farmers and overhaul crop subsidy programs appear to be falling victim to Washington gridlock. Talk of action now to avoid sending the economy over the “fiscal cliff” is just that: talk. Indeed, lawmakers have only been back in session for a couple of days since returning from their August recess, but on Tuesday were already anticipating a quick exit from Washington to hit the campaign trail — with the only significant accomplishment being a mustpass bill to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the month. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, started the day on a sour note by telling reporters after a closed-door morning caucus with the GOP rank and file that he’s not confident Congress can reach a budget deal late this year. A couple of hours later, the Democratic chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, Sen. Debbie Stabenow, of Michigan,

again threw cold water on GOP hopes of passing a short-term extension of food and farm programs when they expire Sept. 30. For his part, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, DNev., was far more hopeful that “some kind of agreement” would be reached. Reid’s GOP counterpart, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, let the cat out of the bag just minutes after Reid’s remarks. He said the sixmonth spending bill, called a continuing resolution, would be the last order of business until the postelection lame duck session in November. The House is set to pass the continuing resolution on Thursday, which means the Senate would pass the measure next week before making its getaway. On the food and farm bill impasse, McConnell said: “I don’t believe that we ought to let the current farm bill expire if we’re unable at this point to pass a replacement.” Hope for that is fading, however; Congress is instead on track to fund food stamps through the continuing resolution. The 2012 budget year ends on Sept. 30.


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWS

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State schools get mixed reviews in annual report BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

A national ranking of colleges and universities showed mixed results for institutions of higher learning in Oklahoma. U.S. News and World Report’s 2013 Best Colleges report was released Wednesday. The report ranks schools nationwide based on a number of criteria, including selectivity, graduation rates and average freshman retention rates. All of Oklahoma’s three national universities remained the same or moved down in this year’s rankings. The University of Oklahoma was ranked at 101st out of 281 universities, the same ranking the university received in 2012. Both Oklahoma State University and the University of Tulsa moved down in rank — OSU from 132nd in 2012 to 139th in 2013, and TU from 75th in 2012 to 83rd in 2013. The rankings divide schools into categories based on size and other factors, said Bob Morse, the magazine’s director of data research. Those categories allow editors to compare schools that have broadly similar missions. Universities are scored on data they report to the U.S. Department of Education and also on perceived prestige. Respondents to a survey rate universities based on their reputations, Morse said, and those scores make up a part of universities’ overall grades. Although its overall ranking didn’t improve, OU showed signs of progress in some of the report’s categories. OU’s sixyear graduation rate edged up from 64 percent in the 2012 rankings to 68 percent for 2013. OU spokesman Michael Nash said university officials were “pleased but not surprised” by the rankings. “While we do not place great emphasis on these rankings because they’re not based upon the actual evaluation of the quality of our academic programs, the University of Oklahoma has continued to grow in the number of highly ranked academic degree programs offered to our students at an affordable cost,” Nash said in an email. OSU’s rankings included an improvement in the university’s six-year graduation rate. The 2012 rankings show a graduation rate of 59 percent, based on 2010 data. In the 2013 rankings, that figure climbed to 62 percent, based on 2011 numbers. OSU officials launched a program in 2011 designed to improve freshman retention and, ultimately, boost the university’s sixyear graduation rate. The program, called the Learning and Student Success Opportunity Center, or LASSO Center, offers services such as tutoring and advising to students who are at risk of dropping out. Despite the university’s drop in rank, OSU spokesman Gary Shutt said the university has a great deal of momentum toward teaching, research and outreach. Although it dropped in rank, TU still held the highest score of Oklahoma’s three national universities. But the school also ranked 12th on a list of schools whose students graduate deeply in debt. According to the ranking, 42 percent of TU students graduated with at least some student debt. Oklahoma’s regional universities fared better in the rankings, with several Oklahoma City schools moving up in rank. . Oklahoma City University, Oklahoma Christian University, the University of Central Oklahoma and Southwestern Oklahoma

SCAN IT Scan the QR code below to view the rankings.

State University all moved up in this year’s ranking. Oral Roberts University remained at 53rd place, and Southern Nazarene University dropped from 76th in the western region in 2012 to 81st in 2013. ORU also posted the

second highest average student debt at graduation in the western region, with graduates carrying an average of $43,712. According to the report, 70 percent of ORU students had debt at graduation. University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Wesleyan University and Rogers State University were ranked on lists for regional institutions with the smallest average student debt. In the regional colleges category, Oklahoma Baptist University dropped from fifth place to third place, and Oklahoma Wesleyan University moved from 10th to seventh place.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

TODAY’S TOP STORIES

NATION | WORLD

NATION

EX-PROFESSOR PLEADS TO MURDER

Protesters chant slogans Tuesday amid orange smoke outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. The largely ultra conservative Islamists climbed the walls of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, went into the courtyard and brought down the flag, replacing it with a black flag with Islamic inscription, in protest of a film deemed offensive to Islam. AP PHOTO

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — An ex-professor pleaded guilty Tuesday to fatally shooting three colleagues and wounding three others at the University of Alabama in Huntsville in 2010, court officials said. Amy Bishop, 47, pleaded guilty to one count of capital murder involving two or more people and three counts of attempted murder.

FIVE CHARGED IN TERRORISM PLOT SAVANNAH, Ga. — Prosecutors in southeast Ge-

orgia have charged five more men in connection with an anti-government militia that authorities say was led by Army soldiers from Fort Stewart. Atlantic Judicial Circuit District Attorney Tom Durden said Tuesday the men are accused of committing thefts, burglaries and auto break-ins to fund the militia group.

WORLD

FACTORY FIRES LEAVE DOZENS DEAD LAHORE, Pakistan — Factory fires in two of Pakis-

tan’s major cities killed 45 people and injured dozens more on Tuesday. Workers recounted how their colleagues were trapped behind blocked exits, and firefighters said that one reason why the blazes were so deadly is that the buildings — a shoe factory in Lahore and a garment factory in Karachi — lacked clear escape routes. FROM WIRE SERVICES

Egyptian protesters storm U.S. Embassy BY SARAH EL DEEB AND MAGGIE MICHAEL Associated Press

CAIRO — Mainly ultraconservative protesters climbed the walls of the U.S. Embassy in Egypt’s capital Tuesday and brought down the American flag, replacing it with a black Islamist flag to protest a U.S.-produced film attacking the Prophet Muhammad. Hours later, armed men in eastern Libya also stormed the U.S. consulate there and set it on fire as anger spread. It was the first time ever that the U.S. Embassy in Cairo has been breached.

U.S. officials said no Americans were reported harmed. The unrest in Cairo began when hundreds of protesters marched to the downtown embassy, gathering outside its walls and chanting against the movie and the U.S. “Say it, don’t fear: Their ambassador must leave,” the crowd chanted. Dozens of protesters then scaled the embassy walls, and several went into the courtyard and took down the flag from a pole. They brought it back to the crowd outside, which tried to burn it, but failing that tore it apart. The protesters on the

wall then raised on the flagpole a black flag with a Muslim declaration of faith, “There is no god but God and Muhammad is his prophet.” The flag, similar to the banner used by alQaida, is commonly used by ultraconservatives around the region. The protest was sparked by outrage over a video being promoted by an extreme anti-Muslim Egyptian Christian campaigner in the United States. A 14minute trailer of the movie depicts Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in an overtly ridiculing way, showing him having sex and calling for massacres.

Some Chicago parents offer support to striking teachers BY DON BABWIN Associated Press

CHICAGO — As Chicago teachers walked the picket lines for a second day, they were joined by many of the very people who are most inconvenienced by their walkout: the parents who must now scramble to find a place for children to pass the time or for baby sitters. Mothers and fathers — some with their kids in tow — are marching with the teachers. Other parents are honking their encouragement from cars or planting yard signs that announce their support in English and Spanish. Unions are still hallowed organizations in Chicago, and the teachers union holds a special place of honor in many households where children often grow up to join the same police,

firefighter or trade unions as their family. “I’m going to stay strong, behind the teachers,” said the Rev. Michael Grant, who joined teachers on the picket line Tuesday. “My son says he’s proud, ‘You are supporting my teacher.’ ” But one question looming over the contract talks is whether parents will continue to stand behind teachers if students are left idle for days or weeks. Mary Bryan, the grandmother of two students at Shoop Academy on the city’s far South Side, supports the teachers because she see “the frustration, the overwork they have.” A protracted labor battle, she said, would “test the support” of many families. Parents “should stick with them, but they might demand teachers go back

to work,” Bryan added. To win friends, the union has engaged in something of a publicity campaign, telling parents repeatedly about problems with schools and the barriers that have made it more difficult to serve their kids. It was a shrewd tactic, said Robert Bruno, professor of labor and employment relations at the University of Illinois. Already, there are some parents who don’t understand why teachers would not readily accept a contract offering a 16 percent raise over four years. Rodney Espiritu, a stayat-home dad whose 4year-old son just started preschool, said the low test scores he’s read about suggest teachers don’t have “much of a foot to stand on.”

Israeli premier ratchets up feud with U.S. over Iranian program BY AMY TEIBEL Associated Press

JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister, ratcheting up a public feud with the U.S. over Iran, made it clear Tuesday that he was dissatisfied with Washington’s refusal to spell out what would provoke a U.S.-led military strike against Iranian nuclear facilities. Washington wants to give diplomacy and bruising sanctions more time to try to pressure Tehran to abandon its suspect nuclear work. But Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says peaceful methods are not working, and has warned repeatedly that Iran is getting perilously close to ac-

quiring a nuclear bomb. “The world tells Israel, ‘Wait. There’s still time,’ ”Netanyahu said Tuesday. “And I say: ‘Wait for what? Wait until when?’ Those in the international community who refuse to put red lines before Iran don’t have a moral right to place a red light before Israel.”

Although the United States has accused Iran of trying to develop nuclear weapon capability under the cover of a peaceful program, the Obama administration has said it does not believe Iran has yet decided whether to build an atomic bomb — if it in fact develops the ability to do so.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Troubled prisoner dies in custody BY BEN FOX Associated Press

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The latest prisoner to die at the U.S. base in Guantanamo, Cuba, was identified Tuesday as a Yemeni man with a history of mental illness who battled guards inside the prison and challenged his confinement all the way to the Supreme Court. Adnan Latif spent more than a decade at Guantanamo, where he repeatedly went on hunger strike and once slashed his wrist and hurled the blood at his visiting lawyer. He also received some mental health treatment at the detainee hospital, according to his lawyers and court records. The government accused him of training with the Taliban in Afghanistan but he had never been charged and the military said there were no plans to prosecute him. Latif was found unconscious in his cell inside the maximum security section of Guantanamo known as Camp 5 on Saturday and pronounced dead a short time later, according to statement from the U.S. military’s Miami-based Southern Command. It said the cause of death remains under investigation. He was the ninth prisoner to die at Guantanamo. Latif’s legal challenge, turned back by the Supreme Court in June, was considered a major setback in the battle against the policy of holding men for more than decade without charge at the U.S. base in Cuba. At one point, Latif was cleared for release. But the U.S. has ceased returning any prisoners to Yemen.

NATION | WORLD

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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Syrian hospital treats civil war wounded BY PAUL SCHEMM Associated Press

ALEPPO, Syria — It had been a calm day in Aleppo’s Shifa Hospital, said Dr. Osman al-Haj Osman, his face etched with exhaustion from just three hours of sleep. Then, a man burst in bearing the shrieking bundle of a 6year-old girl who’d had a machine-gun bullet rip through both her knees. Two months into the battle for Syria’s largest city, civilians are still bearing the brunt of the daily assaults of helicopter gunships, roaring jets and troops fighting in the streets. Shoving aside orderlies and armed rebels, the man deposited Fatima Qassem onto a gurney as a nurse began cutting away the blood-soaked bandages. A doctor reached in and pulled out an inch-long

A Syrian child reacts Tuesday while being treated by a doctor in a hospital in Aleppo, Syria. AP PHOTO

fragment of metal. There was a gush of blood. Large sections of bone and muscle were missing. She cried out plaintively for “Baba,” because the man who brought her was not her father — just someone who had rushed

her across town to the hospital. The family was hopefully on its way. There was a piercing scream as the nurse picked her up again, carrying her into a small operating theater. Her cries subsided into a steady moan.

Her father, Abdu Qassem, came in 15 minutes later, his shirt covered with blood, and asked the orderly behind the desk how she was doing. Qassem said their car was raked by machine-gun fire from government troops. In the operating room, Fatima’s crying grew muffled as an anesthetic was administered and her mouth went slack. Osman cleaned the blood away from the wound and tried to repair the damage. The 30-year-old doctor estimated that 80 percent of the patients are civilians, wounded by falling buildings and exploding shells from the constant bombardment that government forces mete out to the parts of the city outside their control. Forces loyal to President Bashar Assad have been increasingly relying on the

government’s artillery and air power to fight the tenacious rebels who so far refuse to be dislodged from Aleppo. The city is Syria’s commercial hub, and its middle and upper classes were bastions of support for Assad. If the rebels took such a key city, it would give them a quasi-capital to complement the large swaths of territory they control in the north, up to the Turkish border. Osman said the rebels he treats mostly have gunshot wounds from the snipers scattered over the many front lines. “What day is it? I don’t know. What time is it? I don’t know,” Osman said, adding that he goes to sleep at 4 a.m. and wakes up at 8 a.m. — unless he’s roused earlier. “My life is just the wounded and the dead,” he said.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

MONOLOGUE

OPINION

The economy is so bad, I saw Mitt Romney at the supermarket buying Lobster Helper.”

OUR VIEWS | PRESENTATIONS BEFORE OKC SCHOOL BOARD

JAY LENO

Public Q&A’s would serve school board and patrons Fraser

OR three hours on a recent Monday night, members of the Oklahoma City School Board listened and asked questions about the operations and academic achievement of the charter schools in the district. What percentage of students successfully transitions from eighth to ninth grade? What’s the attendance rate? Why are test scores low? What’s the faculty turnover rate? Those are good questions — important ones that school board members should be asking. Board member Lyn Watson made perhaps the most telling request of the evening, at least from a policy perspective. She asked that all of the district’s schools make similar presentations. Board Chairwoman Angela Monson said such reports should be made to the board’s academic performance committee, which would then report to the board. We question whether Monson’s suggested approach is the best one. This isn’t a debate about charter schools versus traditional schools. They’re all public schools, serving the children of Oklahoma City with taxpayer money. It’s encouraging to hear school leaders delivering their results and answering questions from the people elected by our community to safeguard the education of the children and the taxpayer money allotted for that purpose. It’s democracy in action. But to the extent the practice of a public accounting is good for charter schools, wouldn’t it be good for other public schools as well? As Watson suggests, the idea of dozens of school presentations in one night isn’t feasible. But over a period of time, board members might find themselves enlightened and with a better understanding of how their decision-making plays out at the school level on everything from staffing formulas to volunteer policies and of the needs of individual schools or groups of schools.

F

To the extent the practice of a public accounting is good for charter schools, wouldn’t it be good for other public schools as well? Such discussions might even contribute to the public understanding. Schools in Oklahoma City face staggering challenges. The demographics are tough. As one charter school leader pointed out, the issues in the communities where children live present a serious test for schools. But giving leaders at traditional schools a chance to state in a public way where their school is doing well and the areas that need improvement should be viewed as an opportunity to create more dialogue about public education in Oklahoma City. That would be even more the case if the school district would follow through on talk about finding a way to broadcast its meetings. Transparency is the buzzword to describe what we’re suggesting. But it’s more than that. The school board is absolutely obligated to oversee the business of the district, which tends to dominate routine meeting agendas. But members shouldn’t skip the chance to connect that obligation with the even bigger obligation to help students succeed academically. Here’s just one example: Wouldn’t it be good to ask a principal if a large teacher training expense the board approved was well received and useful for faculty? School board service is typically a thankless job that takes way more time than most people probably realize. But the decisions the boards make and the questions members ask are critically important to our city’s kids and their future. The more they know, the better decisions they can make.

GARY VARVEL/THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

A hues edge: Safety first: Solons should address Color Oklahoma red drinking and boating in terms of giving Oklahoma lawmakers found a way a few years ago to hold youngsters accountable on state lakes and rivers. Will they ever do the same with adults? The highway patrol’s marine enforcement division hopes so. Members of that unit told a House committee last week that they’d like to see stronger laws regarding operating under the influence. Presently, boaters 21 and older can drink while operating watercraft, so long as their blood alcohol level doesn’t exceed the legal limit. We understand that people go to the lake to escape the daily grind. But if it’s an arrestable Oklahoma Highway Patrol boat offense to drive an automobile with an open container of beer on hand, why is it acceptable for someone operating a boat to do the same? It’s the culture — laws on the lakes have always been different from those for the roads. But boats and personal watercraft travel at tremendous speeds. In addition, boaters 17 and older don’t have to pass any sort of competency test. They can simply get out on the water and go. Those in the 12-to-16 age group must take a boater education course, under legislation passed in 2006. There have been no fatalities in that age group since the law went into effect, according to the lake patrol. Instead, the most problematic demographic is 25- to 40year-olds. Drownings of adults involve alcohol a majority of the time. State Rep. Pat Ownbey, R-Ardmore, said he will consider drafting legislation next year requiring boating education classes for adults born after a certain date. Those who testified before the House committee said they’d welcome further education requirements. But stiffer laws regarding alcohol consumption would be the bigger help. If lawmakers want to make our lakes and rivers safer for everyone, they’ll listen to the experts and stiffen the penalties for operating a boat while under the influence. That might anger some constituents, but it also could save lives.

At their national convention, Republicans touted the ability of the individual to achieve success. Democrats spent their convention arguing that people are unlikely to prosper without government intervention. Under the GOP, Democrats claim, low-income and middle-class families would be trampled in a Darwinian financial struggle. Fostering success while also caring for the poor, they argue, requires policies to redistribute wealth from successful Americans to others through social programs. Figures from The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s “How America Gives” report bolster the Republican view and undermine the Democrats’ argument. Those who experience personal success not only do well for themselves, but also good for others. That’s particularly true of red-state voters who typically support Republicans. Blue-state voters, it turns out, are far less generous with their own money than they are with other peoples’ money. The Chronicle analyzed the median percentage of income residents give to charity. The eight states ranking the highest voted Republican in the last presidential contest; the seven lowest-ranking states supported Barack Obama. Oklahoma was the 11th most-charitable state; Oklahoma City was the seventh most-charitable metropolitan area. The wildcatter spirit remains a core part of our identity, but Oklahomans know selfreliance is not incompatible with compassion. The Democrats assume the wealthy hoard their money and the poor have no opportunity without government. Those views have the unintended consequence of undermining personal charity. Because blue-state citizens assume government is responsible for the poor, their personal giving reflects that view. In red states, citizens know that taking responsibility for one’s own life means it’s also up to you to help your neighbor. Those who believe in individual responsibility for career success also believe in supporting those in need with the fruits of that success. Allowing citizens, rather than government elites, to guide those decisions maximizes the benefit for the poor.

“THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JAY LENO”

Robinson’s lost ethic

After all the oratory at both political conventions, one line stands out. It was from Michelle Obama, talking about her late father, Fraser Robinson, and his insistence on paying his small portion of her college tuition bills on time. “You see, for my dad,” she said, “that’s what it meant to be a man.” In one moving sentence, she opened a vista on a life of self-sacrifice. The narrative arc of her rendition of his life bent upward, and understandably so. He was a working-class father who raised two Princeton University graduates. But she could just as easily have invoked a sense of the country’s loss. Because we don’t really make Fraser Robinsons anymore. He was a high school-educated man who married and stayed married, who worked and kept working despite considerable adversity. Whatever his relative lack of education and skills, he was a hero of character, shaped by mores that have been eroding for decades. Rich According to MiLowry chelle’s convention speech and to published accounts, her COMMENTARY father was a pump operator at the city water plant in Chicago. He was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis as a young man, and still got up to work every day. The first lady described how she watched him “grab his walker, prop himself against the sink and slowly shave and button his uniform.” When he came home, he’d reach down to lift one leg after another to make it up the stairs and greet his kids. It’s difficult to imagine a more affecting depiction of everyday dutifulness than that. With his wife of 31 years, Marian, Robinson built a family deeply invested in his children’s future. Too few men in his position now do the same. The 2010 study “When Marriage Disappears,” a publication of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia and the Institute for American Values, tells the story. In the 1970s, 73 percent of adults with a high school degree or some college were in intact first marriages. In the 2000s, 45 percent were. In the 1970s, 50 percent of blacks at that level of education were in intact first marriages. In the 2000s, 33 percent were. As recently as 1982, just 13 percent of births to people with this level of education were out of wedlock. In the late 2000s, 44 percent were. Among blacks with a high school degree or some college, the figure was 75 percent. Males with a high school education have been dropping out of the labor force for decades. One flip side is a drastic increase in the rolls of Social Security Disability Insurance, despite better medical care and less-strenuous jobs. Nicholas Eberstadt of the American Enterprise Institute points out that many of the additions are for vague conditions like mood disorders. Forty years ago, Fraser Robinson left for work in pain every day — walking on two canes — and now a small army of his fellow Americans schemes to get paid for doing nothing.

An incalculable gift Through his faithfulness, Fraser Robinson gave Michelle and her brother an incalculable gift. “The parental characteristics that employers value and are willing to pay for, such as skills, diligence, honesty, good health, and reliability, also improve children’s life chances, independent of their effect on parents’ income,” Susan Mayer writes in her book “What Money Can’t Buy.” “Children of parents with these attributes do well even when their parents do not have much income.” The tectonic plates of the culture and economy shifted since the 1960s to squeeze the likes of Fraser Robinson, at the same time the government has been subsidizing a version of the family — single-mother households — that makes him superfluous. The new norm that dispenses with duty-bound fathers is not good for families, and it is not good for men. Michelle Obama powerfully described her father’s pride. For him, to be a man was to be responsible, day after day. His quotidian courage was her windfall; that it is becoming increasingly rare is our tragedy. KING FEATURES SYNDICATE


OPINION

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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POINT OF VIEW | WHAT PROGRAMS SHOULD WE AXE?

We must all join budget cut debate BY GENE A. BUDIG AND ALAN HEAPS

MICHAEL RAMIREZ/INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

GLEANINGS

Strike tests limits of support Chicago has been a union town for as long as any living person can remember. From the West Virginia coal fields to the Detroit assembly lines, Chicago has stood shoulder to shoulder in the early days of organized labor in the struggle for a better life for working men and women. In Chicago, railroad, slaughterhouse, garment and industrial workers, among others, suffered recriminations and sometimes violence to demand rights to a just wage, humane working conditions, a reasonable workday and workweek, safe working conditions and job security. Thanks to unions, workers and their families have elevated themselves from scraping out a meager living in low-paid and dangerous jobs into the middle class. But now, the Chicago Teachers Union and its 25,000 striking teachers against 350,000 students have tested the limits of this town’s historic support. They have tested the patience of many Chicagoans

whose children are being used as pawns. And the tolerance of Chicago taxpayers to shell out more and more to support a teetering and failing institution. And the indulgence of a business and civic community that understands the consequences of labor chaos — particularly in the public school system — on the ability of Chicago to attract jobs. And they have especially tested the support of many Chicago workers who haven’t seen a pay increase, improved working conditions or better job security for years. Or the Chicagoans fired because of the lousy economy. Or those who were able only to find a new job that pays less. Or those now working two jobs (during the summers when teachers are on an extended vacation) to minimally support their families. — Chicago writer Dennis Byrne, in Tuesday’s Chicago Tribune

YOUR VIEWS

Reject false premises After reading “DNC protesters continue to march after standoff” (Associated Press, Sept. 5) it’s clear once again that we should “reject false premises.” The mindset that progressives promote to the American people is the idea that if someone else wins or is successful, you lose. Class warfare is based on the false premise that the wealthy in our nation accumulated their wealth at your expense. This mindset is known as a scarcity mentality. Many Americans haven’t had the religious or business training to differentiate this false premise from the true premise of an abundance mentality, which is believing that there are enough resources and success to share with others. Individuals with an abundance mentality are able to celebrate (and are motivated by) the success of others rather than feeling threatened by it. Progressives tout the idea that the wealthy take too big of a piece of the pie, leaving too little for the rest of us. In reality, we can bake as many pies as we want. We aren’t limited to sharing pieces of one pie. The Occupy Wall Street movement is based on the false mindset of a scarcity mentality. Socialism and communism are based on class envy and a scarcity mentality. Our Founding Fathers were inspired to create a Constitution that provides everyone equal opportunity for success without regard to the success or failure of others. This is an abundance mentality mindset. Let’s identify and then reject concepts that are based on a scarcity mentality. Scott K. Brush, Oklahoma City

WHAT SHE SAID Charles Krauthammer (Commentary, Sept. 7) noted that Michelle Obama’s comments produced “a flood of tears in the hall” that “testified to the Michelle Obama power of this spousal paean.” A paean is something that expresses enthusiastic praise. We feel your paean, Michelle, but it’s not germane. President Obama’s rhetoric hasn’t helped America over the past three years. She was spot on about one thing though: “Being president doesn’t change who you are,” she said, “It just reveals who you are.” Couldn’t have said it better myself! John D. Wyckoff, Oklahoma City

BETTER THAN WHAT? Regarding “Obama says his path leads America to a better place” (News, Sept. 7): Is that anything like being at a funeral and telling the loved ones that the deceased is now in a better place? Sharlotte Henry, Oklahoma City

FILTERED INFORMATION I watched both political conventions on C-SPAN — without the filter of the commentators and “talking heads,” both left and right. The contrast in the tone and tenor of each couldn’t have been more

Send letters to yourviews@ opubco.com or to Your Views, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. Word limit is 250. Include a postal address and telephone number. For other guidelines, go to www.newsok.com/voices/ guidelines or call (405) 475-3920.

stark. The Republican National Convention displayed a party of “grown-ups” — a party of industriousness, generosity, compassion, inclusion and independence. The Democratic National Convention displayed a party of anger, death, divisiveness, racism and dependence. It was shameful that the major networks chose to broadcast only one hour per night. How can we have an informed electorate, capable of making responsible decisions in elections, if they aren’t exposed to as much unfiltered information as possible? B.A. Bauer, Oklahoma City

PARTY PLATFORM CRUMBLES It’s devastating that the Democratic Party has been hijacked by the extreme leftists. The party scrambled to put verbiage back into the party’s platform at their convention. It was made public that God and recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel were covertly left out. A party platform represents the core beliefs of the party and forms the foundation of the presidential candidate’s campaign. The alleviation of the verbiage wasn’t just some oversight, but a covert attempt to steer the party to a totally secular party and furthering the separation of the United States from backing Israel. What’s even more disappointing, even at the urging of their candidate, it took three votes to get the verbiage back into the platform and the third vote was a toss-up. At its so-called passage, it evoked boos from a large part of the audience. These views aren’t shared by mainstream Democrats in Middle America. In “Obama policies hurting state Democratic Party” (Our Views, Sept. 5), Drew Edmonson was quoted as saying recruiting more young people is key to the party’s growth. Actually, a move back to more conservative views would get more people back in the party than recruiting young people. Matthew Dukes, Midwest City

DONE WITH DEMOCRATS After being a lifelong Democrat, I changed my registration to independent prior to the August runoff elections. The final straw was the intent to include support for gay marriage in the party platform. I won’t support or hold membership in an organization that advocates a policy in direct opposition to biblical teaching. I had requested that our state party take a stand against the support for gay marriage, but party leaders seem more in tune with the national party rather than Oklahoma members. I didn’t register Republican because of what I perceive as a lack of compassion for the poor and needy, at least by party leaders. True compassionate conservatism is what I’m looking for. For now, that means being an independent. Raymond Johnson, Ada

With the Republican presidential ticket now set, the national debate about the economy, public spending and the deficit is sure to heat up. This is a conversation in which all of us must make our opinions known. Let’s start with a look at our nation’s finances. In short, while the economy may be improving, we have more tough times and choices ahead. Three recent reports make this clear: I The U.S. Labor Department, tells us that we’re 12 million jobs short of the prerecession level of employment. I The State Budget Crisis Task Force, after studying the finances of six large states (California, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Texas and Virginia) tells us that “The existing trajectory of state spending, taxation and administrative practices cannot be sustained. The basic problem is not cyclical. It is structural. The time to act is now.” I The management consulting firm Bain and Company analyzed the finances of 1,700 public and private nonprofit colleges. It tells us that “onethird of the institutions have an unsustainable financial path” and another 28 Gene Budig percent are “at risk of slipping into an unsustainable condition.” Unfortunately, these reports reflect our broader financial health. The federal government is unable to deal with the national debt, now at more than $15 trillion. Moody’s downgraded 300 municipal bond issuers in the second quarter of 2012, the most in more than a decade. Bankruptcy filings, non-business and business, have risen from under 1 million in 2008 to 1.5 million in 2011. But all is not doom and gloom. Relative to many other countries, our finances are strong; America’s economy has been resilient in the past; and, to a great degree, we control our own destiny. But this control is predicated on a number of factors, one of which is reducing government spending. This brings us to the tough part: what programs do we want to cut and by how much? In a recent report, Andy Kohut, president of the Pew Research Center, stated that “In my years of polling, there has never been an issue such as the deficit on which there has been such a consensus

We need to tell Congress and the presidential candidates what we value. How? We must start and pursue a vigorous and unrelenting debate about budget cuts. among the public about its importance — and such a lack of agreement about acceptable solutions.” The report goes on to tell us that while 70 percent of the public believes the deficit is a major threat to our economic wellbeing, people are neither willing to reduce spending nor to raise taxes. Americans favor spending increases over decreases in 15 of 18 major policy areas (including education, Medicare, Social Security); 60 percent believe that maintaining entitlement benefits is more important than deficit reduction; and there is strong or moderate opposition to taxing employer provided health insurance, raising the gas tax or Medicare contributions, reAlan Heaps ducing federal funding to states, eliminating the home mortgage deduction, raising the Social Security retirement age and/or levying a national sales tax. So what are to do? We need to tell Congress and the presidential candidates what we value. How? We must start and pursue a vigorous and unrelenting debate about budget cuts. To get the ball rolling, here are three principles that we may want to seriously consider: I Protect investments in our future. This moves education and infrastructure to the top of the list. I Protect those who are most needy and will be most damaged by reductions. I Get the economy back up and running and, to a great degree, this means creating jobs. Georges Clemenceau, the French journalist and statesman, said, “War is too important to be left to the generals” We need to say that the budget is too important to be left to the politicians. Budig is the past president/chancellor of three major state universities and former president of Major League Baseball’s American League. Heaps is a vice president at the College Board in New York City.

POINT OF VIEW | LEVEL PLAYING FIELD URGED

States, businesses need fairness in marketplace BY BRAD HENRY AND MIKE ROUNDS

The Internet has revolutionized business and how people shop. It will continue to inspire innovation and competition while providing Americans with boundless opportunities. It also brings new challenges, including how to ensure tax parity between Main Street businesses and online retailers. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a state can’t require companies to collect state sales taxes unless the companies have a physical presence in that state. Importantly, consumers still owe the state sales taxes for online purchases. But unlike a local store, the online retailer doesn’t have to collect the tax and remit it to the state. Instead, the consumer is legally bound to pay the taxes directly to the state — a difficult requirement for the state to enforce. This year, Oklahoma will likely lose more than $200 million in uncollected taxes from online purchases. More important, the jobs of more than 170,000 individuals (more than 10 percent of Oklahoma’s workforce) who work in Brad Henry local retail stores are at risk. Oklahoma has lost as many as 16,000 jobs due to the loss of state sales tax revenue. Internet sales have increased by 15.4 percent during the past year, a rate nearly double that of overall retail sales. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, e-commerce has steadily increased as a percentage of overall retail sales from 1.6 percent in the first quarter of 2003 to 4.9 percent in the first quarter of 2012. Twenty-four states, including Oklahoma and South Dakota, have adopted the Streamlined Sales and Tax Agreement, which makes it easier for retailers who operate in multiple jurisdictions to collect and remit taxes. Other states have individually negotiated with e-retailers to begin collecting the

This year, Oklahoma will likely lose more than $200 million in uncollected taxes from online purchases. More important, the jobs of more than 170,000 individuals (more than 10 percent of Oklahoma’s workforce) who work in local retail stores are at risk. tax. The Governors’ Council of the Bipartisan Policy Center is hosting a public forum Friday at Oklahoma City University to bring attention to this issue. The governors’ council consists of a bipartisan group of former governors committed to promoting state perspectives at the federal level. Governors are doing all they can to level the playing field for their small businesses. Their stateMike Rounds by-state initiatives have created a patchwork of tax laws that’s resulted in many of the large e-retailers calling for a federal solution. Congress must act quickly to pass a federal law giving states permission to require online retailers to collect sales taxes. Again, these taxes are already due to the states, but there is no easy way for online retailers to collect and remit them. If Congress fails to act, we invite Oklahoma policymakers to join other states in challenging online retailers to create a fair playing field for local businesses. Fairness and sound tax policy aren’t just for the real world — they should apply in the virtual world as well. Henry, former governor of Oklahoma, and Rounds, former governor of South Dakota, are members of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Governors’ Council.


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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Train: Bureau says woman, agent had been in contact

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Ex-banker receives $104M from IRS BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FROM PAGE 1A

had tried to commit suicide several times before, her sister said, although video footage of the fatal accident apparently shows her trying to elude the train at the last second. Cunningham’s body was found near the Main Street rail crossing, police said. Amy Fuentes, the dead woman’s sister, said Cunningham was severely abused as a child. She said the family moved around before she and her sister finished school in the Woodward area and that most of her family still lives in Oklahoma. Fuentes, who lives in Massachusetts, described her sister as a person who struggled most of her life with mental health issues. She said Cunningham was “a really bad selfmutilator.” She spent several years in prison and tried to hang herself while incarcerated, Fuentes said. An inmate profile on the state Corrections Department’s website shows she had numerous “selfinflicted” knife wounds to her left arm. With her sister’s past, Fuentes said she was shocked to learn that the bureau was meeting with Cunningham and listening to what she had to say. Fuentes said her sister was in contact with a female bureau agent. “She had to be aware, you know, of the mental state my sister was in,” Fuentes said. “She’s always had problems … she had a very bad childhood. I just can’t believe they would let her do that.” Cunningham had multiple felony convictions dating back to 1998. She was convicted of assault and battery with a deadly weapon in 2000, state records show.

Mark Woodward, bureau spokesman, denied that Cunningham was a fullfledged informant but acknowledged the agency had a working relationship with the deceased woman. “She had conversations with our agent about possible drug and prostitution/ human trafficking activity,” Woodward said in a statement. “No, she was not an OBN informant. She did have some conversations with one of our agents, but she was not an informant.” Woodward said the bureau does “extensive backgrounds and screenings with all our informants.”

Victim tried to move Joe Faust, a spokesman for Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway, said there didn’t appear to be any foul play involved in Cunningham’s death. Faust said video footage of the incident helped investigators come to that conclusion. He also said Cunningham’s body traveled an unspecified distance before coming to rest near the Main Street rail crossing in Norman. “She was not struck at a crossing,” Faust said. “It happened away from the crossing.” Faust said a man who died Sept. 1 in Norman — near the Boyd Street crossing — committed suicide. The train that struck Cunningham could have

been going as fast as 55 mph through Norman, Faust said, but it’s not known at this time exactly how fast the train was traveling when in it struck the victim. He said the train wasn’t making a switch or slowing down at the time. Faust said a train traveling at 55 mph takes about one mile to come to stop “with brakes pressed down to the ground.” The video footage of the accident will not be made public, although Norman police described it in detail for the victim’s sister. “I spoke with the detective from Norman who was working on the case, and he said, from the surveillance on the train, it looked like she tried to get off at the last minute,” Fuentes said. “Like maybe she backed out but just wasn’t fast enough.”

‘A broken mind’ Fuentes said her sister had become somewhat of a lone missionary in the last years of her life, roaming the streets looking for prostitutes “to save.” “She wasn’t homeless, she had her own apartment, apparently,” Fuentes said. “She just liked living on the streets, and she liked trying to reach out to people.” It was this total immersion, her sister says, that likely led her to commit suicide by standing in front of a speeding train.

Susie Mae Cunningham is shown in this 2011 booking photo from the Oklahoma County jail.

“I hadn’t talked to her in months, but she was the type of person who got too involved … she really felt people’s pain because she’s been through so much,” Fuentes said. “This wasn’t easy for her, you know, dealing with these females who are being exploited.” Fuentes said she wasn’t sure why her sister was in Norman. Cunningham lived in Oklahoma City. “She had a big heart but a broken mind,” Fuentes said. “She was dedicated to staying out on the streets and helping these girls.”

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service has awarded a former banker $104 million for providing information about overseas tax cheats — the largest amount ever awarded by the agency. Former Swiss banker Bradley Birkenfeld is credited with exposing widespread

tax evasion at Swiss bank UBS AG. Birkenfeld himself served roughly two-and-ahalf years in prison for a fraud conspiracy conviction related to the case, which resulted in a $780 million fine against the bank. The case also led to an unprecedented deal requiring UBS to turn over thousands of names of suspected American tax dodgers.

Wreck injuries claim woman FROM STAFF REPORTS

A Marietta woman has died of injuries from a wreck last week. About 5:40 p.m. Friday, Raven D. Willis, 18, of Marietta, was driving north on State Highway 99C, about four miles west and two miles south of Madill

in Marshall County, when her car went out of control, struck two fence posts and turned onto its side, according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol. She was taken to a Plano, Texas, hospital where she died Tuesday, troopers said. Willis was wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash.


OKLAHOMA CITY

CORRECTIONS

Council hears plan proposals The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council.

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel on Tuesday. PAGE 13A

BACK PAGE

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

PLAYGROUND HELPS KIDS WITH DISABILITIES SWING INTO FUN

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City’s executive director, Susan Adams, look at the zoo’s new playground. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Children with disabilities who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo soon will have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for children with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is set to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through

the bars while in their wheelchairs. And the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, said Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director. “As a parent with three kids, I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience

of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.”

Playing with ideas Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it, and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants

program is to maximize impact. “Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities also has sponsored educational programs at the zoo including ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects, and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends Director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do it and this is the right place, and that’s all it took.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

Family signs line roadways to welcome Marines home BY MARTHA WAGGONER Associated Press

NEW RIVER AIR STATION, N.C. — Days before Lance

Hydrographer James Glaeser, front right, points out to divers Monday the approximate location where they will begin mapping the wreck of the USS Hatteras in the Gulf of Mexico about 20 miles from Galveston, Texas. AP PHOTO

Sonar to give best view yet of 1863 Civil War shipwreck BY MICHAEL GRACZYK

DID YOU KNOW?

Associated Press

ABOARD THE RESEARCH VESSEL MANTA, Gulf of Mexico — The world will soon

HISTORY OF THE BATTLE

get its first good look at the wreckage of the only U.S. Navy ship sunk in combat in the Gulf of Mexico during the Civil War, thanks to sophisticated 3-D sonar images divers have been collecting this week in the Gulf’s murky depths. The USS Hatteras, an iron-hulled 210-foot-long ship that sunk about 20 miles off the coast of Galveston, Texas, in January 1863, has sat mostly undisturbed and unnoticed since its wreckage was found in the early 1970s. But recent storm-caused shifts in the seabed where the Hatteras rests 57 feet below the surface have exposed more of it to inspection, and researchers are rushing to get as complete an image of the ship as possible before the sand and silt shifts back. “You can mark Gettysburg or Manassas, (but) how do you mark a battlefield in the sea?” said Jim Delgado, the director of maritime heritage for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, and the person overseeing the project. A team of archaeologists and technicians Monday began two days of scanning the wreckage using a sonar imaging technology that hadn’t been used yet at sea, Delgado said. On Monday aboard the research vessel Manta, researcher Christopher Horrell gleefully pored over computer images of the Hatteras’ stern and paddle wheels that had just been transmitted from the seafloor.

According to the Navy Historical Center, the 1,126-ton USS Hatteras was built in 1861 in Wilmington, Del., as a civilian steamship. Later that year, it was purchased by the Navy, commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and assigned to join the blockade of the Florida coast to keep vessels from delivering supplies and munitions to the Confederacy. On Jan. 6, 1863, it joined the fleet commanded by David Farragut. Five days later, it pursued and tracked down a three-masted ship that identified itself as British, but later opened fire on the Hatteras from 25 to 200 yards away and revealed it was actually the CSS Alabama, a notorious Confederate raider. Forty-three minutes later, with the Hatteras burning and taking on water, Cmdr. Homer Blake surrendered, and he and his crew were taken aboard the Alabama as prisoners, eventually winding up in Jamaica. Of the 126-man crew, two were lost and are believed entombed in the wreck, which became the only Union warship sunk by a Confederate raider in the Gulf.

Fantastic results “This is what I got into archaeology for. It’s fantastic,” said Horrell, a senior marine archaeologist for the Department of the Interior. The images, taken by a roughly 2-foot-long cylin-

A diver plots out the spots on the wreck of the USS Hatteras where sonar images will be taken during a mapping expedition. AP PHOTO

drical device deposited near the wreckage, were used to position divers who then used 3-D scanning devices to map the site. The sand and siltfilled water near the seafloor limited the divers’ visibility to 3 to 10 feet, and it makes filming or photographing the wreckage difficult. But it doesn’t affect the sonar technology, which produces images by analyzing sound waves bouncing off objects, allowing scientists to capture a more complete look at the wreckage. Delgado said he’s hoping to post the images online for the public by January, in time for the 150th anniversary of the battle with the CSS Alabma. He said he also hopes researchers review them to look for ways to preserve the wreckage. “Whatever we can do to make it accessible,” Delgado said. “We want to share this with folks and show people history is real.” The wreck site was discovered in the early 1970s by a Rice University professor, said Amy Borgens, the Texas state marine archaeologist. The Hatteras wreck is in waters administered by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the ship itself still remains property of the U.S. Navy. Before the work began, a wreath was placed in the Gulf, red and white rose petals were scattered on

the water’s surface and a brief memorial service held for two crewmen who died aboard the Hatteras. The Alabama, credited with 60 kills, was eventually sunk thousands of miles away, when a Union ship attacked it in the English Channel in 1864 after it was repaired in France.

Cpl. Kenny Milton was scheduled to return home from Afghanistan, his wife sat on the floor of a sweltering helicopter hangar, painting on poster board. “My husband, my heart, my hero,” she drew on the board, while around her other wives and kids of deployed Marines made placards for their own loved ones. Even though she had drawn four other signs over the past few weeks, she came to the banner-marking party at New River Air Station with a friend to paint more. “It’s important to me that my husband, every which way he turns, he sees something that has his name on it because he knows how much I’ve missed him, and I know how much he’s missed me,” said Selina Milton, whose husband was returning after seven months away from home on his first deployment. About 30 families participated in the bannermaking party, one of many held at New River and nearby Camp Lejeune as troops return from Iraq and Afghanistan. The banners from New River families line U.S. 17 leading to the air station, while the Camp Lejeune banners hang from fences along State Highway 24. They’re part of a Marine tradition with uncertain roots that’s observed from Lejeune on the East Coast to Camp Pendleton in California. “It’s just one of those things — we’ve always done it,” said Family Readiness Officer Christine Shawhan, who works with the families of the VMM-365, an Osprey squadron with about 200 members. “ … It really helps the families. That’s when the celebration starts. It makes it real for the families that they’re getting their Marines or sailors back.” Families use the poster parties as a way to channel their anticipation of seeing their loved ones again after months of separation and worry. Their creations caught the attention and admiration of a peace activist, Chuck Fager, who says they are a kind of folk art. Fager has started a photo-

Luis Rodriguez watches his mother, Theresa, paint signs in July to welcome home her husband during a banner-making party at New River Air Station near Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C. AP PHOTO

It’s important to me that my husband, every which way he turns, he sees something that has his name on it because he knows how much I’ve missed him, and I know how much he’s missed me.” SELINA MILTON

MILTON’S HUSBAND WAS RETURNING AFTER SEVEN MONTHS AWAY FROM HOME ON HIS FIRST DEPLOYMENT

graphic collection of the signs he first noticed as he visited Fort Bragg soldiers jailed in the brig at Lejeune. “There was a variety and color and emotion in the banners that really began to catch my eye,” said Fager, director of Fayetteville’s Quaker House. Some signs are a straightforward greeting — “Welcome Home, Sgt. Smith.” Others were witty or touching. “Packages sent — 20. Nights alone — 215. Tears cried — tons. Two weeks with Cpl. Ham. PRICELESS,” reads one banner in Fager’s book. “Thanks Iraq 4 giving me Evan back,” reads another. Among the racier banners was this one with drawings of hearts and an apple: “Welcome home Zack Seavey. No more

pickin’ my own fruit.” When Fager realized most posters fell victim to the elements, he decided to photograph his favorites and put them in an online book titled “Priceless.” He rescued a couple from the ground and kept them. They are, he says, cultural artifacts. “In my collection, I don’t really have any commentary,” Fager said. “It’s not about me and my views about the war. It’s about these families calling out to each other in a difficult situation and doing so with a wit and sensitivity that’s very touching.” The New River gathering marked the start of Ginny Miller’s welcomehome celebration for her husband, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. She was making signs with the help of her parents and her three sons, ages 9, 7 and 5. She had had heavy-duty vinyl signs made for their house, but the boys also wanted to make their own for their dad, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. And they were helping by making generic signs for the single Marines who might not have anyone to welcome them home. “I think the main thing for this is that it is a sign that the end of the deployment is coming,” Miller said. “I really think that’s it. You get to the point where it’s time to make homecoming signs, and it’s just so exciting.” Seven-year-old James said he was drawing a flag with his dad saluting. “He’s talking to his friend in the Osprey,” he said. “I tried to do my best.” He was certain his father would be proud of the sign because he included “XOXO” on his sign.

IN BRIEF TAHLEQUAH

LAWTON

EVALUATION IS REQUESTED

PRISON CELLPHONES DRAW ARREST

An attorney representing a Hulbert woman charged with manslaughter is seeking a mental evaluation for her client. Attorney Angela Jones filed paperwork seeking the evaluation for Misty Richardson, who is charged in the death of Herbert Lee Potts. Prosecutors allege Richardson fatally shot Potts, then tried to hide his death by pouring acid and lye on his body. Authorities discovered Potts’ body in June in a shallow grave in northwest Cherokee County. Richardson’s attorney said in court filings that her client may not be able to assist in her own defense. Richardson has pleaded not guilty. She is due in court Oct. 10 for a preliminary hearing. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Authorities say a man accused of throwing cellphones over a fence for inmates at the Lawton Correctional Facility was arrested about 2 a.m. Tuesday on the northwest corner of the privately run prison. Surveillance video captured a man tossing eight cellphones over the fence. Authorities say contraband phones sell for a high price within the prison. Lawton police say everything thrown over the fence was recovered. The man’s name had not been released Tuesday. ASSOCIATED PRESS


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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13A

Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation

Oklahoma City police investigate the scene of a wreck Tuesday morning at NW 10 and Classen after a vehicle being chased by police crashed, sending three occupants in the vehicle to a hospital. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announces jail accreditation Tuesday for the county jail facilities. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL/THE OKLAHOMAN BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

U.S. marshals capture man who fled rape trial in Texas

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken

went on without him, and McGowen was convicted the next day of aggravated sexual assault of a child and sentenced to 99 years in prison. McGowen was set to be formally sentenced Thursday in a Liberty courtroom before being transferred to the Texas prison system, Greene said.

Associated Press

HOUSTON — A man who fled his trial a day before being convicted and sentenced in the repeated group sexual assault of an 11-year-old Southeast Texas girl was captured Tuesday after being a fugitive for nearly two weeks, authorities said. Eric McGowen, 20, was arrested after being found in an apartment in northeast Houston, said Alfredo Perez, a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service. Information provided to the Gulf Coast Violent Offenders Task Force led officials to McGowen, Perez said. The fugitive was apparently caught by surprise when authorities entered the apartment and arrested him, said Capt. Steve Greene, a spokesman for the Liberty County sheriff’s office. Task force members turned McGowen over to Texas Rangers, who took him back to Liberty County, where he was convicted, Perez said. By Tuesday afternoon, McGowen was in the Liberty County jail, Greene said. Six law enforcement agencies coordinated the search for McGowen. Both Greene and Perez declined to release further

Eric McGowen

details about what led authorities to the apartment or who McGowen had been staying with. The Liberty County District Attorney’s office and McGowen’s attorney did not immediately return phone calls seeking comment. The investigation regarding individuals who might have helped McGowen elude authorities continues, Greene said.

Convicted in absentia Authorities had been searching for McGowen since he fled his trial Aug. 29, the same day the girl tearfully testified about the attacks in her hometown of Cleveland, about 45 miles northeast of Houston. McGowen had been free on bail at the time and never came back to court after a break in testimony. The trial in the nearby county seat of Liberty

First to be tried McGowen was one of 20 men and boys who authorities say repeatedly sexually assaulted the girl on at least five occasions from mid-September through early December of 2010. He was the first defendant to stand trial in the case. Before his trial, all six juveniles and two of the 14 adults charged had pleaded guilty. Since McGowen’s conviction, four other adults have pleaded guilty and are set to be sentenced Sept. 21. His disappearance was the latest twist in a case that divided the small town of Cleveland, both because of the horrific allegations and suggestions from some residents that the girl was partly responsible because of her appearance. Police began investigating after one of the girl’s classmates told a teacher he saw video of her being sexually assaulted in an abandoned trailer.

crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.

Suit over failed floodwalls heads to New Orleans court

A teddy bear lies at the base of a marker for the 17th Street Canal Floodwall on Aug. 27 in New Orleans. AP FILE PHOTO BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — The ArBY JUAN A. LOZANO

to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said the Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate

my Corps of Engineers is back on trial, seven years after Hurricane Katrina’s epic storm surge shredded the flood protection system the corps had built for New Orleans. Starting Wednesday, a federal judge will hear testimony on claims that excavation work by the corps and one of its contractors caused the failure of floodwalls meant to protect the city’s Lower 9th Ward and neighboring St. Bernard Parish. The corps rejects the plaintiffs’ negligence claims, countering that water from Katrina’s rain and surge overtopped and overwhelmed floodwalls along the east side of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, also known locally as the Industrial Canal. The case will be heard without a jury and decided by U.S. District Judge Stanwood Duval Jr., who ruled in 2009 on separate but related claims that the corps’ work on a shipping channel left the same areas vulnerable to flooding. If Duval rules for the plaintiffs again, the case could evolve into a classaction. Joseph Bruno, a lead plaintiffs’ attorney for both cases, said more than $1 billion could be at stake if Duval rules against the corps and its contractor,

BACKGROUND The trial will be the second to pit New Orleans residents against the corps over damage from flooding in Katrina’s aftermath. The storm struck Aug. 29, 2005, leaving about 80 percent of the city underwater after levees and floodwalls failed. The trial is expected to last about a month.

Washington Group International Inc. “Everybody knows they screwed up,” Bruno said. “The only question is how and whether they have to pay.” In March, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Duval’s landmark ruling that the federal government isn’t immune from lawsuits blaming Katrina’s flood damage on the corps’ operation and maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet navigation channel. The second trial centers on a lock replacement project that began in 1999, when the corps hired WGI to perform excavation and backfilling work near the canal floodwalls. Plaintiffs’ attorneys argue the corps and WGI should have known the work could jeopardize the floodwalls’ stability but failed to properly evaluate and protect against failure. University of California at Berkeley engineering professor Robert Bea, an expert witness for the plaintiffs, concluded that subterranean water pressures from Katrina’s storm surge passed through the

holes and a layer of clay with enough force to breach the floodwalls in two places. Justice Department lawyers representing the corps say Bea is the only proponent of this theory and accused him of performing a “deeply flawed and unscientific analysis.” “At trial it will become apparent that no competent evidence supports the plaintiffs’ contention that hydraulic underseepage and uplift pressures caused the breaches,” the government lawyers wrote in a court filing. Instead, the government offers an explanation that is “simpler, more consistent with the facts:” Katrina’s overwhelming surge overtopped the floodwalls and caused the breaches. The government denies WGI’s work was at fault. WGI says the corps was solely responsible for ensuring that the excavation and backfilling work wouldn’t jeopardize stability of the floodwalls. WGI also assailed Bea’s conclusions, calling them “divorced from reality and completely unsupportable.”


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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Company distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

Resthaven Memory Gardens lawn crypt, providing 2 spaces in a 2 level crypt $2500 + $395 transfer Fee Call 405-640-2578 for details

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MERCER-ADAMS

www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363 3 adjoining lots in Sunny Lane, Pd $1800 ea in '04, will sell $1000 ea obo. Kim - 918-617-2592 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com ‘‘‘ QUICK SALE ‘‘‘ Rose Hill (4 plots) Retail for $2195ea. Take $3900 946-4371


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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 12A PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

WEST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

PLAYGROUND HELPS KIDS WITH DISABILITIES SWING INTO FUN

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City’s executive director, Susan Adams, look at the zoo’s new playground. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Children with disabilities who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo soon will have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for children with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is set to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through

the bars while in their wheelchairs. And the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, said Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director. “As a parent with three kids, I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience

of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.”

Playing with ideas Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it, and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants

program is to maximize impact. “Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities also has sponsored educational programs at the zoo including ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects, and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends Director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do it and this is the right place, and that’s all it took.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.

NOTICE is hereby given by Snyder Partners, P.O. Box 3010, Cody, WY 82414, (307-587-4291) pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165: 10-5-5, and RP 165:5-7-27, that application 1301700012 has been filed with the Oklahoma Corp. Com. to approve the following commercial disposal well: Brown #1 SWD; Location: C SW/4 Section 32-T17N-R12W; Formation: Pontotoc 3250’-4250’; Rate & Pressure: 3000BPD@1200PSI. Objections may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission within 30 days of this notice.

Public Notice Putnam City Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. Putnam City Schools also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator: Dr. April Grace Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Putnam City Schools 5401 N.W. 40th Oklahoma City, OK 73122 (405) 495-5200, ext. 1230 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (office hours)

Notice of Sale: at Security Self Storage, 7100 NW 50th Bethany, Oklahoma 73008 will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage units(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00 pm. on Sept. 25, 2012, no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit #: 1209 JOEL MANNING 10104 Hefner Village Terr. OKC OK 73162 UNIT #: 1267 DEBORAH JOHNSON 6700 NW 58th TERR. OKC OK 73122 UNIT #: 1411 SAM STEARMAN 6906 NW 53rd Street Bethany OK 73008 UNIT #: 1715 BRIAN BIVIN PO Box 433 Davenport OK 74026

On July 13, 2012, an Application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking consent to the Assignment of Broadcast License of Radio Station KTLR (AM), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma from Tyler Broadcasting Corporation (TBC) to WPA Radio LLC. KTLR (AM) operates on an assigned frequency of 890 kilohertz, with an effective radiated power of 1.0 kilowatts day. The Officers, Directors and Shareholders who hold ten percent or more interest of TBC: Ty

A. Tyler and Tony J. Tyler. The Manager and Member who hold ten percent interest or more of WPA Radio LLC is Stanton Nelson. A copy of the Assignment Application is available for public inspection on-line at www.fcc.gov, or during business hours at KTLR (AM) located at: 5101 S. Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Public Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students 18 years or older certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. (2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate. Parents or eligible students may ask the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. (4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Putnam City Schools to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

ANYONE HAVING INTEREST IN A 1964 FORD RANCHERO VIN# 5H27T246801 CONTACT EARL HAMILTON 405-545-6923. Sale date 9-13-12. Anyone claiming legal/financial interest in the following vehicles call Sue @ 354-9778. 1970 Triumph MC VIN#BC01832T150T or 1999 Kawasaki KVF30041 ATV VIN#JKAVF8A13XB503752. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1951 Ford VIN B1CH212273 or 1951 Ford VIN B1DA136909 call Sandra 350-2087.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

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Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


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METRO | STATE

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 12A PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NORTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

PLAYGROUND HELPS KIDS WITH DISABILITIES SWING INTO FUN

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City’s executive director, Susan Adams, look at the zoo’s new playground. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Children with disabilities who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo soon will have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for children with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is set to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through

the bars while in their wheelchairs. And the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, said Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director. “As a parent with three kids, I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience

of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.”

Playing with ideas Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it, and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants

program is to maximize impact. “Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities also has sponsored educational programs at the zoo including ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects, and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends Director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do it and this is the right place, and that’s all it took.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.

NOTICE is hereby given by Snyder Partners, P.O. Box 3010, Cody, WY 82414, (307-587-4291) pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165: 10-5-5, and RP 165:5-7-27, that application 1301700012 has been filed with the Oklahoma Corp. Com. to approve the following commercial disposal well: Brown #1 SWD; Location: C SW/4 Section 32-T17N-R12W; Formation: Pontotoc 3250’-4250’; Rate & Pressure: 3000BPD@1200PSI. Objections may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission within 30 days of this notice.

Public Notice Putnam City Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. Putnam City Schools also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator: Dr. April Grace Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Putnam City Schools 5401 N.W. 40th Oklahoma City, OK 73122 (405) 495-5200, ext. 1230 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (office hours)

Notice of Sale: at Security Self Storage, 7100 NW 50th Bethany, Oklahoma 73008 will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage units(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00 pm. on Sept. 25, 2012, no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit #: 1209 JOEL MANNING 10104 Hefner Village Terr. OKC OK 73162 UNIT #: 1267 DEBORAH JOHNSON 6700 NW 58th TERR. OKC OK 73122 UNIT #: 1411 SAM STEARMAN 6906 NW 53rd Street Bethany OK 73008 UNIT #: 1715 BRIAN BIVIN PO Box 433 Davenport OK 74026

On July 13, 2012, an Application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking consent to the Assignment of Broadcast License of Radio Station KTLR (AM), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma from Tyler Broadcasting Corporation (TBC) to WPA Radio LLC. KTLR (AM) operates on an assigned frequency of 890 kilohertz, with an effective radiated power of 1.0 kilowatts day. The Officers, Directors and Shareholders who hold ten percent or more interest of TBC: Ty

A. Tyler and Tony J. Tyler. The Manager and Member who hold ten percent interest or more of WPA Radio LLC is Stanton Nelson. A copy of the Assignment Application is available for public inspection on-line at www.fcc.gov, or during business hours at KTLR (AM) located at: 5101 S. Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Public Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students 18 years or older certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. (2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate. Parents or eligible students may ask the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. (4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Putnam City Schools to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

ANYONE HAVING INTEREST IN A 1964 FORD RANCHERO VIN# 5H27T246801 CONTACT EARL HAMILTON 405-545-6923. Sale date 9-13-12. Anyone claiming legal/financial interest in the following vehicles call Sue @ 354-9778. 1970 Triumph MC VIN#BC01832T150T or 1999 Kawasaki KVF30041 ATV VIN#JKAVF8A13XB503752. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1951 Ford VIN B1CH212273 or 1951 Ford VIN B1DA136909 call Sandra 350-2087.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

PROPOSED LOCATION IS INTERSTATE 35 AND 15TH STREET

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond, with a proposed location on Interstate 35 just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and the interstate. The first issue before the city is a request for a 500square-foot sign that is 70 feet from the ground, which is larger than Edmond’s code allows. “It is too tall and too big,” City Planner Bob Schiermeyer said. The store and fuel station, to be located on 15 acres in the southwest corner of Fox Lake Plaza, would have a 90-foot frontage onto the interstate. The code allows a 25-foot-tall sign that is 60 square feet. “The property is way off the road, and they think they need that big of a sign,” Schiermeyer said. Fox Lake Lane is west of the proposed 138,000square-foot box building that is proposed to have different elevations and insets in the design. Planning commission members are expected to consider the sign variance at their meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at 20 S Littler Ave. City council members will make the final decision on the variance. Zoning for the business on that property is already in place. A site plan for the building has not been turned into the city. City Councilman Nick Massey is a promoter of business growth in Edmond. “Economic growth in Edmond is great,” Massey

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond. The first request before the city is a variance from the sign code.

said about the proposed Sam’s store, the first of its kind in Edmond. The property where Sam’s may be located has been an issue for nearby property owners since more than a decade ago, when the Fox Lake Plaza Shopping Center was first proposed by developer Frank Battle. The land has been bare for years, and mounds of dirt have been removed, causing property owners in Fox Lake housing continued problems. A year ago, Jim Tapp, with Fox Lake Investments, purchased the land from Expressway Development, a company owned by Battle. Expressway Development was in bankruptcy because of two unpaid mortgages for the proposed Fox Lake Plaza. “I am glad to see the property finished. It has been on hold for a long time,” Massey said. “I am glad to see some progress.”

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Edmond City Council hears plan for Arcadia Lake trail BY DIANA BALDWIN

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond, just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and Interstate 35. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY CITY OF EDMOND

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

EDMOND — City council members voted to spend $200,000 for engineering to design a multipurpose trail around Arcadia Lake as part of a public-private project. David Tew, with the Arcadia Lake Trail Coalition, said in a presentation to the city council this week that they expect the trail to be open by 2014 for walkers, joggers, bicyclists and others. “This is a community resource and a community benefit,” said Tew, the Mercy Health chief operating officer. A nearby property owner and the equestrian riders aren’t in favor of how the trail is being designed around the lake. John Fitch, a Southlake resident, told council members he is concerned about the safety of the Boys Ranch Town due to the trail bringing strangers to the area. “This is a threat to the safety of the boys,” Fitch said. Fitch said he is not opposed to the trail — just a trail all the way around the lake. “I don’t want a 20-mile trail,” Fitch said. “It is ridiculous. We need to be

creative with our money. We don’t want to be like Lake Hefner.” Fitch warned the council members that trash associated with the trail would negatively impact the ecological system at the lake. He also said the trail would be closed from Oct. 1 to Jan. 15 because of bow hunting season at the lake. Kathryn McKinney, a member of the Friends of Arcadia Lake Equestrian Trails, said they are not opposed to the trail at Arcadia Lake. But, she said they don’t want the two trails to cross or for the jogging trail to be built near the horse trail. “Horses are frightful,” McKinney said. “They are likely to bolt and lose a rider or crash through to another trail.” Tew said they are working with the surrounding neighbors, the Boys Ranch, U.S. Army Corps of

Engineers and others in the design. A community connections meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Sept. 27 at the Downtown Community Center. Tew said he came up with the idea for the trail around the lake a year ago Monday night when he was sitting in his recliner with a separated shoulder from a bicycle accident. He said he wanted to come up with a plan where bicyclists didn’t have to compete with motor vehicles. Tew hopes to have the design completed in a month. Trails are a priority for a number of people living in Edmond. The city is designing another trail on the east side of Edmond that would run beneath Interstate 35 and continue east to Spring Creek Park at the lake. The city has budgeted $1.8 million for the trail.


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

PARALYMPIC ATHLETES BRING HOME MEDALS

U.S. women’s sitting volleyball team coach Bill Hamiter talks to his players as he leads them to a silver medal finish at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The team trains at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma-trained resident athlete Jeremy Campbell and members of the USA women’s sitting volleyball team won medals for Team USA at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. Campbell defended his 2008 title in the men’s F44 discus throw, winning his second gold medal in the event and breaking the Paralympic record with a throw of 60.05 meters. He also broke a record at the 2012 UCO Endeavor Games in June. The sitting volleyball team finished the games with a silver medal after a 3-1loss to China in the gold medal finals match. The team beat Brazil, Slovenia and Ukraine and lost to China twice. UCO became an official U.S. Olympic Training Site in July 2009. The university has been an official U.S. Paralympic training site since 2005.

3 males sought in drive-by shooting FROM STAFF REPORTS

Police were looking for three black males after a drive-by shooting in southeast Oklahoma City. No one was injured in the shooting that disrupted a porch gathering in the neighborhood Sunday evening. About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report. The woman said she ran to her vehicle when the shots rang out and tried to chase the SUV before realizing her tire had been shot. The mirror and gas cap of the vehicle were also struck by bullets, according to the report. The front passenger window of another vehicle at the home was broken by a bullet which appears to have ricocheted before striking the car. Another witness at the scene said she noticed the vehicle pass the house about five times every 20 to 30 minutes before the shooting. Witnesses said the occupants of the car appeared to be about 17 or 18 years old. While interviewing witnesses, the officer told the parents of several children at the home to keep them out of the street and away from the crime scene, but the children picked up casings in the street before they were secured for evidence, the report states. No arrests have been made in the incident.

U.S. Paralympic athlete Jeremy Campbell celebrates at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London after winning a gold medal in the men’s F44 discus throw.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

ACHIEVERS COMMUNITY SERVICE

SCOUTING

Coppermark banker Darcie Henderson was elected chairwoman of the Junior Achievement of Oklahoma Inc. — Oklahoma City Region board of directors. Henderson has been volunteering and fundraising for Junior Achievement since 2000 and serves on the state board. She has been with Coppermark Bank for 20 years and is senior vice president in the cash management department. Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to plan for their futures and make smart academic and economic choices.

Benton Gifford III, of Purcell, has earned his Eagle Scout rank. Gifford, 17, is a member of Troop 237 in the Last Frontier Council. Gifford’s Eagle Scout project was a renovation of the Lions Club baseball complex. Gifford’s project involved repainting buildings, installing a bench, repairing a urinal, installing new doorknobs and replacing damaged signs. Gifford, along with volunteers, spent 1,500 hours on the project. Benton Gifford is the son of Jennifer and Roger Johnson and a Gifford III junior at Purcell High School, where he is a member of the National Honor Society and the drum line. FROM STAFF REPORTS


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

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Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


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METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 14A PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

IN BRIEF

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

SOUTH

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

PLAYGROUND HELPS KIDS WITH DISABILITIES SWING INTO FUN

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City’s executive director, Susan Adams, look at the zoo’s new playground. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Children with disabilities who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo soon will have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for children with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is set to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through

the bars while in their wheelchairs. And the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, said Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director. “As a parent with three kids, I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience

of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.”

Playing with ideas Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it, and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants

program is to maximize impact. “Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities also has sponsored educational programs at the zoo including ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects, and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends Director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do it and this is the right place, and that’s all it took.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

Family signs line roadways to welcome Marines home BY MARTHA WAGGONER Associated Press

NEW RIVER AIR STATION, N.C. — Days before Lance

Cpl. Kenny Milton was scheduled to return home from Afghanistan, his wife sat on the floor of a sweltering helicopter hangar, painting on poster board. “My husband, my heart, my hero,” she drew on the board, while around her other wives and kids of deployed Marines made placards for their own loved ones. Even though she had drawn four other signs over the past few weeks, she came to the banner-marking party at New River Air Station with a friend to paint more. “It’s important to me that my husband, every which way he turns, he sees something that has his name on it because he knows how much I’ve missed him, and I know how much he’s missed me,” said Selina Milton, whose husband was returning after seven months away from home on his first deployment. About 30 families participated in the bannermaking party, one of many held at New River and nearby Camp Lejeune as troops return from Iraq and Afghanistan. The banners from New River families line U.S. 17 leading to the air station, while the Camp Lejeune banners hang from fences along State Highway 24. They’re part of a Marine tradition with uncertain roots that’s observed from Lejeune on the East Coast to Camp Pendleton in California. “It’s just one of those things — we’ve always done it,” said Family Readiness Officer Christine Shawhan, who works with the families of the VMM-365, an Osprey squadron with about 200 members. “ … It really helps the families. That’s when the celebration starts. It makes it real for the families that they’re getting their Marines or sailors back.” Families use the poster parties as a way to channel their anticipation of seeing their loved ones again after months of separation and

Luis Rodriguez watches his mother, Theresa, paint signs in July to welcome home her husband during a banner-making party at New River Air Station near Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C. AP PHOTO

worry. Their creations caught the attention and admiration of a peace activist, Chuck Fager, who says they are a kind of folk art. Fager has started a photographic collection of the signs he first noticed as he visited Fort Bragg soldiers jailed in the brig at Lejeune. “There was a variety and color and emotion in the banners that really began to catch my eye,” said Fager, director of Fayetteville’s Quaker House. Some signs are a straightforward greeting — “Welcome Home, Sgt. Smith.” Others were witty or touching. “Packages sent — 20. Nights alone — 215. Tears cried — tons. Two weeks with Cpl. Ham. PRICELESS,” reads one banner in Fager’s book. “Thanks Iraq 4 giving me Evan back,” reads another. Among the racier banners was this one with drawings of hearts and an apple: “Welcome home Zack Seavey. No more pickin’ my own fruit.” When Fager realized most posters fell victim to the elements, he decided to photograph his favorites and put them in an online book titled “Priceless.” He rescued a couple from the ground and kept them. They are, he says, cultural artifacts. “In my collection, I don’t really have any com-

mentary,” Fager said. “It’s not about me and my views about the war. It’s about these families calling out to each other in a difficult situation and doing so with a wit and sensitivity that’s very touching.” The New River gathering marked the start of Ginny Miller’s welcomehome celebration for her husband, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. She was making signs with the help of her parents and her three sons, ages 9, 7 and 5. She had had heavy-duty vinyl signs made for their house, but the boys also wanted to make their own for their dad, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. And they were helping by making generic signs for the single Marines who might not have anyone to welcome them home. “I think the main thing for this is that it is a sign that the end of the deployment is coming,” Miller said. “I really think that’s it. You get to the point where it’s time to make homecoming signs, and it’s just so exciting.” Seven-year-old James said he was drawing a flag with his dad saluting. “He’s talking to his friend in the Osprey,” he said. “I tried to do my best.” He was certain his father would be proud of the sign because he included “XOXO” on his sign.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

PARALYMPIC ATHLETES BRING HOME MEDALS

U.S. women’s sitting volleyball team coach Bill Hamiter talks to his players as he leads them to a silver medal finish at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The team trains at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma-trained resident athlete Jeremy Campbell and members of the USA women’s sitting volleyball team won medals for Team USA at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. Campbell defended his 2008 title in the men’s F44 discus throw, winning his second gold medal in the event and breaking the Paralympic record with a throw of 60.05 meters. He also broke a record at the 2012 UCO Endeavor Games in June. The sitting volleyball team finished the games with a silver medal after a 3-1loss to China in the gold medal finals match. The team beat Brazil, Slovenia and Ukraine and lost to China twice. UCO became an official U.S. Olympic Training Site in July 2009. The university has been an official U.S. Paralympic training site since 2005.

U.S. Paralympic athlete Jeremy Campbell celebrates at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London after winning a gold medal in the men’s F44 discus throw.

3 sought in drive-by shooting FROM STAFF REPORTS

Police were looking for three black males after a drive-by shooting in southeast Oklahoma City. No one was injured in the shooting that disrupted a porch gathering in the neighborhood Sunday evening. About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report. The woman said she ran to her vehicle when the shots rang out and tried to chase the SUV before realizing her tire had been shot. The mirror and gas cap of the vehicle were also struck by bullets, according to the report. The front passenger window of another vehicle at the home was broken by a bullet which appears to have ricocheted before striking the car. Another witness at the scene said she noticed the vehicle pass the house about five times every 20 to 30 minutes before the shooting. Witnesses said the occupants of the car appeared to be about 17 or 18 years old. One person told police one of the suspects had a red string in his hair, according to the report. While interviewing witnesses, the officer told the parents of several children at the home to keep them out of the street and away from the crime scene, but the children picked up casings in the street before they were secured for evidence, the report states. No arrests have been made in the incident.

About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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ACHIEVERS COMMUNITY SERVICE

high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship.

Coppermark banker Darcie Henderson was elected chairwoman of the Junior Achievement of Oklahoma SCOUTING Inc. — Oklahoma City Region board of directors. HenBenton Gifford III, of Purderson has been volunteercell, has earned his Eagle ing and fundraising for Junior Scout rank. Gifford, 17, is a Achievement since 2000 member of Troop 237 in Darcie and serves on the state Henderson the Last Frontier Council. board. She has been with Gifford’s Eagle Scout proCoppermark Bank for 20 ject was a renovation of the years and is senior vice presLions Club baseball comident in the cash manageplex. Gifford’s project inment department. Junior volved repainting buildings, Achievement is the world’s installing a bench, repairing largest organization dedia urinal, installing new doorcated to giving young people knobs and replacing damthe knowledge and skills aged signs. Gifford, along they need to plan for their with volunteers, spent 1,500 futures and make smart hours on the project. academic and economic Benton Gifford is the son of JennifGifford III choices. Programs are deliver and Roger Johnson and a ered by corporate and comjunior at Purcell High School, munity volunteers and provide where he is a member of the Nationhands-on experiences that give stual Honor Society and the drum line. dents from kindergarten through FROM STAFF REPORTS


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METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.

NOTICE is hereby given by Snyder Partners, P.O. Box 3010, Cody, WY 82414, (307-587-4291) pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165: 10-5-5, and RP 165:5-7-27, that application 1301700012 has been filed with the Oklahoma Corp. Com. to approve the following commercial disposal well: Brown #1 SWD; Location: C SW/4 Section 32-T17N-R12W; Formation: Pontotoc 3250’-4250’; Rate & Pressure: 3000BPD@1200PSI. Objections may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission within 30 days of this notice.

Public Notice Putnam City Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. Putnam City Schools also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator: Dr. April Grace Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Putnam City Schools 5401 N.W. 40th Oklahoma City, OK 73122 (405) 495-5200, ext. 1230 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (office hours)

Notice of Sale: at Security Self Storage, 7100 NW 50th Bethany, Oklahoma 73008 will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage units(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00 pm. on Sept. 25, 2012, no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit #: 1209 JOEL MANNING 10104 Hefner Village Terr. OKC OK 73162 UNIT #: 1267 DEBORAH JOHNSON 6700 NW 58th TERR. OKC OK 73122 UNIT #: 1411 SAM STEARMAN 6906 NW 53rd Street Bethany OK 73008 UNIT #: 1715 BRIAN BIVIN PO Box 433 Davenport OK 74026

On July 13, 2012, an Application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking consent to the Assignment of Broadcast License of Radio Station KTLR (AM), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma from Tyler Broadcasting Corporation (TBC) to WPA Radio LLC. KTLR (AM) operates on an assigned frequency of 890 kilohertz, with an effective radiated power of 1.0 kilowatts day. The Officers, Directors and Shareholders who hold ten percent or more interest of TBC: Ty

A. Tyler and Tony J. Tyler. The Manager and Member who hold ten percent interest or more of WPA Radio LLC is Stanton Nelson. A copy of the Assignment Application is available for public inspection on-line at www.fcc.gov, or during business hours at KTLR (AM) located at: 5101 S. Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Public Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students 18 years or older certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. (2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate. Parents or eligible students may ask the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. (4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Putnam City Schools to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

ANYONE HAVING INTEREST IN A 1964 FORD RANCHERO VIN# 5H27T246801 CONTACT EARL HAMILTON 405-545-6923. Sale date 9-13-12. Anyone claiming legal/financial interest in the following vehicles call Sue @ 354-9778. 1970 Triumph MC VIN#BC01832T150T or 1999 Kawasaki KVF30041 ATV VIN#JKAVF8A13XB503752. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1951 Ford VIN B1CH212273 or 1951 Ford VIN B1DA136909 call Sandra 350-2087.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

IV

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Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

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METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 15A

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

EAST

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

PLAYGROUND HELPS KIDS WITH DISABILITIES SWING INTO FUN

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City’s executive director, Susan Adams, look at the zoo’s new playground. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Children with disabilities who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo soon will have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for children with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is set to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through

the bars while in their wheelchairs. And the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, said Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director. “As a parent with three kids, I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience

of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.”

Playing with ideas Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it, and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants

program is to maximize impact. “Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities also has sponsored educational programs at the zoo including ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects, and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends Director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do it and this is the right place, and that’s all it took.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

METRO | STATE

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Okla-

homa City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home.

Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road between SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Mas-

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

Sonar to give best view yet of 1863 Civil War shipwreck BY MICHAEL GRACZYK

DID YOU KNOW?

Associated Press

ABOARD THE RESEARCH VESSEL MANTA, Gulf of Mexico — The world will soon

HISTORY OF THE BATTLE

get its first good look at the wreckage of the only U.S. Navy ship sunk in combat in the Gulf of Mexico during the Civil War, thanks to sophisticated 3-D sonar images divers have been collecting this week in the Gulf’s murky depths. The USS Hatteras, an iron-hulled 210-foot-long ship that sunk about 20 miles off the coast of Galveston, Texas, in January 1863, has sat mostly undisturbed and unnoticed since its wreckage was found in the early 1970s. But recent storm-caused shifts in the seabed where the Hatteras rests 57 feet below the surface have exposed more of it to inspection, and researchers are rushing to get as complete an image of the ship as possible before the sand and silt shifts back. “You can mark Gettysburg or Manassas, (but) how do you mark a battlefield in the sea?” said Jim Delgado, the director of maritime heritage for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, and the person overseeing the project. A team of archaeologists and technicians Monday began two days of scanning the wreckage using a sonar imaging technology that hadn’t been used yet at sea, Delgado said. On Monday aboard the research vessel Manta, researcher Christopher Horrell gleefully pored over computer images of the Hatteras’ stern and paddle wheels that had just been transmitted from the seafloor.

According to the Navy Historical Center, the 1,126-ton USS Hatteras was built in 1861 in Wilmington, Del., as a civilian steamship. Later that year, it was purchased by the Navy, commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and assigned to join the blockade of the Florida coast to keep vessels from delivering supplies and munitions to the Confederacy. On Jan. 6, 1863, it joined the fleet commanded by David Farragut. Five days later, it pursued and tracked down a three-masted ship that identified itself as British, but later opened fire on the Hatteras from 25 to 200 yards away and revealed it was actually the CSS Alabama, a notorious Confederate raider. Forty-three minutes later, with the Hatteras burning and taking on water, Cmdr. Homer Blake surrendered, and he and his crew were taken aboard the Alabama as prisoners, eventually winding up in Jamaica. Of the 126-man crew, two were lost and are believed entombed in the wreck, which became the only Union warship sunk by a Confederate raider in the Gulf.

Fantastic results “This is what I got into archaeology for. It’s fantastic,” said Horrell, a senior marine archaeologist for the Department of the Interior. The images, taken by a roughly 2-foot-long cylin-

A diver plots out the spots on the wreck of the USS Hatteras where sonar images will be taken during a mapping expedition. AP PHOTO

drical device deposited near the wreckage, were used to position divers who then used 3-D scanning devices to map the site. The sand and siltfilled water near the seafloor limited the divers’ visibility to 3 to 10 feet, and it makes filming or photographing the wreckage difficult. But it doesn’t affect the sonar technology, which produces images by analyzing sound waves bouncing off objects, allowing scientists to capture a more complete look at the wreckage. Delgado said he’s hoping to post the images online for the public by January, in time for the 150th anniversary of the battle with the CSS Alabama. He said he also hopes researchers review them to look for ways to preserve the wreckage. “Whatever we can do to make it accessible,” Delgado said. “We want to share this with folks and show people history is real.” The wreck site was discovered in the early 1970s by a Rice University professor, said Amy Borgens, the Texas state marine archaeologist. The Hatteras wreck is in waters administered by the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the ship itself still remains property of the U.S. Navy. Before the work began, a wreath was placed in the Gulf, red and white rose petals were scattered on

the water’s surface and a brief memorial service held for two crewmen who died aboard the Hatteras. The Alabama, credited with 60 kills, was eventually sunk thousands of miles away, when a Union ship attacked it in the English Channel in 1864 after it was repaired in France.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond, with a proposed location on Interstate 35 just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and the interstate. The first issue before the city is a request for a 500square-foot sign that is 70 feet from the ground, which is larger than Edmond’s code allows. “It is too tall and too big,” City Planner Bob Schiermeyer said. The store and fuel station, to be located on 15 acres in the southwest corner of Fox Lake Plaza, would have a 90-foot frontage onto the interstate. The code allows a 25-foot-tall sign that is 60 square feet. “The property is way off the road, and they think they need that big of a sign,” Schiermeyer said. Fox Lake Lane is west of the proposed 138,000square-foot box building that is proposed to have different elevations and insets in the design. Planning commission members are expected to consider the sign variance at their meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at 20 S Littler Ave. City council members will make the final decision on the variance. Zoning for the business on that property is already in place. A site plan for the building has not been turned into the city. City Councilman Nick Massey is a promoter of business growth in Edmond. “Economic growth in Edmond is great,” Massey said about the proposed Sam’s store, the first of its kind in Edmond. The property where Sam’s may be located has been an issue for nearby property owners since

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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IN BRIEF ANNUAL AUCTION AND DINNER SET FOR SEPT. 27 DEL CITY — Deadlines for sponsors and

individual tickets for the 2012 Annual Auction and Dinner are approaching. The event is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Sept. 27 at the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame, 4040 N Lincoln Blvd. The deadline for sponsors is Thursday and Sept. 20 is the deadline for individuals. Gold sponsorships are available for $700 and include a table of eight, two bottles of wine, two drink tickets per

person and a company logo on the program and any other printed material. Silver sponsorships are $300 and include four tickets and company name on program and printed material. Individual tickets are $50. For tickets or sponsorships, contact the Del City Chamber of Commerce at 6771910 or delcitychamber@coxinet.net. FROM STAFF REPORTS

ACHIEVERS

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond, just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and Interstate 35. First request before the city is a variance from the sign code. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY CITY OF EDMOND

more than a decade ago, when the Fox Lake Plaza Shopping Center was first proposed by developer Frank Battle. The land has been bare for years, and mounds of dirt have been removed, causing property owners in Fox Lake housing continued problems. A year ago, Jim Tapp, with Fox Lake Invest-

ments, purchased the land from Expressway Development, a company owned by Battle. Expressway Development was in bankruptcy because of two unpaid mortgages for the proposed Fox Lake Plaza. “I am glad to see the property finished. It has been on hold for a long time,” Massey said. “I am glad to see some progress.”

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond, just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and Interstate 35.

Edmond council hears Arcadia Lake trail plan BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — City council members voted to spend $200,000 for engineering to design a multipurpose trail around Arcadia Lake as part of a public-private project. David Tew, with the Arcadia Lake Trail Coalition, said in a presentation to the city council this week that they expect the trail to be open by 2014 for walkers, joggers, bicyclists and others. “This is a community resource and a community benefit,” said Tew, Mercy Health’s chief operating officer. A nearby property owner and the equestrian riders aren’t in favor of how the trail is being designed around the lake. John Fitch, a Southlake resident, told council members he is concerned about the safety of Boys Ranch Town because the will bring strangers to the area. “This is a threat to the safety of the boys,” Fitch said. Fitch said he is not opposed to the trail — just a trail all the way around the lake. “I don’t want a 20-mile trail,” Fitch said. “It is ridiculous. We need to be creative with our money. We don’t want to be like Lake Hefner.” Fitch warned the council members that trash associated with the trail would negatively impact the ecological system at the lake. He also said the trail would be closed from Oct. 1to Jan. 15 because of bow hunting season at the lake. Kathryn McKinney, a member of the Friends of Arcadia Lake Equestrian Trails, said they are not opposed to the trail at Arcadia Lake. But, she said they don’t want the two trails to cross or for the jogging trail to be built near the horse trail. “Horses are frightful,” McKinney said. “They are likely to bolt and lose a rider or

The city is designing another trail on the east side of Edmond that would run beneath Interstate 35 and continue east to Spring Creek Park at the lake. crash through to another trail.” Tew said they are working with the surrounding neighbors, the Boys Ranch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others in the design. A community connections meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Sept. 27 at the Downtown Community Center. Tew said he came up with the idea for the trail around the lake a year ago when he was sitting in his recliner with a separated shoulder from a bicycle accident. He said he wanted to come up with a plan where bicyclists didn’t have to compete with vehicles. Tew hopes to have the design completed in a month. Trails are a priority for a number of people living in Edmond. The city is designing another trail on the east side of Edmond that would run beneath Interstate 35 and continue east to Spring Creek Park at the lake. They have budgeted $1.8 million for the trail. The money will come from the 2000 sales tax passed for capital improvements. Design work is expected to be completed by the end of the year. TAPP Development Corp. is considering building a wellness park and trail head on the west side of the interstate that could tie into the city’s new trail. “We hear about it (trails) on a regular basis,” Mayor Charles Lamb said.

COMMUNITY SERVICE

SCOUTING

Coppermark banker Darcie Henderson was elected chairwoman of the Junior Achievement of Oklahoma Inc. — Oklahoma City Region board of directors. Henderson has been volunteering and fundraising for Junior Achievement since 2000 and serves on the state board. She has been with Coppermark Bank for 20 years and is senior vice president in the cash management Darcie department. Henderson Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to plan for their futures and make smart academic and economic choices. Programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers and provide hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship.

Benton Gifford III, of Purcell, has earned his Eagle Scout rank. Gifford, 17, is a member of Troop 237 in the Last Frontier Council. Gifford’s Eagle Scout project was a renovation of the Lions Club baseball complex. Gifford’s project involved repainting buildings, installing a bench, repairing a urinal, installing new doorknobs and replacing damaged signs. Gifford, along Benton with volunteers, Gifford III spent 1,500 hours on the project. Gifford is the son of Jennifer and Roger Johnson and a junior at Purcell High School, where he is a member of the National Honor Society and the drum line.


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METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

3 males are sought in drive-by shooting FROM STAFF REPORTS

U.S. women’s sitting volleyball team coach Bill Hamiter talks to his players as he leads them to a silver medal finish at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The team trains at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

PARALYMPIC ATHLETES BRING HOME MEDALS FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma-trained resident athlete Jeremy Campbell and members of the USA women’s sitting volleyball team won medals for Team USA at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. Campbell defended his 2008 title in the men’s F44 discus throw, winning his second gold medal in the event and breaking the Paralympic record with a throw of 60.05 meters. He also broke a record at the 2012 UCO Endeavor Games in June. The sitting volleyball team finished the games with a silver medal after a 3-1loss to China in the gold medal finals match. The team beat Brazil, Slovenia and Ukraine and lost to China twice. UCO became an official U.S. Olympic Training Site in July 2009. The university has been an official U.S. Paralympic training site since 2005.

For The Oklahoman

EDMOND — Thanks to a random trip to a flea market, food pantries will prosper and thousands will be exposed to the rich historical heritage of Edmond before statehood. Five years ago, Judy Howard, owner of Buckboard Antique Quilts, was shopping at the Oklahoma City Antiques Flea Market at State Fair Park. She found a jewel — a cookbook of recipes and merchant advertisements compiled by Edmond pioneer women. The book cover was gone, but the inside title page reads “Cookbook Compiled by the Ladies of the Christian Church — Favorite Receipts of the Ladies of Edmond.” Howard said the origin is something of a mystery because Edmond’s First Christian Church doesn’t have a record of such a women’s group — and First Christian Church isn’t mentioned by name. Howard took her newfound treasure, revamped it with an introduction and a few extra recipes she found and reissued a 112page book, “1905 Cookbook — Food for Body and Soul.” She added about 200 photographs from the era, courtesy of the Edmond Historical Society. The result is a book that gives an insight into the pioneer spirit of women who tamed a land not too far removed from the 1889 Land Run. Readers also get a look at some of the culinary delights of the time including potato stuffing for goose or duck as well as the two hogs heads required for making mincemeat. There are also dandy in-

About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report. ing to the report. The front passenger window of another vehicle at the home was broken by a bullet which appears to have ricocheted before striking the car. Another witness at the scene said she noticed the vehicle pass the house about five times every 20 to 30 minutes before the shooting. Witnesses said the occupants of the car appeared to be about 17 or 18

years old. One person told police one of the suspects had a red string in his hair, according to the report. While interviewing witnesses, the officer told the parents of several children at the home to keep them out of the street and away from the crime scene, but the children picked up casings in the street before they were secured for evidence, the report states. No arrests have been made in the incident.

ANNIVERSARIES

Bob and Betty Batt, of Harrah, were married Aug. 3, 1957, in Jones.

U.S. Paralympic athlete Jeremy Campbell celebrates at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London after winning a gold medal in the men’s F44 discus throw.

1905 Edmond cookbook offers peek at pioneer womens’ spirit BY STEVE GUST

Police were looking for three black males after a drive-by shooting in southeast Oklahoma City. No one was injured in the shooting that disrupted a porch gathering in the neighborhood Sunday evening. About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report. The woman said she ran to her vehicle when the shots rang out and tried to chase the SUV before realizing her tire had been shot. The mirror and gas cap of the vehicle were also struck by bullets, accord-

structions on how to cook brains. Howard finished the book last year and has it for sale for $12.95. Proceeds go to food pantries. “God has blessed me greatly owning Buckboard Quilts for 36 years, so it’s now my time to give back to help others through my business,” Howard said. The book also fits neatly into an exhibit that opened this month at the Edmond Library: “Quilted Scrapbook Exhibit from Central Oklahoma’s 1905 Cookbook.” The exhibit features scrapbook-style quilts detailing the era when Oklahoma became a state.

There are many quilt shows and expos across the country, Howard said. In an average year there can be hundreds. Howard offers quilts and copies of the 1905 cookbook for the quilt shows. The local vendor can take 30 percent off a book sale and the rest will go to a designated food pantry. On the Buckboard Antique Quilt Web page, www.heavenlypatchwork. com, she sells some of the antique quilts she has acquired in 36 years of business. Proceeds from those sales can go to a food pantry of the buyer’s choice or one Howard selects.

Freda and Carl Blair, of Mustang, were married Aug. 11, 1962, in Cheyenne.

Marcia and David Landes, of Yukon, were married Aug. 10, 1962, in Billings.

The Oklahoman will publish free anniversary announcements for couples celebrating 50 years or more of marriage. To contribute information: I Send an email to kburk@opubco.com with “Anniversary” in the subject line. I Send mail to The Oklahoman, Attn.: Kimberly Burk, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. I To contribute a photo, email a JPEG image or mail a good-quality photo — no larger than 5 by 7 inches Ralph and Donna Waland no smaller than 2 by 3 inches — with your dron, of Mustang, were anniversary information two weeks before the married Aug. 10, 1962, anniversary. in Oklahoma City.

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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Oklahoma County’s jail 1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents wins official accreditation FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken

to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate

crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.

Suit over failed floodwalls heads to New Orleans court Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announces jail accreditation Tuesday for the county jail facilities. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

U.S. marshals capture man who fled rape trial in Texas went on without him, and McGowen was convicted the next day of aggravated sexual assault of a child and sentenced to 99 years in prison. McGowen was set to be formally sentenced Thursday in a Liberty courtroom before being transferred to the Texas prison system, Greene said.

BY JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

HOUSTON — A man who fled his trial a day before being convicted and sentenced in the repeated group sexual assault of an 11-year-old Southeast Texas girl was captured Tuesday after being a fugitive for nearly two weeks, authorities said. Eric McGowen, 20, was arrested after being found in an apartment in northeast Houston, said Alfredo Perez, a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service. Information provided to the Gulf Coast Violent Offenders Task Force led officials to McGowen, Perez said. The fugitive was apparently caught by surprise when authorities entered the apartment and arrested him, said Capt. Steve Greene, a spokesman for the Liberty County sheriff’s office. Task force members turned McGowen over to Texas Rangers, who took him back to Liberty County, where he was convicted, Perez said. By Tuesday afternoon, McGowen was in the Liberty County jail, Greene said. Six law enforcement agencies coordinated the search for McGowen. Both Greene and Perez declined to release further

Eric McGowen

details about what led authorities to the apartment or who McGowen had been staying with. The Liberty County District Attorney’s office and McGowen’s attorney did not immediately return phone calls seeking comment. The investigation regarding individuals who might have helped McGowen elude authorities continues, Greene said.

Convicted in absentia Authorities had been searching for McGowen since he fled his trial Aug. 29, the same day the girl tearfully testified about the attacks in her hometown of Cleveland, about 45 miles northeast of Houston. McGowen had been free on bail at the time and never came back to court after a break in testimony. The trial in the nearby county seat of Liberty

First to be tried McGowen was one of 20 men and boys who authorities say repeatedly sexually assaulted the girl on at least five occasions from mid-September through early December of 2010. He was the first defendant to stand trial in the case. Before his trial, all six juveniles and two of the 14 adults charged had pleaded guilty. Since McGowen’s conviction, four other adults have pleaded guilty and are set to be sentenced Sept. 21. His disappearance was the latest twist in a case that divided the small town of Cleveland, both because of the horrific allegations and suggestions from some residents that the girl was partly responsible because of her appearance. Police began investigating after one of the girl’s classmates told a teacher he saw video of her being sexually assaulted in an abandoned trailer.

BY MICHAEL KUNZELMAN Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — The Army Corps of Engineers is back on trial, seven years after Hurricane Katrina’s epic storm surge shredded the flood protection system the corps had built for New Orleans. Starting Wednesday, a federal judge will hear testimony on claims that excavation work by the corps and one of its contractors caused the failure of floodwalls meant to protect the city’s Lower 9th Ward and neighboring St. Bernard Parish. The corps rejects the plaintiffs’ negligence claims, countering that water from Katrina’s rain and surge overtopped and overwhelmed floodwalls along the east side of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, also known locally as the Industrial Canal. The case will be heard without a jury and decided by U.S. District Judge Stanwood Duval Jr., who ruled in 2009 on separate but related claims that the corps’ work on a shipping channel left the same areas vulnerable to flooding. If Duval rules for the plaintiffs again, the case could evolve into a classaction. Joseph Bruno, a lead plaintiffs’ attorney for both cases, said more than $1 billion could be at stake if Duval rules against the corps and its contractor, Washington Group International Inc. “Everybody knows they screwed up,” Bruno said. “The only question is how and whether they have to pay.” In March, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Duval’s landmark ruling that the federal government isn’t immune from lawsuits blaming Katrina’s flood damage on the corps’ operation and maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet navigation channel. The second trial centers on a lock replacement project that began in 1999, when the corps hired WGI to perform excavation and backfilling work near the canal floodwalls. Plaintiffs’ attorneys argue the corps and WGI should have known the work could jeopardize the floodwalls’ stability but failed to properly evaluate and protect against failure. University of California at Berkeley engineering professor Robert Bea, an expert witness for the plaintiffs, concluded that subterranean water pressures from Katrina’s storm surge passed through the holes and a layer of clay with enough force to breach the floodwalls in two places. Justice Department lawyers representing the corps say Bea is the only proponent of this theory and accused him of performing a “deeply flawed and unscientific analysis.” “At trial it will become apparent that no competent evidence supports the plaintiffs’ contention that hydraulic underseepage and uplift pressures caused the breaches,” the govern-

A teddy bear lies at the base of a marker for the 17th Street Canal Floodwall on Aug. 27 in New Orleans. AP FILE PHOTO

ment lawyers wrote in a court filing. Instead, the government offers an explanation that is “simpler, more consistent with the facts:” Katrina’s overwhelming surge overtopped the floodwalls and caused the breaches. The government denies WGI’s work was at fault.

NOTICE is hereby given by Snyder Partners, P.O. Box 3010, Cody, WY 82414, (307-587-4291) pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165: 10-5-5, and RP 165:5-7-27, that application 1301700012 has been filed with the Oklahoma Corp. Com. to approve the following commercial disposal well: Brown #1 SWD; Location: C SW/4 Section 32-T17N-R12W; Formation: Pontotoc 3250’-4250’; Rate & Pressure: 3000BPD@1200PSI. Objections may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission within 30 days of this notice.

Public Notice Putnam City Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. Putnam City Schools also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator: Dr. April Grace Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Putnam City Schools 5401 N.W. 40th Oklahoma City, OK 73122 (405) 495-5200, ext. 1230 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (office hours)

Notice of Sale: at Security Self Storage, 7100 NW 50th Bethany, Oklahoma 73008 will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage units(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00 pm. on Sept. 25, 2012, no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit #: 1209 JOEL MANNING 10104 Hefner Village Terr. OKC OK 73162 UNIT #: 1267 DEBORAH JOHNSON 6700 NW 58th TERR. OKC OK 73122 UNIT #: 1411 SAM STEARMAN 6906 NW 53rd Street Bethany OK 73008 UNIT #: 1715 BRIAN BIVIN PO Box 433 Davenport OK 74026

On July 13, 2012, an Application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking consent to the Assignment of Broadcast License of Radio Station KTLR (AM), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma from Tyler Broadcasting Corporation (TBC) to WPA Radio LLC. KTLR (AM) operates on an assigned frequency of 890 kilohertz, with an effective radiated power of 1.0 kilowatts day. The Officers, Directors and Shareholders who hold ten percent or more interest of TBC: Ty

WGI says the corps was solely responsible for ensuring that the excavation and backfilling work wouldn’t jeopardize stability of the floodwalls. WGI also assailed Bea’s conclusions, calling them “divorced from reality and completely unsupportable.”

A. Tyler and Tony J. Tyler. The Manager and Member who hold ten percent interest or more of WPA Radio LLC is Stanton Nelson. A copy of the Assignment Application is available for public inspection on-line at www.fcc.gov, or during business hours at KTLR (AM) located at: 5101 S. Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Public Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students 18 years or older certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. (2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate. Parents or eligible students may ask the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. (4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Putnam City Schools to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

ANYONE HAVING INTEREST IN A 1964 FORD RANCHERO VIN# 5H27T246801 CONTACT EARL HAMILTON 405-545-6923. Sale date 9-13-12. Anyone claiming legal/financial interest in the following vehicles call Sue @ 354-9778. 1970 Triumph MC VIN#BC01832T150T or 1999 Kawasaki KVF30041 ATV VIN#JKAVF8A13XB503752. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1951 Ford VIN B1CH212273 or 1951 Ford VIN B1DA136909 call Sandra 350-2087.


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Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 17A

IN BRIEF

EDMOND | STATE A 11

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. SALLISAW

Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

1905-ERA EDMOND COOKBOOK OFFERS PEEK AT PIONEER LIFE

Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

Risk for older than 50

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY JACLYN COSGROVE

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

OKLAHOMA CITY

A quilt exhibit displayed this month at the Edmond Library is tied to a 1905 cookbook, sales of which benefit food pantries. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, THE OKLAHOMAN

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, who authorities described as a “con man” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

BY STEVE GUST For The Oklahoman

EDMOND — Thanks to a random trip to a flea market, food pantries will prosper and thousands will be exposed to the rich historical heritage of Edmond before statehood. Five years ago, Judy Howard, owner of Buckboard Antique Quilts, was shopping at the Oklahoma City Antiques Flea Market at State Fair Park. She found a jewel — a cookbook of recipes and merchant advertisements compiled by Edmond pioneer women. The book cover was gone, but the inside title page reads “Cookbook Compiled by the Ladies of the Christian Church — Favorite Receipts of the Ladies of Edmond.” Howard said the origin is something of a mystery because Edmond’s First Christian Church doesn’t have a record of such a women’s

group — and First Christian Church isn’t mentioned by name. Howard took her newfound treasure, revamped it with an introduction and a few extra recipes she found and reissued a 112page book, “1905 Cookbook — Food for Body and Soul.” She added about 200 photographs from the era, courtesy of the Edmond Historical Society. The result is a book that gives an insight into the pioneer spirit of women who tamed a land not too far removed from the 1889 Land Run. Readers also get a look at some of the culinary delights of the time including potato stuffing for goose or duck as well as the two hogs heads required for making mincemeat. There are also dandy instructions on how to cook brains. The vintage ads were offering corsets, buggies and artificial eyes. Howard finished the

book last year and has it for sale for $12.95. Proceeds go to food pantries. “God has blessed me greatly owning Buckboard Quilts for 36 years, so it’s now my time to give back to help others through my business,” Howard said. The book also fits neatly into an exhibit that opened this month at the Edmond Library: “Quilted Scrapbook Exhibit from Central Oklahoma’s 1905 Cookbook.” The exhibit features scrapbook-style quilts detailing the era when Oklahoma became a state. There are many quilt shows and expos across the country, Howard said. In an average year there can be hundreds. Howard offers quilts and copies of the 1905 cookbook for the quilt shows. The local vendor can take 30 percent off a book sale and the rest will go to a designated food pantry. “I want to feed hungry

children,” she said. That’s not her only outreach. On the Buckboard Antique Quilt Web page, www.heavenlypatch work.com, she sells some of the antique quilts she has acquired in 36 years of business. Proceeds from those sales can go to a food pantry of the buyer’s choice or one Howard selects. Previous quilt shows have resulted in the following: I $1,400 for the Latimer County Food Bank in Loveland, Colo. I $700 for Food for Thought Learning Institute in Norman. I More than $1,000 for Boys Ranch Town in the Meat House’s Edmond benefit “Grilling for a Cause.” “We have the possibility of raising a lot of money for these groups,” Howard said. “The challenge is to get the word out.”


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Sam’s Club may be coming to Edmond, with a proposed location on Interstate 35 just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and the interstate. The first issue before the city is a request for a 500square-foot sign that is 70 feet from the ground, which is larger than Edmond’s code allows. “It is too tall and too big,” City Planner Bob Schiermeyer said. The store and fuel station, to be located on 15 acres in the southwest corner of Fox Lake Plaza, would have a 90-foot frontage onto the interstate. The code allows a 25-foot-tall sign that is 60 square feet. “The property is way off the road, and they think they need that big of a sign,” Schiermeyer said. Fox Lake Lane is west of the proposed 138,000square-foot box building that is proposed to have different elevations and insets in the design. Planning commission members are expected to consider the sign variance at their meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at 20 S Littler Ave. City council members will make the final decision on the variance. Zoning for the business on that property is already in place. A site plan for the building has not been turned into the city. City Councilman Nick Massey is a promoter of business growth in Edmond. “Economic growth in Edmond is great,” Massey said about the proposed Sam’s store, the first of its kind in Edmond. The property where Sam’s may be located has been an issue for nearby property owners since

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond, just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and Interstate 35. First request before the city is a variance from the sign code. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY CITY OF EDMOND

more than a decade ago, when the Fox Lake Plaza Shopping Center was first proposed by developer Frank Battle. The land has been bare for years, and mounds of dirt have been removed, causing property owners in Fox Lake housing continued problems. A year ago, Jim Tapp, with Fox Lake Invest-

ments, purchased the land from Expressway Development, a company owned by Battle. Expressway Development was in bankruptcy because of two unpaid mortgages for the proposed Fox Lake Plaza. “I am glad to see the property finished. It has been on hold for a long time,” Massey said. “I am glad to see some progress.”

Sam’s Club is looking to build a new store in Edmond, just north of the Walmart Supercenter at 15th Street and Interstate 35.

Edmond council hears Arcadia Lake trail plan BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — City council members voted to spend $200,000 for engineering to design a multipurpose trail around Arcadia Lake as part of a public-private project. David Tew, with the Arcadia Lake Trail Coalition, said in a presentation to the city council this week that they expect the trail to be open by 2014 for walkers, joggers, bicyclists and others. “This is a community resource and a community benefit,” said Tew, Mercy Health’s chief operating officer. A nearby property owner and the equestrian riders aren’t in favor of how the trail is being designed around the lake. John Fitch, a Southlake resident, told council members he is concerned about the safety of Boys Ranch Town because the will bring strangers to the area. “This is a threat to the safety of the boys,” Fitch said. Fitch said he is not opposed to the trail — just a trail all the way around the lake. “I don’t want a 20-mile trail,” Fitch said. “It is ridiculous. We need to be creative with our money. We don’t want to be like Lake Hefner.” Fitch warned the council members that trash associated with the trail would negatively impact the ecological system at the lake. He also said the trail would be closed from Oct. 1to Jan. 15 because of bow hunting season at the lake. Kathryn McKinney, a member of the Friends of Arcadia Lake Equestrian Trails, said they are not opposed to the trail at Arcadia Lake. But, she said they don’t want the two trails to cross or for the jogging trail to be built near the horse trail. “Horses are frightful,” McKinney said. “They are likely to bolt and lose a rider or

The city is designing another trail on the east side of Edmond that would run beneath Interstate 35 and continue east to Spring Creek Park at the lake. crash through to another trail.” Tew said they are working with the surrounding neighbors, the Boys Ranch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others in the design. A community connections meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Sept. 27 at the Downtown Community Center. Tew said he came up with the idea for the trail around the lake a year ago when he was sitting in his recliner with a separated shoulder from a bicycle accident. He said he wanted to come up with a plan where bicyclists didn’t have to compete with vehicles. Tew hopes to have the design completed in a month. Trails are a priority for a number of people living in Edmond. The city is designing another trail on the east side of Edmond that would run beneath Interstate 35 and continue east to Spring Creek Park at the lake. They have budgeted $1.8 million for the trail. The money will come from the 2000 sales tax passed for capital improvements. Design work is expected to be completed by the end of the year. TAPP Development Corp. is considering building a wellness park and trail head on the west side of the interstate that could tie into the city’s new trail. “We hear about it (trails) on a regular basis,” Mayor Charles Lamb said.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500 students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m.

While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000

Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

EDMOND | STATE

PARALYMPIC ATHLETES BRING HOME MEDALS

IN BRIEF NORMAN

ART CONTEST SET The Cleveland County CROP Walk to Stop Hunger will hold a sidewalk chalk art contest for children Saturday outside the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Registration begins at 9 a.m. The contest is from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Entry fee is a donation of peanut butter or tuna. Prizes will be awarded. The annual CROP Walk will be Oct. 7.

PALEONTOLOGIST TO VISIT SAM NOBLE Paul Sereno, known for his discoveries of ancient creatures such as “SuperCroc” and “Raptorex,” will give a free presentation at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave. The event will be preceded by a dessert reception at 6:30 p.m.

U.S. women’s sitting volleyball team coach Bill Hamiter talks to his players as he leads them to a silver medal finish at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The team trains at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

FROM STAFF REPORTS

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma-trained resident athlete Jeremy Campbell and members of the USA women’s sitting volleyball team won medals for Team USA at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. Campbell defended his 2008 title in the men’s F44 discus throw, winning his second gold medal in the event and breaking the Paralympic record with a throw of 60.05 meters. He also broke a record at the 2012 UCO Endeavor Games in June. The sitting volleyball team finished the games with a silver medal after a 3-1loss to China in the gold medal finals match. The team beat Brazil, Slovenia and Ukraine and lost to China twice. UCO became an official U.S. Olympic Training Site in July 2009. The university has been an official U.S. Paralympic training site since 2005.

U.S. Paralympic athlete Jeremy Campbell celebrates at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London after winning a gold medal in the men’s F44 discus throw.

3 sought in drive-by shooting FROM STAFF REPORTS

Police were looking for three black males after a drive-by shooting in southeast Oklahoma City. No one was injured in the shooting that disrupted a porch gathering in the neighborhood Sunday evening. About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report. The woman said she ran to her vehicle when the shots rang out and tried to chase the SUV before realizing her tire had been shot. The mirror and gas cap of the vehicle were also struck by bullets, according to the report. The front passenger window of another vehicle at the home was broken by a bullet which appears to have ricocheted before striking the car. Another witness at the scene said she noticed the vehicle pass the house about five times every 20 to 30 minutes before the shooting. Witnesses said the occupants of the car appeared to be about 17 or 18 years old. One person told police one of the suspects had a red string in his hair, according to the report. While interviewing witnesses, the officer told the parents of several children at the home to keep them out of the street and away from the crime scene, but the children picked up casings in the street before they were secured for evidence, the report states. No arrests have been made in the incident.

About 6:15 p.m., a woman who lives in the 5100 block of Gaines Street told police she and a group were in front of her home when a black 2000 Hyundai sport utility vehicle ran a stop sign and the front passenger fired shots from the vehicle as it passed the house, according to the police report.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

LIBRARY HOSTS GARDEN WORKSHOP ON TUESDAY The Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., will host a garden workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the library. Norm Park will discuss the benefits to soil of cover crops. Participants can bring seeds and plants to swap. A monarch butterfly exhibit created by Annie Hart will be featured.

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM HOSTS FOSSIL FIELD TRIP The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History will sponsor an adult fossil field trip Friday and Saturday. Paleontology curator Steve Westrop will meet with participants at 7 p.m. Friday at the museum for a pre-field trip presentation. The group departs from the museum at 9 a.m. Saturday to a dig site to collect marine fossils. Transportation is provided. Bring a sack lunch. Cost is $60 for members and $70 for nonmembers. Registration is required. Call 325-1008. FROM STAFF REPORTS


THE OKLAHOMAN

NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Allyson Potts and assistant librarian Beverly Theige decide on a clapping pattern to share with participants at a Music Connection program at the Norman Public Library.

Izzy Evershed participates in the Norman Public Library’s Music Connection program. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY NORMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY

Norman library uses music to entice kids BY CHRISTIAN POTTS For The Oklahoman

NORMAN — The Norman Public Library is making a connection with some of its youngest visitors and soon-to-be readers — through music. “Music grows every part of the brain, from listening skills, language development, coordination, concentration and memory to logical thinking, reading and writing,” said Mary Ann Boersma, child development specialist with the Cleveland County Health Department. That’s the point behind Music Connection, a twice-weekly program of the Children’s Services Department of the library. Norman Music Connection is a reorganization of a program the library has offered for the past five years. To celebrate the kickoff of the new effort, the community is invited to programs set for 7 p.m. Thursday and 10:30 a.m. Friday. The program is offered at those times most Thursdays and Fridays, giving parents the option of a morning or evening opportunity. During those times, the traditional “quiet in the library” rule in the children’s department does not apply, as children sing, play instruments and dance. “Hearing something in a song really helps young children to learn it,” said children’s assistant librarian Beverly Theige, who leads the classes each week. The program is for ages 3 to 7 and features songs, rhymes, some dances and a chance to play a few simple instruments. During the summer, local musicians share their talents with the groups and allow children to look at their instruments. For younger children, the Rhythm Babies class, which is offered at 9:30 a.m. Fridays, often swells to nearly 100 children and parents, as some of the library’s youngest customers get an early taste of sound and song. The library has hosted music-centered classes for more than a decade, when longtime library supporter Gloria Jean Fenn hosted the Rhythm Babies class once a month. Theige came on board about six years ago to expand that class as well as create a class for slightly older children. In each age group,

Theige tries to include repetition in what children do, often sharing some of the same rhymes and songs for a month or so at a time as part of the program. “Many times a child may come and be completely silent, or keep bouncing off the walls, and you wonder if they’re getting anything from it,” Theige said. “But then after a month of it, they are participating a lot more, or I’ll hear from their parents

that they are singing some of the song we’ve done here at home. It’s very rewarding to hear about that.”

To learn more For more information on any of the programs and services offered by the library’s children’s department, call 701-2630 or go online to www.justsoyou know.us/norman. Christian Potts is public information officer for the Norman Public Library.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

I

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

NOTICE is hereby given by Snyder Partners, P.O. Box 3010, Cody, WY 82414, (307-587-4291) pursuant to OCC-OGR 165:10-5-4, 165: 10-5-5, and RP 165:5-7-27, that application 1301700012 has been filed with the Oklahoma Corp. Com. to approve the following commercial disposal well: Brown #1 SWD; Location: C SW/4 Section 32-T17N-R12W; Formation: Pontotoc 3250’-4250’; Rate & Pressure: 3000BPD@1200PSI. Objections may be filed with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission within 30 days of this notice.

Public Notice Putnam City Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. Putnam City Schools also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator: Dr. April Grace Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources, Putnam City Schools 5401 N.W. 40th Oklahoma City, OK 73122 (405) 495-5200, ext. 1230 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (office hours)

Notice of Sale: at Security Self Storage, 7100 NW 50th Bethany, Oklahoma 73008 will accept sealed bids for the dispersal of personal property and/or household goods to satisfy rent in arrears and/or delinquent storage fees. Bids will be accepted on the entire contents of storage units(s). No individual items or partial unit bids will be accepted. Sale will start at 3:00 pm. on Sept. 25, 2012, no late bids will be considered. The following units are scheduled to be sold: Unit #: 1209 JOEL MANNING 10104 Hefner Village Terr. OKC OK 73162 UNIT #: 1267 DEBORAH JOHNSON 6700 NW 58th TERR. OKC OK 73122 UNIT #: 1411 SAM STEARMAN 6906 NW 53rd Street Bethany OK 73008 UNIT #: 1715 BRIAN BIVIN PO Box 433 Davenport OK 74026

On July 13, 2012, an Application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission seeking consent to the Assignment of Broadcast License of Radio Station KTLR (AM), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma from Tyler Broadcasting Corporation (TBC) to WPA Radio LLC. KTLR (AM) operates on an assigned frequency of 890 kilohertz, with an effective radiated power of 1.0 kilowatts day. The Officers, Directors and Shareholders who hold ten percent or more interest of TBC: Ty

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

A. Tyler and Tony J. Tyler. The Manager and Member who hold ten percent interest or more of WPA Radio LLC is Stanton Nelson. A copy of the Assignment Application is available for public inspection on-line at www.fcc.gov, or during business hours at KTLR (AM) located at: 5101 S. Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Public Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents and students 18 years or older certain rights with respect to the student's education records. These rights are: (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. (2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parent or eligible student believes are inaccurate. Parents or eligible students may ask the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the school has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. (4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Putnam City Schools to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

ANYONE HAVING INTEREST IN A 1964 FORD RANCHERO VIN# 5H27T246801 CONTACT EARL HAMILTON 405-545-6923. Sale date 9-13-12. Anyone claiming legal/financial interest in the following vehicles call Sue @ 354-9778. 1970 Triumph MC VIN#BC01832T150T or 1999 Kawasaki KVF30041 ATV VIN#JKAVF8A13XB503752. Anyone with legal/financial interest in 1951 Ford VIN B1CH212273 or 1951 Ford VIN B1DA136909 call Sandra 350-2087.

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken

to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate

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crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.


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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Zoo playground is for disabled children

Tom Buckner, Oklahoma City Zoo maintenance supervisor, and Susan Adams, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director, look at the zoo’s new playground.

Susan Adams, executive director of Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City, looks at a swing in the Oklahoma City Zoo’s new playground. PHOTOS BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

Physically disabled children who visit the Oklahoma City Zoo will soon have a playground designed to fit their needs. The zoo and Ronald McDonald House Charities have partnered to build a $23,000 playground on the zoo’s grounds with equipment designed for the disabled. The Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant playground is slated to open next month. The playground includes a swing that kids in wheelchairs can use and a jungle gym that allows children to use their arms to pull themselves through the bars while still in their wheelchairs. Even the picnic table has a section of the bench cut out so kids can sit shoulder to shoulder with their family and friends. The playground was made possible by a $10,000 grant from Ronald McDonald House. Oklahoma City ZooFriends and the zoo chipped in the rest. The goal of the playground is to give disabled visitors and their parents the full playground experience, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Oklahoma City executive director Susan Adams said. “As a parent with three kids I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing,” Adams said. “These parents will also be able to have the experience of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.” Zoo maintenance supervisor Tom Buckner visited other playgrounds in the metro area with equipment designed for disabled children to get ideas for what the playground should include. The swing is perhaps the centerpiece of the project. “They can roll their wheelchair onto it, lock it down and chain it and they can actually swing,” Buckner said. “It’s not a big swing, but it’s enough to give them the sensation that they’re doing something.” Adams said the goal of the community grants program is to maximize impact.

As a parent with three kids I’ve spent many hours pushing them in a swing. These parents will also be able to have the experience of pushing their child in a swing where they might otherwise not have had that opportunity.” SUSAN ADAMS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES OF OKLAHOMA CITY

“Because of the number of attendees at the zoo and the number of families that would benefit from having an installation like this, we believe it was a very worthy grant,” Adams said. Ronald McDonald House Charities has also sponsored educational programs at the zoo in-

cluding ZooFriends for Kids. “They’ve helped spearhead those projects and this is exactly what they did with the playground,” ZooFriends director Dana McCrory said. “They gave us the seed money and said we believe you can do and this is the right place and that’s all it took.”


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

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ACHIEVERS

Darcie Henderson

COMMUNITY SERVICE

SCOUTING

Coppermark banker Darcie Henderson was elected chairwoman of the Junior Achievement of Oklahoma Inc. — Oklahoma City Region board of directors. Henderson has been volunteering and fundraising for Junior Achievement since 2000 and serves on the state board. She has been with Coppermark Bank for 20 years and is senior vice president in the cash management department. Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to plan for their futures and make smart academic and economic choices. Programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers and provide hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship.

Benton Gifford III, of Purcell, has earned his Eagle Scout rank. Gifford, 17, is a member of Troop 237 in the Last Frontier Council. Gifford’s Eagle Scout project was a renovation of the Lions Club baseball complex. Gifford’s project involved repainting buildings, installing a bench, repairing a urinal, installing new doorknobs and replacing damaged signs. Gifford, along with volunteers, spent 1,500 hours on the project. Gifford is the son of Jennifer and Roger Johnson and a junior at Purcell High School, where he is a member of the National Honor Society and the drum line.

SS Vent Hood, 2'x4'x10' with exhaust fan & MUA filters $1500 obo ¡ 580-682-0418

CONCRETE FOREMAN

WE PAY & TOW AWAY Your unwanted vehicle wrecked, running or not. No Title OK. 512-7278

Paving company in need of an experienced foreman. We offer competitive salary, vacation, health/life insurance. Apply at 10200 NW 10th or call 405-577-2944.

$250 & Up for non-running vehicles, no title ok. 405-819-6293

Townsend Motors, LLC 8901 N Harrison, Shawnee, OK 405-273-0330 ¡ Selling the last 35 Antique Classic Cars that were in the museum from 1901 to 1984

The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following position. Housekeeping/Laundry $100 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

Flashback Car show, Sept 15th Mineral Wells Park, Guthrie 405-282-0899 Classic Car Restoration Free transport avail 918-605-6070 YesteryearClassicAutos.com

'02 Monte Carlo SS, 56K, Loaded, 1 Owner $10,000 ¡‘¡ 732-7216

2010 FORD FUSION SE Smokestone metallic, 26,600 miles $15,500. Call 405-503-6056.

05 Mustang convertible, V6, auto, 25Kmi, $16,500 326-0665 aft 2pm

DRILLER HELPER and CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING TECH NEEDED. Will Train. Some benefits. Apply in person at 809 NW 34th, Moore.

FULL-TIME OPPS -

HS grads ages 17-38. Full pay, benefits, training, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. No exp needed. Call Mon-Fri 877-628-9562

Land Surveying Company looking for experienced Crew Chief. Benefits included. 405-278-7839

Maintenance, Make Ready & Grounds, Jobs Available. Must have tools & transportation. Call Chris at 751-2277.

HUMAN RESOURCES

CAREER POSITION Looking for individual that wants a career position in Human Resources. Position will start with clerical duties such as workers compensation administration, interviewing potential employees unemployment claims, employee tracking utilizing excel, and PowerPoint presentation. Progressing to workers compensation depositions and trials. EEOC, policies, and employee benefits. Prefer degree in HR and/or Management. Individual may have some prior HR experience or be a college graduate wanting to gain the experience. Must have excellent computer skills. If qualified please send resume to:

Counter height, dining room table, 2 tone (black & brown), 4 chairs with leaf, solid wood, exc. cond, $300. local owner 806-474-8811

OWNER CARRY 3313 NW 24 th 3bd 1.5 bth, 1 car, Nice historic, Totally remod. $5k dwn 348-2108

Route Manager

Remodelled Edmond Office/Condo 370-8471

8' x 8' barn, all wood with shingled roof, will assemble, $900. 580-458-8883 2 Metal Buildings, Like New! Can deliver. $650 & $1200. 371-6026

Remolded Edmond Office/Condo 370-8471 Hot Tub, seats 6 $2000; Tanning Bed, 16-bulb, 110 volt $700 Call 405-382-2243 HOT TUB 6 ft round, 400 gallon $800 ¡ Call 405-388-4126

www.imperialco.com

'99 Escort ZX2, runs great, AC, new tires $1,999. 405-343-6043

'92 Civic 4 dr, 5spd runs good, ac doesn't work $1500obo 885-6115

2000 E-320, 1 Owner, Sunroof, Silver, Exc Cond $7500 ¡ 641-5183

2006 Mitsubishi Eclipse 13,500 miles, constantly garaged, 6 CD changer, premium sound, operable sunroof, cruise control, auto locks, $13,200. 405-842-3680

1987 Olds Delta 88, 4dr, 41,850 miles, very good cond., all equip., $3900 OKC, 405-685-4292

2000 Ford Explorer 4X4 runs good $2300 obo, 761-9653 or 313-9912

2000 Dodge Ram Conversion Van, 86K mi. $3000 obo 405-265-0572

2005 Puma 27 ft, Nice Unit! $8000 OBO 405-265-0572

Service Representative

Lincare, a leading national respiratory company, seeks caring Service Representative. Service patients in their home for oxygen and equipment needs. Warm personalities, age 21+, who can lift up to 120 lbs should apply. CDL w/DOT a plus or obtainable. Exc growth opportunities. Drug-free workplace. EOE. Fax resume 405-736-0908 or in person at 2828 Parklawn Dr. Ste. 11, Midwest City, OK. WAREHOUSE/CDL DRIVER with Hazmat endorsement preferred. Oilfield chemical manufacturing. Health ins., 401K, other benefits. Starting pay $14/hr DOE. Tuttle area. Contact office, 405-392-3505 Warehouse Position needed for fast paced growing company. Previous warehouse experience is required. Please fax your resume to 405-843-4935 or email to info@sabaforlife.com . Position is full time Mon-Fri, 8am to 5pm with occasional req. overtime.

Apply at 3000 N. Rockwell.

Case Manager Transitional Outpatient Care

Work as a Case Mgr in the Transitional Outpatient Care Unit of The Referral Center performing assessments to include trauma screening and perform psycho-educational groups. Must have a min of 1 yr exp working with substance abuse consumes in recovery. Must be Case Mgmt Certified. M-F may include some evening appts. Apply: 1215 NW 25th St EOE

Dental Hygienist

Travis L. Turney, DDS - Blanchard seeks full time Dental Hygienist. Fax resume to 405-485-9569.

Medical Assistant Full Time for pedicatric office. Computer skills necessary. Fax resume to 631-4404.

Orthopedic Surgeon

Administrative Assistant

needed for Edmond lawn care comapny. Good phone & computer skills a must. MS Word, Excel, QuickBooks, plus lawn care specific program req'd. Email resume to mjohnson86@cox.net Dental Administrator in Del City area able to use dental software, file insurance, schedule appointments, multi task. Call 670-4480

Office Assistant

No experience necessary. Apply 309 SW 59th, Suite 106, OKC.

Certified IT Professionals PMP, CPA and IT Certs BS, 10+ yrs IT exp., SDLC, EVM, Budget/Financial, JAD, SharePoint www.lcibest.com

FT, Reynolds Community Hospital, Ft. Sill, OK. Day shift, M-F, no wkends/holidays. Suff. exp. diagnosing & treating diseases & injuries. Exp. in shoulder/knee arthroscopy. Exp. in castings, aspirations, injections brace application and other procedures. Doctor of Medicine/Osteopathy residency training program in orthopedics. Board eligible or board certified by ABOS. Call Lisa @ 301-208-8770; CV to Lturner@raorad.com or fax to 301-208-8394 EOE

CMAs & MATs - All Shifts LPN - 3-11 SHIFT Apply at: Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St, OKC. The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following positions. • CMA 2p-10p Mon-Fri, $300 sign-on bonus • LPN weekends double 6a-10p Shift diff and $500 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

Pit Bull PUPS 11wks Razor Edge/Gotti Bullies. Ears Cropped Sire Out of California Kennel 1M 3F $1000-$1,200. Call 405-8020090. New video on website oklahomabluethunderbullies.com Pit Bull Pups, Blue, Black, Brindle, $175. 405-305-7500 Pomeranian M 10yeras BLK/Wh, F 9years Cream/Wh. Shots. Free to good homes 405-627-7783

Poodle, M, Blk/W Parti Cute $200. 580-583-2696 Rottweiler, Reg German Pups, blk & mah., F&M $550 405-279-3103

ASST MANAGERS Up to $40K Sign on bonus, on the spot interviews, benefits. Attend hire event Tue 9/11, 2-7 Taco Bueno 1400 SW 74th Expwy OKC. For more info 405-509-1990/ 204-8913

The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following position. • Cook/Dietary Aid FT $100 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

Rottweiler, 5 mo old Female $225 ¡¡¡¡ Call 405-476-3772 Rottweilers, Real German Bred Pups, AKC $500-$1000 ¡ 619-0643 Wire Haired Fox Terrier, AKC, F, Super Cute, $450. 580-583-2696 Wilshire Valley Apartment Newly Remodeled 1, 2 & 3 bed S8 (upgrd. + 1 bd) Call 475-9984 for Specials

Yorkie, AKC 9wks M/F $250-$500 s/w 580-504-7115 can send pics Yorkie Puppies, AKC, 2F, Lovable & Huggable $450ea. 405-537-1147

National Company Seeking

Self starting individuals for local area. Immediate Start. Above average income potential. Complete training. Customers come to you. Weekly pay, commission advance Call 800-926-1452 for appointment.

Rennovated 2bd, 1ba, 1car, W/D, ch&a, 3529 NW 51st Open Today 918-607-5564

512 NW 141st, 3/2/2, nice area, Edmd. Schls. $1000 mo, 749-0603

2/1/1 washer/dryer hkups $525mo. MG Realty 831-0207 3bd 1.5 bath 2car gar 1100sf $850mo sec 8 ok Alex 990-0488

Advanced CMA for Adult Daycare

Maltese 2M 1F, 1st shots, $400$500. 210-3472 209-0426 can text see pics at okiemaltese.com

Pomeranians, 8wks, 2 females, 1 male, $200. 405-708-8833

NOW HIRING -

No exp needed. Good pay and benefits, paid training, promotions, regular raises. HS grads ages 17-38. Call Mon-Fri 800-492-4841

English Bulldog Puppies, AKC, Ready for new homes 9/15 $900; AKC 1yr old M, house trained $1500 ’ 903-826-1195

German Shepherd, AKC Pups & Adults, Champion Heidelberg's, $850 ¡ 918-261-4729

8300 SW 15TH OKC OK 73128

to do quality control, training, audits, directly over see 8-10 routes. Customer Service attitude a must, experience a plus. Must have good driving record & pass drug test. NO CDL req’d. Taking applications via Fax 405-495-9296, In person 6801 Pat Ave. or visit us at

English Bulldog Puppies AKC 9 wks.3males 6wks 3females 2males.First shots, wormed,vet checked. $1500. Traci 405-830-7367 a_zmom@yahoo.com

John Deere LT 150, 15hp Kohler, 38" cut, runs good, $650. 405-200-7273

Cactus Drilling Company LLC

»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» JOIN IMPERIAL COFFEE & VENDING TEAM!!! Imperial is looking for a

Benton Gifford III

Apprentice &/or Journeyman Electrician

for comm. & industrial. &/or service work. Paid employee ins., 401k, holidays & vacation. Must have valid driver's license. Call 521-8810 for appt.

CNC MACHINIST

JA OILFIELD MFG, INC

is looking for an experienced CNC MACHINIST WE OFFER COMPETITIVE PAY & BENEFITS INCLUDING: ¡Paid Health/Dental Insurance ¡ Paid Life & Disability ¡Paid Vacation & Holidays ¡Matching 401k Plan

3410 Cameron Court, 2/2/1 Appl $695 no pets JW Rlty 755-2510

BENGALS, Silver Black Spotted 2M, 2F, $500 ¡ 580-334-4231 ’’ Cute & Free Kittens, ’’ 6 weeks old, 405-942-4496

Yorkies, Parti & Regular, $450-$1000. Lic# OK89 820-7272 puppylovefarms.com Yorkies, Super Cute!! M & F $200. 580-583-2696

Black Angus Bull 16 months, low birth weight, semen tested. $1250405-760-3696

Australian Shepherd Puppies 3 females, 2 males. Born 7/25/ 2012. Black bi's, tri's and blue merle. ASCA registry and pedigree available. Vet checked and healthy. Parents on site. $300$600 aselv7@hotmail.com (918)652-1277 Weleetka, OK

1404 SE 41st, 3 bed, 1 bath, large backyard, W/D hkup w/appliances, ch&a, w/alarm ¡ 501-6570

Wolf Cubs 90% Timber Wolf 10% German Shepherd, M/F $250 Call 405-412-3461

2bd, 1ba, 1car, fncd yard, ch&a $795 2024 Andover Ct 640-7209

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CONCRETE FOREMAN

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HVAC Journeymen and Make Ready & Maintenance Person

Cairn Terrier, AKC, M&F, Toto Wizard of Oz, $200-$250, 580-583-2696.

Year round employment. Good pay and benefits. Apply in person at Stonebrook Apts, 9301 N. MacArthur Blvd. STANDARD TESTING AND ENGINEERING COMPANY, Oklahoma City office is seeking a highly motivated and experienced Construction Materials Testing Field Technician. A minimum of 1-2 years experience is desired & ACI &/or ODOT Certifications preferred. Salary commensurate with qualifications. Position offers benefits and chance for advancement. EOE. Send Resume by email to

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GOBER BUILDINGS LLC Post Frame Metal Buildings: 30x40x10, (1) 12x8 overhead (1) entry door, and concrete $11,900. Call . 405-650-2556 ¡ Laminate Flooring 2100 sf, 25 yr warranty, 95¢/sf ¡ Prefinished oak, Hardwood, 2400 sf, 30 year warranty $2/sf ¡¡ 405-632-0499 ¡¡

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2000 used solid brick 40¢ each; + 500 used named brick $1 each; $50 minimum; OKC; 405-664-2100

Warehouse/Delivery Driver, Class B CDL req'd. Mon-Fri Only. Apply in person at 1209 SE Grand Blvd.

Solid Brazilian Cherry• Hardwood Flooring • (2600sf) Beautiful, never used $2.50/sf • 632-0499 Sheet Metal, 3'x10', $16 Mon-Sat (405)390-2077/659-3054

English Bulldog Puppies, AKC, s/w, champ lines, $1,000. Adults $300. » 918-448-6226

CARPENTER, DRYWALL AND MORE. 408-7513


20A

I

EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

Resthaven Memory Gardens lawn crypt, providing 2 spaces in a 2 level crypt $2500 + $395 transfer Fee Call 405-640-2578 for details

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EDMOND | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


CORRECTIONS

Jail is accredited Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announced Tuesday the county jail has been accredited by a national group. At right, jail administrator Jack Herron receives a certificate of accreditation from Whetsel. PAGE 14A

IN BRIEF

NORMAN | STATE A 11

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Missing Vietnam airman comes home to final rest BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

The remains of an El Reno Air Force officer missing for 44 years have been identified and will be returned to Oklahoma for burial Saturday with full military honors.

West Nile death toll reaches 8 in state BY JACLYN COSGROVE Staff Writer jcosgrove@opubco.com

A Tulsa County man older than 65 is the eighth state resident to die this year because of West Nile virus, according to state Health Department data released Tuesday. Since the beginning of the year, 127 cases of West Nile virus have been confirmed by the state Health Department. Of the confirmed deaths, two were in Oklahoma County, three were in Tulsa County, one was in Seminole County and two were in Carter County. Public health officials have recommended that residents take precautions to avoid mosquito bites. West Nile virus is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito. More than 80 percent of people who are bitten by an infected mosquito do not contract the virus.

Risk for older than 50 Of the people who become sick, most develop West Nile fever, with symptoms of headache, fever and fatigue, according to the Health Department. People older than 50 are at the highest risk of developing severe neurological disease after being infected. Nationwide, 1,993 cases have been reported so far this year, the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the first week in September since West Nile virus was first detected in SEE TOLL, BACK PAGE

Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton, 46, was among 11 Americans who went missing after North Vietnamese commandos overran a tactical air navigation radar site March 11, 1968, on a Laotian mountaintop. Blanton was U.S. commander at the site known as Lima Site 85, and is the

second of the 11 missing servicemen to be identified, according to U.S. Department of Defense’s Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office. Blanton and 18 other men were assigned to the radar site on a 5,600-foot mountain peak known as Phou Pha Thi in Houaphan

province, Laos, when it was overrun. Eight of the men were rescued that day by U.S. helicopters. A joint recovery operation was instigated by the United States and Laos People’s Democratic Republic in 1994 with no SEE MISSING, BACK PAGE

OFFICERS ID 1 KILLED, 1 HURT Police have identified victims of a shooting and a homicide in far southeast Oklahoma City. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Chad Lawrence Martin, 22, arrived at St. Anthony Hospital with a gunshot wound about 3:25 a.m. Monday and told police he was shot at 12900 Kerns Road. Police went to the address and found Jonathon Kyle Patton, 23, dead with trauma to his body, Knight said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SALLISAW Air Force Lt. Col. Clarence F. Blanton 46, of El Reno

NORMAN LIBRARY USES MUSIC TO ENTICE YOUNG READERS BY CHRISTIAN POTTS For The Oklahoman

NORMAN — The Norman Public Library is making a connection with some of its youngest visitors and soon-to-be readers — through music. “Music grows every part of the brain, from listening skills, language development, coordination, concentration and memory to logical thinking, reading and writing,” said Mary Ann Boersma, child development specialist with the Cleveland County Health Department. That’s the point behind Music Connection, a twice-weekly program of the Children’s Services Department of the library. Norman Music Connection is a reorganization of a program the library has offered for the past five years. To celebrate the kickoff of the new effort, the community is invited to programs set for 7 p.m. Thursday and 10:30 a.m. Friday. The program is offered at those times most Thursdays and Fridays, giving parents the option of a morning or evening opportunity. During those times, the traditional “quiet in the library” moniker in the children’s department does not apply, as children sing, play instruments and dance. “Hearing something in a song really helps young children to learn it,” said children’s assistant librarian Beverly Theige, who leads the classes each week. The program is for ages 3 to 7 and features songs, rhymes, some dances and a chance to play a few simple instruments. During the summer, lo-

OKLAHOMA CITY

WOMAN FACES TRIAL IN DEATH A former Arizona woman accused of having her husband killed for a $1 million life insurance policy was ordered to stand trial, court officials said Tuesday. Raelynne Simonin, 24, is charged in Sequoyah County with accessory after the fact in the death of Jack Vincent Purselley, 39, of Akins. Purselley, whom authorities described as a “con man,” died July 25, 2011, from gunshot wounds. Simonin told Arizona authorities she married Purselley because he said he had obtained a $1 million life insurance policy and she was the beneficiary. Charged with firstdegree murder are Craig Neal Hart, 55, of Vian, and David Joseph Danylchuk, 53, of Sallisaw. William Douglas Daniel, 53, of Sallisaw, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison, according to court records. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Allyson Potts and Norman assistant librarian Beverly Theige decide on a clapping pattern for a Music Connection program. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY NORMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY

Izzy Evershed participates in the Norman Public Library’s Music Connection program.

cal musicians share their talents with the groups and allow children to look at their instruments. For younger children,

the Rhythm Babies class, which is offered at 9:30 a.m. Fridays, often swells to nearly 100 children and parents, as some of the library’s youngest customers get an early taste of sound and song. The library has hosted music-centered classes for more than a decade, when longtime library supporter Gloria Jean Fenn hosted the Rhythm Babies class once a month. Theige came on board about six years ago to expand that class as well as create a class for slightly older children. In each age group, Theige tries to include repetition in what children do, often sharing some of the same rhymes and songs for a month or so at a time as part of the

program. “Many times a child may come and be completely silent, or keep bouncing off the walls, and you wonder if they’re getting anything from it,” Theige said. “But then after a month of it, they are participating a lot more, or I’ll hear from their parents that they are singing some of the songs we’ve done here at home. It’s very rewarding to hear about that.”

To learn more For more information on any of the programs and services offered by the library’s children’s department, call 701-2630 or go online to www.justsoyou know.us/norman. Christian Potts is public information officer for the Norman Public Library.


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NORMAN | STATE

Suspect held in bomb threat BY SHEILA STOGSDILL For The Oklahoman

MIAMI, OK — An Ottawa County man who owed back child support was arrested Tuesday, accused of calling in a bomb threat to a Miami school and attempting to extort money from a bank, police Chief George Haralson said. Bobby Harris, 24, of Miami, was in custody on complaints of misusing a 911 system, making a terrorist threat and extortion from a lending institution. Haralson said about 500

students were evacuated to a nearby church about a block away from the school after police received the bomb threat about 11 a.m. While police were searching the high school, the Miami-based Welch State Bank officials reported they received a threat from someone saying that, in exchange for a large sum of money, he would not blow up Miami High School, Haralson said. “The first phone call was made from a cellphone, which was found

with a backpack near Welch State Bank,” Haralson said. The second threat was made from a Walmart payphone, he said. “We knew the bomb threat was a hoax, but proceeded to search the school with bomb dogs from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and the Tulsa Police Department,” Haralson said. Law enforcement officers used the bogus bomb threat as an opportunity to conduct a training exercise, he said.

Donna Mae Bartlett, 85, was found dead in her car Tuesday at the bottom of this ravine near Council Road and SW 109. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon woman found at crash site FROM STAFF REPORTS

The body of a missing Yukon woman was found Tuesday in her crashed vehicle in southwest Oklahoma City. Donna Mae Bartlett, 85,

was reported missing Monday night by her daughter after she failed to return home. Her body was found about 7:15 a.m. inside a car at the bottom of a ravine on S Council Road be-

tween SW 104 and SW 119, said Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Gary Knight. The cause of the crash is unclear, as is the cause of Bartlett’s death. She was not wearing a seat belt, police said.

Family signs line roadways to welcome home Marines BY MARTHA WAGGONER Associated Press

NEW RIVER AIR STATION, N.C. — Days before Lance

Cpl. Kenny Milton was scheduled to return home from Afghanistan, his wife sat on the floor of a sweltering helicopter hangar, painting on poster board. “My husband, my heart, my hero,” she drew on the board, while around her other wives and kids of deployed Marines made placards for their own loved ones. Even though she had drawn four other signs over the past few weeks, she came to the banner-marking party at New River Air Station with a friend to paint more. “It’s important to me that my husband, every which way he turns, he sees something that has his name on it because he knows how much I’ve missed him, and I know how much he’s missed me,” said Selina Milton, whose husband was returning after seven months away from home on his first deployment. About 30 families participated in the bannermaking party, one of many held at New River and nearby Camp Lejeune as troops return from Iraq and Afghanistan. The banners from New River families line U.S. 17 leading to the air station, while the Camp Lejeune banners hang from fences along State Highway 24. They’re part of a Marine tradition with uncertain roots that’s observed from Lejeune on the East Coast to Camp Pendleton in California. “It’s just one of those things — we’ve always done it,” said Family Readiness Officer Christine Shawhan, who works with the families of the VMM-365, an Osprey squadron with about 200 members. “ … It really helps the families. That’s when the celebration starts. It makes it real for the families that they’re getting their Marines or sailors back.” Families use the poster parties as a way to channel their anticipation of seeing their loved ones again after months of separation and

Luis Rodriguez watches his mother, Theresa, paint signs in July to welcome home her husband during a banner-making party at New River Air Station near Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C. AP PHOTO

worry. Their creations caught the attention and admiration of a peace activist, Chuck Fager, who says they are a kind of folk art. Fager has started a photographic collection of the signs he first noticed as he visited Fort Bragg soldiers jailed in the brig at Lejeune. “There was a variety and color and emotion in the banners that really began to catch my eye,” said Fager, director of Fayetteville’s Quaker House. Some signs are a straightforward greeting — “Welcome Home, Sgt. Smith.” Others were witty or touching. “Packages sent — 20. Nights alone — 215. Tears cried — tons. Two weeks with Cpl. Ham. PRICELESS,” reads one banner in Fager’s book. “Thanks Iraq 4 giving me Evan back,” reads another. Among the racier banners was this one with drawings of hearts and an apple: “Welcome home Zack Seavey. No more pickin’ my own fruit.” When Fager realized most posters fell victim to the elements, he decided to photograph his favorites and put them in an online book titled “Priceless.” He rescued a couple from the ground and kept them. They are, he says, cultural artifacts. “In my collection, I don’t really have any com-

mentary,” Fager said. “It’s not about me and my views about the war. It’s about these families calling out to each other in a difficult situation and doing so with a wit and sensitivity that’s very touching.” The New River gathering marked the start of Ginny Miller’s welcomehome celebration for her husband, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. She was making signs with the help of her parents and her three sons, ages 9, 7 and 5. She had had heavy-duty vinyl signs made for their house, but the boys also wanted to make their own for their dad, Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Miller. And they were helping by making generic signs for the single Marines who might not have anyone to welcome them home. “I think the main thing for this is that it is a sign that the end of the deployment is coming,” Miller said. “I really think that’s it. You get to the point where it’s time to make homecoming signs, and it’s just so exciting.” Seven-year-old James said he was drawing a flag with his dad saluting. “He’s talking to his friend in the Osprey,” he said. “I tried to do my best.” He was certain his father would be proud of the sign because he included “XOXO” on his sign.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

NORMAN | STATE

Midwest City student rewarded for kindness

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

VI

13A

ANNIVERSARIES

BY PETER WRIGHT For The Oklahoman

MIDWEST CITY — D.J. Dunn gave a sideways hug to Hannah Reynolds as they sat in the library of Monroney Junior High School for an interview. The two seventh-graders formed a bond last year, but with new schedules, they don’t see each other as often. They caught up on the usual middle school affairs — teachers, classes, sports. But D.J. was anxious. It was lunch hour and he was hungry. When the interview was over he quickly spun around and raced down the hall in his green wheelchair. There’s a lot to keep track of in the sixth grade, but the friendship between D.J. and Hannah stood out to one teacher. Hannah helped D.J. when he needed it, and with a summer between then and now, their friendship is receiving special recognition. “I’ve given her a hug I don’t know how many times,” D.J. said. “I think it was every day,” Hannah responded. D.J. has arthrogryposis, a disorder that results from a lack of muscle tissue around multiple joints. It can limit a person’s strength, requiring a wheelchair or braces to move around. He said he can walk with assistance, but spends most of his time in a chair. That’s been his experience as far back as he can remember. “I wasn’t in a wheelchair until I was about 11 months old,” he said. D.J. and Hannah met in Cindy Mikeman’s geography class early in their sixth-grade school year. They developed a daily routine that started when he wanted to sit at a desk. “D.J. would roll into the classroom, and he would transfer into a desk,” Mikeman said. “She would move his wheelchair to the other side of his desk.” If he needed a book from his backpack, she would get it for him. They did classroom activities together, and if he got stuck on a problem, she would talk him through it, asking him questions to guide him to an answer. “D.J. normally does his own work, but if he gets confused and doesn’t get it, I can help him out,” Hannah said. Their friendship grew outside Mikeman’s classroom, too. At lunch, Hannah invited D.J. to eat with her and her friends. He made them laugh during every meal. “He pretty much has been adopted into my friends group,” she said. “He has a bunch of best friends now.” Making people laugh might be D.J.’s favorite hobby, he said. During the interview, while Hannah was talking about the new people she’s meeting in middle school, he called her attention to a corner behind her and swung his elbows in circles when she wasn’t looking. “Are you dancing?” Hannah said, turning around. “You’re dancing behind my back. That’s what you’re doing.” He denied the allegation. A few years ago, D.J. said, he was walking with braces, trying to build up his strength when he fell and broke a bone. “My leg just snapped,” he said. “It just snapped right open.” While that might make some people overly cautious of injuries, he’s stays pretty active. He wins games of air hockey, and he loves playing basketball. When his team was down a few points at a recent game, he made a shot that ultimately helped them win. “I said, ‘I’m not giving up,’ ” he said. “I put my shoulder out and threw the

Bob and Betty Batt, of Harrah, were married Aug. 3, 1957, in Jones.

Freda and Carl Blair, of Mustang, were married Aug. 11, 1962, in Cheyenne.

Marcia and David Landes, of Yukon, were married Aug. 10, 1962, in Billings.

The Oklahoman will publish free anniversary announcements for couples celebrating 50 years or more of marriage. To contribute information: I Send an email to kburk@opubco.com with “Anniversary” in the subject line. I Send mail to The Oklahoman, Attn.: Kimberly Burk, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. I To contribute a photo, email a JPEG image or mail a good-quality photo — no larger than 5 by 7 inches Ralph and Donna Waland no smaller than 2 by 3 inches — with your dron, of Mustang, were anniversary information two weeks before the married Aug. 10, 1962, anniversary. in Oklahoma City.

Hannah Reynolds was awarded a $1,000 college scholarship from Kohl’s Department Stores for helping fellow Monroney Middle School student D.J. Dunn. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

ball and swish.” Last year he competed in a wheelchair race at Special Olympics Oklahoma. He practiced at school every morning when he was getting ready to compete. “We would all go out to the hallway, and the kids would get so excited and they would cheer him on,” Mikeman said. The friendship between D.J. and Hannah had a positive effect on everyone. Mikeman said the kindness between them spread through the classroom, encouraging others to be more positive. In part, that’s why she nominated Hannah for a $1,000 college scholarship from Kohl’s Department

Stores. Hannah said it came as a surprise when a package showed up at her house announcing she had won the award. Mikeman said she deserved it for her willingness to help anyone, but especially for her kindness toward D.J. “She was just a helpful friend who wanted to do the right thing,” she said. Mikeman has retired from teaching. D.J. and Hannah now have different lunch hours and classes on different floors, but they’re still friends. Toward the end of the interview D.J. leaned back in his wheelchair, effortlessly popping a wheelie. “What are you doing?” Hannah said. “I wish I had my own wheelchair.”


14A

VI

NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN

Oklahoma County’s jail wins official accreditation

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel announces jail accreditation Tuesday for the county jail facilities. PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

A positive audit by a national jail accreditation group legitimizes a fiveyear program to improve operations at the county jail, Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said Tuesday. Accreditation by American Correctional Association is a first for the county and means less liability for lawsuits and another step toward full compliance with U.S. Department of Justice standards, Whetsel said. “This accreditation is a testament to the professionalism and hard work of our employees,” he said. “Under the leadership of (jail administrator) Maj. Jack Herron, our employees have transformed our jail into an exemplary example, a benchmark for detention centers on the national level.” Whetsel said the county has worked for years to address dozens of operational deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department in 2007. While significant facility deficiencies remain, he said, the new accreditation marks compliance with the operational ones. Whetsel told The Oklahoman in April that his office has injected upward of $10 million into capital improvements at the facility since the federal department issued its findings.

Among steps taken: About 60 new jailers and other staff were hired and a bar code system now computerizes hourly inmate sight checks. The facility has also initiated an inmate security classification system, and a new camera system allows jail staff to monitor most of the facility remotely. The sheriff’s department also brought on a new medical contractor, which initiated an electronic medical record system and enacted new urgent care and assessment policies, Whetsel said. He said Tuesday the office may be “just weeks away” from receiving national accreditation for its health and mental health care operations. “The only thing we have left yet now are the facilities. At this time, an architectural firm is reviewing space requirements, need, cost estimates and other information before making a recommendation on remodeling the current jail or recommending a new one.” Oklahoma County in February approved a contract with a Georgia firm to develop a concept for a new jail, which at an estimated cost of $300 million would address the remaining facility deficiencies outlined by the Justice Department. Problems with escapes, inmate deaths and suicides led to the Justice Depart-

ment’s inquiry. County elected officials in 2008 signed a memorandum of understanding, agreeing to address or resolve 60 deficiencies by 2015. Whetsel said the new operations accreditation will last for three years, and then the county will seek reaccreditation. Currently the jail in Tulsa County is the only other jail in Oklahoma to receive the correctional association’s stamp of approval. Whetsel said accreditation means jail officials will have constant contact with the American Correctional Association. “There will also be annual reporting regarding compliance with standards, updated plans for actions and significant events review,” he said. “The ACA will also conduct regular audits of our facility.” But critics have questioned the reliability of the audit. Some complain the cost — as much as $3,000 per day and as much as $1,500 per auditor, according to one report — amounts to “pay-forplay.” A 2001 report by The Boston Globe claimed American Correctional Association was accused of allowing prison and jail administrators to “buy a seal of approval that serves to inflate the reputations of the facilities, cushion them against lawsuits and fend off regulation.”

1 jailed, 5 hurt in accidents FROM STAFF REPORTS

The driver of a sport utility vehicle was arrested and two passengers were injured Tuesday following two accidents involving the same vehicle. Oklahoma City police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said Dustin Orr, 30, was arrested on multiple traffic violations as well as outstanding felony warrants following a chase that began with one accident and ended with another. Two female passengers in Orr’s vehicle were taken

to a hospital for treatment of injuries. Orr was not injured. Capt. Dexter Nelson said Orr was arrested after his vehicle struck another SUV about 9:50 a.m. near NW 10 and N Western Avenue, and then fled the scene. A pursuit of the vehicle led to a second accident, in which his vehicle overturned, skidded on its roof before striking a curb and turning upright a block later at N Classen Boulevard. Meanwhile, in a separate

crash Tuesday, three people were injured about 8:30 a.m. in a two-vehicle rollover accident at Interstate 44 and SW 104, fire Maj. Tammy McKinney said. Eastbound lanes of the highway were closed while firefighters extricated three people from two vehicles. One victim was taken to Deaconess Hospital, while two others were treated at OU Medical Center, Emergency Medical Services Authority spokeswoman Lara O’Leary said.


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Norman 3-year-old wins money for college savings BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

NORMAN — Juniper Clough isn’t yet in kindergarten, but her family is already planning for her college education. Clough, 3, of Norman, won $2,529 toward an Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan account during the Think Big! Save for College! Sweepstakes. The sweepstakes is an annual partnership between the savings plan and state Libraries Department. It was promoted over the summer along with the state’s Summer Reading Program. State Treasurer Ken Miller presented the winnings to Juniper and her parents, Anna and Josh Clough, at the Norman Public Library. “We certainly want to do what we can to help people prepare to be successful in the global marketplace, and education is a

$250 & Up for non-running vehicles, no title ok. 405-819-6293

Townsend Motors, LLC 8901 N Harrison, Shawnee, OK 405-273-0330 ¡ Selling the last 35 Antique Classic Cars that were in the museum from 1901 to 1984 Flashback Car show, Sept 15th Mineral Wells Park, Guthrie 405-282-0899 Classic Car Restoration Free transport avail 918-605-6070 YesteryearClassicAutos.com

really big piece of that,” Miller said. Anna Clough said planning for Juniper’s college savings has been on her mind. “I, like a lot of parents, knew I wanted to start a savings plan, but it just kept getting put off,” she said. “Now, we plan to start putting money in her account each year.” Emily McBrayer, 18, of Idabel, also received $2,529 toward a college savings account. The libraries where Juniper and McBrayer registered received $1,000 each for their summer reading programs. More than $22,000 in awards has been given to contest winners in the four years of the sweepstakes, Miller said. About $10,000 has been awarded to state libraries. For more information about the plan or to open an account, go to www.ok4 saving.org or call (877) 654-7284.

The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following position. Housekeeping/Laundry $100 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

DRILLER HELPER and CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING TECH NEEDED. Will Train. Some benefits. Apply in person at 809 NW 34th, Moore.

FULL-TIME OPPS -

'02 Monte Carlo SS, 56K, Loaded, 1 Owner $10,000 ¡‘¡ 732-7216

HS grads ages 17-38. Full pay, benefits, training, 30 days vacation/yr, $ for school. No exp needed. Call Mon-Fri 877-628-9562

Land Surveying Company 2010 FORD FUSION SE Smokestone metallic, 26,600 miles $15,500. Call 405-503-6056.

05 Mustang convertible, V6, auto, 25Kmi, $16,500 326-0665 aft 2pm

'99 Escort ZX2, runs great, AC, new tires $1,999. 405-343-6043

looking for experienced Crew Chief. Benefits included. 405-278-7839

Maintenance, Make Ready & Grounds, Jobs Available. Must have tools & transportation. Call Chris at 751-2277.

NOW HIRING -

No exp needed. Good pay and benefits, paid training, promotions, regular raises. HS grads ages 17-38. Call Mon-Fri 800-492-4841

HUMAN RESOURCES

CAREER POSITION Looking for individual that wants a career position in Human Resources. Position will start with clerical duties such as workers compensation administration, interviewing potential employees unemployment claims, employee tracking utilizing excel, and PowerPoint presentation. Progressing to workers compensation depositions and trials. EEOC, policies, and employee benefits. Prefer degree in HR and/or Management. Individual may have some prior HR experience or be a college graduate wanting to gain the experience. Must have excellent computer skills. If qualified please send resume to:

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

VI

15A

IN BRIEF LIBRARY HOSTS GARDEN WORKSHOP ON TUESDAY

NORMAN

ART CONTEST SET The Cleveland County CROP Walk to Stop Hunger will hold a sidewalk chalk art contest for children Saturday outside the Santa Fe Depot, 200 S Jones Ave. Registration begins at 9 a.m. The contest is from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Entry fee is a donation of peanut butter or tuna. Prizes will be awarded. The annual CROP Walk will be Oct. 7.

PALEONTOLOGIST TO VISIT SAM NOBLE Paul Sereno, known for his discoveries of ancient creatures such as “SuperCroc” and “Raptorex,” will give a free presentation at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave. The event will be preceded by a dessert reception at 6:30 p.m.

Warehouse/Delivery Driver, Class B CDL req'd. Mon-Fri Only. Apply in person at 1209 SE Grand Blvd.

The Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave., will host a garden workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the library. Norm Park will discuss the benefits to soil of cover crops. Participants can bring seeds and plants to swap. A monarch butterfly exhibit created by Annie Hart will be featured.

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM HOSTS FOSSIL FIELD TRIP The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History will sponsor an adult fossil field trip Friday and Saturday. Paleontology curator Steve Westrop will meet with participants at 7 p.m. Friday at the museum for a pre-field trip presentation. The group departs from the museum at 9 a.m. Saturday to a dig site to collect marine fossils. Transportation is provided. Bring a sack lunch. Cost is $60 for members and $70 for nonmembers. Registration is required. Call 325-1008. FROM STAFF REPORTS

SS Vent Hood, 2'x4'x10' with exhaust fan & MUA filters $1500 obo ¡ 580-682-0418

Counter height, dining room table, 2 tone (black & brown), 4 chairs with leaf, solid wood, exc. cond, $300. local owner 806-474-8811 John Deere LT 150, 15hp Kohler, 38" cut, runs good, $650. 405-200-7273

German Shepherd, AKC Pups & Adults, Champion Heidelberg's, $850 ¡ 918-261-4729 Morkie 2F 3M okcpoms.com $350-$450, OK#02. 405-609-9241 Pembroke Welsh Corgi Puppies, Tri color, 2M, 2F, POP, $250. 580-450-1100 PIT BULL TERRIER ADBA, 4F 1M, blue puppies, Edge/Thug $500 » »» 618-6587

Cactus Drilling Company LLC 8300 SW 15TH OKC OK 73128

Pomeranian M 10yeras BLK/Wh, F 9years Cream/Wh. Shots. Free to good homes 405-627-7783 »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» JOIN IMPERIAL COFFEE & VENDING TEAM!!! Imperial is looking for a

8' x 8' barn, all wood with shingled roof, will assemble, $900. 580-458-8883

Route Manager

to do quality control, training, audits, directly over see 8-10 routes. Customer Service attitude a must, experience a plus. Must have good driving record & pass drug test. NO CDL req’d. Taking applications via Fax 405-495-9296, In person 6801 Pat Ave. or visit us at

Remodelled Edmond Office/Condo 370-8471 Remolded Edmond Office/Condo 370-8471

Hot Tub, seats 6 $2000; Tanning Bed, 16-bulb, 110 volt $700 Call 405-382-2243 HOT TUB 6 ft round, 400 gallon $800 ¡ Call 405-388-4126

www.imperialco.com

Pomeranians, 8wks, 2 females, 1 male, $200. 405-708-8833 Poodles, CKC 9wks. 2 beautiful M. Black- white & black. Very small. $300ea 439-4936 Rottweiler, Reg German Pups, blk & mah., F&M $550 405-279-3103 Yorkie, ACA, 2M Parti, $500, 2F, toy, black & tan, $500, iluvyorkies.com 405-288-2018

Service Representative

'92 Civic 4 dr, 5spd runs good, ac doesn't work $1500obo 885-6115

2000 E-320, 1 Owner, Sunroof, Silver, Exc Cond $7500 ¡ 641-5183

Lincare, a leading national respiratory company, seeks caring Service Representative. Service patients in their home for oxygen and equipment needs. Warm personalities, age 21+, who can lift up to 120 lbs should apply. CDL w/DOT a plus or obtainable. Exc growth opportunities. Drug-free workplace. EOE. Fax resume 405-736-0908 or in person at 2828 Parklawn Dr. Ste. 11, Midwest City, OK. WAREHOUSE/CDL DRIVER with Hazmat endorsement preferred. Oilfield chemical manufacturing. Health ins., 401K, other benefits. Starting pay $14/hr DOE. Tuttle area. Contact office, 405-392-3505

2006 Mitsubishi Eclipse 13,500 miles, constantly garaged, 6 CD changer, premium sound, operable sunroof, cruise control, auto locks, $13,200. 405-842-3680

Warehouse Position needed for fast paced growing company. Previous warehouse experience is required. Please fax your resume to 405-843-4935 or email to info@sabaforlife.com . Position is full time Mon-Fri, 8am to 5pm with occasional req. overtime.

2000 Dodge Ram Conversion Van, 86K mi. $3000 obo 405-265-0572

2005 Puma 27 ft, Nice Unit! $8000 OBO 405-265-0572

Advanced CMA for Adult Daycare

Apply at 3000 N. Rockwell.

Case Manager Transitional Outpatient Care

Work as a Case Mgr in the Transitional Outpatient Care Unit of The Referral Center performing assessments to include trauma screening and perform psycho-educational groups. Must have a min of 1 yr exp working with substance abuse consumes in recovery. Must be Case Mgmt Certified. M-F may include some evening appts. Apply: 1215 NW 25th St EOE

Dental Hygienist

Travis L. Turney, DDS - Blanchard seeks full time Dental Hygienist. Fax resume to 405-485-9569.

needed for Edmond lawn care comapny. Good phone & computer skills a must. MS Word, Excel, QuickBooks, plus lawn care specific program req'd. Email resume to mjohnson86@cox.net Dental Administrator in Del City area able to use dental software, file insurance, schedule appointments, multi task. Call 670-4480

Office Assistant

No experience necessary. Apply 309 SW 59th, Suite 106, OKC.

PMP, CPA and IT Certs BS, 10+ yrs IT exp., SDLC, EVM, Budget/Financial, JAD, SharePoint www.lcibest.com

CONCRETE FOREMAN

Paving company in need of an experienced foreman. We offer competitive salary, vacation, health/life insurance. Apply at 10200 NW 10th or call 405-577-2944.

Self starting individuals for local area. Immediate Start. Above average income potential. Complete training. Customers come to you. Weekly pay, commission advance Call 800-926-1452 for appointment.

Apprentice &/or Journeyman Electrician

for comm. & industrial. &/or service work. Paid employee ins., 401k, holidays & vacation. Must have valid driver's license. Call 521-8810 for appt.

AUTOCAD DESIGNER

Mfg seeks fast paced, detail oriented candidate w/autocad, cadworx, & cadworx plant 3-D modeling exper. Also, must have exper. w/ P&IDs, ISOs, BOM, piping, vessels, structural steel & familiarity w/skid mounted equipment. Apply in person at:

QB JOHNSON

9000 S. Sunnylane, OKC fax or email resume to ddurbin@qbjohnson.com fax 405-672-2701

The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following positions. • CMA 2p-10p Mon-Fri, $300 sign-on bonus • LPN weekends double 6a-10p Shift diff and $500 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

4724 Leslie, 3bd, 1.5ba, gar, ch&a, fenced backyard, $625mo, $400dep No pets 760-8392

3/2/2 Built in 2007 close to I240 $850 + dep. 405-863-2999

YORKIES , Extra Cute, Small Guar. $295-$345 405-380-8469 BENGALS, Silver Black Spotted 2M, 2F, $500 ¡ 580-334-4231 Kittens $275 to free! Bengals, Pixie Bobs & Mixed 405-413-2798

Black Angus Bull 16 months, low birth weight, semen tested. $1250405-760-3696 Wolf Cubs 90% Timber Wolf 10% German Shepherd, M/F $250 Call 405-412-3461

1404 SE 41st, 3 bed, 1 bath, large backyard, W/D hkup w/appliances, ch&a, w/alarm ¡ 501-6570

Lrg 3bd 2ba w/d hkup $600mo + $300dep 640 SW 47th 631-8039

Australian Shepherd Puppies 3 females, 2 males. Born 7/25/ 2012. Black bi's, tri's and blue merle. ASCA registry and pedigree available. Vet checked and healthy. Parents on site. $300$600 aselv7@hotmail.com (918)652-1277 Weleetka, OK

12405 SW 2nd, 2/2/1, Mustang Schls, $750, no smoke/no pets, 405-650-3067

CNC MACHINIST

Orthopedic Surgeon

CMAs & MATs - All Shifts LPN - 3-11 SHIFT Apply at: Sommerset Assisted Living 1601 SW 119th St, OKC.

Wilshire Valley Apartment Newly Remodeled 1, 2 & 3 bed S8 (upgrd. + 1 bd) Call 475-9984 for Specials

JA OILFIELD MFG, INC

(length of service reqmts apply) Qualified applicants may Apply in person at

Certified IT Professionals

Yorkie Puppies, AKC, 2F, Lovable & Huggable $450ea. 405-537-1147

National Company Seeking

Medical Assistant Full Time

FT, Reynolds Community Hospital, Ft. Sill, OK. Day shift, M-F, no wkends/holidays. Suff. exp. diagnosing & treating diseases & injuries. Exp. in shoulder/knee arthroscopy. Exp. in castings, aspirations, injections brace application and other procedures. Doctor of Medicine/Osteopathy residency training program in orthopedics. Board eligible or board certified by ABOS. Call Lisa @ 301-208-8770; CV to Lturner@raorad.com or fax to 301-208-8394 EOE

YORKIE PUPPIES, ACA Reg, 1F 3M, 6wks, W/T/DC $600ea Will Meet. 405-249-0313

The Wolf Living Center is looking for the following position. • Cook/Dietary Aid FT $100 sign-on bonus Apply at Wolf Living Center, 18501 NE 63rd, Harrah, 454-1400

is looking for an experienced CNC MACHINIST WE OFFER COMPETITIVE PAY & BENEFITS INCLUDING: ¡Paid Health/Dental Insurance ¡ Paid Life & Disability ¡Paid Vacation & Holidays ¡Matching 401k Plan

for pedicatric office. Computer skills necessary. Fax resume to 631-4404.

Administrative Assistant

ASST MANAGERS Up to $40K Sign on bonus, on the spot interviews, benefits. Attend hire event Tue 9/11, 2-7 Taco Bueno 1400 SW 74th Expwy OKC. For more info 405-509-1990/ 204-8913

Basset Hound, UKC, Beautiful! Tri Color, 2 boys, POP, $400 wormed & 1st shots. Available Now. 580-656-0867 BOSTON TERRIERS, AKC, 7wks, S/W, 4M 1F $350-$400 blk/wht, Sable & white POP 405-543-9460

¡¡ SIGN ON BONUS ¡¡ 2101 SE 67th Street OKC, OK 73149

BOXER, AKC, fawn M, 1 yr old, shots current $300 ¡ 818-0562

CONCRETE FOREMAN

Paving company in need of an experienced foreman. We offer competitive salary, vacation, health/life insurance. Apply at 10200 NW 10th or call 405-577-2944.

Chihuahua, Reg. okcpoms.com $200 -$275, OK#02. 405-609-9241

HVAC Journeymen and Make Ready & Maintenance Person

DACHSHUND MINI AKC 2 tiny LH Females blk & tan, piebald, s/w/dc $250, Newcastle (405) 392-5490/641-4841

Boxer puppies »»» s/w, $250, 405-598-2442 or 788-1743.

Year round employment. Good pay and benefits. Apply in person at Stonebrook Apts, 9301 N. MacArthur Blvd. STANDARD TESTING AND ENGINEERING COMPANY, Oklahoma City office is seeking a highly motivated and experienced Construction Materials Testing Field Technician. A minimum of 1-2 years experience is desired & ACI &/or ODOT Certifications preferred. Salary commensurate with qualifications. Position offers benefits and chance for advancement. EOE. Send Resume by email to

bburris@stantest.com

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16A

VI

NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Deaths ADA

Dorsey, Jeffrey Paul, 54, pharmaceutical chemical engineer, died Saturday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Trinity Baptist Church (Criswell, Ada). Throne, Suzanne, 77, retired office manager, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Criswell, Ada). Watson, John Rufus, 90, carpenter, died Tuesday. Services Friday in Dallas, Texas (Criswell, Ada). Zakszewski, Paul Martin, 61, retired oil drilling supervisor, died Saturday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, St. Joseph Catholic Church (Criswell, Ada).

ANADARKO

Shook, Dylan Wade, 19, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Squaretop Baptist Church (Steverson, Anadarko).

ATOKA

Jones, James “Jim,” 79, carpenter, died Monday. No services (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Gastel, Lathe Randall, infant son of Brad and Amber Gastel, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 2 p.m. Friday, Memorial Park Cemetery (WalkerBrown, Bartlesville).

BLANCHARD

Briskey, Jennifer, 48, died Sunday. Graveside services 1 p.m. Thursday, Yukon Cemetery (Caskets Inc. & Johnson, Del City). Stevenson, Duane A., 64, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Primrose Funeral Service. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Newcastle United Methodist Church (Primrose, Norman).

BOKCHITO

Roper, Rudolph Red, 88, died Friday. Services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Bokchito Church of Christ (Brown’s, Durant).

CARNEY

Baker, Wanda Aileen, 93, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Parks Brothers, Chandler).

CHICKASHA

Boevers, Randy Don, 58, farmer and rancher, died Saturday. Services 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church, Ninnekah (Ferguson, Chickasha).

CUSHING

Patterson, Goldie Alice, 95, homemaker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church-Disciples of Christ (Palmer & Marler, Cushing).

DEL CITY

Lane, Lonnie Jr., 82, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Sunny Lane, Del City).

DURANT

Moore, Richard Wayne, 61, died Sunday. Services 6 p.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant). Peebles, Josephine Steward, 93, died Aug. 31. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Old Bokoshe Cemetery (Holmes-Coffey-Murray, Durant). Russell, Sue, 66, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Brown’s, Durant).

EDMOND

France, Joyce Dean, 80, registered nurse, died Tuesday. No services (Cremation Society, Oklahoma City). Gateley, Laurann Katherine, 22, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, LifeChurch.tv (Matthews, Edmond).

ELK CITY

Joy, Carolyn, 79, homemaker, died Tuesday. Mass 11 a.m. Friday, St. Matthew Catholic Church (Martin, Elk City).

ENID

Blecha, Frank, 95, farmer, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Golden Oaks Chapel (LadusauEvans, Enid).

EUFAULA

Graham, Janet Elizabeth, 74, homemaker, died Friday. No services (Hunn Black & Merritt, Eufaula).

GUTHRIE

Ford, Lance Leon, 23, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday (Hayes, Guthrie).

GUYMON

Hill, Ruby Jane, 85, homemaker, died Saturday. Services Wednesday in Gruver, Texas (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARDESTY

Fox, Glena Jean, 59, Wolf Creek Store owner, died Sunday. Services 3 p.m. Wednesday, Hardesty Community Church (HensonNovak, Guymon).

HARTSHORNE

Shores, Clemit C., 93, coal miner, died Saturday. No services (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

KINGFISHER

Deatherage, John A. Jr., 66, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church (Sanders, Kingfisher).

LAWTON

Johnson, Quintin Lee, 51, died Aug. 30. Services 11 a.m. Wednesday (Whinery-Huddleston, Lawton). Magnusson, Mary Louise Kraus “Lou,” 77, died Saturday. Mass noon

Friday, Holy Family Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton). Regian, Alice, 81, died Monday. Services 1:30 p.m. Thursday (Becker, Lawton).

LONE GROVE

Nuckels, Wanda Jean, 75, homemaker, died Sept. 6. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Alexander, Wilson).

LONGDALE

Redhat, Christopher Wayne, 28, died Sunday. Wake 7 p.m. Wednesday, Longdale Assembly of God. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, Longdale Gymnasium (Haigler-Pierce, Canton).

justice, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Sept. 20, First Unitarian Church (Affordable Cremation, Oklahoma).

PAWNEE

Hedges, Patsy, 72, Pawnee Public School employee, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday, First Assembly of God (Poteet, Pawnee).

SNYDER

SHAWNEE

STERLING

McKimmey, Jeffrey Scott, 51, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, First Church of the Nazarene (Walker, Shawnee). Smothers, Billy Thomas, 71, production supervisor, died Tuesday. Wake 5 p.m. Friday, family home

MANSFIELD

Craig, Wallace Clark, 85, finance officer, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Walker, Shawnee). Bedford, Thomas William, 36, Komar and Son shipping and receiving worker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Saturday, Bower Cemetery, Long Town (Bishop, McAlester). Lewis, A.C., 89, Arkla Gas Co. distribution superintendent, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, First Baptist Church of McAlester (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MIDWEST CITY

Gelsinger, Ingrid I., 74, laundromat attendant, died Sept. 8. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lewis, Wanda Sue, 77, hair stylist, died Monday. No services (Bill Eisenhour, Del City).

MILL CREEK

Counts, Mattie LaNell, 56, died Monday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Thursday, Mill Creek Cemetery (DeArman’s Clagg, Sulphur).

MOORE

MUSKOGEE

Epps, Darrell D., 42, musician, died Friday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, Roxy Theatre (Ragsdale, Muskogee).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Bagley, Audrey Fern, 73, died Sunday. Services Friday in Kennedale, Texas (Galbraith Pickard, Weatherford, Texas). Brown, Lee Bobby, 70, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Childers, Donny Ray, 45, heavy equipment operator, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Triumph Family Worship Center (John M. Ireland, Moore). Conway, Ruby, 95, died Sept. 7. Graveside services 10 a.m. Friday, Sunny Lane Cemetery (Caskets Inc & Johnson, Del City). Conway, Laura L., 74, retired nurse, died Thursday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Tabitha Baptist Church (McKay-Davis, Oklahoma City). Edgington, Deanna Reanee, 49, medical assistant, died Monday. No services (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Edwards, VeNora, 82, seamstress, died Monday. Services 12:30 p.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hall, Carmen Jo, 88, died Tuesday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Rancho Village Baptist Church (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Hicks, Warren Eugene, 68, truck driver, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Bill Eisenhour, Del City). Johnson, Raymond E., 88, died Sunday. Services 1 p.m. Thursday, The Village Christian Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary North, Oklahoma City). Labastida, Eva Angelina, 50, Hobby Lobby order puller, died Sept. 7. Memorial services 2 p.m. Friday (Bill Eisenhour NE, Oklahoma City). Lee, Elvin Earl, 74, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Nutter, Ellen Rebecca “Becky,” 76, died Aug. 11. Services 6 p.m. Saturday, East County Flea Market, Midwest City (Absolute Economical, Oklahoma City). Pauley, J.D., 87, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Advantage, Oklahoma City). Reynolds, Charles Robert, 86, petroleum industry landman, died Sunday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Church of the Servant (Buchanan, Oklahoma City). Schroeder, George “Sonny,” 80, ironworker, died Saturday. Services 4 p.m. Wednesday (Smith and Kernke NW 23 Street, Oklahoma City). Smith, Ronald Dale “Ron,” 62, died Sunday. Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Southern Hills Baptist Church (Vondel Smith Mortuary at South Lakes, Oklahoma City). Stewart, Terrinda J., 56, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Jernigan Memorial Church of the Nazarene, Bethany (Vondel L. Smith and Son South, Oklahoma City). Story, Gerald Ray, 77, aircraft mechanic, died Saturday. Services 10:30 a.m. Friday, Forest Hill Christian Church (Corbett, Oklahoma City). Summers, Edward Hardy “Hardy,” 79, retired state Supreme Court

IN BRIEF OKEMAH

DAY CARE WORKERS WILL BE TRIED Two Creek Nation day care workers accused of child abuse were ordered to stand trial, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Tracy Owens, 36, of Boley, and Rosie Hicks, 50, of Okemah, appeared Monday in Okfuskee County District Court. A video of the incident shows Hicks lacing a toddler’s plate of green beans with hot sauce and then laughing as the toddler begins to cry, the arrest affidavit states. Hicks admitted to police that she caused the toddler to fall down by pushing away a table the child was using to hold himself up with, the affidavit states. The women are no longer employed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Child Development Center, said Maxey Reilly, assistant district attorney. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

Klucas, Suely As, 55, died Sunday. Services 11 a.m. Tuesday (WhineryHuddleston, Lawton). Jacobi, Albert Gus, 88, farm operator, died Monday. Wake 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Becker Funeral Home of Fletcher Chapel. Mass 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church (Becker, Lawton).

Clyde D. Towery

Aug 20, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY After a long illness, Clyde D. Towery passed away September 10, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on August 20, 1926. Thereafter, he moved with his parents to the Canal Zone and graduated from Balboa High School. He attended New Mexico School of Mines before transferring to the University of Oklahoma, where he was graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering. He was a Registered Professional Engineer in Oklahoma and Kansas and spent more than 50 years on oil and gas projects throughout the southwest. He was a member of Scottish Rite, India Shrine Temple, Royal Order of Jesters, Men’s Dinner Club, and ATO Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Jo June Towery; and his sons, Curtis K. Towery, and T. Scott Towery and wife Tonya - all of Oklahoma City. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at the Westminster Presbyterian Chapel. Memorial donations may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church or Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation.

Charles Homer Lawson

Sept 25, 1933 - Sept 8, 2012

HARRAH Charles Homer Lawson passed from this life on September 8, 2012. He was born September 25, 1933, in Bartlesville, OK to Homer & Ellen Lawson. He was happily married for 57 years, having married his sweetheart, Pauline Bernice Holderman, on November 15, 1955. He served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1973, retired after 20 years and was awarded the Bronze Star for distinguished service during the Vietnam conflict and the Army Commendation Medal for being instrumental in obtaining for his unit numerous superior ratings for this contribution to the successful accomplishment of his battalion's overall mission. Upon retirement, he worked and for 20 years at TAFB to gain a secondary retirement to enjoy life with his wife and family. Charles is survived by his wife, Pauline, of the home; and his seven children: Ronald Lawson, of Jones, OK; Katherine and Richie Jekel, of Chandler, OK; Marjorie and Rick Wood, of Jones, OK; Jeanette and Leon Gibbons, of Joshua, TX; Gloria and Ronald O'Dell, of Jones, OK; Felesha and Bruce Scanlan, of Edmond, OK; and Vaundra and Angela Lawson, of Harrah, OK. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Services were held September 11, 2012.

STILLWATER

Grindstaff, Vernie Lucille, 80, homemaker, died Sunday. Graveside services 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fairlawn Cemetery (Palmer & Marler, Stillwater).

WELEETKA

Harjo, Hepsey, 79, homemaker, died Monday. Wake 6 p.m. Thursday, Shurden Chapel. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Little Cussetah United Methodist Church (Integrity, Henryetta).

WOODWARD

White, Betty Jo, 59, homemaker, died Sunday. Services 10 a.m.

Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Biery, Johnnie Jean, 73, food service coordinator, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Yukon Church (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Horn, Mary Lois, 86, secretary, died Sunday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Ringling Memorial Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Robeson, Barbara, 74, jewelry store owner, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Covenant Community Church (Smith & Turner Mortuary, Yukon). Organ donor

Morton C. Cuplin

Della Gene Privett

Emma Rose-Gilbert

OKLAHOMA CITY Morton C. Cuplin, formerly of Bartlesville, OK, passed peacefully at age 84 on September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. Morton was a longtime music educator, whose greatest legacies are the family he loved and the multitudes of students he taught. Morton is survived by his wife, Patricia; and two daughters: Pamela Dowd (Timothy), of Oklahoma City; and Meg Gregory (Scott), of Eden Prairie, MN; and grandchildren: Kelley, Megan, Tim (Brittany) and Molly Dowd; Adam and Alex Gregory. The family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the caring staff of Crossroads Hospice, The Fountains at Canterbury and The Mansion at Waterford in Oklahoma City. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, September 14 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Bartlesville, OK. Following a reception, Interment will be at Memorial Park Cemetery under the direction of Stumpff Funeral Home. To read full obituary, memorial info and leave condolences, visit www.stumpff.org

MOORE Della Gene Privett, age 85, of Moore, Oklahoma, passed away September 10, 2012. She was born December 2, 1926, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to Samuel & Beaulah Griffith. Della attended Southgate Baptist Church in Moore. She enjoyed traveling, reading and shopping. Della was employed by St. Anthony Hospital, where she worked in Medical records most of her working career. She retired after approximately 26 years of service. Her first love was spending time with her family. Della is survived by two sons, Pete Brown & wife Lori, of Oklahoma City; and Charlie Brown, of Yukon, OK; one grandson, Brandon Brown; four granddaughters, Angela York, Sheri Steed, Bridgette Brown and Breeanne Brown; seven great-grandchildren, Billie, Keaton, Braydon, Cole, Brooke, Kira and Mason; and one great-great-grandson, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her parents, Samuel & Beaulah; her husbands, Pete Brown and Gene Privett; daughter-in-law, Virginia Brown; and grandson-in-law, Jay York. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, at the Chapel in Resurrection Memorial Cemetery, 7801 Northwest Expressway in Oklahoma City. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home in Moore, OK.

OKLAHOMA CITY Emma Rose-Gilbert, of OKC, passed away on Sept. 7, 2012, at the Integris Hospice House at the age of 62. She was born in Glendale, CA Sept. 19, 1949. She will be having a celebration of life service at Corbett Funeral Service, 807 W. Wilshire Blvd., OKC, on Friday, Sept. 14th at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Integris Hospice House, OKC; Parkinson’s Foundation, OKC; and A.R.F (Animal Rescue Foundation) Nichols Hills, OK.

Sept 7, 2012

MCALESTER

Burris, Carolyn Gaye, 52, died Friday. Services 2 p.m. Wednesday (Resthaven, Oklahoma City). Johnson, Linda Sherry, 66, registered nurse, died Monday. Services 1 p.m. Friday, Lynlee Mae Chapel (John M. Ireland, Moore). Wentworth, Lonnie Charles, 63, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fort Sill National Cemetery, Elgin (John M. Ireland, Moore).

(Parks Brothers, Chandler). Wilson, Marcella Diane, 93, greeter, died Saturday. Services 2 p.m. Thursday (Walker, Shawnee).

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Stephanie Renee Weese Feb 17, 1971 - Sept 9, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Stephanie Renee Weese passed away September 9, 2012. She was born February 17, 1971, in Midwest City, OK. She is survived by her three children, Justice, Presley, and Cambrye; and sister, Kayley. Celebration of Life Service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, September 13, 2012, at Lifechurch.tv Midwest City, OK.

Chuck Pendergast July 21, 1935 - Sept 10, 2012

GAINESVILLE, TX A Celebration of Life for Chuck Pendergast, 77, of Moss Lake, Gainesville, TX, will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, 1-5 p.m. at the Pendergast residence on Moss Lake, 273 Butcher Point, Gainesville, TX 76240. Mr. Pendergast passed away September 10, 2012, in Gainesville, TX. Chuck was born July 21, 1935, in Oswego, NY to William and Lillian Pendergast. In 1959, Chuck married Barbara Vander Tweel in Rochester, NY. The couple eventually settled in Oklahoma City, where Chuck began the Automotive program at South Oklahoma City Community College. Chuck spent nearly two decades hosting “The Answer Man” radio show on KTOK in Oklahoma City. Chuck and Barbara were avid RV campers and were members of the ‘89ers Camping Club in Oklahoma City for over 25 years. Survivors include: wife, Barbara Pendergast, of Moss Lake; son, Will Pendergast and wife Kathleen, of Coppell, TX; son, Richard Pendergast and wife Nicki, of Moss Lake; granddaughter, Robyn Lambert and husband Raymon; brother, Ronald Pendergast and wife Doris; and brother, Eugene Pendergast and wife Leila. Survivors also include many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: sister, Donna Hinkson; and brother, Bill Pendergast. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Moss Lake Volunteer Fire Dept., 160 FM 1201, Gainesville, TX 76240. The family would like to sincerely thank the MLVFD for their continued dedication and support of the past year and a half.

Dec 2, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

Carolyn Garrett Pool June 16, 1941 - Sept 7, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Loving mother, grandmother, friend, and respected educator, Carolyn Garrett Pool was born June 16, 1941, in Norman, OK, to parents, John and Hazel Garrett, and passed away September 7, 2012, in Oklahoma City. She is survived by her two children: son, Garrett Pool, 43; and daughter, Catherine Pool, 41; and three grandchildren: Jacob Pool, 18, Sophia Pool, 15, and Joseph Pool, 12. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma in 1987. Since 1994, she was Professor in the Department of History and Geography at the University of Central Oklahoma and Professor and Director of Museums Studies. From 1993 to 1994, she was Administrator, Museums West Consortium National Traveling Exhibition; 1983-1993, she was Executive Director, Oklahoma Museums Association. Prior to that, she had also been a Visiting Professor, University of Oklahoma, and Project Specialist, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History/Oklahoma Archeological Survey, as well as a Visiting Instructor at Rose State College. She received numerous Awards and Grants throughout her career and conducted Museum Professional Training through Program Development and Administration. She had multiple professional affiliations and wrote and edited many Publications and presented numerous Papers at Professional Conferences. She was also active in numerous Consulting and Public Service Projects, University Service Activities, College of Liberal Arts Committees, and Department of History and Geography Committees. A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday, September 17, 2012, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral 127 N.W. 7th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73102. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Laboratory of History Museum at the University of Central Oklahoma by contacting Heidi Vaughn, Director, at 405-974-5789 or via e-mail at HVaughn@uco.edu

Sept 19, 1949 - Sept 7, 2012

Daniel Robert Sheehan

Nov 26, 1928 - Sept 9, 2012

BURNEYVILLE A Memorial Mass honoring the life of Daniel Robert Sheehan, 83, of Burneyville, OK, will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14, 2012, in the Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Marietta, OK, with Father Oby Zunmas officiating. Interment will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Oklahoma City, OK. Arrangements are under the direction of FlanaganWatts Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Marietta. Mr. Sheehan was born November 26, 1928, in Pittsburgh, PA, the son of William Sheehan & Dorothy Fauss-Sheehan. He passed away Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Mercy Love County Hospital in Marietta. Mr. Sheehan graduated from Teaneck High School in New Jersey and went on to attend Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he served as President of the SAE Fraternity. Mr. Sheehan then went on to receive his law degree from Oklahoma City University Law School. He served his country in the United States Army during World War II 1946-1948. On September 27, 1952, he married Patricia Lindberg. Mr. Sheehan soon after completed another tour of duty with the Army during the Korean Conflict 1952-1954. Mr. and Mrs. Sheehan then lived in the Oklahoma City area until 1983, when Mr. Sheehan closed his law practice and they moved to the Burneyville/ Marietta area, where Mr. Sheehan opened a claims practice for Oklahoma and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance. Mr. Sheehan became active in the Falconhead Community serving as legal consul for many years. He was an avid golfer and member of the Men’s Golf Association. Mr. Sheehan also spent many hours researching the history of the Falconhead Community. He was an active member of the Good Shepherd Catholic Church and loved reading, surfing the internet, and doing family genealogy. He enjoyed many things in life, but perhaps the thing he enjoyed most was spending time with his wife, his children, and his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Pat, of the home; two sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Jackie Sheehan, of Yukon, OK; and Bob and Linda Sheehan, of Edmond, OK; daughter and son-in-law, Sue and Don Lindsley, of Highlands Ranch, CO; sister, Dolores Leonis, of Glenview, IL; sister-in-law, Doris Sheehan, of Florence, SC; grandchildren, T.J. Lindsley, of Atlanta, GA; Chris and Hillary Sheehan, of Little Rock, AR; Meghan Sheehan, of Edmond; and Darby Sheehan, of Edmond. Mr. Sheehan was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Bill Sheehan and Ray Sheehan; and one sister, Rose Marie Noethiger. Honorary bearers are T.J. Lindsley, Chris Sheehan, Bing Poh, Andy Patterson, and Dr. Vergil Smith. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested memorial contributions be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. Online guest book: wattsfuneralhome.com


THE OKLAHOMAN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

NEWSOK.COM

Allen Franklin Vaughn Nov 11, 1934 - Aug 20, 2012

MISSION HILLS, CA Allen Franklin (Bud) Vaughn died suddenly in Humboldt State Park, Weott, CA, "where the mountains meet the sky and the redwoods soar to the stars." Frank was born in Oklahoma City to Howard and Christine Vaughn. He graduated from Bethany HS and served in the U.S. Navy. Frank was preceded in death by his parents; stepmother, Dorothy; and his grandparents, Robert & Emma Vaughn. He is survived by his sister, Judy Weathers (Harvey); nephew, Patrick Overand (Kelle); two greatnieces; and cousins, Robert Vaughn and Katy Lester - all of Oklahoma City; also survived by his friends: Nelson Berlager, Mission Hills, CA; Bill Marley, and Fred and DaLane Loyd, Hot Springs, AR. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, September 14 at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, 4701 NW Expressway.

Feb 29, 1924 - Sept 9, 2012

Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag

OKLAHOMA CITY Raymond Eugene Johnson, age 88, died Sunday, September 9, 2012, in Mercy Hospital, after suffering a stroke. A Leap Year baby, he was born February 29, 1924, on his family farm in Crescent, OK to Ivan Carl and Edith Bachelor Johnson. Raymond attended Guthrie High School, during which time he played basketball, served in ROTC and designed the Blue Jays' ROTC logo, which is still in use today. He graduated in 1943, and married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Jean Bates, in 1944, moving to Bethany and then Oklahoma City shortly thereafter. The epitome of the American Dream, Raymond was a self-made man, becoming a successful commercial builder. His myriad of building accomplishments include some of the first hotels and motels in Oklahoma, schools, armories, shopping centers, including the Village Shopping Center on May Avenue (which he also owned), as well as donating his services to aid in the building of his family’s church, the Village Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. Active in the community he helped build, Raymond was a 30+ year member of the Oklahoma Executive Success Club (aka “Tip Club”), as well as serving on the Board of Silver Lake, Inc., where he built the home that he and Wanda lived in for over 40 years. Raymond loved the outdoors, whether as an avid bow, rifle and black powder hunter and fisherman, as an accomplished gardener (with some of his banana trees still growing in the Myriad Botanical Gardens), or as an ice skater, building a safe skating area in his neighborhood lake and owning over 20 pairs of ice skates so anyone could join. As a gifted artist, he also loved to paint the outdoors. Raymond also traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Europe, the Pacific and Middle East, with his wife, Wanda. A well-respected and Godly man, Raymond was always willing to help anyone in need. Devoted to his family, they could always count on him in whatever they chose to do. Although slowed by age in recent years, “Papa” remained physically active, whether helping someone with a fix-it project, teaching his great-grandchildren to fish, or enjoying his recent “22nd Leap Birthday.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Ivan Carl Johnson, Edith Bachelor Johnson King, and stepfather, Shirley Malcom King; and sister, Loreta Johnson Novak. He is survived by his wife, Wanda Bates Johnson; daughter, Rae Jean Johnson; son, Ivan Johnson; granddaughters, Beth Brown Bonilla and her husband Mike, Tori Johnson Richmond and her husband Steve, and Alisa Johnson Beck and her husband Chris; grandson, Scott Brown; great-grandchildren, Garrett and Raymond Bonilla, States and Satchel Beck, and Nimue Richmond; and countless other loving family and friends. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to The Village Christian Church (http://villagechristianokc.org). Memorial service will be held on Thursday, September 13 at 1 p.m. at The Village Christian Church, 9401 Ridgeview Drive, Oklahoma City (The Village), Oklahoma 73120. Interment will be at the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Arrangements for Raymond and his family have been placed in the care of Vondel Smith & Son Mortuary.

MARCO ISLAND, FL Edmund Gottlieb Sonntag died peacefully at home, surrounded by loved ones, on September, 9, 2012. He was born in Waterbury, CT on November 17, 1919, to Gottlieb and Julia (Buss) Sonntag. Edmund was a graduate of Crosby High School in Waterbury, CT and earned his engineering degree at the University of New Haven (CT). Edmund served in World War II in the Judge Advocate’s Office reporting to Sitka, Alaska, where he was assigned to the 266th Artillery Battalion. Prior to this assignment, Edmund completed training at the 1st Army Headquarters at Governor’s Island, NY and attended Officers’ Candidate School at Ft. Monroe, VA. After returning from Alaska, he served in the Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Major. Following college, Edmund worked as an engineer for Scovill Manufacturing Company (Waterbury, CT) for 22 years before beginning his own manufacturing company, Zhone Industries, in New Haven. Edmund married Helen Hart, of Springfield, IL, on June 23, 1945, and they made their home in Middlebury, CT, where they raised their children, Sandi and Bill. Edmund and Helen were longtime members of the First Lutheran Church in Waterbury, where Edmund volunteered for over a decade as Sunday School Administrator. Helen passed away in 1989 after 43 years of marriage. Edmund was a 50-year member of the Harmony Lodge #42 A.F. and A.M. of Waterbury, CT. He was also honored to be chosen as the Potentate of the Sphinx Shrine of Newington, CT in 1990. He continued his service more recently as the treasurer for the Marco Island Shrine Club. Within his many Shrine activities, Edmund was most generous and devoted to assisting the National Children’s Shriners Hospitals. In 1991, Edmund married Ednah Rose Neugebauer from Middletown, CT, and they spent time between their homes in CT and Marco Island, FL. Upon Ednah’s passing in 2003, Edmund moved permanently to Marco Island, where he continued to be active in the local Shrine Club serving as treasurer. Edmund was a member of Marco Lutheran Church, where he met his dear friend, Julia Schmidt. Julia and Edmund traveled, entertained friends, and enjoyed looking out over the Gulf at sunset. Edmund is survived by a daughter, Sandra Carpenter, of Lineville, AL; and a son, Dr. William E. Sonntag (wife, MaryAnn), of Edmond, OK. He also leaves two grandchildren, Melissa Berner (husband, David), of Nazareth, PA, and David Sonntag (wife, Allyson), of Wake Forest, NC; along with four great-grandchildren, Hayden Berner and Asher, Anna and Parker Sonntag. Edmund was predeceased by his brother, Karl Sonntag. He is also survived by a niece and nephew. A memorial service to celebrate Edmund’s life will be held at Marco Lutheran Church on September 14, 2012, at 11 a.m., with interment in the church Memorial Garden. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in Edmund’s name to Shriners Hospital for Children Boston Donations, 51 Blossom St, Boston, MA 02114 (www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org); or Marco Lutheran Church, 525 N Collier Blvd, Marco Island, FL 34145.

Raymond E. Johnson

Nov 17, 1919 - Sept 9, 2012

Denie Cupples

March 21, 1964 - Sept 2, 2012

MORGAN HILL, CA Denie Cupples, 48, passed away on September 2, 2012, in San Francisco, CA. She was born in Oklahoma City, OK to Eddie & Karen Miller. Denie attended high school in Yukon, OK, graduating in 1982. While working in the retail and insurance field, Denie attended the University of Central Oklahoma for two years and was well-known in her community. In the late 1980s, Denie briefly lived in Amarillo, TX, where she was a Store Manager at Limited, Inc. She met her husband, Tom, in 1990 as she was also working in sales, and they later moved to California in 1992. Denie remained in sales until 1997, then she cared for her children and the home full time. Denie was preceded in death by her mother, Karen; and nephew, Zack Thurston. Denie is survived by her husband of 18 years, Tom; daughters, Madison and Taylor; father, Eddy; stepfather, Carl Lane; sisters, Edie Thurston and Lanie Harryman; brother, Shawn Miller; and many other loving family members and numerous dear, loving friends. A Memorial Service to celebrate Denie’s life will be held on Friday, September 14th at 4 p.m. at Good News Church, 1054 East Main Street, Yukon, Oklahoma.

Duane A. Stevenson Oct 1, 1947 - Sept 10, 2012

BLANCHARD Duane Alan Stevenson was born in Mooreland, Oklahoma, on October 1, 1947, to Clyde Wesley and Opal Fern Stevenson. Duane passed away on September 10, 2012, in Norman. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 14, 2012, at the First United Methodist Church of Newcastle. The family will receive friends on Thursday, September 13, 2012, 6-8 p.m. at Primrose Funeral Service. For more information on the services for Duane, please visit www.primrosefuneralservice.com

Joseph W. "Joe" Perkins May 17, 1939 - Sept 6, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Joe Perkins, age 73, passed away on September 6, 2012, from the complications of a stroke that trapped his body but not his spirit 3K years earlier. Born in Kansas City, KS to Esther Ruth and Joseph W. Perkins, Sr, he was the only boy among four sisters. Because of his dad’s career, one of his first loves was the railroad. He worked for the railroad to pay for college, after which he joined the U.S. Air Force. He retired as a major after 20 years, worked in real estate, and was hired by Boeing to develop training programs for AWACS. He loved beautiful, old wood, so his hobby of refinishing furniture turned into his next enterprise. He operated Phoenix Antiques and Refinishing in McLoud, OK for several years. In later years, he shared his giving spirit touching lives as a volunteer/ director of the MidDel Food Pantry and acting as volunteer patient liaison at Midwest Regional Hospital. He was preceded in death by his parents, and two sisters, Janelle Knudsen and Lorraine Rocha. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Joyce, of the home; along with one son, Christopher J. Perkins, of Midwest City; one daughter, Andrea Paulson, son-inlaw Eric and granddaughters, Ella and Ava, of Pakenham, England; sister, Lola Perkins, of Rockport, Maine; sister, Marilyn Pope and husband Ed; one aunt, Nadine Loetel, of Kansas City; and many treasured cousins, nieces and nephews in Kansas, Phoenix, Michigan, Wisconsin and Israel. He was blessed to be surrounded by his loving church family at St. Matthew UMC in MWC. Services will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, at St. Matthew , 300 N. Air Depot , MWC, 73110. Please go to the website www.bffuneralhome.com for charities requested in lieu of flowers.

Jesse F. Jacobs, Jr April 26, 1958 - Sept 5, 2012

EDMOND Services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the EM Temple Memorial Chapel, 2801 N. Kelley Ave. in Oklahoma City, OK. Interment will follow in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation will take place at 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Thursday and 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. on Friday. Jesse is survived by his loving wife of 21 years, Carlisa Carter Jacobs; his mother, Bobbie J. Jacobs; brother, Jason C. Jacobs; one daughter, Kiara Burton; and two grandsons, Elijah Burton and Hezekiah Wright.

Mattie Meyer

Dec 2, 1922 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Mattie Meyer, Methodist leader, heart of the family and Oklahoma native, died peacefully Saturday, September 8, among family and friends, at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City. She was eighty-nine. Mattie Ada (Burford Cozart) Meyer was born in Waukomis, Oklahoma, December 2, 1922. She was the youngest and curly redhead of three children of Verna “Gangy” and Hugh “Dick” Cozart, who worked a homestead farm and managed several businesses in Garfield County through the Dust Bowl years. She drove a wheat truck to market, raised and showed champion sheep, sang in the chorus, and represented Oklahoma at national 4-H conventions in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Mattie graduated valedictorian of her class, sang and played marimba, and met Lester Meyer at Waukomis High School. She attended Phillips University, taught secondary school and left Oklahoma State University to marry Lester at his naval base in San Diego before he shipped out in 1944. She was a wonderful mother of three preacher’s kids (PKs), very grandmother to seven grandchildren and great-grandmother of twelve so far – feeding them butterhorn rolls and sugar cookies, playing Wahoo and teaching love, faith and that all is possible. Mattie and Lester served 43 years together in the United Methodist Church. Mattie was the minister’s wife, which included being staff support, organist, choir director and Sunday school teacher. They served Methodist congregations at Driftwood and Byron near Enid, Blue Mound near Denton, Trinity in Enid, Comanche, Broken Arrow First, Edmond First, and Linwood and Nichols Hills in Oklahoma City. They also served Oklahoma UMC Conference Districts of Stillwater, Tulsa and North Oklahoma City. Mattie was a stalwart member of United Methodist Women and many circles concerning church, society and women’s issues. She retired with Lester at Epworth Villa in Oklahoma City and lived the next 21 years among countless friends, directing the choir and volunteering service as part of the founding family. She was a gracious, joyful southern lady and lived her faith. Lester; Hugh, her brother, and wife Dorothy; and Opal, her sister, and husband Carl preceded her in death. Left to continue good work on this earth are children, Carol, Richard, and Annette; grandchildren, Michael Schoeffler, Amy Diane Warren, Chad Harper, Tanna Bader, Jacob Harper, Tara Meyer, Adam Meyer, and their families; and a wonderful extended family. A memorial service will be at Nichols Hills United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City Friday, September 14 at 10 a.m. It is preceded by burial at Waukomis Cemetery Thursday at 2 p.m. Memorials may be given to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, NY, NY 10004; or Suzanna Wesley Benevolent Fund at 14901 N Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73132. We give thanks for Mattie’s long, full life of faith, love and hope.

Anthony Michael “Tony” George April 24, 1989 - Sept 7, 2012

IDABEL Anthony Michael “Tony” George, 23, of the Forest Grove Community, Idabel, OK, passed away on Friday, September 7, 2012, at Idabel, OK. He was born on April 24, 1989, in Oklahoma City, OK, the son of Mike and Mary Balderas George. Tony is survived by his parents, Mike and Mary George, of the Forest Grove Community; sisters, Makayla George, of the Forest Grove Community; and Darenda George, of Moore, OK; his nephew, Darrien George, of Moore, OK; and maternal grandparents, Frank and Jean Balderas, of Newcastle, OK; and Ramona Baucom, of Oklahoma City. A memorial Service will be held at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Sooner Rose Missionary Baptist Church, 5701 S.E. 12th St., Midwest City, OK. Online condolences can be sent at www.whitefamilyfh.com Arrangements with White Family Funeral Home Idabel, Oklahoma

Marshall G. Griffith Nov 2, 1927 - Sept 8, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Marshall Glenn Griffith, 84, died Sept. 8, 2012. He was born Nov. 2, 1927, in Augusta, KS to Glenn and Josephine (Clark) Griffith. After retirement from his lifetime of missionary service, he was serving as Associate Pastor at May Avenue Church of the Nazarene. Marshall received his Bachelor’s degree from Pasadena College and served his country during WWII in the Navy. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Della; brother, Quentin; sister, Corinne; and brother, Danny. He is survived by his sons, Kevin Griffith and wife Dawn of Trophy Club, TX; and Kelly Griffith and wife Sheri of Bethany, OK; daughter, Teresa Greenhill and husband Gary of Broken Arrow, OK; brother, Darrell Griffith; sister, Polly Cristensen and husband Chris; and eight grandchildren, Dustin and wife Amy, Spencer, Ashley, Amy and fiancé Dave, Katie and husband Nathan, Brenton, Tessia and Amber. The family will greet visitors on Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercer-Adams. Services will be Friday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. at Western Oaks Church of the Nazarene, with interment in Resurrection Cemetery. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.merceradams.com

Maudella Misenheimer

Jan 22, 1923 - Sept 9, 2012

DEL CITY Maudella Misenheimer, 89, passed away on September 9, 2012. Maudella was born on January 22, 1923, in Oklahoma City, OK to Minor Dewey and Bessie Gione (Medlock) McMillan. Maudella worked many years for Lawyers Title in downtown OKC. She enjoyed watching OU Football, having a homecooked breakfast and spending time with her two special Boston Terriers. Maudella was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Jim; nephew, Jerry L Durrin, Jr.; and brother-in-law, Jerry L. Durrin, Sr. Survivors include her sister, Betty Durrin; nephews, Bob Durrin and wife Marisa, and Marc Durrin; and one special greatnephew, Tyler Durrin. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 15, 2012, at the Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel. Interment will follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Condolences may be offered at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

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Dolores Emerson Nov 26, 1926 - Sept 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Dolores (85) died Sept. 10, 2012, with family by her side. Born Nov. 26, 1926, in Oklahoma City, OK to Elmer G & Nellie M (Davis) Cooper, Dolores lived her life with passion and will most be remembered for her love of family. She graduated from Classen HS in 1944. She attended OK A&M, OCU, and OU and married her high school sweetheart, Gerald (Jerry) in 1948. They were married 51 wonderful years until his death in 1999. Their children, Candy, Randy, and Jill, will remember “mom” as a very caring and generous mother. She loved Sunday dinners with the whole gang, cooking, traveling, reading, gardening, genealogy, knitting, and her dogs. She and daddy spent many wonderful years traveling the world and attending OU football games (even though she was an Aggie fan), and tailgating with their best friends, Tebe & Norma Harris. She was a charter member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority at OU and served as PTA president for numerous years at Mayfair Elementary and Northwest Classen HS. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband; son-in-law, Steve Bosnyak; and granddaughter, Molly Emerson. She is survived by her children, Candy Bosnyak, Randy Emerson, and Jill Langston & husband Ken; grandchildren, Barry Bosnyak & wife Terri, Brittany Langston, Bo Langston & wife Trandy, Maggie Conell & husband Joey, Abby Emerson & partner Thomas Hines, and Annie, Casey, and Julie Emerson; great-grandchildren, Henry and Oliver Bosnyak, Kacen Ayer, Brailey Langston, David Reed, Caden Nichols, Madelyn and Jackson Connell, and Greenley Hines. The family would like to especially thank her caregivers at Crossroads Hospice and T.B. Lackey Health Center at Baptist Village. Visitation will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 12 at HahnCook/Street & Draper, 6600 Broadway Extension. Service will be at 2 p.m. Sept. 13 at Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper Chapel. Interment will follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

In Loving Memory James Adam Stafford 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday James Adam Stafford. We love you and miss you. Love Mom, Marty, Dad, Amy and Shawn In Loving Memory JAMES ADAM STAFFORD 09-12-89 - 04-24-12 Happy Birthday Uncle Adam. We love you and miss you. Love, Mason and Tyler

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NORMAN | STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

CHINA VIETNAM NIETNAM LAOS LAOS

CHINA

Houaphan Houaphan province province

THAILAND Asia

THAILAND Detail area

CAMBODIA

CAMBODIA

Toll: Fairgoers cautioned to beware of mosquitoes FROM PAGE 11A

the United States in 1999. This year, Oklahoma has broken its record for the most confirmed cases of West Nile virus. West Nile virus is cyclical, peaking every three to four years. In 2007, the state saw 107 cases and nine deaths. The Oklahoma State Fair begins Thursday, and public health officials are

Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

FROM PAGE 11A

results. A second operation in 2003 resulted in the discovery of one of the missing servicemen, but logistics and safety concerns precluded further recovery attempts, the department said in a news release issued Tuesday. “From 1994 to 2009 ... teams pursued multiple leads from dozens of witnesses interviewed, including those involved with the attack,” the release reads. “In 2005, a Laotian citizen provided U.S. officials an identification card bearing Blanton’s name and human remains pur-

portedly found at the base of Phou Pha Thi.” Circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools — including mitochondrial DNA which matched that of Blanton’s sister — convinced scientists the remains belonged to Blanton. Blanton’s family now lives in Hot Springs, Ark., according to the department. Since 1973, nearly 1,000 servicemen killed in the Vietnam War have been accounted for and returned to their families for burial. More than 1,660 Americans who disappeared during the conflict remain unaccounted for.

cautioning fairgoers to wear mosquito repellent with DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus. Additionally, anyone spending time outdoors also should wear long sleeves and long pants to shield skin from mosquitoes. It also is important for residents to remove standing water from their homes; standing water can serve as a breeding ground

for mosquitoes. Residents of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County can report stagnant water outside their property. To file a complaint about a mosquito habitat, residents can visit the complaints section of the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website or call the county health department’s Consumer Protection division at 425-4347.

ONLINE Phil Maytubby, chief of public health protection at the Oklahoma CityCounty Health Department, will answer questions about West Nile virus in an online chat at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Anyone interested can find the chat at www. NewsOK.com/ health. Readers are welcome to ask questions and participate in the conversation.

OKC council hears 3 areas of 5-year Capital Improvement Plan proposals BY MICHAEL KIMBALL

Missing: DNA confirms identity

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

The next five years of capital spending in Oklahoma City will involve nearly a half-billion dollars on water supply issues alone, city officials told the Oklahoma City Council on Tuesday. Three city departments presented their budgets within the city’s nearly $2.5 billion Capital Improvement Plan during Tuesday’s council meeting. The five-year plan is a document that has to be updated every two years for the city to remain in compliance with state law. The utilities, parks and recreation and information technology departments were the first to present their plans, with other city departments to follow in coming weeks. The council can make modifications to the plan before it adopts it in the fall.

Utilities The Utilities Depart-

ment has plans to spend about $653 million on capital projects over the next five years, department Director Marsha Slaughter told the council. About $488 million of that is on the water supply as the department seeks to upgrade its raw water transport capabilities, the capacity of its drinking water production and the ability to move water through the city. “The time has come to add capacity to our system,” Slaughter said. The city will need to move more water from lakes in southeastern Oklahoma in the coming years to meet growing demand, Slaughter said. More pumping stations and water mains also will be built within the city to maintain water supply and pressure even on the outskirts of town, and projects to upgrade water treatment plants also are ongoing.

Parks The city Parks and Recreation Department plans to spend about $47 million

on facility improvements, $32 million on parks and about $8 million on trails and paths, department Director Wendel Whisenhunt said. Part of the unfunded portion of the parks budget is for a $15 million renovation to the Freede Little Theater in the Civic Center Music Hall, which didn’t get renovated as part of the original MAPS program that renovated much of the rest of the building. About $10 million for a new aquatic center in northeast Oklahoma City also is included but not funded. About 7 percent of the overall Capital Improvement Plan is unfunded, but that’s a smaller percentage of the budget than in recent years. It’s a hole that city Budget Director Doug Dowler has said can be closed by the city council with careful advance planning. Whisenhunt said he’s happy the parks department has a capital improvement budget at all, after it had been left mostly stripped of capital pro-

ject funding for more than two decades. “The amount that’s funded is going to allow us to continue to make progress in the parks system toward making ours the most exemplary ... in the country,” he said. “We have that as a realistic goal.”

Information technology About $36 million in upgrades to the city’s radio system makes up the bulk of the Information Technology Department’s capital spending plans over the next five years, department Director Schad Meldrum said. Included in the spending plan is an effort to redesign the city’s website, www.okc.gov, and add more services that can be used online. There are no plans to install cameras in city police cars with the current plan. Police Chief Bill Citty said the cameras are cost prohibitive for now, but he’s interested in installing them when funding is available.


YOUR MONEY

TECHNOLOGY

Old iPhones pose dilemma

Faith in Facebook

In case you haven’t heard by now, Apple is unveiling its latest iPhone on Wednesday. That leaves the question: What should you do with your old one? The new phones will join some 244 million iPhones sold since the first one launched in 2007.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, shown right, hasn’t enjoyed seeing his company’s stock get pummeled on Wall Street this summer, but he is relishing the opportunity to prove his critics wrong. PAGE 3B

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ENERGY

BUSINESS

OG&E HAS PLAN SET

B THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

MOST SIGNIFICANT COST-CONTROL MEASURES IN HEALTH CARE REFORM HAVE YET TO TAKE EFFECT

Family health costs climb BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Annual premi-

ums for job-based family health insurance went up just 4 percent this year, but that’s no comfort with the price tag approaching $16,000 and rising more than twice as fast as wages. The annual survey released Tuesday by two major research groups served as a glaring remind-

er that the nation’s problem of unaffordable medical care is anything but solved. Premiums for a family plan are averaging $15,745, with employees paying more than $4,300 of that. And lower wage workers are paying more for skimpier coverage than their counterparts at upscale firms. Overall, “it’s historically a very moderate increase in premiums,” said Drew Altman, president of

the Kaiser Family Foundation, which conducted the survey with the Health Research & Educational Trust. He quickly added: “But even a moderate increase feels really big to workers when their wages are flat or falling.” General inflation rose only 2.3 percent. Following a 9 percent hike in premiums last year, the 2012 SEE HEALTH, BACK PAGE

State not at highest fire risk, study says Real Estate Editor richardmize@opubco.com

Oklahoma burning Oklahoma has seen 150,000 acres burn and lost some 600 homes to wildfire this year alone, CoreLogic noted, quoting figures from the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. Nonetheless, the firm counted zero Oklahoma homes at “very high risk” and just 80 at “high risk” based on the way it categorizes urban and agricultural settings. The lack of natural fuels in both urban and agricultural landscapes gives them “low wildfire risk,” the firm said. However, CoreLogic also developed wildfire risk scores based on a combination of risk inside individual property boundaries and their distance from higher wildfire risk zones. Scores range from 1 to 100, with higher numbers indicating “increased opportunity of wildfire.” Under its scoring system, CoreLogic counted 1,077,998 homes ranked 150 and valued at $95.5 billion; 707 homes ranked 5160 and valued at $52.5 SEE FIRES, BACK PAGE

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IN BRIEF

MARKETS Coverage, 5B X DOW JONES 69.07, 13,323.36 X NASDAQ 0.51, 3,104.53 X OIL $0.63, $97.17 X NATURAL GAS $0.180, $2.992 [ CATTLE $0.10, $127.00 [ WHEAT $0.001⁄2, $9.04

GASOLINE COST MAY GO DOWN

BY RICHARD MIZE

Oklahoma has zero homes at “very high risk” for wildfires, and just 80 at “high risk,” the lowest among 13 Western states studied in a new report for the insurance industry — statistically speaking. Santa Ana, Calif.-based property informationanalytics firm CoreLogic released its first Wildfire Hazard Risk Report this week. It identified 740,000 residences at high or very high risk for wildfire damage at an estimated value of $136 billion. The study found 57,385 homes in Oklahoma at moderate risk and 110,153 homes at low risk for wildfire damage. CoreLogic estimated the value of homes at high risk at $6.8 million, moderate risk at $5.6 billion, and low risk at $10.8 billion. Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak was on the road Tuesday and not available for an interview, spokesman Brian King said.

Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. laid out a plan to reduce demand for its electricity so it doesn’t have to build a new power plant until at least 2020, the utility told regulators Tuesday.

The burned remains of fire-damaged homes at Paradise Spa in Las Vegas remain unrepaired months after they were vacated. PHOTO PROVIDED

NEV. CONDOMINIUM RESIDENTS FEAR MONEY IS GOING TO OKC ALSO ... PROMISES AND PROBLEMS Oklahoma City’s First National Center, the pride of the downtown skyline when it opened in 1931, faced having its utilities shut off when its New York-based ownership sold the property in 2006 to investment groups led by Aaron Yashouafar. The $21 million sale surprised several downtown real estate players who questioned how the price could have shot up from its Aaron Yashouafar sale for $5 million in 1999. Investment groups led by Aaron Yashouafar, chief executive officer of Los Angeles-based Milbank Real Estate, pledged to spend millions to restore the building as Class A office property. Aaron Yashouafar, his brother, Solyman Yashouafar, and nephew, Raymond Yashouafar, courted local leaders and boasted of their track record as successful, award-winning building owners. “We stand by our word,” Raymond Yashouafar said in a presentation to an exclusive 2006 gathering of civic leaders at the Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club. “We have a good reputation where we’ve already done work. The previous ownership made a lot of promises and didn’t follow through. We don’t do that.” Six years later, the Yashouafars’ track record includes being named among New York City’s top slumlords by The Village Voice, bankruptcies and foreclosures in California and Oklahoma, and a resident revolt at their Sky Las Vegas condominiums. First National Center, meanwhile, is set to lose about half of its income stream when a lease with Devon Energy expires next year.

BY STEVE LACKMEYER Business Writer slackmeyer@opubco.com

Victims of insurance embezzlement by First National Center owner Aaron Yashouafar say they have yet to be compensated for their losses and are questioning the source of payments being made to Capmark Bank to prevent the Oklahoma City landmark from being turned over to a receiver. Yashouafar pleaded guilty in July to a felony count of embezzlement of an insurance settlement for fire damages at the Paradise Spa condominiums in Las Vegas. He first sought to pay $1 million in restitution to Paradise Spa residents over a one-year period. But Clark County, Nev., Judge Carolyn Ellsworth ruled that the full restitution be paid before the Nov. 14 sentencing. The plea also requires Yashouafar to serve a minimum 30 days incarceration. In an interview Tuesday, Yashouafar disputed the extent of harm experienced by Paradise Spa residents, saying he owned most of the fire-damaged units and only a couple of residents were displaced. He called an effort by the

Paradise Spa homeowners board to publicize their complaints “propaganda” and said they are guilty of sloppy accounting. “Unfortunately, they have ulterior motives, and you are being played,” Yashouafar said when questioned about the case. Yashouafar entered the guilty plea after an investigation by Nevada Attorney General Cortez Masto, who claimed Yashouafar defrauded the condominium residents of more than $1 million when he was treasurer of the homeowners association board of directors. Masto accused Yashouafar of collecting two insurance checks, one for more than $400,000, the other for more than $430,000, and depositing them in an outof-state bank account instead of using the funds for repairs. “Older victims, many of whom were living on fixed incomes in Paradise Spa, were forced to find and pay for alternative living quarters when they were still obligated to make mortgage payments on their burned condo units, while waiting for repairs that would never be made,” Masto said. SEE EMBEZZLE, BACK PAGE

The waning days of summer should mean the last increases in gasoline prices for a while. Average gasoline prices rose 1.5 cents overnight to $3.843 per gallon Tuesday, the biggest gain in two weeks. The price has risen about 50 cents since July 1. Motorists in about eight states are paying at least $4 per gallon, according to AAA, Wright Express and the Oil Price Information Service. Even the lowest prices — $3.59 in Mississippi and $3.60 in South Carolina — are up more than 60 cents. Yet, relief is in sight. Refiners can soon switch to selling winter blends of gasoline, which are cheaper than summer gasoline blends formulated to reduce pollution. “This is the fireworks finale for the season, the next four or five days,” said Tom Kloza, OPIS chief oil analyst. “By next week, it will, it will start to move lower.” This week, short supplies of summer gasoline, particularly in the Northeast, are contributing to the latest increase, Kloza said. He also cited lingering effects from supply disruptions caused by Hurricane Isaac. ASSOCIATED PRESS

GAS PRICES AAA’s average for regular unleaded: Nation $3.843 Week ago $3.824 Month ago $3.692 Year ago $3.6655 Record $4.114 (set) 7-17-08 Tuesday

State $3.727 $3.673 $3.550 $3.558 $3.955 7-16-08

SCAN IT Scan the QR code below with your smartphone for articles and related multimedia in this section.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

BUSINESS UPDATE

YOUR MONEY

EMPLOYERS POST FEWER OPENINGS

APPLE WILL UNVEIL NEWEST MODEL THIS WEEK, PROMPTING MANY TO UPGRADE

11 things you can do with your old iPhone BY BARBARA ORTUTAY Associated Press

NEW YORK — In case you haven’t heard by now, Apple is unveiling its latest iPhone on Wednesday. That leaves the question: What should you do with your old one? The new phones will join some 244 million iPhones sold since the first one launched in 2007. Some have been lost or stolen. Some of us are still hanging on to our old gadgets in some futile attempt to resist the constant upgrade cycle that technology companies force on us. Here are a few things to do with yours once you buy the iPhone 5. 1. Give it to your kids. No toy in the history of toys has ever been as appealing to a kid as an iPhone. They are shiny, they have games and grown-ups use them for important things. More importantly, they are either off-limits or doled out in limited quantities as a reward. Load up your old iPhone with games and give it to a deserving child. 2. Give it to your mom. Alternately, if a Luddite adult has been thinking of taking the plunge into the world of smartphones, your old iPhone may help him or her get over the hump. If you have an iPhone 4 or 4S, you might also find someone who’s still hanging on to an earlier model and give them the gift of an upgrade. 3. Use it as a tiny iPad. You’ll be able to watch videos, send email and search Wikipedia for random facts to end cocktailparty disagreements with your decommissioned iPhone — as long as you have a Wi-Fi connection. There’s even a camera. 4. Donate it to charity. Several charities accept old phones, though these groups likely won’t give your old phones to people in need. Rather, they sell your donated phones to recyclers, using the funds to support their cause. A nonprofit group called Cell Phones for Soldiers will take your “gently used” phone and sell it to recycling company ReCellular. It will then use the proceeds to buy calling cards for soldiers. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence works with another recycling group in a similar manner. About 60 percent of the phones it collects are refurbished and resold. The money goes toward supporting the coalition.

Piotr Kubiak of Oakland, Ill., shows off his iPhone 4, right, next to his old iPhone outside of an Apple Store in Chicago. AP ARCHIVES PHOTO

ALSO ... NEW YOUTUBE APP SET FOR IPHONE SAN FRANCISCO — YouTube is being repro-

grammed for the iPhone and iPad amid the latest fallout from the growing hostility between Apple and the video service’s owner, Google. The new format debuted Tuesday with the release of a new YouTube application that will introduce more advertising and more videos on Apple’s trend-setting devices. The changes are being made because Google Inc. and Apple Inc. didn’t renew a five-year licensing agreement that established YouTube as one of the built-in applications in the operating system that runs the iPhone and iPad. YouTube is being bumped from the menu of pre-installed apps on the next version of Apple’s mobile operating system, or iOS, which could be released as early as Wednesday when the latest iPhone is expected to be unveiled. The updated iOS also is dumping Google’s digital maps as its go-to source for directions. The new YouTube app will create more moneymaking opportunities for Google and video producers because it allows advertising to be shown with the clips. That’s something Apple hasn’t allowed on the pre-installed YouTube app. The ban on ads prevented many music videos and other widely watched clips from being shown in the iOS app because some copyright owners don’t allow their content to be shown if there is no way for them to be paid. ASSOCIATED PRESS

The remaining 40 percent of the phones are recycled, according to the group’s website. It pays for shipping if you are mailing three or more phones. There are a few more suggestions from New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation at: www.dec.ny.gov/ chemical/8818.html. 5. Alarm clock Do you still use that old radio alarm you bought in the 20th century? Join the 21st century by turning your old iPhone into an alarm clock. Hide it in a different spot in your bed each night for an added challenge. 6. Sell, sell, sell!

Sell your phone for a few hundred bucks if you can. There will likely be a flood of the gadgets soon after people start getting their new phones, so it might make sense to wait. A company called Gazelle will make an offer for your old phone based on its condition, your phone carrier and other information. A 32 gigabyte iPhone 4S on Verizon Wireless, for example, was recently going for $237 in good condition and $90 if it’s broken. Glyde.com also offers to help you resell your old phone. A recent check showed the above 4S getting roughly $325 to $350 after fees are deducted —

provided there is a buyer. A “speed sale” that guarantees to sell it in seven days will get the seller slightly less money. 7. Trade in at GameStop. The video game retailer offers cash or store credit for old iPhones, iPods and iPads. The service is only available in stores. 8. Stream music. Stick that baby in a speaker dock, spring for a Pandora subscription ($36 per year) or Spotify ($10 per month) and bam, you have a stereo. Or try SoundCloud. Although it’s meant to let you create and share music with people, it’s also a good place to listen to DJs you like or discover new ones. TuneIn, meanwhile, will let you listen to online radio stations. 9. Keep it as a backup. Nearly one-third of cellphone owners have had their gadgets lost or stolen, according to a recent survey from Pew Internet & Pew Internet & American Life Project. 10. Use it as a camera. At its core, a decommissioned iPhone is a hard drive with a camera. Snap photos with it. You can also use it to move photos and other files from one computer to another. 11. Recycle with Apple Apple Inc.’s own recycling program will give you an Apple gift card if it is determined to have a “monetary value.” A 32 gigabyte iPhone 4S with some light scratches but in good working condition was recently estimated at $280. That’s higher than Gazelle, but you’ll have to spend the money at Apple. The company also accepts broken phones for recycling but you won’t get any money for them.

Survey shows company owners’ outlook rises BY JOYCE M. ROSENBERG Associated Press

NEW YORK — Small business owners are getting a little more optimistic about how their companies will do after the November election, according to a survey released Tuesday. The National Federation of Independent Business says owners it surveyed last month expect their companies’ sales and overall business conditions to pick up after the election and the end of the year. That brighter outlook helped lift the federation’s small business optimism index by 1.7 points in August to 92.9. The group, which lobbies on behalf of small business owners, compiled the index from its survey of 736 of its members.

Many business owners have refrained from hiring or expanding their companies not only because of the economy but also because of uncertainty over the presidential election. The survey still shows business owners have a generally dim view of the current economy, said William Dunkelberg, the federation’s chief economist. “There is too much uncertainty to make major financial commitments,” he said. Dunkelberg called the August index “another solid recession reading.” Still, “it could be they’re starting to see things at street level that we don’t see in the (economic) numbers” that come out each month, Dunkelberg said. He noted that car and truck sales have been strong, there have been some signs of recovery in

the housing market, and the energy industry in the Midwest is doing well. “These are thing that are happening that are making some owners more optimistic,” he said. David Audretsch, an economics professor at Indiana University’s Institute for Development Strategies, said that while the economy is recovering more slowly than after past recessions, small business owners aren’t paying attention to economic numbers such as the government’s monthly jobs report. Instead, they’re focused on what’s going on in their own environment. “I think they’re feeling that things are getting better,” he said. “Small business tends to be a leading indicator of the business cycle.” The number of owners

who said they expect to create new jobs rose 5 percentage points from July, to 10 percent. While the reading is low, the increase was significant. The number of owners expecting their sales to improve also rose 5 percentage points, to 1 percent, erasing a negative reading in July but still weak. The number of owners who expect business conditions to improve in six months rose 6 percentage points, although that reading remained negative at 2 percent. Nearly a quarter of the owners, 24 percent, said they plan to make capital expenditures in the next three to six months, up 3 percentage points. Capital expenditures include purchases such as vehicles, equipment and real estate and improving or expanding buildings and facilities.

WASHINGTON — U.S. employers posted fewer jobs in July than in June, further evidence that hiring may stay weak in the coming months. Job openings fell to a seasonally adjusted 3.67 million, the Labor Department said Tuesday. That’s down from June’s 3.72 million job openings, which was revised lower. The figures follow Friday’s disappointing employment report, which said the economy added only 96,000 jobs in August. That’s below July’s total of 141,000 and the average 226,000 a month added in the first three months of the year. The unemployment rate fell to 8.1 percent from 8.3 percent, but only because the number of people working or looking for work fell. The drop in available positions has made job hunting more competitive. Nearly 12.8 million people were unemployed in July, meaning 3.5 people were competing for each open position. While that’s down from a post-recession high of 7-to-1 in July 2009, the ratio is 2 to 1 in a healthy economy. Job openings have increased 68 percent from 2.2 million over the past three years. But companies aren’t filling them quickly. Total hiring has increased only 11 percent in that stretch. There are several reasons companies aren’t hiring faster, economists say. Companies may not be offering sufficient pay to entice workers to take the jobs. Some employers say they can’t find enough skilled workers in certain industries, such as information technology. Businesses also are worried about Europe’s financial crisis, slowing growth in China and the pending expiration of tax breaks in the U.S. Employers are still posting fewer jobs than before the recession, when they advertised about 4.4 million a month. ASSOCIATED PRESS

IN BRIEF TREASURY PROFITS ON AIG SALE WASHINGTON — The Treasury Department says it has received an additional $2.7 billion from the sale of American International Group stock. The sale comes one day after the government reported a profit on its four-year investment in the bailed-out financial firm. Treasury says the banks underwriting the sale have exercised their option to buy 83.1 million additional AIG shares at $32.50. Together with Monday’s $18 billion in stock sales, Treasury says the government has recovered a total $197.4 billion from the company. That’s all of its original investment of $182.3 billion plus a return of $15.1 billion to taxpayers. The sales cut the government’s stake in AIG to less than 16 percent. At the height of the financial crisis, the government held a 53.4 percent stake in the company.

FEDERATION OPPOSES SETTLEMENT WASHINGTON — The National Retail Federation is opposing a proposed $7.25 billion settlement that Visa Inc., MasterCard Inc. and major banks have agreed to pay retailers for alleged fee fixing. The retail trade association said Tuesday that its board has given approval for it to go to court to try to block the settlement. It says it is unsure whether outside groups will be allowed to intervene or whether the case qualifies for class action status. The federation says it believes the proposed settlement will not stop swipe fees from rising and that it will prevent any future legal challenges. In July Visa, MasterCard and the banks settled a lawsuit that claimed card issuers conspired to fix merchants’ fees for accepting credit cards.

U.S. TRADE DEFICIT RISES TO $42B WASHINGTON — The U.S. trade deficit grew to $42 billion in July, widened by fewer exports to Europe, India and Brazil that offset a steep decline in oil imports. The Commerce Department said Tuesday that the trade deficit increased 0.2 percent from June’s deficit of $41.9 billion. U.S. exports fell 1 percent to $183.3 billion. Sales of autos, telecommunications equipment and heavy machinery all declined. Imports dropped 0.8 percent to $225.3 billion. Economists note that the deficit would have grown much faster had it not been for a 6.5 percent drop in oil imports, largely reflecting cheaper global prices. Prices have increased since then, while demand for exports has dampened. FROM WIRE REPORTS

IN STOCK MCDONALD’S McDonald’s says a key sales figure climbed 3.7 percent in August, as the fast food chain emphasized the value of its menu items. The chain’s strongest performance came from the Asia/Pacific region, Middle East and Africa, with revenue up 5.7 percent at stores open at least 13 months. The U.S. and Europe also posted gains, led by strong U.S. sales of breakfast and value items and strength in the U.K., France and Russia.

FINANCIAL COMPANY AFLAC AIG Allstate Citigroup First Cash Fin. Lincoln National Manulife Fin. Morgan Stanley PSEG Funding Wells Fargo

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

$48.62 $33.45 $38.50 $32.66 $45.97 $24.43 $12.08 $17.25 $31.54 $34.15

+4.56% -3.21% +2.94% +9.97% +1.32% +4.80% +6.53% +11.22% -0.44% +1.04%

+8.33% +38.97% +38.74% +15.28% +31.31% +20.82% +9.32% +7.28% -0.85% +20.12%

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

$34.39 $102.82 $30.24 $51.05 $64.20 $21.59 $82.35 $115.87 $79.65

-0.03% -4.10% +5.59% +4.55% +1.15% +5.27% -1.65% +7.12% +4.75%

+20.41% +12.89% +1.51% +9.76% +10.65% +17.59% +12.47% +36.13% +64.19%

MANUFACTURING COMPANY Altria Colgate Palmolive Dow Chemical DuPont Ecolab General Electric Kimberly Clark PPG Ind. Whirlpool Corp.

TRANSPORTATION COMPANY Allegiant Air Boeing FedEx Ford Motor Co. Harley Davidson Honeywell JB Hunt L-3 Vertex Aerospace Lockheed Martin Northstar Aerospace Spirit Aerosystems Toyota US Airways Group Visteon

CLOSING PRICE $65.05 $71.27 $88.70 $10.15 $45.03 $59.79 $51.90

YTD WEEK CHG. CHG. -1.17% +22.16% +0.56% -3.97% +1.33% +4.14% +7.86% -8.81% +8.04% +14.49% +3.95% +7.57% -1.59% +14.67%

$71.52 $92.24

+3.56% +5.94% +1.89% +12.46%

$0.20 $25.00 $81.30

0.00% -68.25% +1.01% +18.43% +3.26% +19.95%

$11.62 $47.22

+11.20% +126.95% -7.43% +2.45%


BUSINESS: NATION | WORLD

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

SOCIAL WEBSITE IS EXPECTED TO MAKE MORE PROFIT

Facebook has overcome hurdles, founder says BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg hasn’t enjoyed seeing his company’s stock get pummeled on Wall Street this summer, but he is relishing the opportunity to prove his critics wrong. “I would rather be in a cycle where people underestimate us because I’d rather be underestimated,” Zuckerberg said Tuesday. “I think it gives us the latitude to go out and make some big bets.” Zuckerberg, 28, made his remarks before a standing-room-only audience at a tech conference in San Francisco in his first interview since Facebook Inc.’s rocky initial public offering in May. The social networking leader’s stock has lost nearly half its value since the IPO. More than $50 billion has been lopped off Facebook’s market value as the company’s shares have fallen from $38 to Tuesday’s closing price of $19.43. No one has lost as much as Zuckerberg, who has seen the value of his Facebook holdings fall more than $9 billion. That while hearing more skeptics second-guess his ability to lead the company that he founded eight years ago in his Harvard University dorm room. Since speaking during Facebook’s first earnings conference call as a public company nearly seven weeks ago, Zuckerberg has remained largely out of the spotlight. Wearing a gray T-shirt, jeans and sneakers, Zuckerberg looked at ease through his half-hour ap-

pearance. He smiled frequently and even chuckled a few times before a San Francisco audience composed largely of fellow geeks who, like him, tend to enjoy talking about computer coding and building cool products instead of discussing revenue growth and business strategies. Yet Zuckerberg clearly was aiming many of his remarks at investors. He emphasized that Facebook cared about making money as well as pursuing his mission to make the world a “more open and connected place.” He also repeated his belief that the company would figure out numerous ways to profit from the growing number of its 955 million worldwide users who visit its online hangout through mobile applications instead of Web browsers on desktop computers. Zuckerberg said the performance of Facebook’s stock “has obviously been disappointing,” but he said it’s a great time to “double down” on the company’s future. “I think it is really easy for folks to underestimate how really fundamentally good mobile is for us,” Zuckerberg told his interviewer, former blogger turned venture capitalist Michael Arrington, at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference. Zuckerberg shouldered some of the blame for the misperceptions about Facebook’s mobile prospects, saying he made a mistake by initially relying on a computer coding called HTML 5 so the company’s applications could

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a “fireside chat” Tuesday at a conference organized by technology blog TechCrunch in San Francisco. Zuckerberg gave his first interview since the company’s rocky initial public offering in May. AP PHOTO

run on a multitude of different mobile operating systems. That resulted in sub-par experiences for many users, he acknowledged, prompting Facebook to use more customization tools to account for the differences in the software that run different devices such as the iPhone and Android phones. Some investors evidently liked what Zuckerberg had to say. Facebook shares gained 66 cents, or 3.4 percent. The ubiquity of smartphones has created problems for Facebook and other advertising-

BUSINESS BRIEFS NATION

VISUAL EFFECTS FIRM FOLDS

GLITCH AFFECTS AIRLINES Southwest Airlines say customers encountered problems booking flights Tuesday because of a glitch in their reservations systems. Both airlines said Tuesday that the problem was fixed quickly, and they blamed it on Sabre Holding Corp., which provides reservations-systems technology to airlines. Sabre confirmed the accounts. American Airlines spokesman Matt Miller said the outage lasted about 45 minutes and was fixed shortly after 11 A.M. Miller said the outage affected all airlines and travel agencies that use Sabre, a former part of American that was spun off into a separate company in 2000. Southwest tweeted that the problem had been fixed. Frontier Airlines and Alaska Airlines said they too experienced brief outages in their Sabre-run systems. United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and US Airways said they were not affected

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — Less than a year after going public, the digital production company founded by director James Cameron has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and agreed to sell the core of its business to a private investment firm for $15 million. Digital Domain Media Group Inc., best known for its work on Cameron’s “Titanic,” has produced visual effects for more than 90 movies, including “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” and the “Transformers” series. And in April, its Tupac Shakur hologram made a splash when it took the stage at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and appeared to perform alongside Snoop Dogg. The downward spiral was swift. The company went public just 10 months ago but sold nearly five million shares at $8.50 each, below the expected $10 to $12 range. Drifting to the $5 range by spring, the stock then spiked as high as $9.20 following huge reaction to the Shakur hologram.

FDA WARNS L’OREAL

PEPSICO PRESIDENT LEAVES

DALLAS — American Airlines and

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug

Administration is warning cosmetics maker L’Oreal SA that its website for Genefique exaggerates the benefits of the skin cream, portraying it as a drug with medical properties. The agency issued a warning letter Friday to the company’s Lancome unit, which markets Genefique Youth Activating Concentrate and similar anti-wrinkle cosmetics. The letter was posted to FDA’s website Tuesday. Lancome claims Genefique “boosts the activity of genes” and contains special ingredients that “stimulate cell regeneration to reconstruct skin to a denser quality.” The agency says only drug products are allowed to make such claims, and Lancome has not submitted necessary data to market its product as a drug. The letter instructs the company to respond with a plan for correcting the language.

EX-BROKER ADMITS FRAUD CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — The founder of an Iowa brokerage has signed a plea agreement with federal prosecutors in which he admits to carrying out a $200 million fraud and embezzlement scheme that bankrupted his company. Prosecutors said Russ Wasendorf Sr. will plead guilty to mail fraud, embezzling customer funds and two counts of making false statements to regulators. U.S Magistrate Judge Jon Scoles confirmed the agreement but hasn’t ruled on the matter. Prosecutors said Wasendorf could be sentenced to up to 50 years in prison.

NEW YORK — PepsiCo Inc. said Tuesday

that its president is leaving after less than a year on the job, indicating a change at the top may not be coming any time soon. The Purchase, N.Y., company said John Compton’s departure is effective immediately. After joining the soda and snack food giant about 30 years ago, Compton had been named to the newly created position of president in March. PepsiCo said Zein Abdalla, CEO of its European division, will take over as president. Enderson Guimaraes, who serves as president of the company’s global nutrition group, was named to head PepsiCo Europe. Abdalla and Guimaraes are both 52.

LEGG MASON TO SEEK CEO BALTIMORE — Legg Mason’s chairman

and CEO Mark Fetting, who led the money manager through the difficult years during and after the financial crisis, will step down Oct. 1. The asset management company said Tuesday that Joseph Sullivan, Legg Mason Inc.’s head of global distribution, will become interim chief executive as it searches for a new CEO. The company’s lead independent director, W. Allen Reed, will become non-executive chairman Fetting will remain as a consultant to the Baltimore-based company through the end of the year. He became CEO in January 2008, a month after the Great Recession began, and was named chairman that December. FROM WIRE REPORTS

dependent Internet companies because the smaller screens on those devices have less space to show commercial messages. One way Facebook will address that challenge is by inserting more ads into the mobile news feeds that highlight status updates and photos shared by users’ friends and families, according to Zuckerberg. He once again tried to shoot down speculation that Facebook is developing its own smartphone. “It is so clearly the wrong strategy for us,” he said. “It doesn’t move the needle for us.”

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

...

3B

Budget impasse could put debt rating at risk BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The U.S. government’s debt rating could be heading for the “fiscal cliff” along with the federal budget. Moody’s Investors Service on Tuesday said it would likely cut its “Aaa” rating on U.S. government debt, probably by one notch, if budget negotiations fail. If Congress and the White House don’t reach a budget deal, about $1.2 trillion in spending cuts and tax increases will automatically kick in starting Jan. 2, a scenario that’s been dubbed the “fiscal cliff,” because it is likely to send the economy back into recession and drive up unemployment. A year ago, Moody’s cut its outlook on U.S. debt to “negative,” which acts as a warning it might downgrade the rating, after partisan wrangling over raising the U.S. debt limit led the nation toward default. Rival agency Standard & Poor’s took the drastic step of stripping the government of its “AAA” rating on its bonds on Aug. 5, 2011. Fitch Ratings issued a warning of a potential downgrade.

In politicians’ hands In its report Tuesday, Moody’s said it is difficult to predict when Congress will reach a deal on the budget, and it will likely keep its current rating and

“negative” outlook until the outcome of the talks is clear. In Washington, Moody’s action didn’t spur the politicians responsible for making a deal to sit down at the table. House Speaker John Boehner, an Ohio Republican, said he’s not confident that Congress can reach a deal and avoid a downgrade. No serious negotiations are expected until after the November elections. Boehner’s Democratic counterpart in the Senate, Majority Leader Harry Reid, was far more hopeful that “some kind of agreement” would be reached after the elections. Moody’s also noted that the government will likely again reach the debt limit by the end of the year, which means another round of negotiations in Congress on raising the limit if the U.S. is to keep paying its bills. “Under these circumstances, the government’s rating would likely be placed under review after the debt limit is reached, but several weeks before the exhaustion of the Treasury’s resources,” Moody’s analyst Steven A. Hess said in his report. Despite the rating cut last year from S&P and the warnings from Moody’s and Fitch, the U.S. has been able to borrow at very low rates because investors are still buying U.S. government bonds.


4B

.

BUSINESS: STATE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

UTILITY TO ADD RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES, INSTALL EMISSIONS CONTROLS

OG&E announces plan for its generation needs BY PAUL MONIES Business Writer pmonies@opubco.com

Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. laid out a plan to reduce demand for its electricity so it doesn’t have to build a new power plant until at least 2020, the utility told regulators on Tuesday. OG&E may add more renewable energy, most likely wind generation, by 2014. It also plans to install emissions-control equipment to deal with several federal environmental regulations. But OG&E wants to hold off on the most expensive emissions controls for its coal plants until legal reviews are complete. The utility presented its integrated resource plan at a public meeting before the Oklahoma Corporation Commission in Oklahoma City. The plan, which is not binding, has to be submitted every three years to regulators. Leon Howell, OG&E’s director of resource planning, said the plan is a snapshot of how the utility will deal with future customer needs in several areas, including generation, transmission and environmental regulations. “Demand response is very important to our 2020 goal going forward,” Howell said.

Smart meters used OG&E said the installation of smart meters and Smart Hours, a variablepricing program for peakdemand times, will help lower daily customer demand. The utility forecasts daily system demand of 5,864 megawatts in 2020, a reduction of more than 500 megawatts. Most of the reduction would come from expiring wholesale power contracts OG&E has with other utilities. The utility said it will issue a request for information next year to see if additional wind capacity would be affordable for its

customers. OG&E added wind power last year with its 227 megawatt Crossroads project in Dewey County. It will add another 60 megawatts later this year when it begins buying power from a NextEra Energy Resources wind farm near Blackwell.

Shifting to natural gas Coal generated 59 percent of OG&E’s electricity in 2011, with another 35 percent coming from natural gas. Wind provided the remaining 6 percent. The utility expects to shift most of its generation to natural gas by 2042, when it will make up almost two-thirds of OG&E’s energy mix. Jim Roth, an attorney representing Chesapeake Energy Corp., commended the utility for moving toward natural gas for more of its future generation. But he urged OG&E to explore recent commission rules that make it easier for utilities to buy natural gas on long-term contracts. “We think Oklahoma’s ratepayers could benefit by Oklahoma utilities locking in a long-term gas supply,” Roth, a former corporation commissioner, said after the meeting. “They obviously don’t need to lock in their entire supply, but when we’re at historic lows, why not lock in at least 10 years or more?” In the meantime, OG&E has to deal with several environmental regulations to control emissions from its coal plants. Scrubbers are the most expensive option, OG&E said, but it may also look at retiring coals units or converting them to natural gas. Much of those costs would be passed on to customers. “We’re continuing to look out for customers’ costs and that’s the big reason why we are delaying the decision on scrubbers and we haven’t gone forward with putting scrubbers on our units,” Howell said. OG&E is working to-

Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. crews work on Rockwell Avenue between Memorial Road and NW 122. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES PHOTO

ward installing emissionscontrol equipment for regulations dealing with mercury and air toxic gases, as well as nitrogen oxide emissions. But it is waiting for a court review to deal with sulfur dioxide emissions, which federal regulators said interfere with visibility at national parks.

Coal plants criticized The Sierra Club said OG&E should be doing more to emphasize energy efficiency and criticized the utility for relying on aging coal plants that are due for expensive upgrades. “It is also disappointing that OG&E views cleanup requirements on its coal plants as hassles to be battled in court rather than an opportunity to better protect the health of Oklahomans,” said Whitney Pearson, associate organizing representative with the Sierra Club’s Beyond

Coal campaign. OG&E said its customers will be responsible for more than $1.36 billion in transmission upgrades in the next decade to make the regional grid more reliable. The utility is a member of the Arkansas-based Southwest Power Pool, which organizes and plans electricity transmission in a nine-state area. Major transmission upgrade costs for the region are pooled among members. Several meeting participants questioned OG&E on the cost estimates for those transmission upgrades. The estimates went from $61 million in 2011to $147 million by 2021. Howell said the pool has ramped up its transmission expansion plans and the revenue requirements should come down over time as the investments depreciate over the next 40 years.

Texas company to buy Chesapeake acreage BY JAY F. MARKS Business Writer jmarks@opubco.com

A fledgling Texas company has struck a $125 million deal to acquire acreage in east Texas from Chesapeake Energy Corp. Fort Worth-based Energy & Exploration Partners Inc. acknowledged the pending deal Monday in a regulatory filing. A Chesapeake spokesman declined to comment on the deal, which Energy & Exploration Partners expects to close in the fourth quarter, according to its filing in advance of a planned initial public offering. Chesapeake has spent much of 2012 trying to sell assets to cover budget shortfalls that could reach as high as $22 billion. The Oklahoma City-based company has announced about $4.7 billion this year, including the sale of its former midstream OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Tuesday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. — $93.75 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. — $81.75 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted Aug. 17: COMPLETION Carter: Citation Oil & Gas Corp.; Tatums Field Unit No. 72-2 Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 23-01S-03W; 50 barrels oil per day; TD 3,202. Logan: Elder Craig Oil & Gas LLC; Cannon No. 1-14 Well; SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 14-16N-02W; 43 barrels oil per day; TD 5,759. Nowata: CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Doenges II No. 4 Well; NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 11-26N-14E; 1 barrels oil per day; TD 1,445. CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Doenges Ranch No. 75 Well; N1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 11-26N-14E; 0.5 barrels oil per day; TD 1,470. CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Smok-

OTHER SALES Chesapeake Energy Corp. has announced two asset sales this year as it tries to raise money to cover its projected capital costs. The company brought in about $2.6 billion from a series of deals announced in April for acreage and future production in Oklahoma and Texas. Chesapeake sold its stake in its former pipeline subsidiary for $2 billion in July. Future transactions with the newly named Access Midstream Partners could yield more money for the cash-strapped company.

subsidiary. The biggest assets still on the market are Chesapeake’s holdings in west Texas’ Permian Basin and a joint venture in the oilrich Mississippian play in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas. Chesapeake expects to raise as much as $14 billion this year from asset sales, plus another $4 billion to $5 billion in 2013. Oppenheimer analyst Fadel Gheit said the east Texas deal isn’t a big one for Chesapeake.

“Chesapeake has bigger fish to fry,” he said.

erise No. 142 Well; C SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 31-25N-15E; 1 barrels oil per day; TD 1,366. CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Taylor No. 11 Well; NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 11-25N-14E; 3 barrels oil per day, 6,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 1,375. Pottawatomie: Gillham Paul Oil Co.; State No. 3-A Well; C NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 16-08N-04E; 5 barrels oil per day;, 25,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 4,540. Stephens: Jack Operating Co. Inc.; Crump No. 31 Well; NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 10-02S-05W; 8 barrels oil per day; TD 1,070. Texas: Whiting Oil & Gas Corp.; Hovey Morrow Unit No. 4-2 Well; NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 04-05N-13E; TD 6,485. Whiting Oil & Gas Corp.; Northeast Hardesty Unit No. 19-4 Well; SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 10-03N-18E; 1 barrels oil per day; TD 6,450. Woods: Redland Resources Inc.; Molly No. 27-12 Well; SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 27-29N-17W; 50 barrels oil per day, 45,000 cu-ft

gas per day; TD 5,616.

Latest deal Energy & Exploration Partners’ Chesapeake deal covers more than 57,000 net acres in five east Texas counties. The area is part of what the Texas company calls the Eaglebine because it includes the Eagle Ford Shale and Woodbine Sandstone. The acquisition will more than double the Texas company’s holdings. It had about 43,000 net

INTENT TO DRILL Alfalfa: SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Hadwiger 2611 No. 1-9H Well; NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (SL) of 09-26N-11W; TD 10,837. SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Woods 2909 No. 3-17H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 17-29N-09W; TD 9,650. Canadian: Devon Energy Production Co. LP; McCray No. 2-26H; NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (SL) of 26-13N-10W; Woodford. Cotton: Sharp, Sean M.; Kennedy No. 3 Well; E1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 29-01S-10W; TD 2,450. Garfield: M M Energy Inc.; Dively No. 62 Well; C NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 24-22N-04W; TD 4,800. Plymouth Exploration LLC; Semrad No. 1-3H Well; N1⁄2 NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 (SL) of 03-23N-05W; TD 10,400. Grady: Sheridan Production Co. LLC; N.E. Verden Unit No. 47-02 Well; NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 09-08N-08W; TD 10,200.

acres in three core areas as of Aug. 31: the Eaglebine, the Wolfcamp play in west Texas’ Permian Basin and the Niobrara Shale in Colorado and Wyoming. Energy & Exploration Partners previously had accumulated about 18,000 acres in the Eaglebine. The company struck a deal with subsidiaries of Halcon Resources Corp. to help develop the acreage. Constellation Energy Commodities Group Inc. also bought a stake in the Eaglebine acreage. Halcon has drilled three wells in the area, with production from the first one expected to begin by the end of the month. Those partners will have an opportunity to buy a 65 percent working interest in acreage that is part of their areas of mutual interest. The Chesapeake acquisition will give Energy & Exploration Partners more than 70,000 net acres in the play. Grant: Tessera Energy LLC; Joan No. 2-21 Well; C SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 21-25N-05W; TD 6,225. Kay: International Energy Corp.; ETU No. 1-6 Well; C SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 20-25N-01E; TD 4,825. Love: Mid-Con Energy Operating Inc.; HDSU Sullivan No. 14-12 Well; NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 12-06S-02W; TD 8,500. Noble: Hulen Operating Co.; Matthiesen No. 26-1 Well; C W1⁄2 NW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 26-24N-02W; TD 4,846. Nowata: Dawson Gary dba Mitten Well Service LLC; Roy Adams No. 3 Well; SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 27-27N-15W; TD 1,150. DDCoil LLC; Hewitt No. 3 Well; NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 of 14-26N-15E; TD 1,400. Roger Mills: Apache Corp.; Tucker No. 3-9HA Well; NW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 09-12N-26W; TD 18,000. Washita: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Neil 5-11-18 No. 1H Well; N1⁄2 N1⁄2 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (BHL) of 05-11N-18W; TD 17,400.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Clean Line Energy gets federal approval BY PAUL MONIES Business Writer pmonies@opubco.com

A planned high-voltage, direct-current electricity transmission line from Oklahoma to Tennessee has cleared another federal regulatory step and can now negotiate rates with customers, the company said Tuesday. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved an application from Plains and Eastern Clean Line to sell up to 75 percent of the transmission line’s capacity to utilities and renewable-energy providers. The remaining capacity would be sold under what’s called an “open season” process that provides access for other customers on similar terms and conditions. The 750-mile project would take electricity from wind farms in the Oklahoma Panhandle to customers in Tennessee. If it meets several other regulatory requirements, the project is expected to be in operation by 2017. Michael Skelly, president of Clean Line Energy Partners, said the commission approval was another important step. “We are excited at the momentum surrounding the Plains and Eastern Clean Line and we look forward to working with our local, state and federal stakeholders as we continue to develop the transmission line project in a responsible and transparent manner,” Skelly said in a statement. Plains and Eastern Clean Line said its project employees have met with

The Plains and Eastern Clean Line will create jobs while enabling billions of dollars of investments in Oklahoma’s clean energy industry.” MICHAEL MING

OKLAHOMA ENERGY SECRETARY

more than 1,800 people in the project area. They’ve also held meetings with local officials and community leaders in more than 30 counties across Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee. Plains and Eastern Clean Line already has agreements with Claremore-based Pelco Structural LLC to manufacture the monopoles for the transmission lines. “This approval from FERC is a great step toward developing Oklahoma’s low-cost, clean energy resources,” said Oklahoma Energy Secretary Michael Ming. “The Plains and Eastern Clean Line will create jobs while enabling billions of dollars of investments in Oklahoma’s clean energy industry,” he said. Clean Line received commission approval earlier this year for its Rock Island Clean Line, a similar high-voltage, directcurrent transmission project from Iowa to Illinois.

OKLAHOMA BRIEFS GROUP TO EXPAND YOUTH TRAINING The Central Oklahoma Workforce Investment Board is expanding youth leadership development training and educational support services with AmeriCorps grant funds. AmeriCorps members address critical needs in communities all across America; AmeriCorps grants are awarded through a competitive process. With AmeriCorps grant funds, the board is able to pay an AmeriCorps member to help increase program capacity and deliver training to youth in the community. Parents, community organizations and education entities interested in partnering with the Central Oklahoma Workforce Investment Board to provide study skills or leadership development training should email angelawilliams@cowib.org or call 622-2029; youth may make self-referrals. The Central Oklahoma Workforce Investment Board is responsible for administering employment and training funds, as well as providing leadership in aligning efforts to meet the labor force needs of the business community in Canadian, Cleveland, Logan and Oklahoma counties.

MERCY PRESIDENT NAMED TO BOARD Dr. Jim Dixson, president of Mercy Clinic Primary Care, has been appointed to the American Hospital Association’s Regional Policy Board. Dixson will meet three times yearly with 64 counterparts from the Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma region to discuss health care and hospital policy issues and alternatives. The regional policy board’s recommendations and analyses are used by the American Hospital Association board during policy deliberations. Dixson, in addition to his current administrative role as president of the Primary Care Division of Mercy Clinic, serves as medical director at The Good Samaritan Clinic, a free clinic for the uninsured in Edmond. “It’s important that Oklahomans have a voice in these policy discussions,” Dixson said. FROM STAFF REPORTS

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS AGRI MARKETS AND STATE GRAINS Due to technical difficulties the Agri Markets and State Grains are not in today’s paper. These graphics should return tomorrow.

Woods: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Rider 1-28-15 No. 1H Well; N1⁄2 N1⁄2 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 (BHL) of 01-28N-15W; TD 10,175. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Roper 1-28-15 No. 1H Well; N1⁄2 N1⁄2 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (BHL) of 01-28N-15W; TD 10,205. SOURCE: OIL-LAW RECORDS CORP. LIVESTOCK Tuesday’s livestock report from the Oklahoma City Stockyards: Receipts: 9,366 Steers: Medium and Large No. No. 1: (weighted average): Calves: 314 lbs. $214.58; 375 lbs. $207.29; 417 lbs. $181.41; 472 lbs. $169.95; 533 lbs. $154.72; 569 lbs. $151.50; 626 lbs. $142.25; 670 lbs. $143.29; 741 lbs. $135.91; Yearlings: 625 lbs. $149.45; 666 lbs. $147.51; 730 lbs. $143.75; 771 lbs. $144; 816 lbs. $139.06; 869 lbs. $134.05; 917 lbs. $132.06; 950 lbs. $131.50; 1019 lbs. $128.25. Heifers: Medium and Large 1: (weighted average): Calves: 359 lbs. $158; 433 lbs. $150.57; 470

lbs. $146.41; 524 lbs. $142.86; 573 lbs. $140.21; 609 lbs. $135.37; Yearlings: 633 lbs. $139.25; 668 lbs. $140.74; 716 lbs. $134.35; 782 lbs. $130.99; 816 lbs. $125.34; 876 lbs. 122.38; 911 lbs. $120.33; 960 lbs. $119.50. HOGS Receipts: 100 Compared to Tuesday: Barrows and Gilts: Steady. U.S. Nos. 1-3 220-270 lbs., $43 Sows: Steady. U.S. Nos. 1-3 300-500 lbs., $31-$34 U.S. Nos. 1-3 500-700 lbs., $36-$38 Boars: 200-250 lbs., $20; over 250 lbs., $5 SOURCE: USDA-OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MARKET NEWS SERVICE


BUSINESS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

p

NASDAQ 3,104.53

+69.07

Today

Mortgage applications

1,400 1,360

p n Money&Markets

percentage change, seasonally adjusted

0 -1.8

-2

-2.5

-4

-4.3

-4.5

-6 -7.4

-8

8/3

8/10

8/17

8/24

8/31

Source: Mortgage Bankers Association

S&P 500

3,160

Close: 1,433.56 Change: 4.48 (0.3%)

3,100

1,450

Investors have been buying fewer shares in long-term mutual funds in recent weeks. Estimated inflows, or share purchases, in long-term mutual funds rose to $5.84 billion in the week ended Aug. 8. But they have been declining on a weekly basis ever since. The Investment Company Institute reports inflow figures today for the week ended Sept. 5.

Interestrates

Close: 3,104.53 Change: 0.51 (flat)

2,900 2,800 M

A

M

J

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NYSE

NASD

3,363 3,173 2039 978 202 15

1,563 1,529 1447 990 88 23

J

A

S HIGH 13354.34 5147.37 471.64 8264.29 3117.86 1437.76 1004.37 15038.08 845.15

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

M

A

LOW 13253.21 5095.54 469.83 8209.26 3099.10 1429.13 999.88 14953.78 839.32

M

J

CLOSE 13323.36 5133.50 469.91 8246.15 3104.53 1433.56 1001.67 14997.77 841.92

CHG. +69.07 +34.89 -1.32 +53.75 +0.51 +4.48 +1.23 +43.99 +2.55

J

A

%CHG. +0.52% +0.68% -0.28% +0.66% +0.02% +0.31% +0.12% +0.29% +0.30%

S

YTD +9.05% +2.27% +1.13% +10.29% +19.17% +13.99% +13.93% +13.71% +13.63%

PIMCO Total Return 2.0 Bill Gross is competing with himself. The world’s most influential bond investor launched an exchangetraded fund version of his Total Return bond mutual *82(""$6-;1327,6%+3

key difference is the lower cost of the ETF, which charges just 0.55 percent of investor assets a year for fund operations. The mutual fund charges 0.85 percent, or $3 more for every $1,000 invested. Since its debut, the Total Return ETF is outperforming its sister mutual fund by a wide margin. The ETF has returned 8.7 percent since its March 1 launch. The Total Return mutual fund has posted a 5 percent return since then.

Tale of the tape: compari6323*7,)Total Return bond mutual fund with its counterpart ETF, which was launched in March.

Mutual fund (PTTAX) $270 billion $7 billion

Before investors consider a switch to the lower cost ETF, they should understand that the performance difference is expected to narrow.24%577,%76 because mortgage securities and high-yield corporate bonds have contributed to recent ETF returns. The mutual fund has made those investments too, but their impact has been smaller. The fund has thousands of bond investments versus hundreds in the ETF. With $270 billion in assets, the mutual fund is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest and â&#x20AC;&#x153;is the proverbial aircraft carrier that takes forever to turn around," says Morningstar analyst Eric Jacobson. Still, the ETF will continue to attract new investors. They deposited a net $2.4 billion through 8+867 >",-6-6/-2(3*% rock-star ETF,@6%<6%'3&6)2 >7=6 reasonable to expect the flows will continue to be strong.â&#x20AC;?

Exchange-traded fund (BOND) $2.6 billion $2.4 billion

Total assets Net inflows

March through July*

March through 8+867

Expense ratio Total return

0.85%** 5.0%

0.55% 8.7%

%5', 7,538+,!)47 

8+867(%7%237<)7%9%-0%&0) 29)67356-27,)-267-787-32%06,%5)'0%66"" $4%<%03:)5);4)26) ratio of 0.46 percent. ",%7-2'08()61%2<-29)673563:2-2+7,)*82(-2 /40%26

%5/):)00)22-!3,2?

!385')6

Company Spotlight

ZYNGA (ZNGA)

52-WEEK RANGE

$2.66

Price-earnings ratio (Based on past 12 monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; results): Lost money Total return this year: -70% AP

Karp was hired in August 2011. Zynga says the groups that Karp oversaw have been moved to other divisions in the company, which means he is not being replaced. San Francisco-based Zyngaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stock closed at $2.79, or down 1.1 percent, Tuesday. The stock is down 72 percent from its December initial public offering price of $10.

Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close: $2.79

15.91

Market value: $2.2 billions

Total returns through Sept. 10

SOURCES: Morningstar; FactSet

Stocks rose modestly Tuesday, as investors ticipate in the bailout fund set up to calm await a pair of decisions that could make big imEuropeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debt crisis. On Thursday, the Federal pacts on the market later this week. On Wednes- Reserve will conclude a two-day meeting. Many day, the focus will be on Europe. A German court investors expect it to approve measures to stimwill rule on whether the country can legally parulate the economy. Legg Mason LM Thor Industries THO Sonoco Products SON Close: $26.85 1.38 or 5.4% The money manager said that it is searching for a new CEO. Chairman and CEO, Mark Fetting, is stepping down next month. $27 26

Close: $33.75 1.08 or 3.3% The camper and bus maker said that it was raising its regular quarterly dividend to 18 cents per share from 15 cents per share. $35

J

J A 52-week range

$22.36

S $29.56

25

Close: $30.13 -0.91 or -2.9% Due to operational problems, the packaging materials company cut its current-quarter profit outlook and withdrew its 2012 outlook. $32 31

30

25

30 J

J A 52-week range

$18.71

S $34.70

29

J

J A 52-week range

$26.10

$34.83

Vol.: 637.0k (1.6x avg.) PE: 16.1 Mkt. Cap: $1.79 b Yield: 1.8%

Vol.: 1.7m (3.3x avg.) PE: 15.3 Mkt. Cap: $3.03 b Yield: 4.0%

Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gen. Stores

United Natural Foods

Finish Line

Close: $57.99 2.33 or 4.2% The operator of Midwestern convenience stores reported a profit in the fiscal first-quarter that beat Wall Street expectations. $65

UNFI

Close: $55.24 -5.20 or -8.6% Even though its fourth-quarter net income rose 46 percent, the food distributorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal 2013 guidance was weaker than expected. $65

Close: $24.51 0.72 or 3.0% Two separate analysts from Citi and Canaccord reiterated their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buyâ&#x20AC;? ratings on the sneaker retailerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stock, citing higher sales. $30

60

60

25

55

55

20

50 $42.41

J

J A 52-week range

S $63.00

Vol.: 1.2m (4.4x avg.) PE: 19.1 Mkt. Cap: $2.22 b Yield: 1.1% SOURCE: Sungard

50

J

J A 52-week range

$32.83 Vol.: 1.9m (6.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.7 b

FINL

S $61.21

PE: 32.5 Yield: ...

15

J

J A 52-week range

$17.80 Vol.: 18.0 (0.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.21 b

S $26.16

PE: 16.0 Yield: 1.0% AP

to long-term mutual funds, in billions

$6 5.8 5.3

4 3.4

0 -1.2

-2

1.65 2.81

+0.05 +0.04

1.95 3.25

... ... +0.01 -0.04 +0.01 ... +0.40

British pound Canadian dollar Chinese yuan

PVS

.6223 .9733 6.3363

.6251 .9776 6.3387

CLOSE Euro Japanese yen Mexican peso

.7776 77.78 13.0008

8/22

8/29

1YR AGO 2.91 5.01 2.27 8.54 4.07 3.56 36.90

OPEN

CLOSE

CH.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Oct 12 96.29 97.17 Nov 12 96.62 97.50

+.63 +.62

Est. sales 507,026 Mon's. sales 493,096 Mon's open int 1,565,285 off 8165.00

NATURAL GAS (NYMX) 10,000 mm btu's, $ per mm btu Oct 12 2.842 2.992 Nov 12 2.963 3.104

+.180 +.163

Est. sales 645,612 Mon's. sales 340,428 Mon's open int 1,121,877 off 14156.00

GOLD (COMX) 100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. Sep 12 1736.00 1731.80 +3.10 Oct 12 1725.90 1732.30 +3.10 Est. sales 118,228 Mon's. sales 120,235 Mon's open int 456,913 off 176.00

CBOT SILVER 5000 oz. (CBOT) 5000 troy oz- dollars per troy oz Sep 12 33.625 33.473 -.198 Oct 12 33.478 33.478 -.108 Est. sales 6 Mon's. sales 42 Mon's open int 513 up 2.00

ForeignExchange CLOSE

8/15

FuturesTrading

1.70 2.85

2.54 4.23 1.78 6.52 3.47 2.92 48.89

8/8

EXP.

.01 .04 .10 .20 .87

Barclays LongT-BdIdx 2.54 Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.23 Barclays USAggregate 1.79 PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 6.48 RATE FUNDS Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.48 .13 YEST 3.25 Barclays US Corp 2.92 .13 6 MO AGO 3.25 PHLX Bank 49.29 .13 1 YR AGO 3.25

8/1

Source: Investment Company Institute

+0.01 ... ... ... +0.03

PVS

3.0

2

.09 .13 .19 .25 .64

YEST

+3.10

Estimated inflows

.10 .13 .19 .25 .67

BONDS

5B

.

p

GOLD $1,731.80

+.0091

1YR AGO

NET CHG

NY HARBOR GAS BLEND (NYMX) 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Oct 12 3.0275 3.0435 +.0195 Nov 12 2.9040 2.9211 +.0160

PVS .7832 78.28 13.0684

Est. sales 83,609 Mon's. sales 140,091 Mon's open int 293,059 up 3637.00

Oklahoma Inc. Stocks 52-WEEK HI LO

NAME

LAST

22.98 31.19 2.55 54.64 83.80 87.30 60.00 44.00 7.86 32.07 30.24 18.35 97.19 76.34 87.70 5.60 2.62 1.20 37.80 13.35 68.60 42.28

AAON AccessMid ADDvntgT AlliHold AllnceRes ApcoO&Gs BOK BncFstOK BlueknEP ChesEng ChesGran n Comprssco ContlRes DevonE DollarTh EducDev h GMX Rs GrayM rsh GulfportE HalconR rs HelmPayne LSB Inds

19.10 +.14 29.74 -.45 2.15 -.05 48.15 -.35 61.84 +.34 16.76 -.22 57.95 -.26 42.78 +.11 6.45 +.05 20.10 +.53 21.84 +.18 16.99 +.05 78.18 +.90 60.62 +1.25 87.14 +.05 4.13 +.03 .82 +.03 .33 ... 28.17 +.47 8.55 +.34 48.32 +1.37 39.77 +.53

14.64 22.50 1.90 36.98 50.42 15.17 43.82 30.50 4.95 13.32 17.37 11.25 42.43 50.74 50.94 3.75 0.71 0.28 15.79 1.95 35.58 24.85

CH.

YTD %CH. DIV -6.8 +2.6 +2.6 -7.4 -18.2 -79.5 +5.5 +14.0 -1.2 -9.8 -9.2 +13.3 +17.2 -2.2 +24.0 -17.6 -34.4 -28.3 -4.3 -8.9 -17.2 +41.9

YLD

0.24 1.3 1.68 5.6 ... ... 2.79 5.8 4.25 6.9 ... ... 1.52 2.6 1.16 2.7 0.44 6.8 0.35 1.7 2.58 11.8 1.55 9.1 ... ... 0.80 1.3 ... ... 0.48 11.6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.28 .6 ... ...

52-WEEK HI LO

NAME

LAST

27.91 85.16 15.06 27.61 57.54 46.21 61.58 19.25 36.00 4.82 32.77 9.04 36.97 25.10 36.99 10.94 11.45 1.54 53.35 23.42 34.63 65.39

LaredoP n MagelMPtr MatrixSv NGL EnPt OGE Engy ONEOK s OneokPtrs OrchidsPP PanhO&G PostRockE RoseRck n SandRdge SandRMiss SandRdgP SemGroup SonicCorp SwstBc Syntrolm h Unit WPX En n WmsCos WmsPtrs

22.68 +.32 84.67 -.08 11.10 +.12 25.24 +.35 54.32 -.14 46.15 +.25 57.29 +.33 18.07 +.09 31.36 +.56 1.84 -.05 31.40 -1.37 7.20 +.08 25.09 +.07 20.50 ... 35.90 -.20 10.05 +.03 11.01 +.01 .74 +.01 43.43 +1.30 16.60 +.43 33.74 +.12 51.44 +.12

17.25 57.38 7.34 19.46 45.70 31.21 42.10 11.36 24.16 1.33 19.00 4.55 18.76 14.88 18.34 6.35 3.75 0.58 32.08 13.22 17.88 48.28

ExchangeTradedFunds NAME Barc iPath Vix ST CS VS 2x Vix ShTm CS VS InvVix STerm Direxion SCapBear 3x iShares Brazil iShare Japan iShares Silver Trust iShs FTSEChina25 iShs Emerg Mkts iShares EAFE iShares Rus 2000 Mkt Vect Gold Miners PowerShs QQQ Trust ProSh UltraSht S&P SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr SPDR Energy SPDR Financial SPDR Industrial US Nat Gas Fund Vanguard Emg Mkts

TKR VXX TVIX XIV TZA EWZ EWJ SLV FXI EEM EFA IWM GDX QQQ SDS SPY XLE XLF XLI UNG VWO

FUND NAV American Funds BalA x 20.12 CapIncBuA m 53.22 CpWldGrIA m 36.08 EurPacGrA m 39.39 FnInvA m 40.12 GrthAmA m 33.54 IncAmerA m 18.07 InvCoAmA m 30.75 NewPerspA m 30.22 WAMutInvA m 31.40 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 32.72 Stock 119.36 Fidelity Contra 78.64 Magellan 73.99 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m 2.23 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv 13.24 Harbor IntlInstl d 59.09 PIMCO TotRetA m 11.49 TotRetAdm b 11.49 TotRetIs 11.49 Vanguard 500Adml 132.71 InstIdxI 131.86 InstPlus 131.87 MuIntAdml 14.33 TotBdAdml 11.15 TotIntl 14.41 TotStIAdm 35.89 TotStIIns 35.89 TotStIdx 35.87 WelltnAdm 59.05

LAST 9.86 1.84 15.96 14.83 54.84 9.11 32.41 33.40 40.60 53.44 84.06 49.81 68.43 13.84 143.91 73.91 15.68 36.96 20.19 41.46

CH. -.07 -.08 +.11 -.09 +.75 +.04 +.12 +.34 +.48 +.60 +.18 +.33 -.11 -.06 +.40 +.78 +.13 +.20 +1.15 +.45

%YTD -72.2 -94.2 +145.2 -44.0 -4.4 ... +20.3 -4.2 +7.0 +7.9 +14.0 -3.1 +22.6 -28.2 +14.7 +6.9 +20.6 +9.5 -21.9 +8.5

CH.

PERCENT RETURN 4WK. 12MO. 3YR. 5YR.

-.07 +.17 +.22 +.36 +.13 +.07 +.05 +.08 +.11 +.07

+1.5 +0.9 +2.5 +2.5 +2.3 +2.8 +1.5 +1.4 +2.6 +1.3

+11.6 +8.9 +6.4 +3.5 +11.2 +10.1 +11.7 +10.2 +8.7 +13.8

+3.5 +1.5 -0.3 -1.2 +1.2 +0.7 +2.9 +0.4 +1.7 +1.1

+.45 +.66

+3.5 +13.5 +3.4 +2.3 +28.7 +10.8

-2.9 -1.3

+.03 +.15

+3.1 +22.0 +14.2 +3.7 +19.0 +7.0

+3.6 -2.1

+.01

+1.9 +17.4 +12.0

+4.1

+.04

+0.5 +4.1

+8.6 +10.2

+.62

+1.8 +16.0

+6.2

-0.5

-.01 -.01 -.01

+0.6 +7.9 +0.6 +8.0 +0.6 +8.3

+7.2 +7.4 +7.6

+8.4 +8.6 +8.9

+.42 +.41 +.41 -.01 -.02 +.14 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.12

+2.2 +2.2 +2.2 +0.2 +0.1 +2.6 +2.6 +2.6 +2.6 +1.2

+13.5 +13.5 +13.5 +5.7 +6.1 +2.9 +13.8 +13.8 +13.7 +10.4

+1.7 +1.7 +1.7 +5.5 +6.4 -3.4 +2.3 +2.3 +2.1 +4.3

+19.1 +15.7 +18.9 +11.6 +22.4 +21.5 +17.6 +24.5 +18.7 +24.2

+27.0 +27.0 +27.0 +6.7 +4.3 +8.8 +26.6 +26.5 +26.4 +19.0

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR

YTD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

8.12 10.20 20.09 4.43 17.66 15.80

10.75 14.77 29.35 1.79 26.36 19.85

8.34 9.17 14.19 5.94 22.49 12.40

3.76 2.46 6.24 -0.93 3.43 3.34

5YR

7.97 8.90 9.73

10.31 11.57 12.94

7.92 8.32 8.80

2.25 1.61 1.60

8.89 13.68 13.00 10.97 11.09 15.01 9.69 8.43 11.67

0.77 13.33 6.88 10.88 9.58 10.09 11.32 8.29 14.06

4.94 3.54 4.53 2.87 5.93 9.19 1.63 7.25 7.47

-1.45 -4.79 -3.40 -3.99 -2.08 -1.27 -4.93 1.63 -1.23

BALANCED

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 23.67 10.00 38.28 27.29 75.13 18.73 3.37 0.99 28.47 20.65 43.96 35.85 3.55 2.30 88.70 56.42 112.09 73.04 10.10 4.92 77.83 56.90 10.34 6.79 87.85 46.19 41.25 31.67 59.68 44.71 18.36 10.48 51.00 38.08 28.37 12.30 90.00 67.93 41.24 17.39 15.80 8.53 59.97 33.31 40.60 26.28 57.89 31.03 21.89 12.41 46.49 27.85 69.75 60.83 95.30 74.57 93.99 70.37 32.29 18.53 39.55 25.61 41.71 27.33 105.46 65.91 107.13 63.75 106.68 66.36 7.62 3.60 88.75 54.90 4.82 1.33 31.32 25.15 24.41 17.30 35.71 9.05 85.90 28.89 10.05 7.15 5.49 2.10 62.00 35.12 26.77 9.30 28.00 17.31 94.30 68.63 52.61 30.49 81.79 61.12 46.41 34.65 75.24 49.94 8.84 6.36

NAME AAR AT&T Inc AdmRsc AlcatelLuc AMovilL AEP AmShrd Anadarko Apache BkofAm Boeing Celestic g Cimarex CocaCola s ConocPhil s Dell Inc EngyTsfr EthanAl ExxonMbl GaylrdEnt Goodyear Group1 Hallibrtn HomeDp IntlBcsh JPMorgCh JohnJn LabCp LockhdM Lowes MetLife NobleCorp NobleEn OReillyAu OcciPet ParkDrl PlainsAA PostRockE RepubSvc Rollins SeagateT SearsHldgs SwstAirl SprintNex Starbucks Terex TetraTc 3M Co UMB Fn UPS B VerizonCm WalMart Xerox VALUE

SPECIALTY FUNDS

Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

YTD %CH. DIV

CH.

+1.7 +22.9 +17.6 +22.3 -4.2 +6.5 -0.8 -0.7 -4.4 -34.3 +52.6 -11.8 -19.2 -9.9 +37.8 +49.3 +84.7 -23.4 -6.4 -8.6 +25.1 -14.3

YLD

... ... 3.77 4.5 ... ... 1.65 6.5 1.57 2.9 1.32 2.9 2.64 4.6 0.80 4.4 0.28 .9 ... ... 1.53 4.9 ... ... 3.13 12.5 2.43 11.9 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.25 3.7 3.17 6.2

Stocks of Local Interest

MutualFundCategories

S

Vol.: 5.1m (3.4x avg.) PE: 25.3 Mkt. Cap: $3.63 b Yield: 1.6% CASY

10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

NET CHG

PVS

The Oklahomanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top 30 Mutual Funds

Another departure at Zynga

Another executive has left Zynga, followed by that of Mike Verdu, the the struggling online company companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief creative officer. behind â&#x20AC;&#x153;FarmVilleâ&#x20AC;? and other games. Jeff Karp, the chief marketing and chief revenue officer announced his departure Monday. In August, Chief Operating Officer John Schappert left the company after less than a year and a half. Schappertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exit was

YEST

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 1-year T-note 2-year T-note 5-year T-note

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.70 percent Tuesday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

1,350

24

TREASURIES

10 DAYS

3,000

2,700

p

EURO 1.2860

+.02

Mutual fund watch

3,100

1,300

p

GASOLINE $3.04

The monetary policymaking body of the Federal Reserve begins two days of meetings today. Many expect that the committee will favor a third round of bond purchases or other support for the financial system. Such bond purchases are meant to lower long-term interest rates and encourage more borrowing and spending. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has said that the central bank is inclined to provide new stimulus to the U.S. economy if it's needed.

3,200

1,400

1,250

+.04

Federal Reserve meeting

Nasdaq composite

3,040

10 DAYS

30-YR T-BONDS 2.85%

6-MO T-BILLS .13%

+4.48

Mortgage applications

While mortgage interest rates remain near record lows, banks have been receiving fewer requests for home loans. A weekly survey by the Mortgage Bankers Association registered a weekly decline all of last month in applications for new residential mortgages. The slide narrowed the last two weeks of August. The latest survey is due out today.

1,440

p

S&P 500 1,433.56

+.51

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

p

DOW 13,323.36

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

LAST 16.68 37.62 36.14 1.16 25.30 43.43 2.90 71.62 89.79 9.03 71.27 7.91 60.52 37.77 56.37 10.64 42.76 23.66 89.62 40.57 13.06 58.39 35.35 56.72 19.35 39.60 68.20 88.99 92.24 28.60 35.36 37.05 93.94 85.64 86.44 4.64 86.93 1.84 28.22 24.02 30.11 56.56 8.95 5.00 50.73 22.97 27.21 91.17 49.11 73.54 44.24 74.06 7.49 BLEND

YTD CH. %Ch. +.02 -13.0 +.20 +24.4 +.14 +24.1 -.01 -25.6 +.10 +11.9 +.04 +5.1 -.08 +9.0 +1.22 -6.2 +.21 -0.9 +.45 +62.4 +.19 -2.8 +.17 +7.9 +1.13 -2.2 +.11 +8.0 +.19 +1.5 +.03 -27.3 -.16 -6.7 +.54 -0.2 +.14 +5.7 -.24 +68.1 -.06 -7.8 -.24 +12.7 +1.08 +2.4 -.58 +34.9 +.06 +5.5 +.84 +19.1 +.02 +4.0 +.06 +3.5 +.21 +14.0 -.09 +12.7 +.38 +13.4 +.30 +22.6 +.83 -0.5 +.58 +7.1 +.12 -7.7 +.03 -35.3 -.18 +18.4 -.05 -34.3 +.01 +2.4 -.14 +8.1 +.24 +83.6 -.59 +78.0 -.20 +4.6 -.15 +113.7 -.10 +10.3 +.37 +70.0 +.23 +26.0 +.50 +11.6 -.04 +31.8 +.49 +0.5 +.18 +10.3 +.55 +23.9 +.03 -5.9 GROWTH

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

12.5 25.4 11.3 -1.9

LV

15.9 29.1 13.1 3.0

LB

20.4 28.2 15.4 3.6

LG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

13.2 23.4 12.8 2.1

MV

14.4 26.3 16.9 4.2

MB

15.3 18.5 16.4 2.8

MG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

15.3 30.3 15.7 5.8

SV

14.8 23.9 14.2 3.3

SB

15.0 26.1 16.2 4.1

SG

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

1SVI1YXYEP*YRHWPMWXIHEX2I[W3/GSQ

5.48 2.54 10.95 10.88 4.15 7.15 1.47

6.02 3.14 14.02 13.70 6.21 10.06 1.96

7.23 5.09 9.55 12.39 5.50 6.74 2.39

6.15 5.45 3.65 7.01 4.91 4.92 2.82


6B

.

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

WEATHER Mostly sunny

ACROSS THE U.S.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather.com ©2012

High pressure centered over the eastern part of the country will support sunshine and breezy conditions again. This will result in a threat of wildfires. Winds: S 10-20 mph.

92/61 84/57

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

90/63

94/65

92/67 93/68

92/68 92/68

90/65

92/64

93/67

Showers

-10s -0s

Up-to-date video, forecasts, maps, radar and warnings, go to NewsOK.com

What’s ahead for Oklahoma City Thursday 81/56

Winds:

WNW 7-14 mph

Friday 73/51

Winds:

NNE 10-20 mph

Saturday 79/55

Sunday 83/60

Winds:

Winds:

E 3-6 mph

S 6-12 mph

Regional forecast

Major lake levels

For the record

Arkansas: Plenty of sunshine today. Mainly clear tonight. Texas: Mostly sunny today. A shower or thunderstorm in spots; any time at the coast, during the afternoon in the southeast. New Mexico: Times of sun and clouds today; a shower or thunderstorm around; however, dry in the south and on the Plains. Kansas: Partly sunny today. A thunderstorm in the west; cooler in the north and southwest. Sunny in the southeast. Missouri: Plenty of sunshine today. Partly cloudy tonight. A shower or thunderstorm around tomorrow. Colorado: Mainly cloudy today. A couple of showers and a heavy thunderstorm; arriving during the afternoon in the east.

As of 7 a.m. yesterday Lake Normal Altus 1,559.0 Arbuckle 872.0 Arcadia 1,006.0 Brok. Bow 599.5 Canton 1,615.4 Copan 710.0 Eufaula 585.0 Ft. Cobb 1,342.0 Ft. Gibson 554.0 Ft. Supply 2,004.0 Foss 1,642.0 Grand 745.0 Hudson 619.0 Hulah 733.0 Kaw 1,009.1 Kerr 460.0 Keystone 723.0 Oologah 638.0 Salt Plains 1,125.0 Skiatook 714.0 Tenkiller 632.0 Texoma 615.0 Thunderbird 1,039.0 Webb. Falls 490.0 Wister 478.0

Yesterday in Oklahoma City:

Yesterday’s pollen

Current 1,533 868.81 1,004 592.23 1,607 708.59 580.74 1,337 552.21 2,001 1,632 742.24 620.12 730.67 1,008 459.79 719.36 635.52 1,123 705.32 623.64 614.57 1,033 489.85 476.60

Total Precipitation Mold and pollen counts courtesy of the Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic.

Monday 85/61

Winds:

Yesterday in the state:

Jan. 1 - This date in 2012 ......................... 21.77 Normal Jan. 1 - This date ........................ 26.43 Oklahoma City annual precip. is ....... 35.85

Fires: Outer urban areas become more vulnerable FROM PAGE 1B

million; 1,007 homes ranked 61-80 and valued at $72.3 million; and 381 homes ranked 81-100 and valued at $28.2 million.

Developed wild lands “Homes located within a city boundary are not safe from the threat of wildfire destruction. In fact, the unprecedented growth of urban areas over the past 50 years has generally increased the likelihood homes will be damaged by wildfire activity,” CoreLogic’s Howard Botts said in a news release. “As residential development has expanded into formerly undeveloped wild lands, the transitional area between the two, known as the wildfire urban interface, has become exceptionally vulnerable to wildfire.” Some 40 percent of homes in the U.S. are in such transitional areas, Botts said, “and windblown embers are capable of igniting homes located hundreds or even thousands of feet away from an actual fire.” Despite the losses and the eruption of widespread fires the past few years, CoreLogic noted that Oklahoma isn’t known for

significant wildfires.

numbers

of

Drought and wind Drought and high winds, however, are creating risk here that can’t be ignored, according to the firm, which studied Oklahoma, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Wyoming and Washington. The combination of drought and wind in Oklahoma “underscores the importance of evaluating wildfire risk in areas with less active histories that tend to be overlooked,” CoreLogic said in the report, dated Aug. 23. “It is as yet unknown what the total amount of insured losses will be, but given the extent and extreme nature of the current fires, the 2012 wildfires in Oklahoma may well be the worst in state history.” Incidentally, CoreLogic’s study period ended the day after the Federal Emergency Management Agency approved assistance for homeowners in Creek County but did not extend aid to homeowners in Oklahoma, Cleveland and Payne counties. Wildfires destroyed hundreds of homes in those areas July 28-Aug. 14.

Winds:

SSE 6-12 mph

H L Prc. 93 63 .00 Midnight 67 Enid 1 a.m. 65 Gage 93 68 .00 2 a.m. 65 Guymon 101 67 .00 3 a.m. 64 Hobart 94 67 .00 4 a.m. 61 McAlester 91 62 .00 5 a.m. 61 Ponca City 95 63 .00 6 a.m. 60 93 59 .00 7 a.m. 58 Tulsa 8 a.m. 63 Chickasha 94 59 .00 91 61 .00 9 a.m. 73 Durant 10 a.m. 80 El Reno 93 59 .00 11 a.m. 86 Guthrie 92 63 .00 Noon 88 Idabel 89 58 .00 1 p.m. 90 Miami 89 62 .00 2 p.m. 92 Norman 92 62 .00 3 p.m. 93 93 56 .00 4 p.m. 93 OKC Shawnee 92 62 .00 5 p.m. 92 Stillwater 94 58 .00 6 p.m. 91 7 p.m. 87 Woodward 94 69 .00 One year ago in Oklahoma City: 89/57 Normal high/low in Oklahoma City: 87/65 Record high/low: 105 in 2000/48 in 1940 National extremes yesterday: Guymon, OK, 101; Stanley, ID, 23

Jan. 1 - This date in 2009 ........................ 24.31 Jan. 1 - This date in 2010 ....................... 28.49 Jan. 1 - This date in 2011 ......................... 18.88

Tuesday 84/56

Doak called the rejections “bureaucratic” and “cruel” and noted that 227 of the destroyed homes were in the counties where aid was denied. Gov. Mary Fallin formally appealed FEMA’s decision last Thursday.

Be prepared “Firefighters throughout our state have done a tremendous job protecting as many homes as possible,” Doak said Tuesday in a prepared statement. “Still, the last several weeks have been very difficult in terms of wildfires. I’ve seen the hardest-hit areas firsthand. With most of our state still in ‘extreme’ or ‘exceptional’ drought conditions, all Oklahomans must continue to be prepared for wildfires and learn how to protect themselves through Firewise and other educational programs.” Understanding wildfire risk is important for lessening the impact of disaster, Botts said. “Accurately identifying risk levels, even in areas where wildfire activity has historically been low, is imperative to mitigating the potentially devastating effect of fires to property and on human life,” Botts said.

NNW 6-12 mph

Yesterday in the world: H Amsterdam 63 Baghdad 104 Calgary 57 Dublin 54 Frankfurt 75 Geneva 79 Hong Kong 91 Kabul 89 London 66 Madrid 88 Manila 84 Mexico City 73 Montreal 72 Moscow 63 New Delhi 102 Paris 64 Rio 79 Riyadh 104 Rome 79 Stockholm 70 Sydney 64 Tokyo 90 Toronto 75 Vancouver 63

L 61 81 39 45 59 57 82 62 58 55 77 57 45 39 82 63 68 76 64 55 53 77 50 48

Sky Shwr Sun PtCl PtCl Rain Rain PtCl Sun Sun Sun Tstrm Tstrm PtCl PtCl Tstrm Rain PtCl Sun Sun PtCl Sun PtCl PtCl PtCl

Sun, moon: Sunrise today: 7:11 a.m. Sunset today: 7:41 p.m. Moonset 5:24 p.m. Moonrise 4:37 a.m. Sunrise tomorrow: 7:11 a.m. Sunset tomorrow: 7:40 p.m.

New

First

Full

Last

Sep 15

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Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Cheyenne Chicago Cleveland Colo. Springs Columbus, OH Dal-Ft. Worth Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fairbanks Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS Jacksonville Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Mnpls-St. Paul Mobile Nashville New Orleans New York City Omaha Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Providence Raleigh Reno St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sault Ste. Marie Seattle Shreveport Sioux Falls Spokane Tampa-St. Pete Tulsa Washington, DC Wichita

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Yesterday H L Prec. 84 60 95 65 54 37 .01 83 65 73 55 72 50 85 61 75 55 72 48 73 53 96 69 73 50 84 61 80 47 82 54 .15 83 52 77 48 86 61 .01 79 51 92 69 90 64 Tr 94 60 81 52 83 61 .01 90 74 Tr 53 32 74 48 65 44 87 74 90 64 78 56 87 61 86 65 90 60 87 68 1.18 86 61 80 70 82 53 87 63 92 78 1.48 83 58 95 63 87 62 85 56 88 67 73 54 95 61 76 54 98 72 .02 75 46 72 45 73 47 71 51 78 55 87 56 85 60 79 65 92 65 76 71 71 54 79 53 68 48 90 59 96 67 64 36 90 76 .04 93 59 78 57 94 55

Today H L Sky 76 60 T-storm 86 57 PtCldy 52 43 Rain 84 62 Sunny 76 62 Sunny 66 41 Sunny 86 63 Sunny 70 38 Sunny 77 48 Sunny 79 61 Sunny 93 79 PtCldy 80 60 Sunny 80 66 Sunny 84 54 Sunny 64 44 Cloudy 88 63 Sunny 84 61 Sunny 60 46 Shwrs 86 60 Sunny 92 74 Sunny 64 47 Shwrs 84 55 Sunny 86 61 Sunny 70 47 PtCldy 90 70 PtCldy 52 30 PtCldy 80 54 Sunny 68 34 Sunny 87 72 PtCldy 90 73 PtCldy 84 63 Sunny 88 64 Sunny 84 69 PtCldy 88 63 Sunny 91 77 Sunny 88 67 Sunny 81 67 PtCldy 86 65 Sunny 88 69 Sunny 87 78 T-storm 82 60 Sunny 68 53 PtCldy 85 67 PtCldy 84 62 Sunny 86 74 T-storm 80 63 Sunny 82 56 PtCldy 81 60 Sunny 94 82 PtCldy 81 55 Sunny 76 55 Sunny 83 53 Sunny 80 58 Sunny 82 56 Sunny 88 55 Sunny 86 66 Sunny 74 52 PtCldy 94 75 PtCldy 78 69 PtCldy 70 52 PtCldy 76 55 PtCldy 70 49 Sunny 92 69 Sunny 66 47 Shwrs 70 45 Sunny 90 73 PtCldy 92 68 Sunny 83 62 Sunny 90 61 Sunny

Tomorrow H L Sky 75 56 T-storm 72 50 Rain 56 44 Cloudy 83 64 Sunny 76 66 Sunny 72 50 Sunny 84 65 Sunny 68 37 Sunny 83 54 Sunny 81 63 Sunny 96 77 T-storm 83 62 Sunny 85 69 PtCldy 86 55 Sunny 60 40 PtCldy 75 58 T-storm 82 63 Sunny 64 44 Shwrs 85 64 Sunny 93 66 T-storm 64 44 Shwrs 65 49 Shwrs 85 62 Sunny 70 40 PtCldy 89 63 T-storm 49 30 PtCldy 83 56 Sunny 78 47 Sunny 87 73 Sunny 91 74 T-storm 83 62 Sunny 87 65 Sunny 85 70 T-storm 70 52 T-storm 96 79 Sunny 90 67 PtCldy 88 69 Sunny 86 67 Sunny 89 69 Sunny 89 79 T-storm 66 56 T-storm 71 49 PtCldy 86 68 PtCldy 86 62 Sunny 87 74 T-storm 80 64 Sunny 67 46 Shwrs 83 63 Sunny 100 83 Sunny 84 58 Sunny 80 56 Sunny 86 54 Sunny 80 59 Sunny 84 62 Sunny 89 57 Sunny 88 58 PtCldy 80 56 Sunny 96 73 T-storm 81 70 PtCldy 74 55 PtCldy 66 48 PtCldy 78 55 Sunny 93 69 PtCldy 71 40 PtCldy 77 48 Sunny 90 73 T-storm 83 57 T-storm 85 64 Sunny 68 51 Rain

Embezzle: Nev. residents battle landmark’s owner FROM PAGE 1B

Bill O’Donnell, president of the Paradise Spa homeowners association, told The Oklahoman some of the fire-damaged condominiums now are cement slab foundations while other fire-damaged homes remain boarded up. “He has ripped this place apart,” O’Donnell said. “It’s like watching a rape or robbery in slow motion and not being able to do anything about it. My only hope is that there is a court date in November. This guy has done nothing. We’re here suffering until he makes his payments.” O’Donnell said his board opposes a request by Yashouafar’s attorneys to subordinate their liens against the California businessman for the stated intent of refinancing his mortgage on the property. O’Donnell fears that money could go toward paying off a $12 million mortgage with Capmark Bank for First National Center. Yashouafar’s investment groups emerged from a foreclosure action and bankruptcy on the Oklahoma City property this year but have been unable to pay off the mortgage. A Capmark attorney

confirmed Yashouafar has paid the bank for extensions on a deadline to pay off the mortgage or see control of the property go to a receiver, who would be tasked with arranging its sale to another buyer. O’Donnell questioned whether payments to Capmark, which total more than $1 million, have come at the expense of Paradise Spa’s mostly elderly residents who are still without their homes. He said one resident, Iris Hokanson, 84, was moved into another condominium owned by Yashouafar and then charged rent while he diverted insurance proceeds intended for repairs of her condominium. “If he is continuing to make payments to Capmark, I am furious,” O’Donnell said. “These residents have received nothing while the bankers in Oklahoma City are getting Iris Hokanson’s money.” Yashouafar said he is not going to use the money in connection with First National Center and instead will use the proceeds to pay off his mortgage on Paradise Spa. O’Donnell said his board also is owed $1.8 million in delinquent association dues — an amount disputed by Yashouafar.

Yashouafar said his attorneys are awaiting an accounting of what is owed the homeowners association from the embezzled insurance proceeds before paying the $1 million restitution. “Because of their failure to provide financial information, our lawyers have made a motion on this that is set to be heard Wednesday,” he said.

Not giving up Yashouafar said amid the legal entanglements, he believes a brighter future is ahead for First National Center, which he bought in 2006 for $21 million. Renovations were halted in 2009. He said he is considering partial conversions of the site to housing, a hotel and parking. With house arrest or incarceration in Nevada to be decided in 60 days, he was philosophical when asked whether he could have handled his dealings differently. “Always in hindsight ... you find affairs could have been dealt with easier and better. That’s how humans progress. The second time you do things better. If time were to go back, there are some things I would have done differently,” he said.

Health: $2 billion estimated saved under current law FROM PAGE 1B

increase quickly became fodder for the political debate. Republicans said President Barack Obama’s promises to control health care costs ring hollow in light of the findings. But the most significant cost-control measures in Obama’s law have yet to take effect, along with the president’s big push to

cover the uninsured. The cost controls include a new tax on the most expensive insurance plans and a powerful board to keep Medicare spending manageable. Trying to head off critics, the administration issued a report estimating that consumers have saved $2 billion as a result of the health care law. That’s due to a combination of insur-

ance rebates for employers and individual policy holders, as well as closer state oversight of proposed rate increases, facilitated by Obama’s law. But hang on to your wallets: The Kaiser survey showed premiums for jobbased family coverage have risen by nearly $2,400 since 2009 when Obama took office, with a corresponding increase of near-

ly $800 for employee-only coverage. “We aren’t happy to see any increase in health insurance premiums,” said Gary Cohen, head of the administration’s Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, adding that officials are “heartened” it was only a modest rise this year and look forward to slowing costs as more provisions of

the health care law take effect. Obama says he’s working to make health care more affordable for all by leveraging the power of government programs like Medicare to pay hospitals and doctors for results, rather than sheer volume of tests and procedures. But that will take time. Republican Mitt Romney wants to give future

retirees a fixed amount of money to pick either private insurance or a government plan modeled on Medicare. He expects the private market will find ways to deliver quality service at lower cost. The GOP approach mirrors the shift away from traditional pensions, which pay a standard benefit, to 401(k) savings plans that limit the employer’s exposure.


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

OU FOOTBALL

Knights off to hot start

Sooner film study

Lorenzo Alexander and Northwest Classen are 2-0, for the first time in 20 years, heading into Friday’s game against Woodward. PAGE 6C

Jason Kersey unveils his second installment of his OU football film study, this time on the Sooners’ 69-13 win over Florida A&M last week. One thing he noticed is that Kenny Stills is getting more comfortable going across the middle. PAGE 2C

SPORTS

C THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012

Unlimited potential

Berry Tramel btramel@ opubco.com

COMMENTARY

It’s a good time to be a Warhawk

OU FOOTBALL

GET TO KNOW CHUKA NDULE Most fans know Chuka Ndule, below, only as a defensive end at Oklahoma. Get to know Chuka Ndule the person as Stephanie Kuzydym introduces you to The Man Beneath The Mask on the OU blog. Check it out at blog.newsok.com/ou.

LA.-MONROE | IT’S ALSO A GOOD TIME TO BE DIRECTIONAL SCHOOL IN THESE DAYS OF PARITY

T