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HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Small Town, Big CiTy aTTriBuTeS Yukon is the perfect place for peaceful small town living. We have outpaced other suburbs in median household income, median property values, homeownership, educational levels, enjoy a low crime rate and have an outstanding school system. We have easy access to shopping, transportation and entertainment offered locally and in nearby Oklahoma City. Yukon has outstanding events offered throughout the year, so there’s always something to do. We are home to country music superstar Garth Brooks, Cross Canadian Ragweed, legendary western actor Dale Robertson and the world renowned Express Clydesdales.

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From I-40 - Exit 136 North to Vandament then West to 5 Star

Fall Schedule oF eventS • Saturday, October 2 – Oklahoma Czech Festival (Downtown Yukon) • Saturday, November 6 – Pumpkin Harvest Craft Festival (Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive) • Saturday, November 20 – Chill Your Cheeks 5K Run (Chisholm Trail Park, 500 W. Vandament) • Saturday, November 20 – Opening of Christmas in the Park (Yukon City Park, 2200 S. Holly, Chisholm Trail Park, 500 W. Vandament) • Saturday, November 20 – Kris Kringle Karnival (Yukon Community Center, 2200 S. Holly) • Saturday, December 4 – Mayor’s Christmas Party for Kids (Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive) • Thursday, December 16 – Sounds of the Season, performed by the Oklahoma City Philharmonic (Yukon Fine Arts Center, 850 Yukon Avenue)

For more information, call 405.354.1895 or 405.350.8937 • cityofyukonok.gov Pictured (top to bottom): Downtown Yukon during the Czech Festival, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Express Clydesdales

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LIVING GUIDE

YUKON

EDITORIAL

Golden stalks of wheat contrast against the blue sky before wheat harvest begins in Yukon. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

City of Yukon keeps improving while attracting new residents BY CHRIS SCHUTZ Staff Writer cschutz@opubco.com

YUKON — The city of Yukon, which traces its history to its founding in 1891, is expanding in several ways and looking for ways to meet the demands of a growing population. Among the changes are the construction of a $92 million high school, scheduled to open in 2011; improvements to streets and bridges; and completion of a $25 million expansion of Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital, Mayor

Bob Bradway and City Manager Jim Crosby said. Crosby estimates that the 2010 population count will be 25,000, up from 21,073 at the last U.S. Census in 2000. Yukon is one of Oklahoma’s “premier destinations as far as living,” Bradway said. The city has “everything that a medium-size city has,” with a good selection of churches, recreation and movies, he said. The city is located north of Interstate 40 and just west of the north-south leg of the Kilpatrick Turnpike. For people considering a move to the

area, Yukon offers a good environment for raising a family, Bradway said. “If they move to Yukon they would enjoy it,” he said. Bradway said he is proud of fiscal restraint demonstrated by city officials. “We run Yukon just like a family runs their own financial affairs,” he said. The city has cut expenses when necessary, Bradway said. “We’ve all taken a part of the hit that the city’s taken,” he said. Crosby said city officials hope to attract one or two major retailers to boost the city’s sales tax revenue.

Editor of The Oklahoman Ed Kelley 475-4090 ekelley@opubco.com Vice President of News and Information Kelly Dyer Fry 475-3979 kfry@opubco.com Managing Editor Mike Shannon 475-3467 mshannon@opubco.com Director of Custom Publishing and Presentation Yvette Walker 475-3234 ywalker@opubco.com Director of Photography Doug Hoke 475-3321 dhoke@opubco.com Local Editor Rick M. Green 475-3360 rmgreen@opubco.com Assistant Local Editor Nick Trougakos 475-3229 ntrougakos@opubco.com Yukon City Reporter Chris Schutz 475-3421 cschutz@opubco.com Yukon School Reporter Tricia Pemberton 475-3309 tpemberton@opubco.com Contributing Reporters Diana Baldwin, Dave Cathey, Sonya Colberg, Carrie Coppernoll, Bryan Dean, David Hertz, Carla Hinton, George Lang, Richard Mize, Paul Monies, Jennifer Palmer, Darla Slipke, John A. Williams, David Wolfgang, David Zizzo. Page Designer Renee Lawrence. Graphic Designer Chris Schoelen

ADVERTISING Retail Sales/Project Development Management Don White 475-3501 dwhite@opubco.com Retail Account Executive Heidi Cooper 475-3388 hcooper@opubco.com Classified Account Executive Jenni Shrum 475-3661 jshrum@opubco.com


Contents YUKON

6 8

Yukon posted gains in homebuilding and home sales compared with summertime 2009, and one local Realtor says this past year has been “like a return to normal.”

The economy is still a concern, but some new business owners are hoping for sweet success.

10

Columnist Carrie Coppernoll gets caught up in the action and camaraderie of the Spirit League, a baseball league for disabled players.

SERVICES

SCHOOLS

15-16

Who represents you at Yukon City Hall?

18-19

Who represents you in the state Legislature?

20

Exercise your right to vote, but first find out your polling place and how to register.

24

Keep these helpful telephone numbers at your fingertips.

25

Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital is better equipped to deal with emergencies with its recent expansion and improvements.

31

Do you know when spring break is? Check out our calendar for important dates in the school year.

32

The Yukon School District offers parents a variety of ways to manage their child’s meal accounts.

38

Construction of the new Yukon High School is well under way, and the school is scheduled to open for the 2011-12 school year.

EL RENO

42

The Darlington campus at Redlands Community College has quite a history.

T.J. Caster watches the 2009 Czech Festival parade in Yukon. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


43

You don’t have to ask “Where’s the beef?” at El Reno’s popular Fried Onion Burger Day Festival.

46

The annual Canadian County Free Fair features livestock shows, exhibits, a carnival and other entertainment — and don’t forget goats.

THE WAY WE LIVE

50 51

From kids to seniors, the Yukon Parks and Recreation Department offers events for all ages.

Each year the Chisholm Trail Festival brings history to life with Civil War re-enactments, buffalo hunters, a blacksmith shop and a settlers camp at the Kirkpatrick Family Farm.

53

The Mabel C. Fry Public Library is not just for books; it also offers a sense of community and service with a smile.

64

Columnist David Cathey, the Food Dude, wants to know your favorite eateries in Canadian County.

65

Unity, not uniformity, marks the spirit of cooperation among Yukon’s diverse religious congregations.

66

Looking for a church home? Consult our listings of local churches.

70

Find out what events are scheduled in Yukon this year.

Historical re-enactor Taryn Rogers watches the crowd June 5 during the Taste of Louisiana Crawfish and Living History Festival at Kirkpatrick Family Farm in Yukon. PHOTO BY MIRANDA GRUBBS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Yukon posts housing growth gains RECOGNITION | CITY WAS NAMED OKLAHOMA’S MOST AFFORDABLE SUBURB IN 2009 BY BUSINESSWEEK MAGAZINE BY PAUL MONIES Database Editor pmonies@opubco.com

YUKON — Canadian County posted

the state’s second-best growth rate in housing in the last decade, and much of that growth has been in and around Yukon. The latest figures from the U.S. Census show 7,800 houses or apartment units were built from 2000 to 2009 in Canadian County. That gave the county a 23 percent growth rate in housing, behind only Wagoner County’s 30 percent growth. About one-fifth of Yukon’s housing units have been built since 1990. Those new houses have been accompanied by stores, restaurants and school system growth in eastern Canadian County. Single-family home building permits in Yukon declined in 2008 and 2009 but appear to be returning to prerecession levels. The city issued more of those per-

mits in the first six months of 2010 than all of 2009, said Mitchell Hort with Yukon’s community development department. Yukon’s population now stands at almost 23,000, up from 21,000 in 2000. BusinessWeek magazine named the city Oklahoma’s most affordable suburb last year. The city benefits from nearby highways such as Interstate 40 and the Kilpatrick Turnpike. Historic Route 66 also runs through town. Families make up 73 percent of the households in Yukon, according to the latest Census estimates. Almost 10 percent of its residents had moved from another county in Oklahoma in the previous year. The city has higher educational attainment than the rest of the state. About 90 percent of Yukon’s residents older than 25 had high school degrees, while 27 percent had bachelor’s degrees or professional degrees.

About one-fifth of Yukon’s housing units have been built since 1990. Those new houses have been accompanied by stores, restaurants and school system growth in eastern Canadian County.

YUKON AT A GLANCE

How Yukon compares to Oklahoma Yukon

Oklahoma

Homeownership

74 percent

68 percent

High school education

90 percent

85 percent

Bachelor’s degree or higher

27 percent

22 percent

$56,438

$42,541

7 percent

16 percent

39

36.1

$118,700

$100,200

Median household income Poverty rate Median age Median home value

SOURCES: CITY OF YUKON; U.S. CENSUS AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2006-08

If You Have Something To Sell Classified Can Do It — Call 475-3000


Housing market perks up in Yukon HOMES | CONSTRUCTION, SALES UP FROM A YEAR AGO BY RICHARD MIZE Real Estate Editor richardmize@opubco.com

YUKON — Homebuilding and home sales were up in Yukon at midyear compared with summertime 2009. Many big-city housing markets still were staggering from the national housing bust, and the Oklahoma City metro area still was shaking off its own chill. “We’re busier this year now than we were last year at this time,” said Linda Ryburn, a Realtor with Coldwell Banker Twin Rivers Real Estate in Yukon. In fact, she said, “We’re having the best year we’ve ever had.” Sales had moderated some by summer, she said. First-time buyers rushed to home ownership in the spring run-up to the

expiration of a popular federal tax credit for first-time homebuyers. The $8,000 credit for first-timers and a $6,500 credit for certain present homeowners expired April 30. Buyers have until Sept. 30 to close on their purchases. “We’re seeing more second-time buyers now than first-timers,” Ryburn said in early July. After the deep freeze in 2008, when “We flat-lined,” she said, and timid improvement in 2009 even with the federal incentives, the first half of this year seemed almost like a return to normal. At one point, potential home sellers simply pulled their houses off the market or didn’t list them for sale in the first place — not just in Yukon, but SEE HOMES, PAGE 7A

Doyle Province, vice president of mortgage lending at WEOKIE Credit Union, worked the mortgage loan that allowed a family to buy this house on Wimberly Drive in Yukon. PHOTO BY MITCHELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN


Homes: Market is up FROM PAGE 6A

across the Oklahoma City area. “We’re carrying more listings now than we were last year, Ryburn said. For their part, homebuilders in Yukon joined builders across the metro area in stepping up production. Builders started 43 houses through June, compared with 23 the first five months of 2009, an 87 percent increase, according to The Builder Report by Norman-based Dharma Inc. The Builder Report showed these neighborhoods with construction through June: Preston Park, on Mustang Road a quartermile north of Highway 66, with two home starts; Stone Mill, northwest of NW 10 and Mustang Road, with seven homes started; and Villas at Landmark, southeast of Mustang Road and E Main Street, with five home starts. The most recent starts, The Builder Report said, were a 3,260-square-foot house by Willow Bend Homes in Preston Park and a 3,358-square-foot house by Tom Pace Construction in the Stone Mill addition.

Doyle Province is vice president of mortgage lending at WEOKIE Credit Union. PHOTO BY MITCHELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN


New businesses hope for sweet success MARKET | FROZEN YOGURT STORES LUSH BERRIES AND ORANGE LEAF OPEN ACROSS STREET FROM EACH OTHER BY JENNIFER PALMER Business Writer jpalmer@opubco.com

YUKON — A year ago, city officials were close to securing a deal with a big box retailer. But a nationwide recession put a halt to nearly all new stores. Yukon City Manager Jim Crosby said officials still are working to bring a major store like JC Penney to Yukon, near Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital. “I think we’re getting close to closing on one,” Crosby said. “Retail, like everywhere across the nation, is down as far as sales tax is concerned. We hope for a recovery.” A grocery store on the city’s far northeast side of town is also on their wish list, Crosby said.

The city’s newest businesses include a Logan’s Roadhouse and Discount Tire, both of which will be opening soon.

Fro-yo still cool Self-serve frozen yogurt has been one of the exceptions in the recession, with new stores popping up all over the metro area, including two in Yukon. Seeing an opportunity to jump into an unsaturated market, Truong Le in November opened a Lush Berries on Garth Brooks Boulevard north of Interstate 40. Two weeks later, Orange Leaf opened across the street. Now, the owners of each are hoping Yukon is big enough for the both of them. Le said business has been slower SEE BUSINESS, PAGE 11A

Lush Berries in Yukon.

PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN


Spirit League puts team over competition YUKON — Two runners stood on second base. In this baseball league, that’s OK. Volunteers gently reminded the little boy with glasses that he couldn’t be on second because his teammate was already there. He’d have Carrie to wait on Coppernoll first until the next ccoppernoll @opubco.com batter moved COLUMNIST him along. He didn’t mind a bit and scampered back to first. But when the next hitter came up to bat, he couldn’t contain himself. He couldn’t run only to second. He was too excited to run only to third. He couldn’t wait for the girl in front of him anymore. He passed her and ran all the way home. In this baseball league, it’s OK to bend the rules a bit. Following the rules isn’t the point. There are no outs in the Spirit League. There aren’t strikes or scores or full counts. Every batter hits and touches home plate. Every fielder has a chance to catch and throw. But even without a scoreboard, players still are competitive. Hits are exciting. The crowd cheers. And players who wouldn’t normally have a chance to play America’s game can get on the field. My husband and I volunteered last season with the Spirit League, a baseball league for disabled players in Yukon. Volunteers and family members help participants with hitting, throwing and catching. The league is open to all types of disabilities, from autism to Down syndrome to more physical ailments. Players in wheelchairs can glide on hardsurface baselines. We volunteered with the Sluggers, a team of adults, and I was paired with Michelle Beaver. She’s about my age and has Turner’s syndrome, a chromosomal disorder that affects stature and development. We had so much fun together. Most of the players had parents with them to serve as assistants. But one mom told me that the players are more focused and determined when they’re paired with volunteers — not parents.

Above: John Nelson, of Oklahoma City, helps his son, Chris, across home plate during a game in the Yukon Spirit League at Taylor Park. Right: Kyle Bratcher and his mother, Sandy Bratcher, of Del City, wait to field a ball. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Listening to your parents can be annoying at any age, she said. Working with your peers or a different adult is more fun. After the game was over, we traded high-fives with the other team. As we left the field, Michelle thanked me for playing with her and for being her friend. It was the most rewarding feeling. This was what the Spirit League was about. It didn’t matter if there were outs or scoreboards or two runners on second. What mattered was enjoying the best part of baseball — the team.


Owner Truong Le, left, and business partner Vu Nguyen at Lush Berries in Yukon. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Business: New stores FROM PAGE 8A

than expected. Lush Berries recently added crepes and smoothies to its menu, a move he hopes will help differentiate itself from the shop across the street. And Linda Cook, who owns the Yukon Orange Leaf, said the mere size of her store helps set them apart. Orange Leaf, formerly Orange Tree, is based in Oklahoma City and has

expanded to more than 30 stores in markets as far away as Washington state and Hoboken, N.J., according to its website. Cook said her store is the largest in the nation. The square footage of the space means she can accommodate church groups, birthday parties and baby showers — and still have room for walk-in customers. “It’s not like many stores ... where they will buzz in and out,” she said.


SERVICES Yukon police stress community outreach SECURITY | DEPARTMENT WORKING TO REVIVE NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH GROUPS, IMPROVE COMMUNICATION WITH RESIDENTS BY CHRIS SCHUTZ Staff Writer cschutz@opubco.com

YUKON — The Yukon Police Department, led by Police Chief Gary Wieczorek, has 37 sworn officers, three reserve officers and a support staff of 21. It operates from a 26,000-squarefoot station at 100 S Ranchwood Blvd., completed in 2008. The police station also houses the city’s 911 Communications Center and Emergency Operations Center. The Emergency Operations Center is protected with 16-inch concrete walls, built to withstand an E-F5 tornado. The department has an eight-cell jail and two holding areas. The city made several upgrades to the police department in 2009. Mobile laptop computers were added to patrol cars and officials purchased new Taser units. The department conducts several community outreach projects through the year, including a summer Junior Police and Fire Academy for children in grades five through eight, Yukon community affairs specialist Klare Ly said. Yukon police are working to revive neighborhood watch programs, which had become less active in recent years, Ly said. Officers attend the meetings, which has improved communication between police and the community, she said. Crime tips can be anonymously text-messaged to the department. Text to CRIMES (274637) and type in YPD and a message. The system does not identify the message sender. People with crime tips also can call 354-7583 and leave a voice recording.

Yukon Police Sgt. Matt Fairchild teaches a bicycle safety class at Shedeck Elementary School in Yukon. PHOTO PROVIDED BY YUKON POLICE DEPARTMENT


Yukon firefighters look forward to new station BY CHRIS SCHUTZ Staff Writer cschutz@opubco.com

YUKON — The Yukon Fire Department is planning for the construction of a new main fire station at 960 E Main, Fire Chief Kevin Jones said.

The station, which is expected to cost between $5 million and $6 million, will “give us a lot better coverage for the city,” said City Manager Jim Crosby. The project is expected to go out for bids in the fall. Bonds for the fire station project will be retired through sales tax proceeds, A Yukon Fire Department engine. The fire department is planning for a new main station to be built at 960 E Main. PHOTO

BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Crosby said. The station will provide additional training facilities for the fire department, he said. The station is to have additional dorm space for firefighters and house about six of the department’s vehicles, Jones said. The current main fire station, at 302 S Fifth, was built in 1959. The city’s substation at 102 S Ranchwood was built in

1974. Jones, who has been with the department for 21years, became chief in March. He commands 30 firefighters at the two stations. Throughout the year, the department strives to promote public safety through Fire Safety Month programs at local schools, distribution of smoke detectors and CPR classes, Jones said.


YUKON CITY COUNCIL The city of Yukon has a five-member city council. The members are:

BOB BRADWAY

JOHN TIPPS

Mayor and Ward 4 councilman Phone: 354-6552 E-mail: bbradway@cox.net

Vice-mayor and at-large councilman Phone: 354-8956 E-mail: john.tipps@okdhs.org

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SEE COUNCIL, PAGE 16A

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YUKON CITY COUNCIL

NICK GRBA Ward 1 councilman Phone: 350-7414 E-mail: thegrbas@cox.net

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FROM PAGE 15A

JOHN ALBERTS Ward 2 councilman Phone: 354-1991 E-mail: alberts2397046@msn.com

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DEWAYNE MAXEY Ward 3 councilman Phone: 354-1895 E-mail: juju2000@att.net

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State Legislature

The Yukon area is divided into four districts in the state House of Representatives. They are:

HOUSE DISTRICT 41

HOUSE DISTRICT 56

John Enns, R-Enid. Phone number: 557-7321 E-mail: john.enns@ okhouse.gov

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› ›

Rep. John Enns

HOUSE DISTRICT 57 (map, Page 19)

HOUSE DISTRICT 43 Colby Schwartz, R-Yukon. Phone number: 557-7352. E-mail: colby.schwartz@ okhouse.gov

Phil Richardson, R-Minco. Phone number: 557-7401 E-mail: phil richardson@ okhouse.gov

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Rep. Colby Schwartz

Harold Wright, R-Weatherford. Phone number: 557-7325 E-mail: harold. wright@okhouse. gov

Rep. Phil Richardson

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Rep. Harold Wright


SENATE DISTRICT 23

Two members of the State Senate represent the Yukon area. They are:

SENATE DISTRICT 22 Mike Johnson, R-Kingfisher Phone number: 521-5592 E-mail: johnsonm@ oksenate.gov

Ron Justice, R-Chickasha. Phone number: 521-5537 E-mail: justice@ oksenate.gov

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Sen. Ron Justice

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Sen. Mike Johnson


A voter casts a ballot into the polling machine at Canadian Hills Church of the Nazarene in Yukon. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Where to vote VOTING LOCATIONS Precinct number: Polling place 200: Surrey Hills Baptist Church, 12421 N Mustang Road 201: Richland Nazarene Church, 10825 N 6 204: Ranchwood Elementary School, 607 Annawood Drive 206: First Baptist Church Family Life Center, 15 S 6 208: First United Methodist Church, 400 Elm St. 210: Yukon Fine Arts Auditorium, 850 Yukon Ave. 214: Town & Country Christian Church, 2200 S Cornwell Drive 215: New Dimensions Church, 701 N Cemetery Road 216: Independence Middle School, 500 E Vandament Ave. 217: The Pavilion at Spanish Cove, 11 Palm Ave. 218: Covenant Community Church, 2250 N Mustang Road 219: Church of the Savior Episcopal Church, 2750 N Mustang Road 220: Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive 221: Canadian Hills Nazarene Church, 11744 W Reno Ave. 222, 700: Church of Christ, 11700 NW 10 223: Canadian Valley Technology Center, 1701 S Czech Hall Road

224: Canadian Valley Baptist Church, 11500 SW 15 225, 701: Mustang North Middle School, 10901 SW 15 226: Westpoint Christian Church, 1600 S Richland Road 227: United Methodist Church of the Good Shepherd, 10928 SW 15

TO REGISTER TO VOTE Residents who meet eligibility requirements can register to vote at the Canadian County Election Board, post offices, tag agencies or libraries. To register, a person must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. Canadian County Election Board 200 S Bickford Ave. El Reno, OK 73036 Phone: 422-2423

WHAT YOU NEED TO REGISTER The voter registration application form asks for: Name and address Political affiliation Date of birth Last four digits of your Social Security number You must sign and date the oath printed on the form. When you sign the voter registration application form, you swear that you are eligible to vote.


Congressional members U.S. representative: U.S. senators: FRANK LUCAS

TOM COBURN

JIM INHOFE

R-Cheyenne Phone: (202) 225-5565

R-Muskogee Phone: (202) 224-5754

R-Tulsa Phone: (202) 224-4721

Rep. Frank Lucas

Sen. Tom Coburn

Sen. Jim Inhofe


HELPFUL PHONE NUMBERS

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Animal Shelter: 701 Inla, 3546312 Canadian County Courthouse: 201 N Choctaw Ave., El Reno, 262-1070 Centennial Building: 12 S 5, 350-7557 City Clerk: 500 W Main, 3541895 City Hall: 500 W Main, 3541895 City Manager: 500 W Main, 354-1895 City pool: 2200 S Holly Ave., 350-7684 Community Development Office: 528 W Main, 354-6676 Court Clerk’s office: 532 W Main St., 354-4264 Detective’s office: 100 S Ranchwood Blvd., 354-1102 Emergency: 911

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Emergency Management Director: 500 W Main, 354-1895 Fire Station 1: 302 S 5, 354-2133 Fire Station 2: 102 S Ranchwood Blvd., 354-8611 Jackie Cooper Gymnasium: 1024 E Main St., 350-8920 Kimbell Pool: 575 S 7, 354-7191 Mabel C. Fry Library, 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 354-8232 Parks and Recreation Department: 532 W Main, 350-8937 Park Maintenance: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-2121 Police Department: 100 S Ranchwood Blvd., 354-2553 (nonemergency) Property Maintenance: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-8644 Public Works: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-8940 Robertson Activity Center: 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 350-7680

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Sanitation Department: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-4317 Street Department: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-4962 Utility Billing Department: 500 W Main, 354-1895 Utility Maintenance Manager: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-2121 Water and Sewer Distribution: 1035 Industrial Blvd., 354-2769 Yukon Museum and Arts Center: 601 Oak, 350-8937 Yukon Community Center: 2200 S Holly Ave., 354-8442 Yukon Chamber of Commerce: 510 Elm Ave., 3543567 Yukon Senior Center: 1200 Lakeshore Drive, 350-7680

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A new emergency room at Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon hospital expands to serve community BY SONYA COLBERG Staff Writer scolberg@opubco.com

YUKON — With the county’s zooming growth, it’s only natural to expect more mad dashes to the emergency room. And now Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital can better manage the rush. The hospital recently completed an emergency room with 18 beds. The hospital opened in 2001 with four ER beds, just about the time Canadian County began a major growing spree.

The county population increased to more than 109,000 people in 2009, a 25 percent leap since 2000. The hospital initially rearranged and borrowed from other areas to open four more beds to help meet the demand, said James Moore, hospital president. Patient flow has improved and the ER waiting room is now separate from the other areas. Previously, people waiting for babies to be born waited along with other patients needing to get into the SEE HOSPITAL, PAGE 26A


Hospital: New emergency room part of expansion FROM PAGE 25A

emergency room. “The emergency department is kind of the front door to the hospital for many people. To redo that and do it right, we’re all very proud of that,” Moore said. About 200,000 people visit the emergency room each year. The new emergency room is part of the $30 million expansion. The project should be complete by the first or second week in September, Moore said. The project will include a third floor, a 30-bed medical and surgical unit, along with a bigger radiology area, a pharmacy and a laboratory. About 42,000 square feet will be added to the existing 128,000-square-foot building. With more space will come more doctors. Moore said the hospital expects to add 20 or more doctors to the hospital staff in the next 10 years. About 300 physicians work at the hospital, with roughly 35 of those making up the core physician group. Construction on the building began in spring 2008. The project is funded from a bond approved in 2007 by the Oklahoma Development Finance Authority.

An expansion of the emergency room facilities at Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital was recently completed. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN


SCHOOLS Yukon School District sites ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 600 Maple Yukon, OK 73099 354-2587

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Central Elementary School 300 S Ninth; 354-2501 Myers Elementary School 1200 S First; 354-5252 Parkland Elementary School 2201 S Cornwell; 354-7786 Ranchwood Elementary School 607 Annawood Drive; 354-6616 Shedeck Elementary School 2100 S Holly; 354-6601

Skyview Elementary School 2800 Mustang Road; 3544852 Surrey Hills Elementary School 10700 Hastings Ave.; 373-1973 Independence Middle School 500 E Vandament; 354-5274 Lakeview Middle School 2700 N Mustang Road; 3502630 Yukon High School 9/10 1029 Garth Brooks Blvd.; 3546692 Yukon High School 11/12 1000 Yukon Ave.; 354-6661

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Children’s New World East 445 E Main; 354-5052 Children’s New World West 702 Garth Brooks Blvd.; 3545056 Harvest Hills Christian School 9713 N County Line Road; 7211920 St. John Nepomuk Catholic School 600 Garth Brooks Blvd.; 3542509 Southwest Covenant Schools 2250 N Mustang Road; 3540772


SCHOOL CALENDAR

August

November

March

11-13: New teacher induction; new student enrollment 16: All staff reports; elementary school back-to-school night 16-17: Professional days 17: The Breakfast 18: Workday 19: First day of school

8: Professional day, no school 18: Progress reports 24-26: Thanksgiving break

10-11: Nine-weeks tests 11: End of third nine weeks 14-18: Spring break 22, 24: Parent/teacher conferences; report cards 25: No school

September 6: Labor Day, no school 16: Progress reports 21-22: Parent/teacher conferences 24: No school

October 19-20: Nine-weeks tests 20: End of first nine weeks 21-22: Fall break 29: Report cards

December 16-17: Nine-weeks tests 17: End of first semester 20-Jan. 2: Winter break

January 3: Classes resume 7: Report cards 17: Professional day, no school

February 3: Progress reports 21: Professional day, no school

April 22: Snow day 26-27: Progress reports

May 24-25: Nine-weeks tests 25: Last day of school 26: Report day 30: Memorial Day 31: Commencement NOTE: If additional snow days are needed, they will be added to the end of the year. SOURCE: YUKON SCHOOL DISTRICT


School meal accounts can be managed online YUKON — Parents in the Yukon School District can manage their child’s meal account electronically, making online payments and printing out a copy of their child’s eating history report. The report shows all dates and times a child has purchased breakfast or lunch within 30 days. Meals also can be prepaid with cash or check. A fee of $1.75 per deposit is assessed for online payments. Prices for breakfast are $1.10 for elementary school students, $1.20 for middle school students, $1.50 for high school students, $1.60 for teachers and $1.75 for adult visitors. Prices for lunch are $1.80 for elementary school students, $2.05 for middle school students, $2.30 for high school students, $2.60 for teachers and $2.75 for adult visitors. A la carte items are available. Free or reduced-price meals are offered to children whose families qualify under federal guidelines. For more information about the Yukon School District’s child nutrition program, call 265-1340 or go to www.yukon ps.com.

Prices for breakfast are $1.10 for elementary school students, $1.20 for middle school students, $1.50 for high school students, $1.60 for teachers and $1.75 for adult visitors. Prices for lunch are $1.80 for elementary school students, $2.05 for middle school students, $2.30 for high school students, $2.60 for teachers and $2.75 for adult visitors.

The Yukon School District offers a variety of ways to make payment for lunches, including online. THINKSTOCK PHOTO


El Reno student athletes show spirit

El Reno High School’s Jakeil Everheart steals from Claremore’s Alex Miller during a Class 5A boys state basketball tournament game. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY CORY YOUNG, TULSA WORLD

El Reno High School pom squad members perform for the crowd during a high school semifinal state playoff football game between El Reno and Carl Albert High School. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE


A new home for sports A computer drawing of the football field and sports complex planned for the new Yukon High School. School officials hope to have the complex complete by the time the school opens in the fall of 2011. IMAGE PROVIDED BY YUKON SCHOOL DISTRICT


New high school under construction, expected to ease classroom crowding BY TRICIA PEMBERTON Staff Writer tpemberton@opubco.com

YUKON — Yukon classrooms may be filled to bursting this year, but relief is on the way. Concrete and steel are well out of the ground at the new Yukon High School near State Highway 4 and Vandament Avenue. The new campus is on track to open for the 2011-12 school year, Superintendent Bill Denton said. The school will have space for 2,500 students. “It’s a little tight right now,” Denton said. “We’ve been for years adding on classrooms; we’re at capacity.” When the new high school opens, other grades will be reconfigured to accommodate the district’s growth. About 1,500 sixth- through eighthgraders will move into the current high school in 2011-12. Fourth- and fifthgraders will move from each of the district’s seven elementary schools into the two middle school campuses, about 500 students in each, Denton said. That will give the elementary schools more room to grow, he said. There currently are about 7,200 students in the district, Denton said, but it continues to grow each year. Denton said the quality of the curriculum and teaching staff is what brings many people to Yukon. “We’ve been a recognized, outstanding school system,” he said. “I think folks are looking for that. Even the last few weeks of school, people were moving into our district. People are seeing the new high school campus, and that’s attractive to folks.” On a recent summer day, Denton took a group on a tour of the new building. “Everybody is pretty excited about all of the prospects and what it will allow us to do,” he said. The building will cost about $70 million, and is being paid for by a $93 million bond issue passed in 2008. SEE SCHOOL, PAGE 39A

Above and below: Construction continues on the new Yukon High School near State Highway 4 and Vandament Avenue. PHOTOS BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN


School: Renovations FROM PAGE 38A

The bond issue also is paying for a 6,000-seat football stadium and a wellness center that will house most of the school’s athletics programs. The stadium and wellness center also are expected to be open by fall 2011. New softball, baseball and soccer fields will be built later, school officials have said.

Other projects The district also is in the process of several additional building projects. Some renovation is being done to the current high school, Denton said, and a cafeteria will be completed by January at Surrey Hills Elementary School. “We’ve got plenty to occupy our time,” Denton said. Despite the positives, Denton said he worries about state funding in light of this year’s budget cuts. “I don’t think any administrator today is very comfortable,” he said. “But we are trying to keep ahead of our growth.” Denton anticipates about $2.8 million in cuts for the coming year. Still, he’s been able to keep most of his teaching and support staff. The only teachers cut were two temporary contract teachers, he said. The rest of his staff cuts were absorbed through attrition. “We’ve made cuts and we’re getting leaner, but we’re still trying to protect the classroom,” he said.

A sign marks the site of the new Yukon High School. The campus is expected to open in fall 2011. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, THE OKLAHOMAN


EL RENO Miniature warbirds fly through El Reno skies BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

EL RENO — Model Japanese Zero and F4U Corsair airplanes — two military aircraft that would have flown in battle during World War II — shared the skies above the El Reno Regional Airport. The model aircraft were among dozens that took flight during the sixth annual Warbirds Over Oklahoma, a three-day exposition in May. More than 80 pilots

from as far away as Hawaii participated. The threat of rain and overcast skies caused some setbacks. Organizers canceled an air battle re-enactment show and several other planned activities, but that didn’t stop the fun for enthusiasts who gathered throughout the day. Founder Steve Keesey said the event has grown significantly during the past six years. This year, he had hoped to surpass the record number of pilots — 100 — SEE PLANES, PAGE 41A


Planes: Model warbirds FROM PAGE 40A

which was set in 2008. The event featured a variety of activities, ranging from educational sessions for elementary school students, to flight simulation programs. At times, close to half a dozen model airplanes were in the air at once, with wingspans of up to 18 feet. Pilots and builders invest significant time and money in their hobby. Planes can cost from several hundred to thousands of dollars. Kevin Lapham, of Mustang, joked that he could pay off the mortgage on his house if he gave up the hobby. He has been building planes with his dad since he was a boy. During the show, David Webster steadies his remote control World he showed his son, Nicho- War II Mustang model airplane on the flight line las, around the airfield. for the annual Warbirds Over Oklahoma expo at Jim Hein, of Oahu, Ha- the El Reno Regional Airport. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE waii, said the cost is nothing compared to the rewards. He has made friends all across the country. Building and flying also provide a sense of nostalgia, Hein said. Les Morrow, of Lubbock, Texas, has been flying model airplanes since third grade. He said he is still learning about design and engineering elements. His passion for the hobby derives from a love of history. Peter Fritsche, a resident of Allen, Texas, said he enjoys the bragging rights. He said showing off his work is a point of pride. “We don’t drive Ferraris,” Fritsche said. “We fly P-38s.” Fritsche flew a model of a World War II plane called a P-38M. Only 80 of the planes were ever built, Fritsche said. Most were stationed in the Pacific and flew night patrols. Fritsche said the model warbirds are his passion because they have so many variables and so many stories.


Redlands’ Darlington campus has quite a history COMMUNITY COLLEGE | SPANISH-STYLE CHAPEL DATES TO 1913 BY DAVID ZIZZO Staff Writer dzizzo@opubco.com

EL RENO — As you approach the Old Spanish-style chapel with twin bell towers, the words painted over its arched doorway, and its past, come into view: SIGN SHOP. “The state of Oklahoma ran a sign shop out of there” in the 1970s, Andrew Snyder said. That’s just part of the history seen by this building on this historic spot five miles northwest of El Reno where the Chisholm Trail crossed the North Canadian River. Today, although vacant, the chapel serves as the trademark symbol for wines made here. “It is in remarkably good shape,” said Snyder, who teaches viticulture and enology, the art and science of growing grapes and making wine, at Chapel Creek Winery. The winery is operated by Redlands Community College at its 110acre Darlington Agriculture Education and Research Center here. The chapel was built in 1913 by the Order of the Eastern Star, a fraternal organization affiliated with the Masons, as a place for religious services for a home for orphans and aging Masons located here at a settlement known as Darlington. Each Friday night, according to an account in the El Reno American in 1917, the “Masonic Home inmates” at Darlington were treated to “high class, descriptive and educational moving pictures” in the chapel. A hundred yards northwest of the

chapel stands a massive three-story boys’ dormitory built in 1909 by the Masons. The deteriorating structure also is abandoned, except by hundreds of swallows that have built mud nests under its generous eaves. “The walls of the living rooms are glistening white,” a story in The Oklahoman in 1917 said of the dormitory. “There is not a $5-a-day hotel that is more tidy ...” Briefly in 1923, the dormitory served as a state home for drug addicts, Snyder said, until “people pretty much ran them out of town.” The Darlington settlement actually began decades earlier, in the 1860s, as an Indian agency set up for the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. The agency developed into a “full-fledged town,” according to one account, with a sawmill, school, brickyard, various shops and two hotels. In 1869, Brinton Darlington, a Quaker, left his home in Iowa and traveled without the recommended military escort to this outpost in Indian Territory to become superintendent of the agency that would bear his name. Three years later, the man whose Indian name meant “wooden teeth” died. “By all accounts he was well-liked by the Native Americans,” Snyder said. In 1876, when relations with the tribes soured, Fort Reno was built a few hundred yards south of the Darlington Agency on the other side of the North Canadian River to maintain peace. The tribes eventually moved to nearby Concho, and in 1909, the U.S. governSEE REDLANDS, PAGE 43A

Built in 1913, this former chapel, orphanage, drug rehab center and state of Oklahoma sign shop is now the home of Chapel Creek Winery. The winery is part of the Redlands Community College wine-making program. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Redlands: Mason built the chapel FROM PAGE 42A

ment sold the Darlington Agency property to the Masons. In 1922, the Masons moved their home for orphans and elderly Masons to Guthrie, and the Darlington settlement became property of the state of Oklahoma. After the drug treatment center’s brief stint, the state Wildlife Conservation Department took control of the property, using one building there as a quail hatchery. Today, Redland’s Darlington campus is the site of a vineyard and wine research lab, goat dairy, goat meat lab and other facilities. The old dormitory, too expensive to renovate, has an uncertain future. “They have declared it a historical site so we can’t remove it,” Snyder said. For the chapel, though, there could be an even more diverse future. The plan is to renovate the chapel and connect it to an annex, if backers can find the funds, of course. “They want to turn it into a convention center,” Snyder said.

Firefighters cook the world’s largest fried onion hamburger during the 22nd annual El Reno Fried Onion Burger Day. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

El Reno’s onion burger festival feeds a crowd and then some EVENT | GIANT CONCOCTION, MUSIC, CRAFTS, CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES AMONG ATTRACTIONS BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

EL RENO — It takes nearly a dozen members of the El Reno Fire Department to position the top bun onto a 750-pound fried onion hamburger. When they finish, the colossal burger made with 250 pounds of beef and 150 pounds of onions isn’t enough to fill the hungry crowd at the annual Fried Onion Burger Day Festival. The event has games, carnival rides, vendors, car

and motorcycle shows, and, of course, fried onion burgers. Music from live bands pumps through downtown as children participate in crafts and other activities, and adults browse vendors’ booths or the car show. Organizers estimate about 30,000 people attended the event this year. Anyone who missed a piece of the burger can buy fried onion hamburgers from the Main Street Burger Booth. An El Reno man started making fried onion burgers during the Great Depres-

sion because onions were cheap and packed lots of flavor, according to the festival’s website. Eventually, El Reno became known for fried onion burgers. The first festival came from a downtown revitalization effort during the late 1980s. Today, tens of thousands of people flock to El Reno for the festival each year. “The burgers are awesome,” said Tracy Bronson, of Moore. Hundreds of people crowd around SEE FESTIVAL, PAGE 44A


Festival: Annual event brings community together FROM PAGE 43A

the cooking area for the big burger, eager for a bite. The hamburger patty is cooked on a 10-foot circular grill that was designed especially for the occasion. Local politicians and children smother the burger with globs of mustard and five gallons of pickles before cutting pieces and offering them to the crowd. “Everybody was wanting a piece of the big burger,” said Marie Ramsey, court clerk for Canadian County. People of all ages call out to her from every direction as she passes out pieces of the burger. Youngster Melodie Turk’s cheeks swelled when she took a bite of her burger. “It’s good,” Melodie said between mouthfuls. “It tastes a lot like mustard.” Others were left empty-handed. Jon Athan, an El Reno firefighter, refuses to help pass out burgers because of the demand. “It gets crazy,” Athan said. He and other members of the fire department donate their time to help prepare, cook and clean up for the event. Part of their responsibilities include cutting more than 500 pounds of onions. In addition to attracting people from across the state each year, Athan said the festival helps unite the community. Reda Mewhorter returns to El Reno for the festival every year. She graduated from El Reno High School in the late 1960s and now lives in Oklahoma City. This year, she manned a booth of artwork with her family and spent time with her young grandson, Everett, who had fun eating cotton candy and exploring a slide and other children’s activities. “I grew up eating onion burgers, so it’s always a treat to come back and eat one here,” Mewhorter said.

Above: Piper Graves, right, and Shelley Dickerson, center, put mustard on the world’s largest fried onion hamburger during El Reno Fried Onion Burger Day. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Left: Alaina Weaver holds her portion of the world’s largest fried onion hamburger during El Reno Fried Onion Burger Day. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Canadian County Free Fair is Aug. 23-28 EL RENO — The 2010 Canadian County Free Fair will be Aug. 23-28. The fair is held annually at Canadian County Fairgrounds, 220 N Country Club Road. The event includes numerous livestock shows and exhibits, a carnival and several forms of live entertainment. For more information or a fair guide, go to www. canadiancountyfair.com.

A goat looks through the openings of its pen during the Canadian County Free Fair. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Above: Kylie Buchanan washes her goat during the Canadian County Free Fair in El Reno. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Left: Landon Botchlet leads his goat through the barn during the Canadian County Free Fair. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Tammy Bollinger prepares a goat for competition during the Canadian County Free Fair. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Centre of the storm Safety and construction workers walk past the Centre Theater in El Reno after wind damaged the exterior wall in April. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY


Fort Reno celebrates Christmas with bang BY CHRIS SCHUTZ Staff Writer cschutz@opubco.com

EL RENO — The boom of cannons and the pop of pistols welcome the Christmas season each year at Fort Reno. The Christmas Guns celebration carries on a tradition imported from Germany and Bavaria, said Bob Warren, director of the visitor center at the historic fort. It was said that the purpose of the Old World tradition was to drive away evil spirits and welcome the spirit of the Christ child, Warren said. War re-enactors dressed in period costumes fire vintage cannons, rifles and pistols, Warren said. Fort Reno was established in 1874 during the era of wars with American Indians. It was named after Gen. Jesse L. Reno, who was killed during the Civil War.

Re-enactors fire a cannon during the Fort Reno Christmas Guns Celebration.

PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Above: Cord Lorenzen looks on during the Fort Reno Christmas Guns Celebration. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Mike Tompkins, left, and Bob Warren wait to fire their guns during the Fort Reno Christmas Guns Celebration. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Left: Mike Tompkins, left, and Bob Warren fire their guns during the Fort Reno Christmas Guns Celebration. PHOTO BY SARAH PHIPPS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


THE WAY WE LIVE Yukon parks have events that appeal to all BY DAVID HERTZ Staff Writer

YUKON — Yukon Parks and Recreation Department Director Jan Scott can’t name the most popular event her department holds. “They seem to like everything we do,” Scott said. From Senior Games to Festival of the Child, the parks and recreation department has events to appeal to everyone, Scott said. Festival of the Child is one of the most popular events, attracting up to 2,000 people each year. “It takes about 250 volunteers to put it on, so that sort of gives you an idea of how big it is,” Scott said. Kids can take part in more than 70 activities, from painting to kayaking to archery. The Senior Games gives seniors a chance to compete

in events ranging from weightlifting and running to creative writing and table tennis. It also gives them a chance to surprise. “We’ve got guys that were running the 100-yard dash that were 80,” Scott said. For the Taste of Yukon, 20 restaurants set up to serve hundreds of people at an outdoor venue. As summer winds down, Pooches in the Pool gives dog lovers a chance to swim with their pets in the public pools before they’re shut down for the season. To add a touch of class to their events, the parks and recreation department brings the Oklahoma City Philharmonic out to Yukon twice a year, once for the Fourth of July and again at Christmas. “For a small town, I think we do a lot of activities,” Scott said.

Karen Markwell returns a serve as she competes in the table tennis event during the Yukon Parks and Recreation Department Senior Games. PHOTO BY CHRIS LANDSBERGER, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Carolyn Ogden and her grandaughter Emily Ogden, of Yukon, walk in front of period storefronts during Yukon’s Chisholm Trail Roundup in 2008. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Chisholm Trail Roundup brings history to life BY DAVID WOLFGANG Staff Writer

YUKON — The Kirkpatrick Family Farm is known for its historical significance, being in the middle of the Chisholm Trail. But every June the site’s history comes to life with a living history display during the Chisholm Trail Roundup. The roundup features Civil War reenactments, buffalo hunters, a blacksmith shop and a settler’s camp. This year the roundup added a pony show and Clydesdale horses from Express Ranches. Dixie Clement, director of the Kirkpatrick Family Archives, said the historical significance is an important part of Yukon’s identity. “It carries on the historical legacy of the Kirkpatricks and the Chisholm

Trail,” she said. “It’s a part of our culture.” The Kirkpatrick family has allowed the Yukon Historical Preservation Society to use their 33-acre farm for the festival since 1985. Since the Kirkpatrick Family Farm focuses on entertainment for children year-round, the roundup features activities like a petting zoo, crafts, train and pony rides. Clement said the organizers try to improve the festival every year. “The festival grows in size every year because we’re always trying to add new things,” she said. The Chisholm Trail Roundup is held the first weekend of June every year and has been paired with the city’s Crawfish Festival for the past two years. Clement said the roundup attracted about 3,500 people in 2010.


Saturday nights mean polka at Yukon Czech Hall BY GEORGE LANG Assistant Entertainment Editor glang@opubco.com

continuing traditions ensure that the inside of Czech Hall is filled with dancers of all ages, ranging from toddlers to octogenarians. Some regulars at the dances learned to polka at the same time they learned to walk. The key is to listen for the downbeat from the tuba — that’s when the dancer steps. In addition to the weekly dances, Yukon celebrates its Czech tradition the first Saturday of October with the annual Czech Festival, featuring a massive parade, dancers, carnival rides and kolaches, the traditional Czech baked goods. And of course, the epicenter of the festival is Yukon Czech Hall, where the newly crowned Oklahoma Czech-Slovak queen, junior queen, prince, and princess make their first official appearances for the “Grand March.”

YUKON — One of the longest-running entertainment traditions in Oklahoma began in 1899, when local immigrants from what is now the Czech Republic donated a piece of land to the Lodge Sokol Karel Havlicek and WFLA Lodge Jan Zizka No. 67. Once completed, Yukon Czech Hall set the tone for the city’s uncommon approach to family entertainment. At 8 p.m. most Saturday nights since 1930, dancers have converged on Yukon Czech Hall, 205 N Czech Hall Road, to hear polkas, schottisches and waltzes and dance for hours on the hall’s expansive wood floor. Two bands dominate the dance card at Czech Hall: the Bohemian Knights Band and the Masopust Polka Band. Led by David Masopust, the Masopust Polka Band has been performing constantly since before statehood, with a Masopust family member leading Right: Dancers are silhouetted during the weekly polka dance at Yukon Czech Hall. the band throughout that history. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE The city’s rich Eastern European heritage and its


Cliff and Carolynn Bristo sit down with a book as their children participate in a concert at the Mabel C. Fry Public Library. PHOTO BY MITCHELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN

Library has 105-year history of service BY DARLA SLIPKE Staff Writer dslipke@opubco.com

YUKON — The Mabel C. Fry Public Library in Yukon has a tight-knit community feel, despite serving a population of more than 21,000 people. Librarians and staff make an effort to foster that sense of community while adding new programs for a growing population. They know guests by name, make home deliveries for people who are unable to visit the library and send sympathy cards to guests who lose a loved one. Patrons return the kindness by sharing homemade pies or tomatoes from their gardens, said library director Sara Schieman. “They take care of us, and we try to take care of them,” Schieman said. The library got its start in 1905 when a group of 12 women bought two books each and started circulating them among interested readers. The library was housed in several locations on Elm Street before it moved in 1997 to its current lo-

cation at 1200 Lakeshore Drive. It is named after Mabel C. Fry, a longtime librarian. Today, the library offers a host of books, resources and programs for people of all ages and interests. It was recently given new carpet and paint. Guests can participate in a variety of activities throughout the year, including a cookie swap at Christmas, crafts, book clubs, educational speakers and extended workshops. During a Tuesday afternoon program this summer, children sang and danced to the tune of the Sugar Free Allstars, a local rock group. Activities cater to all ages, from storytelling sessions for preschoolers, to video game programs for teenagers, to art lessons for adults. Staff members are always looking to add new programs or enhance existing ones. This summer the library offered an adult summer reading program for the first time. Participants discussed books and learned how to create a water garSEE FRY, PAGE 54A


Fry: Books, activities FROM PAGE 53A

den, among other activities. The program was so successful, organizers plan to expand it next year. “We really wanted to offer something for everybody,” Schieman said. “We pretty much covered the gamut.” Adult program coordinator Carol Cook said the library continues to evolve and so do its programs. She encouraged everyone to come experience the community spirit and participate in fun, free programs. “This is the best bargain around,” Cook said. “Where else can you read so many free books and participate in so many free activities?” For more information about the library, go to www.yukon.lib.ok.us or call 354-8232.

Above: Rob Martin, left, and Chris Wiser make up the Sugar Free Allstars. The band performed during a concert in June at the Mabel C. Fry Public Library in Yukon. PHOTO BY MITCHELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN

Left: Trey Worsham grabs a bag of books he checked out from the Mabel C. Fry Public Library in Yukon. Justice Dunn sits down with a book at the Mabel C. Fry Public Library. PHOTO BY MITCHELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN

PHOTO BY MITHCELL ALCALA, THE OKLAHOMAN


Czech Fest helps keep culture alive BY DAVID WOLFGANG Staff Writer

YUKON — Marjorie Jezek has grown up in Yukon and attended the Oklahoma Czech Festival all her life but says now that she’s president of the festival, she has no time to enjoy the event. “I don’t really get to enjoy it anymore because I’m so busy,” Jezek said. “I like it because it keeps our culture going and brings back memories of when I was little.” This year’s Oklahoma Czech Festival will be Oct. 2 and will feature the annual carnival, parade and the ever-popular craft show. Jezek said this year’s craft show will feature about 150 vendors. Last year, the festival added a car show, pony rides and bull riding. Jezek said they will all be back this year. The car show plans to double its size and add a motorcycle display. The cars will be lined up on Main Street after the parade Saturday morning. Jezek said the festival will have a beer

Kolaches for sale during the 2009 Czech Festival. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

tent and feature typical Czech foods such as kolaches, klobasy and kolbasa all day. She said preparations to bake the 2,500 dozen kolaches start in early July and last

into August. Saturday evening, festival organizers will crown the annual Czech queen, junior queen, prince and princess.

Parade Grand Marshal Delphine Zajic waves to the crowd during the 2009 Czech Festival parade in Yukon. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Paul Shell plays bagpipes for the Pipes and Drums of the Highlanders of Oklahoma City at the Iron Thistle Scottish Heritage Festival and Highland Games at the Kirkpatrick Family Farm in Yukon in 2009. PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Kirkpatrick Family Farm offers glimpse of life in country BY DAVID WOLFGANG Staff Writer

YUKON — For some children in Yukon, the Kirkpatrick Family Farm is more than just a historical site or fun place for families to enjoy a summer day — it can be a full-time job. Children in the local 4-H program come early in the morning and after school to care for their pigs, sheep and cows to prepare them for show at the county fair. Most of the children would never have experience with farm animals if it weren’t for the opportunity at the farm. Dixie Clement of the Kirkpatrick Family Archives said the program is geared toward younger children, so even the parents can get involved. “It seems to bring these families to-

gether,” Clement said. “They take such pride in their accomplishments.” Kirkpatrick Family Farm hosts numerous community events throughout the year by opening its doors to groups such as the Yukon Historical Preservation Society, the city of Yukon Parks and Recreation Department, the Boy and Girl Scouts and 4-H. Clement said making the farm part of life in Yukon is important. “The history of the farm is important to our community pride,” she said. “It is kind of like a 33-acre oasis right smack in the middle of town.” Kirkpatrick Family Farm is host to Easter on the Prairie in the spring, a Scottish festival and haunted forest in the fall and the Firing of the Christmas Guns every December.


The exterior of the Golf Club at Surrey Hills. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Residents have golf options BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

YUKON — Yukon has no public golf courses in its

city limits, but that doesn’t mean Yukon residents lack for golf options. Surrey Hills Golf Club, just north of Yukon, and Westbury Country Club, just south of the city, have Yukon mailing addresses but are within Oklahoma City limits. Yukon athletic coordinator Tim Rhodes said Yukon’s tight borders mean there isn’t much room for golf courses. “I’d love to have a municipal course in town, but our actual city boundaries are not really big,” Rhodes said. “There’s not really much room to put one.” Rhodes said the cost of building a municipal golf course is also prohibitive. He said many Yukon residents play at Westbury, Surry Hills or one of Oklahoma City’s municipal courses.

GOLF COURSES Westbury Country Club

Address: 2101 Westbury ›Terrace. Phone: 324-0707. fees (including ›halfGreens a cart rental): $32.90

Mondays through Fridays, $36.50 Saturdays and Sundays.

Surrey Hills Golf Club

› ›

Address: 11340 Surrey Hills Blvd. Phone: 373-2770. Greens fees (including half a cart rental): $32 Mondays through Fridays, $35 Saturdays and Sundays; twilight fee after 3 p.m.: $22 Mondays through Fridays, $25 Saturdays and Sundays.


Robertson Activity Center erases senior stereotypes BY DAVID HERTZ Staff Writer

YUKON — Casey Barnett, senior activity director at the Robertson Activity Center, believes seniors can reverse popular expectations. “Senior centers have a stereotype: ‘Oh, everybody’s decrepit and can’t go anywhere,’ ” Barnett said. “Senior centers are for people who want to get out and have a good time.” With activities ranging from tai chi to downtown tours, the regulars at the Yukon senior center are anything but sedentary. The center opens at 7:30 a.m. for its various club activities. Lunch is served by 11:45. The senior center meal motto: “Life is short. Eat desert first,” Barnett said. In addition to the activity clubs, the center has a few organized events.

Each month Barnett hosts a birthday celebration for all the seniors born that month. The center also has a bus program that, in addition to taking seniors to and from the center, schedules trips around the metro area. Trips include going go to the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa or touring Oklahoma City’s Bricktown. “We really try to have something for everybody,” Barnett said. “It’s just a nice facility for people to have a good time, to hang out with their friends.”


Daddy-Daughter Dance sweeps them off feet BY DAVID HERTZ Staff Writer

YUKON — The Yukon Parks and Recreation Department will host the eighth annual Daddy-Daughter Dance on Feb. 5 in the Robertson Activity Center. Attendees go all out for the dance, wearing elaborate prom-style dresses and even renting limousines. About 800 dads and daughters usually show up for the dance. “You get some guys dressed up in starched shirts and cowboy boots, and then you get girls in fancy dresses and corsages, and they really make an evening of it,” Yukon Parks and Recreation Department Director Jan Scott said.

But the evening is about more than just dressing up, Scott said. “Everybody looks nice even if they’re in jeans,” Scott said. “Just seeing the dads and their daughters is really cute, and it’s sweet, and the daughters have such a good time.” As always, music will be provided by KOMA disc jockey Ronnie Kaye, who will play a selection of songs including group dance music such as “YMCA” and the chicken dance. The key to the Daddy-Daughter Dance, Scott said, is that the event is only for daughters and their father figures. No moms are allowed. Scott will make an exception for herself though. “I like to dance myself, so I get out,” Scott said.

People dance as they wait in line for pictures during the Daddy-Daughter Dance hosted by the Yukon Parks and Recreation Department in 2007. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE


Everything is bigger at Express Ranches BY JOHN A. WILLIAMS Staff Writer jwilliams@opubco.com

YUKON — Express Ranches in Yukon is not only recognized for its cattle production, but it is also headquarters for Express Clydesdales, a popular breed of show horses. The hardy breed commonly used for pulling heavy loads has become famous as a mascot for various companies in recent years. “They were the semi-truck before the motor,” said Josh Minshull, Express Clydesdales general manager. As many as a 1,000 people a week visit Express Clydesdales in the summer, Minshull said. “Senior adults remember back in the day when horses like this were used for work,” he said. “Little kids like them because they have never seen anything like them before.” Express Clydesdales is home to 20 of the large horses. “Our horses are black and white (as) opposed to bay, or tan and white,” Minshull said. “Black and white make up only 10 percent of the breed.” Express Ranches is owned by Bob Funk, founder and owner of Express Services Inc., the largest privately held professional staffing firm in the United States. The ranch runs as many as 50,000 cattle a year, Minshull said. Express Ranches is the No. 1 seedstock cattle operation in the United States, according to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The ranch operates on 10,000 acres north of Yukon at 2202 N 11. Express Ranches has programs for genetic research and breeding improvements. It markets bulls and sells other cattle. The ranch promotes a number of youth programs. For more information about Express Ranches, go to www.expressranches. com. Express Clydesdales is at 12701 W Wilshire. The barns and a gift shop are open

Express Clydesdales general manager Josh Minshull uses a stepladder to reach the top of Troy, one of the Express Ranches Clydesdales, during the 2009 Oklahoma State Fair. Minshull said it takes 20 to 30 minutes to wash each horse. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON,

OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Trainer Rexx Mann operates a wagon pulled by Clydesdale horses at Express Ranches in Yukon during a benefit for Children’s Hospital Foundation. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 12:30 to 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information about Express Clydesdales, go online to www.express clydesdales.com.


Members of the Pipes and Drums of the Highlanders of Oklahoma City play after the opening ceremonies at the 2009 Iron Thistle Scottish Heritage Festival and Highland Games. PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

Scottish heritage, games are highlighted in March BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

YUKON — Interested in the twirl of the kilt and the skirl of the bagpipes? Then Yukon is the place to be in March. United Scottish Clans of Oklahoma Inc. will host the fifth annual Iron Thistle Scottish Heritage Festival and Highland Games on March 19. The games typically have been a oneday event. Organizers are considering making it a two-day event, said Jonathan Irvin, the vice president and athletic director for United Scottish Clans of Oklahoma. “It is all about family and tradition and keeping your roots alive,” Irvin said. “There is a lot to see and do, and everyone is in a kilt.” Organizers said they are hoping for better weather in 2011. A snowstorm in March kept many people away this year. A few of the competitions were held for the 27 athletes who came despite the wintry weather, but they were limited for the safety of the athletes, Irvin said. Irvin first got interested in the sheaf toss while watching an early-morning

Chad Justin competes in the weight for distance at the Iron Thistle Scottish Heritage Festival and Highland Games. PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE

television show. He is the No. 1 amateur in the Highland Games for this region. Irvin plans to compete in California later this summer. In addition to Scottish games, the festival features dance competitions and plenty of bagpipe music. “There is a lot of fun and friendships, and it brings people back together,” Irvin said. The festival is at Kirkpatrick Family Farm. For more information, call Irvin at 834-1876.


Food editor ready to try out Yukon eateries YUKON — Tucked between the majesty of El Reno fried onion burgers and the grandeur of Oklahoma City, Yukon is a dot on the culinary map. Or is it? That’s what I’d Dave like to find Cathey out. The dcathey@ truth is, opubco.com the only place in Yukon I’ve FOOD DUDE eaten in more than once is Primo’s d’Italia. It’s nothing against Yukon, but I haven’t received enough word-of-mouth to garner a trip to the town that gave us Dawn Welch, owner of The Rock Cafe in Stroud. Welch did mention she worked at a Yukon pizza place that was mostly notable because of a co-worker who used to tease her when he wasn’t practicing his guitar. Fellow by the name of Garth Brooks. So, I’m looking for your favorite places to eat in Canadian County. I’m looking for where the locals eat. Speaking of pizza, who makes your favorite? Italian Jim’s, Fat Daddy’s or Tony’s? What about Mexican food? Ricky’s, Los Tres Compadres, Carlito’s, Alfre-

I need your help, Yukon. Help me out, Canadian County. I’m just around the bend on the Kilpatrick Turnpike from stopping by for a good meal, but what I need is your guidance.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Call Dave Cathey at 475-3115, e-mail him at dcathey@opubco. com or hunt him down at Twitter @TheFoodDood.

do’s, Los Amigos or Poquito de Mexico? And what about barbecue joints? Do you frequent Bad Brad’s, The Rib Crib, Ol’ Hickory or Jimmy’s Smokehouse? When it comes to Chinese food, do you call Great Wall, New China, Hunan Express or Kim Son? Is Santa Fe Cattle Co. the only place in town to get a steak? What about burgers? Do you go to Fat Elvis Diner, Miller Grill, Harry’s or Mae’s? And what about breakfast? Is there a spot in town that I’ve got to visit for the biscuits and gravy or hot cakes? And don’t forget Czech food. If there’s any place other than Prague in Oklahoma where I can find roast pork and dumplings, fried bramboraky, smazak or kolaches, it’s got to be Yukon, right? I need your help, Yukon. Help me out, Canadian County. I’m just around the bend on the Kilpatrick Turnpike from stopping by for a good meal, but what I need is your guidance. Send me your input, and I promise to come out to sample the local flavor then report on my experiences on the Food Dude blog.


The Rev. Tom Arnould, pastor of Good News Church in Yukon, is president of the Yukon Ministerial Alliance. PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH, THE OKLAHOMAN

Yukon churches work together, help others BY CARLA HINTON Religion Editor chinton@opubco.com

YUKON — The Rev. Tom Arnould said Yukon churches can be described by a single word: unity. Arnould, 46, is senior pastor of Good News Church and president of the Yukon Ministerial Alliance. He said the suburban community includes churches of various styles and traditions — “from LifeChurch to a cowboy church, from charismatic to non-charismatic and all the mainline denominations. There’s something for everybody.” “We have unity but not uniformity,” Arnould said. “We try to focus on the great commandment, ‘Love the Lord with all your heart,’ and the Great Commission, so we feel like it’s a very faith-friendly community.” Arnould said examples of the unity among Yukon congregations include Compassionate Hands, 119 S Sixth, a ministry providing aid to the needy in the community, and a food pantry called Manna Pantry, 601 Maple. The charities operate through the combined donations from Yukon churches. He said a Mobile

Meals program also is operated by church volunteers who serve meals to about 70 shut-ins daily. Arnould said the pastors in the city come together to ensure that the faith community is represented through participation in the pastoral care program at Integris Canadian Valley Regional Hospital. They also provide the invocation at chamber of commerce meetings and city council and school board meetings. Arnould said the ministerial alliance sponsors a baccalaureate for high school students and community National Day of Prayer activities. The clergy also gather their congregations for an annual communitywide Thanksgiving service, and the unified congregations have built several Habitat for Humanity homes in the area. Taking their unity to another level, Yukon pastors signed a community marriage policy several years ago, Arnould said. He said the clergy agreed to work together to better prepare couples for marriage. “I like to say that we follow Psalms 133: ‘Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!’ And we genuinely love one another,” he said.


Yukon church listings ASSEMBLY OF GOD

CHURCH OF CHRIST

METHODIST

Discovery Assembly of God Church 1101 S First Yukon, OK 73099 354-2436 Christ’s Legacy Church 11101 N Morgan Road Yukon, OK 73099 373-2215

Church of Christ — South Yukon 11700 NW 10 Yukon, OK 73099 354-1863 West Metro Church of Christ 4900 S Cemetery Road Yukon, OK 73099 324-2400 Yukon Church of Christ 702 S Ranchwood Blvd. Yukon, OK 73099 354-0238

United Methodist Church of the Good Shepherd 10928 SW 15 Yukon, OK 73099 324-1900 First United Methodist Church of Yukon 400 Elm Yukon, OK 73099

BAPTIST Bethel Baptist Church 4901 N Sara Road Yukon, OK 73099 354-7292 Canadian Valley Baptist Church 11500 SW 15 Yukon, OK 73099 324-5742 First Baptist Church of Yukon 15 S Sixth Yukon, OK 73099 354-1911 First Free Will Baptist Church of Yukon 1575 W Vandament Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-1174 Harvest Hills Baptist Church 9713 N County Line Road Yukon, OK 73099 721-1920 Surrey Hills Baptist Church 12421 N Mustang Road Yukon, OK 73099 373-2139 Trinity Baptist Church of Yukon 620 N Cemetery Road Yukon, OK 73099 354-4839 Vandament Avenue Baptist 400 W Vandament Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-5872

CATHOLIC St. John Nepomuk Catholic Church 600 Garth Brooks Blvd. Yukon, OK 73099 354-2743

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Oklahoma City Temple 12020 N Mustang Road Yukon, OK 73099 373-2309

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST First Christian Church 601 Maple St. Yukon, OK 73099 354-5808 Westpoint Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 1600 S Richland Road Yukon, OK 73099 818-9199

EPISCOPAL Church of the Savior 2750 N Mustang Road Yukon, OK 73099 354-7277

JEHOVAH’S WITNESS Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses 400 Ash Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-0486

LUTHERAN Resurrection Lutheran Church-ELCA 675 W Vandament Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-3322

354-8858

NAZARENE Canadian Hills Church of the Nazarene 11744 W Reno Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 324-5661 SEE CHURCHES, PAGE 68A


Churches FROM PAGE 66A

Yukon First Church of the Nazarene 525 E Main St. Yukon, OK 73099 354-4822 Metroplex Church of the Nazarene 10801 N County Line Road Yukon, OK 73099 721-3315

NONDENOMINATIONAL Christ’s Church of Yukon 620 W Vandament Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-0245 Covenant Community Church 2250 N Mustang Road Yukon, OK 73099 354-9338 Good News Church 1054 E Main St. Yukon, OK 73099 354-1032

New Dimensions Church 701 Cemetery Road Yukon, OK 73085 324-9000 Town & Country Christian Church 2200 S Cornwell Drive Yukon, OK 73099 354-7749

PENTECOSTAL

First Pentecostal Church 224 N Third Yukon, OK 73099 354-3388

PRESBYTERIAN

Chisholm Trail Presbyterian Church 801 W Vandament Ave. Yukon, OK 73099 354-3745

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

Yukon Seventh-day Adventist Church 616 S Third Yukon, OK 73099 350-1522

A family prays during a church service.

PHOTO PROVIDED


CALENDAR OF EVENTS AUGUST

5, 12, 19 15 28

Concerts in the Park, Chisholm Trail Park

Pooches in the Pool Party, City Splash Pool Spirit Sprint 5K Run, Chisholm Trail Park

SEPTEMBER

14

National Night Out, Chisholm Trail Park

OCTOBER

2 23

Oklahoma Czech Festival, downtown Yukon Spooksville, Yukon Community Center

NOVEMBER

6 20

Pumpkin Harvest Craft Festival, Robertson Activity Center Christmas in the Park opening, Yukon City Park, Chisholm Trail Park

LaCretia Grant, of Bayou Catering, makes jambalaya June 5 during the Taste of Louisiana Crawfish and Living History Festival at Kirkpatrick Family Farm in Yukon. PHOTO BY MIRANDA GRUBBS, THE OKLAHOMAN

20 20

Kris Kringle Carnival, Yukon Community Center Chill Your Cheeks 5K Run, Yukon City Park, Chisholm Trail Park

DECEMBER

4

Mayor’s Christmas Party for Kids, Robertson Activity Center

16

Sounds of the Season by the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, Yukon Fine Arts Auditorium

JANUARY

8

Baby Crawl, Jackie Cooper Gym

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 71A


CALENDAR OF EVENTS FROM PAGE 70A

Marcella Markes dances with her husband, Vincent, at Czech Hall in Yukon.

FEBRUARY

5

PHOTO BY MIRANDA GRUBBS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Daddy-Daughter Dance, Robertson Activity Center

MARCH

5 24

Trout Fish-Out, Robertson Activity Center pond Taste of Yukon, Robertson Activity Center

APRIL

7

Easter on the Prairie, Kirkpatrick Family Farm

MAY

7

Festival of the Child, Yukon City Park

JUNE

Miranda Thompson and her dog Doug wear camoflage for the Bark at the Park dog show in Yukon. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVE PHOTO BY STEVE GOOCH

4

Chisholm Trail Roundup, Kirkpatrick Family Farm

9, 16, 23, 30

Concerts in the Park, Chisholm Trail Park

JULY

3 4 7, 14, 21, 28

Tribute to Yukon Veterans, Chisholm Trail Park Yukon Freedom Fest, Yukon City Park, Chisholm Trail Park Concerts in the Park, Chisholm Trail Park


HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Small Town, Big CiTy aTTriBuTeS Yukon is the perfect place for peaceful small town living. We have outpaced other suburbs in median household income, median property values, homeownership, educational levels, enjoy a low crime rate and have an outstanding school system. We have easy access to shopping, transportation and entertainment offered locally and in nearby Oklahoma City. Yukon has outstanding events offered throughout the year, so there’s always something to do. We are home to country music superstar Garth Brooks, Cross Canadian Ragweed, legendary western actor Dale Robertson and the world renowned Express Clydesdales.

StaSrtorage

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From I-40 - Exit 136 North to Vandament then West to 5 Star

Fall Schedule oF eventS • Saturday, October 2 – Oklahoma Czech Festival (Downtown Yukon) • Saturday, November 6 – Pumpkin Harvest Craft Festival (Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive) • Saturday, November 20 – Chill Your Cheeks 5K Run (Chisholm Trail Park, 500 W. Vandament) • Saturday, November 20 – Opening of Christmas in the Park (Yukon City Park, 2200 S. Holly, Chisholm Trail Park, 500 W. Vandament) • Saturday, November 20 – Kris Kringle Karnival (Yukon Community Center, 2200 S. Holly) • Saturday, December 4 – Mayor’s Christmas Party for Kids (Robertson Activity Center, 1200 Lakeshore Drive) • Thursday, December 16 – Sounds of the Season, performed by the Oklahoma City Philharmonic (Yukon Fine Arts Center, 850 Yukon Avenue)

For more information, call 405.354.1895 or 405.350.8937 • cityofyukonok.gov Pictured (top to bottom): Downtown Yukon during the Czech Festival, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Express Clydesdales

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YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BANK SINCE 1912

Randy Wright, President and CEO; Carolyn Wright Henthorn, Executive Vice President; Ray Wright, Vice President YNB Main Bank 401 Elm Street • Yukon (405) 354-5281 Lobby: M-F 9-4:30 Drive Thru: M-F 7:30-6:30, Sat. 7:30-12

YNB East 3501 N. Mustang Rd.• Yukon (405) 350-2520 Lobby: M-F 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 Drive Thru: M-F 7:30-6:30, Sat. 7:30-12

YNB Mustang 218 N. Mustang Rd. • Mustang (405) 376-9000 Lobby: M-F 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 Drive Thru: M-F 7:30-6:30, Sat. 7:30-12

YNB Parkway 1550 Garth Brooks Blvd • Yukon (405) 354-1802 Lobby: M-F 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 Drive Thru: M-F 7-6:30, Sat. 7-12

YNB Peoples 6201 NW 23rd • Bethany (405) 495-4511 Lobby: M-F 9:00-5:00 Drive Thru: M-F 7:30-6, Sat. 7:30-12

E X P E R I E N C E T H E Y N B D I F F E R E N C E ! V I S I T W W W. Y N B O K . C O M

YNB Quail 12401 N May Ste 101 • OKC (405) 749-6432 Lobby: M-F 9-5 Drive Thru: M-F 7:30-6, Sat. 7:30-12

Specializing in Self-DefenSe proDuctS concealeD carry claSSeS Firearms • Knives • Mace • Tasers Ladies shop our new gift shop *Layaway and Gift Certificates Available

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Custom Gift Baskets Available


Yukon Living Guide