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classic homes

adj \’kla-sik\

1 a: serving as a standard of excellence: of recognized value; b: Tradition, enduring; c: characterized by simple tailored lines; d: historically memorable

Timeless and always appropriate: Allenton Custom Homes applies a classical approach to homebuilding

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C

Story by Melissa Howell

oco Chanel had it right with her approach to the little black dress. A classic is timeless and always appropriate. Homebuilding company Allenton Custom Homes applies the same philosophy to creating homes. “Unlike many homes that seem to be locked in a certain time era, I want to create timeless pieces – homes that do not reflect when they were built and have a classic look, said owner Steve Allen. “Era-built homes require extensive remodeling when times and styles change, thus forcing potential future buyers to consider the cost of updating in their purchase decisions, while timeless classic homes only require touches of updates. Therefore, it is my goal to always focus on timeless looks for our homes.” continued on next page

The 2009 Parade of Home showcased this bedroom at Canyon Lakes housing addition, 7835 NW 133rd Terrace. The home was built and designed by Allenton Custom Homes.

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Allen started in the homebuilding business in the early 1990s. He purchased a financially ailing water damage and restoration business and grew it into a substantial homebuilding business by 1999. Now, Allenton Custom Homes continues to grow by providing homebuyers with the look and features they want — classic designs with modern, open floor plans that are comfortable transitional to casual elegance. “I like my houses not to be associated with a particular decade of style. Some home designs go out of style in 10 to 20 years, but our goal is to make our clients’ homes remain timeless.” Allenton Homes builds homes of all sizes with numerous luxury touches.

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There is a consistent emphasis on beautiful moldings, special materials and fine workmanship. Steve Allen is known to implement principles of Feng Shui to help focus on creating feelings of comfort. Allen’s “classic” approach however, is not without surprises. This year’s Allenton Home for the 2010 Central Oklahoma Parade of Homes is built with several unique features including a front entry patio with a fireplace, television and waterfall. You can enjoy this patio while overlooking Canyon Lake. Included within this, you will find a two-story children’s tube slide. Steve Allen and his wife, Megan, have four children ranging in ages from 14 to 1 year – Madison, Jacob, Andrew and Sydnee.

Steve Allen is the Chairman of the 2010

Central Oklahoma Parade of Homes. He is a member of the Central Oklahoma and Oklahoma State Builders Associations and has helped many positions with both associations. He was a Central Oklahoma Parade of Homes award winner in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 in multiple categories each year. His company took top honors all of those years. The Journal Record Publishing Company, recognizing his accomplishments in business and community involvement, named Steve as an “Achiever Under 40”.

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homesinnovations

clever gadgets A look at some

story by Kim Cook

ThinkGeek.com’s a great destination for useful gadget hunters. Never find the jam fuzzy or the milk moldy if you’ve got Days Ago fridge timers stuck on the containers. Affixed by either magnet or suction cup, the timers can be set to count off days or hours. They’re battery-run and reusable. Two in a pack, in orange, lime or black, for $7.99.

If you follow tech blogs or watch a few infomercials, you know that inventive minds are always coming up with new households gadgets meant to make life easier. Here’s a look at a few of the more ingenious ones.

Australian engineer Wilson Lee’s useful ReZap battery charger not only replenishes the juice of rechargeable batteries but will also revive non-rechargeables, from the tiniest AAAA to a 6V lantern battery. It uses a microprocessor, and also serves as a battery tester. Even C and D batteries can be revived in the ReZap. At pctreasures.com, $59.95.

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Above: Urban condominium. Interior deco by Janis Briseño Bevers.

Urban vs. suburban. The difference is more than simple geography. Following 9/11, words such as “cocooning” and “staycation” found their way into the dictionary and suburbs became repositories for family “enclaves.” Home became more than a dwelling. It was a place of safety, comfort, entertainment – in short, it became a place we rarely had to leave, said Oklahoma City-based interior designer Janis Briseño Bevers. But nine years later, the home-buying public is beginning to rethink the “enclave” mentality. Growing appreciation for community and neighborly interaction, as well as living simply and sustainably has changed what Americans want in a home, she said. “Urban living combines what I call the three Cs,” Bevers

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Oklahoma City-based designer Janis Briseño Bevers. Photo provided OPUBCO COMMUNICATIONS GROUP


said. “Comfort, convenience and community. It’s about ‘less is more.’ Simple living.” Bevers, who has designed the interiors of several downtown condominiums, said she is seeing more young professionals and empty nesters drawn to an urban lifestyle to escape the expense and hassle of commuting and landscaping. But she adds, components of the trend such as close proximity to retail stores and entertainment and increased community interaction will go from being luxuries to necessities in the not too distant future.

Designing for

urban life

To accommodate an urban lifestyle, Bevers said several things need to be taken into consideration. “I take a number of things into account – how many people live in the dwelling, how they entertain, pets, are they art enthusiasts, do they travel,” she said. Additionally, Bevers said the following should be considered in an urban space: Multifunctional furniture — Since condominiums typically have less room than a suburban home, Bevers said furniture has to be multifunctional. In one of her recent projects continued on next page Kitchen, bathroom and entertainment room with interior decor by Janis Briseño Bevers at Block 42 condominiums in downtown Oklahoma City.

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Baby boomers

comprise large portion of condo market They’re a newly married couple with five grown children between them. Each of them owns a suburban house in the area where they raised their kids. They’re planning to sell both properties and buy another. But they can’t decide if they’d rather stay suburban or change course and buy a condo-apartment in a downtown neighborhood. This story illustrates a common conundrum among baby-boom-age homebuyers. More and more empty nesters are now attracted to city living. Ready access to gourmet restaurants, live theater and museums are among the draws to life in the city, said Nancy Thompson of AARP (aarp.org). Yet, Thompson said, there also are many people in the boomer age group, born between 1946 and 1964, who want to remain in the same general suburban area where they’ve long lived. AARP research shows that eight out of 10 boomers would like to remain in the same house where they’re now living. Even so, a minority are determined to buy another property and reshape their lives after their kids leave home. But Tyson said, “Many people who’ve lived for years in the suburbs would probably miss access to their friends and service providers, such as their doctors and dentists, if they moved downtown.” Are you a boomer torn between buying your next home in the city or suburbs? If so, these pointers could prove helpful:

Do a realistic listing of your wants and needs. Obviously, your ultimate choice of housing should reflect both your lifestyle preferences and your limitations. To help ensure that your next place is the right fit, Thompson suggested you list your priorities before deciding where to buy. She also encouraged older boomers to think about their housing needs as they get older. Perhaps now in your early 60s you still find it easy to scale the stairs of a two-story house. But would a one-level urban condo be a better bet for you as you approach age 70? That could depend on your health status and your level of physical fitness. OPUBCO COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

Above and below: Bevers uses warm colors and clean lines to create an urban look in this kitchen and bathroom.

Don’t let grown children influence you too heavily. It’s not unusual for couples in their 50s or 60s to be swayed in their home-buying choices by grown children in their 20s and 30s who are already independent. The parents assume, correctly or not, that their offspring would be disappointed should they decide to leave the neighborhood where they grew up. Tyson encouraged those with grown kids to realize that their offspring will probably be returning home for overnight visits quite infrequently, especially if they’ve completed their schooling and taken jobs in a distant area. SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2010 | CENTRAL OKLAHOMA HOMES

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Chad Mount, a full-time artist in Oklahoma City, says the most important thing is to be emotionally intrigued by your art so that you fully enjoy and appreciate its place in your home. “[Get] something you’re attracted to, something you’re drawn to … whether you understand what it is or not. Buy something that works well with you as an individual.” This also means you may want to freshen rooms from time to time with different art, to keep with changing tastes. Art aficionados on the prowl for lower prices can also check with art schools and universities if professional artists don’t work. Local art shows also provide a chance to view a wide range of talent and styles. Art shows such as the Festival of the Arts in Oklahoma City attract hundreds of burgeoning and established artists that work in mediums such as oils, acrylics, sculpture, fiber, wood and leather. “You can find original art for the same price as some prints, and it’s made with lots of passion and love,” says David Bromstad, host of HGTV’s “Color Splash: Miami.” Back online, there are several Web-based galleries where you can browse, purchase - even test buy - original artwork. They include Ugallery, where buyers may try out a piece of art for a week. If it doesn’t work out, the return shipping is free. “There’s not a lot of other galleries that allow you to do stuff like that,” Liska says. “It really has a diverse collection of styles.” Etsy and ArtFire sell fine art among scads of crafts, some of it kitschy. Other online sites are limited more to the fine arts, including College Art Online (student, alumni and professor artwork); Gallery Today (signed oil paintings); Original Art Online; and 20x200, which posts a new photograph and work on paper weekly. Liska singles out Collectdotgive.org as a source for contemporary photography. The Web site posts photographers’ prints, and the shooters pledge to donate 100 percent of their print-sale profits to a charity of their choice. “You can go and buy something knowing you’re also donating to really cool causes,” Liska says. Christian Gossin Wilson contributed to the story. © The Associated Press.

Top right: Rosalie Wynkoop’s “Oval Platter,” tin-glazed terra cotta platter Middle photo: Shanna Fliegel’s “Soaring,” earthenware sculpture. At right: Kevin Snipes, “Dag Nabit,” porcelain sculpture (AP Photo/Archie Bray Foundation) OPUBCO COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

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A piece of history

At the end of the removal corridor, which chronicles the Trail of Tears journey, the Stomp Dance feature awaits. Dancers move with you as you circle the ďŹ re in the middle of the room.

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aspace that

livesand

remembers

Oklahoma designer Tom Hoch creates ‘organic’ environment for Chickasaw Cultural Center >>>> story by Christian Gossin Wilson

A

rchitecture and design have changed drastically over time, from the age of mudhuts to “Little House on the Prairie” log cabins to the modern, sleek furnishings of today. For the interior space of the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma City designer Tom Hoch wanted to return to what he calls,“organic architecture.” Traveling roughly 80 miles south from Oklahoma City, the skyline’s towering buildings quickly recede into grasslands and the Arbuckle Mountains. The skies, flocking with pigeons and crows, soon are only occupied by a lone hawk. The sounds of traffic are reduced to whispers of grass. This is what Hoch means when he says,

Oklahoma City designer Tom Hoch

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Photos by Hugh Scott, OPUBCO

The Chickasaw Cultural Center, which opened July 24, hired Tom Hoch Design to create unique furnishings for four particular areas of the Center — the Welcome Center, Aachompa’ Gallery Gift Shop, Souvenir Shop, and Aaimpa Café.

“organic.” The architecture reflects the nature, history, and culture of the land. The Chickasaw Cultural Center, which opened July 24, hired Tom Hoch Design to create unique furnishings for four particular areas of the Center — the Welcome Center, Aachompa’ Gallery Gift Shop, Souvenir Shop, and Aaimpa Café. “They came to us and asked for our input and consideration in doing the design on it and it really evolved into a wonderful project,” Hoch said.“It grew into a wonderful design exercise of blending the cultural aspects of the Nation — which are many — along with the architectural characteristics of that building, that ... organic architecture.” Walking into the Welcome Center, visitors’ eyes are immediately drawn to Hoch’s designs: the tall warmwooded information desk, the brochure cabinet, and the striking wall hanging, carved with the Cultural Center’s logo. The wall hanging is perhaps the most important element of the entire project because it symbolizes the Chickasaw ways of living. The spiral, eye, and sun designs, all tradiCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 28

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Photos by Hugh Scott, OPUBCO

This woven leather checkout desk is the centerpiece of the Gallery Gift Shop. OPUBCO COMMUNICATIONS GROUP


Top: Seating 350 people, the Anoli’ Theater features a 2,400 square foot screen. Programming is constantly changing and includes Chickasaw films and education material.

Tom Hoch has designed Quail Creek Golf and Country Club in Oklahoma City, the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club in Marana, Ariz., and Zavidovo Golf and Lake Resort in Zavidovo, Russia, the company is truly an international player. Photos by Hugh Scott, OPUBCO

tionally found on Chickasaw artifacts, represent the history and culture of the past as well as the life of the present and future. They are incorporated subtly into designs throughout the Center. Next to the Welcome Center is the Aachompa’ Gallery Gift Shop, which sells high-end Native American art. Hoch designed specific displays for jewelry, woven pots, traditional costume pieces, and other smaller craft items. Modular shelving, made with striped walnut wood and accented with leather and copper, stand against the walls. Occupying the middle of the floor are glass-encased jewelry displays that stand on walnut bases. The centerpiece of the shop, however, is the circular, leather- wrapped check-out counter, beautifully woven with light and dark brown leather and finished with a sleek counter top. For the Souvenir Shop, Hoch’s organic walnut display shelves and cabinets resemble those of the Gift Shop but also include a hands-on activity bench for kids. The fourth area Hoch designed is the Aaimpa Café in which walnut benches complement granite counter tops and copper walls. “We didn’t really want to announce the fixture of the furnishing, we wanted really to announce the experience,” Hoch said.“It’s very subtle in the way it’s done and when you go into the space it blends very harmoniously with the architecture. I think it’s going to be a timeless design that will last for years.” Hoch’s company, located at 125 NE 38 Terrace in Oklahoma City, doesn’t just design, but also builds specialized, custom pieces for its clients in an on-site workshop just one door away from the office spaces where the planning and design occur. “It’s very difficult to always find pieces off the shelf that fit your particular concept,” CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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“We were trying to define and convey the rich history and tradition of the Chickasaw culture. I think it embodies the spirit of the Nation.” >>>>>>>>> Oklahoma City designer Tom Hoch Hoch said.“So there’s a huge benefit in us designing and building in-house.” It’s because of this rare combination of custom design and building that Hoch has attracted so many high-profile jobs, and not just in Oklahoma. Having designed Quail Creek Golf and Country Club in Oklahoma City, the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club in Marana, Ariz., and Zavidovo Golf and Lake Resort in Zavidovo, Russia, the company is truly an international player, something Hoch is very proud of. “It’s exciting for a small company in Oklahoma to be garnering work from all over the world,” Hoch said.“I think that’s a statement to the resolve and the talent that we have in our state.” So far, the company has focused primarily on commercial enterprises. “We don’t do a lot of residential design,” Hoch said, “but we like to do what I call custom design, so that’s very important. If someone’s looking for something custom or unique, obviously we’d love to help them in such an endeavor. We do a lot of one-of-a-kind offshoots separate from our hospitality work.” Hoch sees his work with the Chickasaw Nation as yet another career achievement in reflecting the nation’s own distinctive surroundings and circumstances. “We were trying to define and convey the rich history and tradition of the Chickasaw culture,” Hoch said.“I think it embodies the spirit of the Nation.”

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The Removal Corridor features silhouettes, paintings, sculptures and lighting and sound effects that guide you through the history of the Chickasaw removal. Photos by Hugh Scott, OPUBCO

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Central Oklahoma Homes September October