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OKC BOMBING ANNIVERSARY

17 years have passed Remembering those who died in the Oklahoma City bombing remains important 17 years after the attack, the memorial and museum director says. PAGE 3A

THE OKLAHOMAN THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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Jackson joins call by state’s black caucus for gun control BY ZEKE CAMPFIELD Staff Writer zcampfield@opubco.com

Stricter gun control legislation would decrease violent crime and contribute to greater social equality, members of the Oklahoma Legislative Black Caucus said on Wednesday.

REPORT QUESTIONS SETUP OF LOANS

Chesapeake stock dips on news

Joined by the Rev. Jesse Jackson at the Capitol, caucus members spoke out against proposed legislation that would expand the state’s Stand Your Ground law and allow for the open carry of firearms. Sen. Constance Johnson, a chairwoman of the caucus, said the shooting

deaths of several black Tulsa residents on Good Friday as well as the death in March of a Del City man at the hands of a police officer are reminders that violence is a pervasive and ongoing problem. “And there’s so many instances we have forgotten them,” said Johnson,

D-Forest Park. “These are all policies that are going in the wrong direction when you talk about alleviating violence in society.” Last month’s shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin has galvanized Jackson and other civil rights leaders who contend the incident is a reminder

of the persistence of racial and economic injustice in America. Jackson said institutionalized racial inequality made Martin a victim in his school and community before the shooting. “He was killed not

WOMEN IN RECOVERY MARKS GRADUATION AT STATE CAPITOL

FALLIN AS VP? Oklahoma’s first female governor has been mentioned as a possible GOP vice presidential candidate. She says she is honored, but her main goal is working on state issues.

WEATHER

SOME SUN Breezy, dry day. High: 82 Tonight’s low: 54

IN BRIEF GREEN CAN BE CHIC, TOO Some clothing makers are becoming more eco-friendly through material selection and fair trade practices. PAGE 1D

BOW HUNTING STIRS DEBATE Two Oklahoma City commissions differ on whether to allow deer hunting in the city. The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust and city council will make the final decisions. PAGE 11A

24-HOUR DEAL PHOTO BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

Gov. Mary Fallin shakes hands with Brook Larson before her Women in Recovery graduation Tuesday at the state Capitol. In back are fellow graduates Megan Briggs and Teresa Jones. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. Michael McNutt of the Capitol Bureau reports on Page 11A.

Boy, 2, struggles with injuries from tornado BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

WOODWARD — Frank Hobbie and his three children were asleep when an EF3 tornado hit the Hide-A-Way Mobile Home Park just after midnight Sunday.

“There wasn’t enough warning,” said his stepmother, Shelly Hobbie. “The sirens never went off in that area.” The tornado demolished much of the mobile home park and killed six people including Frank Hobbie, 27, and his daughters, Faith Hobbie, 7, and Kelly Hobbie, 4. Frank Hobbie’s

son, Ty Coolie, 2, was injured and is expected to survive. Shelly Hobbie said her stepson was a devoted single father. “He was a very well-rounded young man,” she said. “He had his priorities. His family came first, no SEE TORNADO, PAGE 4A

DEATHS

TODAY’S PRAYER Dear Lord, help us rein in gossiping tongues and not tell untruths about others. Amen. 7D 1B 1E 6E

SPORTS 1B

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BUSINESS WRITERS

Advice Business Classified Comics

James Harden scored a career-high 40 points to lead the Thunder to a 109-97 victory over the Suns in Phoenix. The team is now 2-1 on a five-game road trip.

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ADAM WILMOTH, JAY F. MARKS AND PAUL MONIES,

Also in Business Markets react to Chesapeake news Page 1B

THUNDER STORMS PAST SUNS

SEE JACKSON, PAGE 4A

[ PAGE 1B ] Chesapeake Energy Corp. drew strong reaction from Wall Street on Wednesday on news that CEO Aubrey McClendon has used his personal stake in company wells as collateral for up to $1.1 billion in loans. The stock price initially plummeted but later recovered some ground. Some analysts questioned whether the company failed to fully disclose the program. Chesapeake and its directors, however, said the program has been disclosed since the company became publicly traded in 1993.

Editor’s note Excerpts of both a Reuters report about Chesapeake and the reply from Aubrey McClendon will appear in today’s Business section on Page 1B. To read the entire report and response, scan the QR code below or go to NewsOK.com.

INSIDE

Crossword Opinion Sports TV

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Volume 121, 105 Six sections Copyright 2012 The Oklahoma Publishing Co., Oklahoma City All rights reserved

Dick Clark remembered “American Bandstand” host Dick Clark visits Teen Town at the state fair in Oklahoma City in this 1970 photo. With Clark are, from left, Brenda Rath, Alicia Priest and Darlene Hall. Clark passed away Wednesday at age 82. PAGE 2A THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Visit www.wimgo deals.com to purchase today’s deal and receive an instant voucher via email. Today’s deal is $25 for $50 of shooting range rental and more at Heartland Outdoors ($50 value). Wimgo is now offering more than one deal a day. Details Page 2A.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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TV host Dick Clark, ‘World’s oldest teenager,’ dies at 82 BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCAN IT

LOS ANGELES — Dick

Clark, the ever-youthful television host and producer who helped bring rock n ` ’ roll into the mainstream on “American Bandstand” and rang in the New Year for the masses at Times Square, has died. He was 82. Spokesman Paul Shefrin said Clark had a heart attack Wednesday morning at St. John’s hospital in Santa Monica, where he had gone the day before for an outpatient procedure. Clark had continued performing even after he suffered a stroke in 2004 that affected his ability to speak and walk. Long dubbed “the world’s oldest teenager” because of his boyish appearance, Clark bridged the rebellious new music scene and traditional show business, and was equally comfortable whether chatting about music with Sam Cooke or bantering

Scan this QR Code or go to NewsOK to view a photo gallery of Dick Clark.

said in a statement. “There’s hardly any segment of the population that doesn’t see what I do,” Clark told The Associated Press in a 1985 interview. “It can be embarrassing. People come up to me and say, ‘I love your show,’ and I have no idea which one they’re talking about.” The original “American Bandstand” was one of network TV’s longestrunning series as part of ABC’s daytime lineup from 1957 to 1987.

“American Bandstand’s” Dick Clark visits Teen Town at the State Fair of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City on Sept. 22, 1969. THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

with Ed McMahon about TV bloopers. He long championed black singers by playing the original R&B versions of popular songs, rather than the pop covers. He thrived as the founder of Dick Clark Productions, supplying movies, game and music shows,

beauty contests and more to TV. Among his credits: “The $25,000 Pyramid,” ’`TV’s Bloopers and Practical Jokes” and the American Music Awards. “Dick Clark was a true pioneer who revolutionized the way we listened to and consumed music,” record executive Clive Davis

City DJ remembers Dick Clark as ‘smooth as silk’ pro BY GENE TRIPLETT

really talked personally about the business and what his feelings were and what my feelings were, and what I was trying to learn from such a pro as he was, and, boy, was he a pro.” Kaye said Clark’s rigorous dedication to his work was partially to blame for the severity of Clark’s 2004 stroke. “The morning he got up with the symptoms of the stroke and some numbness, his wife wanted to take him right to the hospital,” Kaye said. “His response was, ‘I can’t, because I’ve got an interview on the phone with a disc jockey.’ So, he waited around too long to go to the doctor and see about his stroke. The severity of it probably could have been much less, had he have gone on. “But that’s just the kind of guy he was. He was totally dedicated to the business. His work ethic was unbelievable.”

OKLAHOMA TIES

Entertainment Editor etriplett@opubco.com

Longtime Oklahoma City disc jockey Ronnie Kaye remembers television host and tireless entrepreneur Dick Clark as “a pro, never ever at a loss for words, smooth as silk on the air and just one of the top-flight people personally and professionally” in the entertainment industry. From 1966 to 1974, Kaye hosted “The Scene,” a local rock ’n’ roll dance show on the former WKY-TV (now KFOR-4), modeling it after Clark’s nationally aired “American Bandstand,” which had a large role in ushering rock music into the mainstream. “I go back with him personally to about ’67 because we both had the same sponsor, which was Dr Pepper,” Kaye said Wednesday. “So that tied us together pretty closely actually, because he came

CLARK VISITED STATE FAIR Longtime “American Bandstand” host Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at the age of 82, appeared at the State Fair of Oklahoma in 1969 and 1970, where he met with teen fans and signed autographs. He appeared at “Teen Town” at the fair. Most of the youngsters wanted to know what California was like,. Clark, who also hosted the game show “$25,000 Pyramid,” was a New Year’s Eve fixture, hosting “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” beginning in 1972. Clark talked to The Oklahoman in 1984 about his work as a television host and producer. “It certainly has its ups and downs,” he said. “And, you may not make a lot of money all the time. But you can count on this; TV is never dull.” FROM STAFF REPORTS

to town, stayed a whole 24 hours with us, went out to the state fair for my TV show, ‘The Scene.’ Of course, it was all about Dr Pepper. “We sent three different couples out to Los Angeles to be on his show, ‘Band-

stand.’ ” Kaye recalls having a lengthy conversation with Clark about his experiences in the entertainment business as they drove around Oklahoma City. “I got to observe him close-up,” Kaye said. “We

Monday was one of Alan my favorite days as NewsOK’s Digital Herzberger Managing Editor. aherzberger@ opubco.com Why? We didn’t win an award or have a record day for web traffic. THE DIGITAL DESK No. Monday ranked so high because it was a great day for our audience. We launched a new website that is a drastic improvement for our fastestgrowing segment of readers. We launched News OK Mobile for smartphones. Here’s why I like it so much: I It more accurately reflects the full website, but presents it in mobile-friendly display. I It allows us to post mobile-specific content when appropriate. I The articles will A screenshot shows showcase our depth of multimedia content, NewsOK’s mobile site. including photos and videos. I Our inside section fronts offer more than just a feed of stories, giving the user much more variety. We felt we were past due in giving that fastgrowing audience a richer experience as they browse NewsOK. And we aren’t done. Because of the way the developers built this version of NewsOK, you will now begin to see more features rolled out to our mobile audience through the rest of this year and beyond. And that part — the part about the future of NewsOK Mobile — is what made Monday such a happy day for me. ALAN HERZBERGER, BLOG.NEWSOK.COM/NEWSOK

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Results for the question: Should chicken ownership be allowed within city limits? Yes: 49 percent No: 51 percent Thursday’s question: Have you ever bought an event ticket from a scalper? Scan the QR code at the right to vote, or go to NewsOK.com.

WHAT YOU’RE READING Top stories on NewsOK.com for the last 24 hours: 1. Son snitches on his alleged drug-dealing 73year-old mother in Oklahoma 2. Obama targets oil market manipulation 3. OU football Q&A: Kenny Stills knows you’re watching him 4. Oklahoma City woman gets life sentence in crystal ball murder 5. Disturbance between 10 girls breaks out at Oklahoma City school 6. Oklahoma City police say 2 nursing assistants caught on camera abusing 96-year-old with dementia 7. OU football notebook: Tress Way learned valuable lesson 8. Two Oklahoma City brothers questioned in triple homicide 9. OSU football: Mike Gundy has experience as a true freshman QB 10. Anadarko officer dies after shooting inside police department

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Event marks 17th year since attack

Oklahoma Christian University honors victims of the Oklahoma City bombing Wednesday with a display of 168 American and 168 Oklahoma flags. PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN

BY BRYAN PAINTER Staff Writer bpainter@opubco.com

Years have passed, 17 to be exact. But the memories of the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building haven’t. The 17th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony will begin at 8:55 a.m. Thursday on the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial. Similar to previous years, 168 seconds of silence will be observed at 9:02 a.m. for those lost as a result of the bombing. “It is important to remember,” said Kari Watkins, executive director of the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. “The city could have gone in a million different directions following the bombing and the people of this city chose to remember. Building the memorial and museum in the heart of our downtown forces people to remember and to pause each time they pass or stop to learn. The annual remembrance ceremonies are much the same way. “These 60 minutes of remembrance cause us to remember the horror and then celebrate the hope of renewal and moving forward for those closest to the terrorist attack and those who simply were changed forever that day.” Watkins said that now a new generation of children who were not even born in 1995 are being taught about what took place. The history is critical to

SCAN IT Scan the QR code below to view a video on a survivor’s story.

ensure they know how far the city and its people have come. She referred to a program this week at the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum by Dr. Michael Berenbaum, a writer, lecturer, teacher and museum development consultant who contributed to the conceptual design of the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. He said the act 17 years ago is going from living memory, those who were here and remember the event, to historical memory, a new generation that doesn’t remember this act. He said it is critical that the next generation learn about the event. Watkins stressed the importance of the yearly observation. “While life does move forward, it is important to remember those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever on April 19, 1995, each year, and it is the most powerful hour of contemplation and celebration of

life for this city,” she said. Earlier this month, the executive director was walking through the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum one day and saw a group of eight to 10 students from the Nebraska Diving Team watching intently the story about survivors. The visitors in the group ranged in age from 10 to 13 years old. She went up to their coach and commented on how respectful they were. “We began to watch them learn from scratch a story they really didn’t know,” Watkins said. “The lessons learned in Oklahoma City by so many and the heroic stories of the family members, survivors and rescue workers that include both ups and downs are changing lives every day as they are learned by our visitors. They see that in everything something good can come from evil and that these people are human in their response but have learned how to overcome. “Everyone can relate to those basic lessons in so many ways.” Watkins hopes the people of Oklahoma realize the example they set for the world in 1995 and that people even today, 17 years later, look to us for answers. The lessons and the strengths of Oklahoma City and its people are looked at from afar with honor and amazement. “Oklahomans chose the tougher road to rebuild and remember and I’m certainly glad we did,” she said.

Remembrance program is planned for bombing FROM STAFF REPORTS

The 17th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony will begin at 8:55 a.m. Thursday at the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial of the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. Memorial Foundation Chairman Gary Pierson will be master of ceremonies. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett are scheduled to join this year’s ceremony. Similar to previous years, 168 seconds of silence will be observed at 9:02 a.m., reflecting the moment the bomb detonated, killing 168 people and changing the nation forever. The ceremony will start with a bagpipe procession of the ceremony participants, led by Pipe Sgt. Kevin M. Donnelly of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Black and Gold Pipes and Drums. This is Donnelly’s third year to participate and he said he does it for the DEA workers who died, all those who lost their lives, and for the survivors. “It’s not like you can say to people ‘Now you’re through the trauma’ or ‘Now you’re through the grieving,’ ” said Donnelly,

Pipe Sgt. Kevin M. Donnelly plays for the 15th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing. PHOTO BY PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

who is assigned to DEA headquarters in Washington, D.C. “I think there’s levels of that, but you continue to grieve, and so therefore we need to continue to remember so that we can live our lives the best we can.”

The Edmond North High School orchestra will provide the music, and Charity Logan will perform a song. Morgan Merrell, whose mother, Frankie Ann Merrell, was killed April 19, 1995, will talk about teaching the next generation the story of the bombing. Afterward will be a reading of the names of the 168 victims, read by family members and representatives of five Oklahoma rescue worker agencies. The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum is at 620 N Harvey. The ceremony is expected to last about an hour. Cox Communications will sponsor free admission to the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum for all visitors on Thursday. The museum will open after the remembrance ceremony and remain open until 5 p.m.


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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

FROM PAGE 1A

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Fallin seeks federal disaster declaration BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

A federal disaster declaration is being sought for Woodward County, where a tornado struck Woodward, killed six people and injured three dozen others.

Gov. Mary Fallin made the request Wednesday. The official designation would provide federal assistance to people and businesses in the tornado-ravaged area. Six confirmed deaths, including three children, and 36 injuries are attributed to

Sunday’s tornado. According to preliminary damage assessments, the storm affected 224 homes and businesses in Woodward County. Of those, 73 were destroyed, 22 received major damage and 21 had minor damage. “Having spoken with

many of the residents in Woodward who lost everything, I know how important it is to do everything in our power to quickly rebuild this community,” said Fallin, who toured Woodward on Sunday. “This disaster declaration would be an important first step in helping

residents and businesses get back on their feet.” If the request is approved, those who had damage will be eligible for assistance for housing repairs or temporary housing, U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest loans for individuals and

businesses to repair or replace damaged property, disaster unemployment assistance, and grants for serious needs and necessary disaster expenses not met by other programs. If the disaster declaration is granted, additional counties could be added later.

Twisted metal from the base of a trailer home frames a damaged home in the background on Tuesday. Nine trailers were destroyed and many others received major damage in the Hide-A-Way Mobile Home Park when a killer tornado roared through sections of Woodward last weekend.

HOW TO HELP

A splintered piece of lumber protrudes from the front of a mobile home Tuesday after it pierced the metal as a tornado roared through sections of Woodward. PHOTOS BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

I Donations can be made to the Thousand Hills Ranch Church Tornado Relief Fund at Bank of Western Oklahoma. The bank can be reached by phone during business hours at (580) 254-5525. I Donations can be made to the Salvation Army by calling (800) 725-2769 or going online to salvationarmy usa.org and clicking the disaster link. I Donations can be made to the American Red Cross by calling 228-9500 or going online at www.okc.

redcross.org and clicking on the “donate” tab. You also can text “Redcross” to 90999 for a $10 gift that will be added to your next cellphone bill. Business owners can help by calling 228-9500. I Food donations can be dropped off at the Living Word Fellowship Church, 1310 Oklahoma Ave. I Clothes can be donated at Joseph’s Coat, 417 Main St., a ministry of Woodward First Baptist Church.

Tornado: Family loved going swimming at lake FROM PAGE 1A

matter what.” Frank Hobbie worked for H&P Drilling, of Tulsa. He collected broken down vehicles like some people take in stray animals, Shelly Hobbie said. “He had Camaros and pickups,” she said. “The girls helped Daddy work on his cars.” The family also enjoyed the outdoors. “They loved to go swimming at the lake,” Shelly Hobbie said. “They went fishing a lot.” The Hobbie family, which includes Frank’s father and three sisters, is devastated, Shelly Hobbie said. The fact that Faith and Kelly were taken so young amplifies the tragedy, which hasn’t fully sunk in, she said. Ty was flown to Lubbock after the tornado, and is expected to recover, Shelly Hobbie said. “It will just be a long process for him,” she said. “He’s got a cast from his chest at his rib cage down. He’s not understanding why he can’t be held.”

Faith Hobbie, 7

Kelly Hobbie, 4

Shelly Hobbie, left, Arley Hutchinson, center, and Linda Dupree, right, embrace at the site of a mobile home after a tornado in Woodward. Shelly Hobbie’s stepson was among those killed in the storm early Sunday. AP PHOTO

Shelly Hobbie said her grandson also doesn’t understand that his father and two sisters are gone,

and she’s not sure how to explain that to a 2-yearold. As Ty grows up, family

members will do their best to let him know how much his father and sisters loved him.

“Frank definitely was a good dad, and he wanted to do right by his kids,” Shelly Hobbie said.

Frank Hobbie, 27

Jackson: Message at Douglass was more motivational FROM PAGE 1A

because of the hoodie he was wearing; he was killed because of who he was under the hood,” Jackson said. “It’s my person, not my apparel, that’s in jeopardy. At the Capitol, and earlier at Frederick Douglass High School, Jackson called for a ban on assault weapons and a repeal of Stand Your Ground legislation in Oklahoma and 24 other states. Legislation is currently pending that would allow Oklahomans with a stateissued permit to openly carry handguns in public. Another proposal would expand the state’s Stand Your Ground law to include churches. “No civilized society accepts that proposition,” Jackson said. “We are the most violent nation on earth … and yet we want to have more access to do more killing.” Other Jackson demands: state legislation that would

Above: The Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks during a news conference Wednesday by the Oklahoma Black Caucus at the Capitol. PHOTO BY DOUG HOKE, THE OKLAHOMAN Left: The Rev. Jesse Jackson talks to players Terrell Williams, left, and DeAngelo Smith on Wednesday as their basketball teammates gather to pose for a team photo with Jackson during his visit to Douglass High School in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN

make hate crimes a felony, a bill of rights for Oklahoma high school and college athletes and an apology from the state for the 1921 race riots in Tulsa. Jackson and Johnson criticized a disparity between state contracts

awarded to white and black business owners as well as a perceived lack of diversity on the state’s Board of Regents. Jackson and the caucus also on Wednesday announced the development of an Oklahoma coalition

that will focus as well on protecting reproductive rights, reducing student loan debts and defending workers’ rights to organize.

Visit to Douglass Earlier in the day, the civil rights leader met with

three-time state basketball champions at Douglass High School and then addressed students in the school auditorium. His message there was less political and more motivational. He urged students, the

majority of whom are black, to avoid “voluntary slavery” by avoiding violence and drugs and by making academic success a priority. “Even slave masters knew that literacy was a key to liberation,” he told the students.


POLITICS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Fallin ‘honored’ to be VP long shot BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

She hasn’t received the call yet, but Gov. Mary Fallin, who was mentioned Wednesday as a long-shot vice presidential possibility, said she would listen. Fallin, who served two terms in Congress before being elected in 2010 as Oklahoma’s first female governor, said she’s flattered, but her main goal is working on state issues. “It’s a great honor to even be mentioned as a potential person that might be considered for that,” Fallin told The Oklahoman. “We’re certainly very proud of all that Oklahoma has done. We’ve made some great progress in our state with the second-best job growth in the nation.” Fallin didn’t endorse any of the GOP presidential candidates before former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney became the presumptive Republican nominee last week. A senior political correspondent for ABC News said Wednesday that Fallin is an outside contender to be Romney’s vice presidential pick. Fallin said she’s open to

discuss the possibility with the Romney campaign. “If someone called and wanted to visit about it — which no one’s contacted me at all — I would certainly be honored to receive that call,” she said. “But my first and foremost goal is just to stay here in Oklahoma and do what I need to do to help Oklahoma grow.” Fallin, 57, has been involved in state government since 1990 when she was elected as a state representative. She then served three terms as lieutenant governor before being elected to Congress in 2006. Most of her priorities were approved during her first year in office last year, such as getting changes in the civil justice system, overhauling the workers’ compensation system, reorganizing and consolidating government functions and agencies, and eliminating the “trial de novo” system that made it hard to fire underperforming teachers. She is working this year to seek more state funding for the state Transportation Department to nearly eliminate the state highway system’s more than

700 structurally deficient bridges by 2019 and to reduce the state’s personal income tax. Both proposals are still alive, although her income tax proposal may be scaled back. Oklahoma’s economy has shown gradual improvement the past two years, which Fallin said has attracted national attention. “People are starting to stand up and take notice of the great things that are happening here,” she said. “It’s good for Oklahoma for, I guess, for me to be mentioned as a potential person they might look at (for vice president). But at this point in time, it’s just a nice honor, and I’m going to keep focusing on what I’m doing here as governor.” Oklahoma Republican Party Chairman Matt Pinnell said he isn’t surprised that Fallin would be considered a vice presidential contender. “She’s very popular in Oklahoma,” he said. “She’s the governor of a state with low unemployment and, with the energy and gas being a big national issue this presidential cycle, it makes a lot of sense for her to be in the mix.”

Economy plays major role as 2012 campaign heats up BY DAVID ESPO AND NANCY BENAC Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Their battle joined, challenger Mitt Romney cricitcized President Barack Obama’s handling of the economy on Wednesday while the commander in chief commiserated up close with victims of the recession and warned that Republicans would only make matters worse. “Obama is over his head and swimming in the wrong direction” when it comes to the economy, Romney said in a speech delivered across the street from the football stadium where the president will deliver his Democratic National Convention acceptance speech this summer. “Even if you like Barack Obama, we can’t afford Barack Obama,” the former Massachusetts governor declared, an evident reference to the president’s ability to transcend at least some of the public’s dissatisfaction with the pace of the recovery. At the same time, Obama sketched his case for re-election in swing-state Ohio, where he met with unemployed workers who have enrolled in job training programs. Then he spoke at the Lorain County Community College. “Right now, companies can’t find enough qualified workers for the jobs they need to fill” locally, he said. “So programs like

President Barack Obama

Mitt Romney

this one are training hundreds of thousands of workers with the skills that companies are looking for. And it’s working.” By contrast, he said, between 2000 and 2008, Republican policies produced “the slowest job growth in half a century … and we’ve spent the last three and a half years cleaning up after that mess.” Campaign symbolism counted for much on a day that seems destined to be replicated often in the six months until Election Day. It was only within the past two weeks that Romney shed his competition for the Republican presidential nomination, and he is still in the process of trying to unite his party after a three-month primary struggle in which he had trouble appealing to hardcore conservatives. But already, elements of the fall campaign are falling into place. Obama’s campaign was airing Spanish language radio ads in Orlando, Fla., Las Vegas and Denver — all

in states that the president won four years ago and that figure to be fiercely contested in the fall. From Ohio, Obama hopscotched to Michigan for two fundraisers, the first a reception at Dearborn’s Henry Ford Museum, where Romney in 2007 launched his unsuccessful bid for the 2008 GOP nomination. Speaking in a museum named for the founder of Ford Motor Co., Obama got some of his biggest cheers when he highlighted his administration’s efforts to rescue the American auto industry. Later, he said that the industry’s recovery didn’t just help Michigan, it “helped to give America a vision of what we could be.” For his part, Romney arranged an appearance for Thursday at a factory in Lorain, Ohio, shadowing Obama’s Wednesday trip to the area. Obama toured the factory as part of his 2008 campaign — and it was closed later.

Secret Service calls rocker over anti-Obama comments BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Rocker and gun rights champion Ted Nugent says he will meet with the Secret Service on Thursday to explain his raucous remarks about what he called Barack Obama’s “evil, America-hating administration” — comments some critics interpreted as a threat against the president. “The conclusion will be obvious that I threatened no one,” Nugent told radio interviewer Glenn Beck on Wednesday. Nugent said he’d been contacted by the agency.

The controversy erupted after the self-styled “Motor City Madman” made an impassioned plea for support for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney during the National Rifle Association meeting in St. Louis last weekend. He also included a cryptic pronouncement: “If Barack Obama becomes the next president in November, again, I will either be dead or in jail by this time next year.” Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie confirmed that the agency was looking into the matter but declined to give details.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

TODAY’S TOP STORIES

NATION

CRIME

JUDGE WITHDRAWS FROM HEARING

Rep. Lucas defends cuts to food stamp program BY CHRIS CASTEEL Washington Bureau ccasteel@opubco.com

WASHINGTON — The House Agriculture Committee voted Wednesday to cut $33 billion from the food stamp program over the next decade, but a leading Democrat on the panel said the move wasn’t serious because the Senate would never consider it. Rep. Frank Lucas, RCheyenne, committee chairman, said the cuts were aimed at closing loopholes and cutting waste in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, whose costs have risen dramatically in recent years. Lucas said much of the reduction could be made by tightening rules that

have allowed states to boost benefits for recipients and broaden eligibility beyond Congress’ intent. The committee’s proposal also would accelerate the expiration of a benefit increase that was part of the 2009 stimulus bill. However, Lucas said, “I’d like to be clear from the start that none of these recommendations will prevent families that qualify for assistance under SNAP law from receiving their benefits. We are working to better target the program and improve its integrity so that families most in need can continue to receive nutrition assistance.” Lucas’ committee oversees the nutrition program because it’s administered

by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The committee’s action was essentially forced by the budget blueprint approved by House Republicans. Rep. Collin Peterson, of Minnesota, the top Democrat on the committee, called the committee’s action a waste of time because the Senate, which is controlled by Democrats, would never consider it. And, Peterson said, “Taking a meat ax to nutrition programs that feed millions of working families in this country to avoid defense cuts is not a serious way to achieve deficit reduction.” Other Democrats on the committee also criticized the effort, while some Republicans defended the food stamp cuts as a prop-

er step toward controlling spending. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on Tuesday sent a letter to Lucas urging the committee to target farm subsidies for cuts, rather than the food stamp program. Wednesday, the Chicago-based charity Feeding America criticized the committee’s action. “Coming at a time of record need and at a time when many state and local safety net programs have been scaled back and the charitable system is stretched to the breaking point, these cuts would be devastating for lowincome families and communities across the country,” said Vicki Escarra, president and CEO of the group.

Scandal brings Secret Service resignations BY ALICIA A. CALDWELL Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Moving swiftly, the Secret Service forced out three agents Wednesday in a prostitution scandal that has embarrassed President Barack Obama. The agency said three agents were leaving the service even as separate U.S. government investigations were under way. The Secret Service did not identify the agents being forced out of the government or eight more it

said remain on administrative leave. In a statement, it said one supervisor was allowed to retire and another will be fired for cause. A third employee has resigned. The agents were implicated in the prostitution scandal in Colombia that also involved about 10 military service members and as many as 20 women. All the Secret Service employees who were involved had their security clearances revoked. “These are the first steps,” said Rep. Pete King,

R-N.Y., chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, which oversees the Secret Service. King said the agency’s director, Mark Sullivan, took employment action against “the three people he believes the case was clearest against.” But King warned: “It’s certainly not over.” The embarrassing scandal erupted last week after 11 Secret Service agents were sent home from the colonial-era city of Cartagena on Colombia’s Caribbean coast after a night of

partying that reportedly ended with at least some of them bringing prostitutes back to their hotel. The special agents and uniformed officers were in Colombia in advance of President Barack Obama’s arrival for the Summit of the Americas. The incident occurred before Obama arrived and was at a different hotel than he stayed in. Lawmakers have called for a thorough investigation and have suggested they would hold oversight hearings.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — The judge overseeing John Edwards’ criminal trial on Wednesday recused herself from considering whether to quash a subpoena issued to a former speech writer for the two-time presidential candidate. Edwards’ lawyers are seeking an extensive list of financial records and other documents from Wendy Button, a 2008 campaign staffer expected to testify for the prosecution. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine C. Eagles said her husband is a former law partner of one of the lawyers representing Button. Eagles will still oversee the trial.

JUDGE RECUSES FROM MARTIN CASE ORLANDO, Fla. — The Florida judge presiding over the Trayvon Martin shooting case removed herself Wednesday after the attorney for defendant George Zimmerman argued she had a possible conflict of interest that related to her husband. Judge Kenneth M. Lester Jr. will preside over the case. The next judge who would be in the court rotation, John D. Galluzzo, also cited a conflict, so Lester was selected, according to a news release from the court.

BODY IDENTIFIED AS MISSING WOMAN FALLBROOK, Calif. — A body found in brush near a Southern California lake was identified Wednesday as a Marine’s wife whose disappearance last week led to the arrest of a woman and the investigation of another Marine. Coroner’s investigators determined the body discovered Tuesday was that of 22-year-old Brittany Dawn Killgore. The disclosure came a day after authorities arrested Jessica Lynn Lopez, 25, on suspicion of murder and continued to investigate Louis Ray Perez, the last person seen with Killgore, as a person of interest in the case.

FORT HOOD TRIAL IS DELAYED FORT HOOD, Texas — A military judge has once again postponed the trial of the Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly Fort Hood shooting rampage. Maj. Nidal Hasan’s court martial is now set to begin in August instead of June on the Texas Army post. The judge issued his ruling Wednesday. Defense attorneys had requested a delay until October. They said they needed more time to review the numerous documents in the case.

LOTTERY

COUPLE CLAIM MEGA MILLIONS PRIZE RED BUD, Ill. — A retired southern Illinois couple claimed the third and final share of last month’s record $656 million Mega Millions jackpot on Wednesday, and said they plan to treat themselves once they’ve sorted out how to invest their windfall. Merle and Patricia Butler bought a $3 quick-pick ticket to the March 30 drawing at the Motomart convenience store in their village of Red Bud. They have opted to collect their winnings — $111 million after taxes — in a lump-sum payment. FROM WIRE SERVICES


NATION

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Panetta apologizes in new scandal BY ROBERT BURNS AND PAULINE JELINEK Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Leon Panetta apologized Wednesday for gruesome, newly revealed photographs that purport to show U.S. soldiers posing with the bloodied remains of dead insurgents in Afghanistan two years ago. He said war can lead young troops to “foolish decisions” and expressed concern the photos could incite fresh violence against Americans. The White House called the photos “reprehensible,” joining Panetta and other top military officials in expressing regret for the latest in a string of embarrassing missteps by the U.S. military in a war that’s built on earning the trust and confidence of ordinary Afghans. In recent

months, American troops have been caught up in controversies over burning Muslim holy books, urinating on Afghan corpses, an alleged massacre of 17 Afghan villagers and other misdeeds. “This is war. I know that war is ugly and it’s violent, and I know that young people sometimes caught up in the moment make some very foolish decisions,” Panetta said. “I am not excusing that behavior, but neither do I want these images to bring further injury to our people or to our relationship with the Afghan people.” “My apology is on behalf of the Department of Defense and the U.S. government,” Panetta told a news conference in Brussels following a meeting of NATO allies at which the way ahead in Afghanistan was the central topic.

The photos were published in Wednesday’s Los Angeles Times. One shows members of the 82nd Airborne Division posing in 2010 with Afghan police holding the severed legs of a suicide bomber. Panetta said he had urged the newspaper not to publish the photos, which it said it was given by a member of the 82nd Airborne. “Those kinds of photos are used by the enemy to incite violence, and lives have been lost by the publication of similar photos in the past,” he said in Brussels. His British counterpart, Philip Hammond, said he regretted the “besmirching of the good name” of all coalition troops who act properly. Mark Jacobson, an international affairs expert at the German Marshall Fund and a former deputy

Should teachers, students be friends on Facebook? BY KAREN MATTHEWS Associated Press

NEW YORK — Should students and teachers ever be friends on Facebook? School districts across the country are weighing that question as they seek to balance the risks of inappropriate contact with the academic benefits of social networking. At least 40 school districts nationwide have approved social media policies. Schools in New York City and Florida have disciplined teachers for Facebook activity, and legislators in Missouri recently acquiesced to teachers’ objections to a strict statewide policy. In the New York cases, one teacher friended several female students and wrote comments including “this is sexy” under their photos, investigators said. A substitute teacher sent a message to a student saying that her boyfriend did not “deserve a beautiful girl like you.” Such behavior clearly oversteps boundaries, but some teachers say social media — in particular Facebook — can be a vital educational resource if used appropriately, especially as a primary means of communication for today’s youngsters. New York Chancellor Dennis Walcott plans to release social media guidelines this month, saying recently that teachers “don’t want to be put in a situation that could either compromise them or be misinterpreted.” Teacher David Roush does not accept students as friends on his personal Facebook page but has created a separate profile to communicate with them — something that runs afoul of Facebook rules restricting users to a single

Nkomo Morris, a teacher at Brooklyn’s Art and Media High School, works on her classroom computer in New York. Morris, who teaches English and journalism, said she has about 50 current and former students as Facebook friends. AP PHOTO

profile. He used the page to get the word out quickly about a summer internship on a cable-access show, and a student who learned about it from the Facebook post won it. “If I would have emailed him, if I had tried calling him, he never would have got it,” Roush said. Nkomo Morris, who teaches English and journalism at a high school in Brooklyn, said she has about 50 current and former students as Facebook friends. That could be a problem if the new rules instruct teachers not to friend students. In that event, “I’d send out a massive message, and I would unfriend them,” Morris said. In the meantime, Morris manages her privacy settings so neither current nor former students see her personal information but do see posts about current events. She also lets students know if something on their pages raises a red flag, such as sexual content. “They’re not always as savvy as I am,” Morris said.

“They haven’t really grasped the level of formality out in the real world.” Missouri legislators last year passed a law that barred teachers from using websites that allow “exclusive access” with students 18 years old or younger. Teachers complained that they would be banned from Facebook and Twitter. A judge granted an injunction, declaring that the law “would have a chilling effect” on freespeech rights. The legislature then repealed the restrictions and passed a new law directing school districts to develop their own policies. Some districts adopted a model policy by the Missouri School Boards Association, decreeing that staff members must use district-approved devices when communicating electronically with students. The guidelines are intended to make it easier for supervisors to monitor teacher-student interactions.

NATO senior civilian representative in Afghanistan, said the incident appeared to reflect a failure of military leadership. “I think the challenge is that you can never completely eliminate incidents like this from happening on the battlefield,” Jacobson said. “You can only reduce the likelihood that they take place.” He said the horrors of war sometimes lead to such behavior by soldiers. “I think it’s a way of distancing themselves from the battlefield, a way of the mind trying to dehumanize something that is as brutal as war.” The 82nd Airborne, based at Fort Bragg, N.C., confirmed that the pictured soldiers are members of the 1st battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade. The brigade returned from

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton listens as Defense Secretary Leon Panetta speaks during a news conference at NATO Headquarters. AP PHOTO

a year-long deployment in August 2010. An Army spokesman at the Pentagon, George Wright, said, “We do not condone service members engaging in such behavior or possessing related materials. This matter remains under investigation

by the unit.” In an initial statement on Panetta’s behalf, his press secretary, George Little, said, “Anyone found responsible for this inhuman conduct will be held accountable in accordance with our military justice system.”


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MONOLOGUE

OPINION

An 83-year-old woman from England is calling herself the world’s oldest supermodel. I’m just going to keep calling her by her real name, Madonna.”

OUR VIEWS | INMATE’S MENTAL CAPACITY IN QUESTION

Allen case among many death penalty puzzles A lesson

CRAIG FERGUSON “THE LATE LATE SHOW WITH CRAIG FERGUSON”

UNNY but apocryphal is the tale of the Allen’s case is instructive. The only quesyouth who kills his own parents and tion that should matter is his mental capacthen pleads for mercy based on the fact ity at the time he killed his wife, not subthat he’s an orphan. sequently. Condemned killers can be on Not funny but in the real world is the story death row for 10 or 12 or more years. A lot can of a man who was shot by police after fatally happen to mental capacity before the senwounding his wife and then claiming he tence is carried out, especially if the inmate lacks the mental capacity to be executed, is of an advanced age at the time of sentencpartly because he was shot by police after ing. One could argue that just living on a killing his wife. death row year after year diminishes mental So far, as a result of a series of court rulcapacity. ings, Garry Allen has escaped the death If Allen’s pre-existing mental capacity penalty to which he was sentenced. Allen Garry Allen’s exedoesn’t meet current standards for execuwas to have been given a lethal injection on cution has been tions, his sentence should be commuted to postponed April 12 in McAlester. life in prison, as the state Pardon and Parole The case is a conundrum for society, one through a series Board has recommended. But the attorney of many that surround capital punishment. of court rulings. general’s office and Gov. Mary Fallin are satAllen’s attorneys say he already lacked mental capacity isfied that the sentence given Allen should be carried at the time of the crime. They not only claim his execu- out. The federal judiciary will determine Allen’s fate. tion violates federal protections but that Oklahoma’s Meantime, the agonizing debate over capital punishprocedure for establishing mental competency in gen- ment goes on, with state after state (Connecticut is the eral is unconstitutional. latest) deciding that the death penalty should no longer We might as well throw this into the mix of disagree- be on the table. Death penalty supporters, a group that ment about capital punishment. That stew has many generally includes a majority of Americans, may grow ingredients already. Who can and who can’t be execut- weary of the debate and acquiesce to a cheaper, less ed is a moving target, currently excluding killers under a controversial system of sentencing killers to life without certain age at the time of the crime (Oklahoma was the the possibility of parole. last state to execute a juvenile, in 2003), mental capacWe wonder, though, whether capital punishment ity and, of course, the specifics of the crime itself. Im- supporters — having achieved their key goal — would migration status has also played a role. then move on to claiming that life without parole is itThe definition of “cruel and unusual punishment” self cruel and unusual. vis a vis the death penalty is itself a moving target — As things now stand, killers who aren’t on death row which is why American executions are now almost en- get scant attention compared with those who have a tirely limited to lethal injections. more certain date with death.

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STEVE BREEN/SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

Book it: As usual, Coburn says what he means

Seeking shelter: Playing politics with severe storms

U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn, never one to mince words, is true to form in his new book about the country’s dire financial straits. But will Coburn’s warnings and his criticism of both parties move the needle in any meaningful way? Our guess is that it won’t, because so much of what emanates out of Washington today is dismissed as spin or blather or self-promotion — everybody’s playing an angle, everybody’s out to score points to help them get re-elected. But Coburn, R-Muskogee, has never really played that game; indeed he said he would serve no more than two terms in the Senate and, with four years remaining in his second term, hasn’t backed off that promise. His observations in “The Debt Bomb: A Bold Plan to Stop Washington from Bankrupting America” reflect what he has said many times since getting to the Senate — if we don’t stop spending like this, particularly on entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare, we’re headed for real trouble. And in order for real changes to occur, both sides of the aisle have to give a little. The Oklahoman’s Chris Casteel reports that in the book, Coburn doesn’t apologize for having reached out to Democrats to try to come up with debt-reduction plans. Coburn served on a bipartisan debt commission whose work was rejected by President Obama — something Coburn called “one of the greatest failures of presidential leadership in American history.” But the senator also skewers the GOP for its spending when it controlled the House under President George W. Bush, and says those in his party who reject any talk of raising taxes are helping block the path to real reform. Government analysts disagree with Coburn’s dire concerns about China holding so much of our nation’s debt. We hope they’re right. If they’re not, well, no one can say Coburn didn’t try to warn us, in plain English.

Hard to say what’s more frustrating, seeing lawmakers invoke last weekend’s deadly tornado to politicize a bill giving legal cover to those who help others during severe weather, or the fact that such a law is needed in the first place. House Bill 2296 by Rep. Eric Proctor, D-Tulsa, dealt with the owners of mobile home parks who make their offices available to residents during storms. It sailed through the House and Senate, but Republican Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed it, saying the legislation treated some business owners differently than others. Proctor tried Monday to get the veto overridden, but Speaker Kris Steele, R-Shawnee, got the issue tabled. Proctor said the move usurped House business and was nothing more than a sop to the GOP governor. Subsequently, it was decided a Rep. Eric bill by Rep. John Enns, R-Enid, Proctor could be amended to address Fallin’s concerns by providing liability protection not just to mobile home park managers, but any Oklahomans who offer shelter during storms. Steele’s office says Proctor and House Democrats rejected his offer to have them assist in crafting that language. Instead, a second override attempt was made Tuesday. It failed after about two hours of debate. Support for Proctor’s bill — the votes were 92-0 in the House, 40-1in the Senate — reflects its popularity. Clearly, it’s a policy winner. But Fallin raised legitimate concerns. Reworking the other bill will allow those to be addressed — and, because it will contain an emergency clause, it can become law as soon as the governor signs it. So this figures to end well, eventually. What won’t end is the litigiousness in our society, which has driven teeter-totters from public parks, forced restaurants to warn patrons that coffee is hot, and for now forced Oklahomans to think twice about whether aiding a friend or stranger during a storm is really worth it.

in moral philosophy WASHINGTON — I’ve now been on a diet for 17 weeks, though it feels like it began early in the Carter administration. It was my Washington Post colleague E.J. Dionne who provided the inspiration and the method. When I asked the secret of his weight loss, he told me: “Two things: Cutting carbohydrates and a bout of the stomach flu.” I took the low-carb route. The sameness of healthy eating has begun gnawing at me. I never want to see a lean protein again — though this, apparently, is the only sort I’m allowed for the rest of my life. Vegetables once crisp and colorful now seem raw and garish. Healthy probiotics have all the appeal of parasites. On the other hand, I miss bread and pasta less than I thought I would, which would have been taken as crazy talk by my Italian ancestors. Dieting is a reintroduction to the mindMichael body problem — a reminder that our Gerson pilgrim souls are fastened to a peanut butter-craving animal. During a diet, COMMENTARY or in a hospital bed, the mind pays tribute to its cranky, demanding host. I have generally avoided the latest dieting technologies. Recent studies had found that people using large forks eat less. Dining in front of a mirror shames people into reducing their consumption by about a third. The color blue in the dining area seems to be an appetite suppressant. But this image — eating with an oversized implement, while staring at your own shrinking image, surrounded by a sea of bright blue — seems less like a dieting strategy than the outcome of ingesting hallucinogenic mushrooms, which are also low carb. It is easy to blame yourself for the scale your self assumes. My research however, indicates that I am the victim of complex historical forces. The human genome was honed for hunter-gatherers — tireless, long-distance trackers of game, capable of storing energy in fat during long winters and frequent famine. Feed a hunter-gatherer 150 to 170 pounds of sugar a year and place him in front of a television set for 4.8 hours a day and you get the average American. A job hunched in front of a computer screen, I can attest, is also not particularly good preparation for the hunt. As Karl Marx would remind us, even impersonal forces produce flesh-and-blood villains. The second-largest employer in America (following government) is the food service industry, packing calories, salt and fat into ever-larger servings, marketed to ever-larger children. Government adds to the buffet by subsidizing the growth of nutritionally empty grains such as corn, used to make sweeteners and to fatten the means of hamburger production. Progressive city councils have begun taking on the culinary-political complex. San Francisco’s board of supervisors voted to ban McDonald’s Happy Meals as the equivalent of cigarette advertising to children. Denmark recently imposed the first “fat tax” on unhealthy foods.

Moral superiority For some, the time has come to fight The Man — the Good Humor Man. Not being a progressive, I find the desire to politicize every social problem to be problematic. Not being a libertarian, I could be persuaded of the usefulness of public efforts to discourage high levels of sugar and salt intake, which impose a private and public cost. But what interests me most is my own growing censoriousness as I’ve shed a few pounds. I had not realized that diets, along with producing feelings of lightheadedness, also result in feelings of moral superiority. Having forsworn McDonald’s and Dairy Queen, I find myself pitying those poor souls still addicted to Big Macs and Blizzards. Judgmentalism comes unbidden. A Snickers bar now seems such a shoddy little sin. So a diet is also a lesson in moral philosophy. It is distressingly easy to condemn others for failings I shared a few months ago — and could share again with one ill-advised trip to the 7-11. Perhaps it is for the best that most weight control plans eventually fail. There is no Pharisee like a Pharisee on a diet. WASHINGTON POST WRITERS GROUP


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U.N. monitors flee shots fired at Syrian protests Associated Press

BEIRUT — Syrian security forces opened fire Wednesday on anti-regime demonstrators surrounding the cars of a U.N. team meant to monitor a shaky cease-fire, sending the observers speeding off and protesters dashing for cover, according to activists and amateur videos. The fresh violence in a suburb of Damascus, the Syrian capital, provided the first public glimpse of the work of the small team struggling to reinforce the international community’s stumbling efforts to end 13 months of deadly conflict in Syria. The shooting, which wounded at least eight people, could also complicate the deployment of a

larger U.N. mission to help a cease-fire take hold between President Bashar Assad’s forces and opposition fighters.

Tanks disappear The difficulties of the team’s mission was clear Wednesday during its visit to the suburb of Arbeen, just northeast of Damascus. The team did not announce its plans to visit the area, but a local activist said residents guessed they were coming when tanks posted throughout the area withdrew early Wednesday. People quickly drew up signs as well as a list of the 34 residents killed since the start of the uprising and information on the scores who have been detained, an Arbeen activist named Ahmed said via

Skype. He declined to give his last name for fear of retribution. Amateur videos posted online showed hundreds of demonstrators crowding around at least three U.N. Land Cruisers, waving Syrian flags and chanting against the regime. In one video, a man with a microphone and huge speakers on the back of a pickup truck led the crowd in singing “Bashar, Bashar, we will not kneel!” A handwritten sign apparently taped by a demonstrator on one of the cars read, “The murderer keeps killing, the observers keep observing and the people keep up the revolution.” In another video, the protesters were walking down a boulevard surrounding the cars when a boom rang out, sending

demonstrators scattering. Smoke rose in front of the crowd and the cars sped off, sirens blaring.

Officers open fire Ahmed, the local activist, said the group was marching toward a square where the government had posted plain clothes security offices called shabiha and government supporters holding a counter demonstration. “We started walking with the observers thinking that they’d protect us, but then the shabiha started shooting at us, even when the observers’ cars were at the front of the march,” he said. After the observers left, security cars drove through the area firing, injuring about 20 people, he said.

Official is in Libya about son of Gadhafi

Search for survivors continues Rescuers work Wednesday at the site of a factory that collapsed in Jalandhar, India. On Wednesday, rescuers found a 15-year-old boy in a cavern that was created when the blanket factory collapsed Sunday. Officials say at least six people were killed in the collapse. Hundreds remain missing. AP PHOTO AMERICAS

FARMWORKERS SEIZE LAND TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — Thousands of farmwork-

ers have seized 30,000 acres of land across Honduras as part of a dispute with large landowners and the government, activists and officials said Wednesday. Activists say the seized territory is arable public land that small farmers have the right to grow crops on under Honduran law. The large landowners who have been farming the land say they bought it legally from the government.

AUTHORITIES FIND AMMUNITION CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico — Mexican customs inspectors seized 268,000 rounds of assault rifle ammunition found in a U.S. truck at a border crossing in Ciudad Juarez, authorities reported Wednesday. Angel Torres, a spokesman for Mexico’s tax agency, said a 37-year-old man from Dallas, Texas, was detained for trying to drive the truck across the border from El Paso, Texas. Torres said the driver claimed he had no goods to declare when he arrived at the border Tuesday.

VOLCANO ALERT REMAINS HIGH MEXICO CITY — Mexico’s Popocatepetl volcano is continuing to spout gases and hot rock fragments and it is dusting towns on its flanks with volcanic ash. But unlike recent days, the ash has not spread to neighboring cities. Officials say the volcano alert level remains high, but no evacuations are planned.

ASIA

BY RAMI AL-SHAHEIBI

FAMILY’S DEPORTATION ON HOLD

Associated Press

ISLAMABAD — The plan to deport Osama bin La-

TRIPOLI, Libya — Libya in-

sisted Wednesday it will put a son of deposed ruler Moammar Gadhafi on trial itself, just as the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court flew to Tripoli to look into his case and that of Gadhafi’s notorious spy chief. The Hague-based court is locked in a legal tug-ofwar with Libya’s ruling National Transitional Council over who should try Seif al-Islam Gadhafi, once considered his father’s heir apparent. He was captured last year in Libya after a civil war that toppled the Gadhafi regime. Libyan spokesman Nasser al-Manei emphasized his government’s decision not to hand over Gadhafi’s son. “Procedures are going forward to try all former regime figures, including Seif,” al-Manei told reporters. Questions have been raised about the new government’s ability to build a judicial system reliable enough to try a figure like Seif al-Islam Gadhafi. Another key challenge is ending extrajudicial detentions by powerful militias. The government statement cast a shadow over the visit of the prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, who was expected to press the ICC’s case for taking over the trial of Gadhafi’s son. Moreno-Ocampo told The Associated Press at Tripoli’s airport that he would also follow up on the case of Abdullah alSenoussi, Gadhafi’s spy chief, who is accused of attacking civilians during the uprising.

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TODAY’S TOP STORIES

WORLD

BY BEN HUBBARD

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den’s three widows and their nine children from Pakistan ran into more bureaucratic hurdles on Wednesday, making it uncertain when they would leave, their lawyer said. The family was detained by Pakistani authorities last May shortly after bin Laden was killed. Pakistan interrogated the family members and eventually charged the widows and two adult daughters last month with illegally entering and living in the country.

INDIA PREPARES FOR MISSILE TEST Defendant Anders Behring Breivik, left, listens to with his lawyers Geir Lippestad, right, and Odd Ivar Groen during the third day of proceedings Wednesday in Oslo. Breivik called Norway’s prison terms “pathetic” and said the death penalty or an acquittal were the “only logical outcomes” for his massacre of 77 people. AP PHOTO

Norway gunman wants his freedom or death TRIAL | CONFESSED KILLER SEES NO OTHER POSSIBLE OUTCOME BY KARL RITTER Associated Press

OSLO, Norway — The right-wing fanatic on trial for massacring 77 people in Norway says he wants either freedom or death, calling the country’s prison terms “pathetic” and arguing for the return of capital punishment, which was last used here to execute Nazi collaborators after World War II. In the third day of his terrorism trial, Anders Behring Breivik was grilled by prosecutors about the anti-Muslim militant group he claims exists. He rejected their suggestions that the “Knights Templar” doesn’t exist, but admitted he had embellished when describing the network in a 1,500page manifesto he published online before the bomb-and-shooting ram-

page on July 22. “In principle, it is not an organization in a conventional sense,” he said, describing it as a leaderless network consisting of “independent cells.” Prosecutors told reporters after Wednesday’s hearing that they don’t believe the group is real or that the meetings Breivik claims took place in Liberia, Britain and the Baltic countries ever happened. The issue is of key importance in determining Breivik’s sanity, and whether he’s ultimately sent to prison or compulsory psychiatric care for Norway’s worst peacetime massacre. If found sane, Breivik could face a maximum 21year prison sentence or an alternate custody arrangement that would keep him locked up as long as he is considered a menace to

society. If declared insane he would be committed to psychiatric care for as long as he’s considered ill. “Acquittal or the death penalty are the only logical outcomes of this case,” the confessed killer said. “I view 21 years in prison as a pathetic sentence.” According to Amnesty International, Belarus is the only country in Europe that still applies the death penalty; two young men were executed there last month. Russia announced a moratorium on capital punishment when it joined the Council of Europe in 1996 and pledged to abolish it, but has not done so. Norway abolished capital punishment in peacetime in 1905 but retained it for war crimes until 1979. After World War II, Norway executed 24 Norwegians, 13 Germans and one Dane.

No progress seen in N. Korea missile efforts BY DONNA CASSATA Associated Press

North Korea’s recent failed rocket launch shows that the communist country has made little progress in its spaceflight program, the head of the U.S. missile defense program said Wednesday. The assessment by Lt. Gen. Patrick J. O’Reilly raises questions about the immediate threat from a North Korean long-range missile and what the U.S. spends to counter it. O’Reilly testified before a Senate panel in defense of the missile de-

fense program and the Obama administration’s $7.75 billion budget request for next year. He was pressed about the failure last Friday of North Korea’s Unha-3 rocket that broke apart. The North Korean government said the rocket carried an Earth observation satellite, though other countries said it was a cover for testing long-range missile technology. North Korea’s Unha rocket shots in 1998, 2006 and 2009 are believed to have ended in failure. “Our experience has been you need a lot of testing and flight testing in order to validate and have reliance

in the capability,” he told the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee. “They do not, and it’s been evident every time they test. And their progress has not been made apparent in this latest flight test.” North Korea’s failed launch has proved to be fodder for both sides in the national security debate. Some lawmakers and arms control advocates have pressed for fewer dollars for missile defense in light of the North’s troubles, while others have argued for more money to protect the United States from an unpredictable regime.

NEW DELHI — India is planning to test launch a

new nuclear-capable missile that for the first time would give it the capability of hitting the major Chinese cities of Beijing and Shanghai. The government has hailed the Agni-V missile, with a range of 3,100 miles, as a major boost to its efforts to counter China’s regional dominance and become an Asian power in its own right.

MIDDLE EAST

ISRAELIS HONOR HOLOCAUST VICTIMS JERUSALEM — Israeli leaders and Holocaust survivors gathered Wednesday in Jerusalem to mark the country’s annual Holocaust Memorial Day. Wednesday night’s ceremony at Yad Vashem begins the 24-hour commemoration for the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis in the Holocaust of World War II. The Holocaust is considered a central event in modern Jewish history and key to Israel’s society.

EUROPE

U.S., CZECHS SIGN WEAPONS DEAL PRAGUE — Officials say the Czech and the U.S. defense ministers have signed a deal that makes it possible for companies to directly supply weapons to the American military. The ministry says the deal known as the Reciprocal Procurement of Defense Equipment and Services Agreement was signed by Czech Defense Minister Alexandr Vondra and U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on Wednesday during a NATO meeting in Brussels. The agreement allows Czech weapons makers to directly participate in public tenders by the U.S. Defense Department. So far, Czech firms could only become subcontractors for U.S. companies.

PAINTINGS BURNED IN PROTEST ROME — The director of a contemporary art mu-

seum in Italy is burning paintings to protest a shortage of funds. Antonio Manfredi set aflame Wednesday night a painting by Neapolitan artist Rosaria Matarese outside the Casoria Contemporary Art Museum, which is housed in the basement of a public school in the hinterland of Naples. A day earlier he burned a painting by a French artist. Both artists had given their consent.

AFRICA

RIVAL GOVERNMENT IS THREATENED KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan’s president threatened Wednesday to topple his rival government to the south, harsh words that could escalate the conflict between the two nations as they intensify clashes over their shared border. As the international community pushed for a peaceful solution to the dispute, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir vowed to “liberate” the people of South Sudan, saying it was his country’s duty to them. South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July after decades of civil war, creating the world’s newest country. But the two never agreed on how to share the oil wealth found in the region between the countries, and the border was never fully demarcated. FROM WIRE SERVICES


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Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 13A

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Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

TITANIC DINNER RAISES MONEY Women FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from local farmers and vendors will be available, starting Saturday at the Edmond Farmers Market. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired nursing assistants accused of abusing an elderly patient with dementia. The employees were accused after the family placed a camera in her room. PAGE 14A

IN BRIEF CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-theme fundraiser for the Rose State College Foundation’s scholarship fund. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the RMS Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10-course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. Menu items included filet mignon, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State

Portraying the first officer, Roger Ford greets guests as they enter the Titanic-theme fundraiser.

students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose

State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns. “This was really a no-brainer for us,” Rose State Foundation director Lisa Pitsiri said. “It’s a chance to put some historical information out there for people and to have a little bit of fun.” Pitsiri said there is a growing demand for scholarship money at the school. Rose State has more than 8,000 students and 60 degree programs. “We always have many more applicants for scholarships than we can fund, and the need isn’t going away,” Pitsiri said. “That’s the focus and mission of the foundation.”

Edmond Farmers Market will open Saturday BY DIANA BALDWIN

NURSING CENTER WORKERS FIRED

program manager. The market is expected to have 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond. Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there

with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets are 8 a.m. to 1p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15. Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street.

Edmond residents search for fresh produce in August at the Edmond Farmers Market. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN


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State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

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Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Egypt and how his view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance.

“I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said. Using the example of

the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current

funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said.

However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates

awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery,

chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for the kids to explore are just a few of the family friendly activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the

race go to YWCA programs that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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13A

SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

CHILD WAS SNATCHED AFTER SHOOTING

Keith Schuchardt, right, is comforted Wednesday in Spring, Texas, the day after the killing of his wife and abduction of his 3-day-old baby. AP PHOTO

Nurse suspected in baby abduction had miscarriage BY MICHAEL GRACZYK AND JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

SPRING, Texas — A Texas woman accused of killing a young mother and abducting her 3-day-old boy had suffered a miscarriage and intended to “adopt” the newborn as her own, authorities said Wednesday. Verna McClain, 30, is charged with capital murder after confessing to killing the new mother and grabbing tiny Keegan Golden from outside a pediatrician’s office in suburban Houston. Keegan was found unharmed hours later with McClain’s sister. The Montgomery County sheriff’s office said Wednesday that McClain — estranged from her husband, with whom she had raised three children — had told her fiance she was pregnant and had given birth to his child. Instead, McClain had miscarried, Capt. Bruce Zenor said. McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, told authorities that she had talked about needing to “do the adoption” soon after taking Keegan. Her fiance, who was not identified Wednesday, is being interviewed by authorities. Officials said they did not believe anyone else was involved in the shooting and abduction.

About the attack Sheriff Tommy Gage said Kala Golden had placed Keegan into her pickup Tuesday afternoon after leaving Northwoods Pediatric Center in Spring, about 20 miles north of Houston. The suspected shooter was parked next to her, Gage said. During the confrontation, the woman repeatedly shot Golden, then snatched the child from her truck and drove away,

according to witness accounts. The dying woman leaned into the vehicle and tried to take the boy back, screaming, “My baby!” but her attacker sped off. Two detectives spotted a vehicle later Tuesday outside a nearby apartment complex that matched witnesses’ descriptions, Gage said. Though McClain’s apartment was empty, she later arrived and talked to authorities. “During her interview with detectives, information was obtained which led detectives to a residence in Harris County where her sister lives and a possible location of the child,” Gage said. McClain was later arrested. Police say she admitted carrying out the attack. Investigators said McClain’s statements included information only the shooter would know and indicated she attacked the mother Tuesday as part of a wider plan to kidnap any child and that Golden was simply a convenient target. She was being held without bail. The baby has been returned to family members, according to Keith Schuchardt, who said he had been married to Kala Golden for three years. He told the Houston Chronicle that he learned of the shooting because as Golden lay dying, she asked another woman to call him and explain the attack. McClain is a vocational nurse. She does not work at the pediatric center, according to a clinic receptionist, Jackie Longoria. Golden’s mother, Linda Golden, told the AP she had no idea what could have sparked the slaying and abduction. “That’s the hardest she’s ever fought,” she said. “She died trying to save her baby.”


14A

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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight between 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, said Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is no construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home and was there

before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation. During a police inter-

view, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest in man’s Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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15A

IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363 2 Burial plots + companion headstone w/ perpetual care at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Valued @ $6700, Sell for $5000 Call Bob @ 405-247-1197 MEMORIAL PARK CEMETERY Section 28---6 Spaces Available 1 Space $1600-2 or more spaces $1450 ea Lanny Gardner Owner/Agent 405-691-1691 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com Resthaven Cemetery, Garden of Serenity spaces 3 & 4, lot 157, sec. 30 - Asking $1695 each. Call 831-0951 for more info. 2 cemetery plots with bronze headstone. $5000. OBO. Sunny Lane, Del City. 405-694-1743 or 405-737-0758


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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

NW 39

66

Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


CAPITOL

EDUCATION

Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 15A

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

WEST

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

TITANIC DINNER RAISES MONEY Women FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-theme fundraiser for the Rose State College Foundation’s scholarship fund. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the RMS Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10-course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. Menu items included filet mignon, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State

Portraying the first officer, Roger Ford greets guests as they enter the Titanic-theme fundraiser.

students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose

State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns. “This was really a no-brainer for us,” Rose State Foundation director Lisa Pitsiri said. “It’s a chance to put some historical information out there for people and to have a little bit of fun.” Pitsiri said there is a growing demand for scholarship money at the school. Rose State has more than 8,000 students and 60 degree programs. “We always have many more applicants for scholarships than we can fund, and the need isn’t going away,” Pitsiri said. “That’s the focus and mission of the foundation.”


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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

METRO | STATE

TREE DEDICATION REMEMBERS 9/11 ATTACKS, MURRAH BOMBING

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SENIORS OKLAHOMA COUNTY SENIOR MENUS For April 23-27 Monday — Salisbury steak with gravy, mashed potatoes, spinach, wheat bread, chocolate pudding and milk. Tuesday — Pinto beans and ham, tomato relish, creamy slaw, cornbread, oranges and milk. Wednesday — Spaghetti and meat sauce, green beans, green salad, Italian bread, cinnamon applesauce and milk. Thursday — Tuna salad, corn chowder, carrot salad, wheat bread, pears and milk. Friday — Chicken breast with gravy, broccoli rice casserole, beets, wheat bread, fruit crisp and milk.

Ron Vega, director of design and construction for the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum, points to a seedling from the Sept. 11 Survivor Tree while speaking during the tree dedication.

Menus are subject to change without notice. For more information, call 949-2709.

NUTRITION SITES The Oklahoma County Senior Nutrition Program operates 17 dining sites, open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. To find a site, call 949-2709.

ACTIVITIES Senior activities are available daily at Will Rogers Senior Activity Center, 3501 Pat Murphy Drive, and Woodson Park Senior Activity Center, 3401 S May Ave. For a schedule, call Will Rogers at 942-4339 or Woodson Park at 681-3266.

IN BRIEF COMMON CAUSE MEETING SET

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Survivors, rescue workers and family members affected by the 9/11 attacks in New York joined Murrah Building survivors on Wednesday on the campus of Oklahoma Christian University for a tree-planting ceremony and dedication of a memorial plaque. Members of 4/19 Outreach, a nonprofit organization of survivors, family members and rescue workers, donated a seedling from the Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and a piece of granite salvaged from the ruins of the Murrah Building to the students, faculty and alumni of Oklahoma Christian for their support and encouragement since the April 19, 1995, bombing. Survivors and rescue workers from the 9/11 attacks drove from New York City with a cutting from the tree that survived the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and a cross cut from the steel of the fallen north tower. In a show of solidarity between the two cities, the trees were planted alongside each other as a symbol of hope and resilience.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

From left, Sarri Singer, Glenn Radalinsky, Charlie Kaczorowski and Tom Canavan shovel the last bits of soil on a seedling from the Oklahoma City Survivor Tree during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University. Singer is a survivor of a terrorist attack in Israel and the director of One Heart, an organization that brings together survivors of terrorist attacks. Radalinsky is a ground zero rescue worker who because of injuries suffered during the rescue and recovery is now retired disabled from the Nassau County Police Department. Kaczorowski is a survivor of the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, survivor of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and was the site supervisor for recovery and cleanup at ground zero for 10 months. Canavan is a 9/11 survivor who dug himself out of the north tower of the World Trade Center. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Andrew Tevington, general counsel of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, will speak Saturday during the monthly meeting of the Common Cause board of directors. The board meets at 9:30 a.m. in Oklahoma City’s Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave. The public is invited. Common Cause is an organization dedicated to open, honest and accountable government. For more information, call O. Gail Poole at (212) 729-8553.

BISHOP TO GIVE LECTURE NORMAN — The United Church of Norman-UCC will host a free lecture Friday by Bishop John Shelby Spong. He will speak at 7 p.m. in the Great Hall of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave. Spong will speak on “Why Christianity Must Change or Die — The Old Paradigm Is Not Working.” For more information, go to www.normanucc.org.

EARTH DAY MARKET IS SATURDAY NORMAN — An Earth Day Arts Market will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the West Wind Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1309 W Boyd St. The event will include fine art, jewelry, ceramics and glasswork by local artists. Visitors are asked to bring individually wrapped snacks for children as a donation to agencies in Norman that serve children.

People pray during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University.

FROM STAFF REPORTS


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond’s Farmers Market opens Saturday

Fresh cantaloupes tempt buyers at the Edmond Farmers Market at Festival Market Place in July.

A customer searches through tomatoes at the Edmond Farmers Market in August.

People search for fresh produce at the Edmond Farmers Market in August. This year’s market starts Saturday.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street. Edmond Farmers Market is a registered market with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and meets all licensure requirements with the Oklahoma Department of Health. Parks department officials are still taking applications for vendor spaces.

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from

local farmers and vendors will once again be available in Edmond at the Farmers Market on Saturday. Locally grown and produced products have been available here since 1988. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department program manager. “They have been able to get a jump-start. There are vegetables out there.” The market is expected to offer 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El

LEARN MORE For more information, call 216-7635.

Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond. Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets, which include the junior market, are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Right: Crowds of shoppers look through produce, flowers and baked goods at the Edmond Farmers Market in July. This year’s market opens Saturday and runs through October.

Norman plans events to celebrate Earth Day FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — More than 50 organizations will offer activities, exhibits and demonstrations at an Earth Day Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins Ave. The free event also will include a tree giveaway, sponsored by the city of Norman. About 450 trees will be distributed on a first-come basis. The giveaway is being made possible through donations from the Apache Foundation and the Oklahoma Tree Bank Foundation. The day’s activities also will include a 5k run, bicycle games and live entertainment, all designed to highlight the need to protect the Earth’s resources. Other Earth Day celebrations in the city will include lectures and a nature walk at the Discovery Cove Nature Center at Lake Thunderbird on Saturday. The center is off State Highway 9 on Clear Bay

Camryn Williams plants a flower during the 2010 Earth Day celebration in Norman. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Boulevard, across from the Turkey Pass campground. Beginning at 10 a.m., naturalist Kathy Furneaux will discuss “What Are Trees Good For?” At 11 a.m., she will lead a discussion about insects with children ages 5 and up. At 1:30 p.m., Furneaux will present a slideshow on bats. She will lead a nature walk beginning at 3 p.m. On Sunday, the Keystone XL Pipeline will be the featured topic of a round-table discussion

from 5 to 7 p.m. at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church at Brooks Street and McGee Drive. A light vegetarian dinner will precede the panel discussion. Speakers will be Roy Knapp, a retired petroleum and geology professor who taught at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Texas; Charles Wesner, chairman of the Oklahoma chapter of the Sierra Club, and Mary Francis, an environmental activist.

Choctaw Land Run Festival scheduled Thursday, Friday BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

CHOCTAW — Thursday and Friday, students will have a chance to re-enact the Oklahoma Land Run of 1889 during the Choctaw Land Run Festival. The ninth annual festival starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. both days, with a kids’ land run race each hour at Choctaw Creek Park, 2001 N Harper. “It’s so much fun to watch the kids ... they’ll get in line and try to sneak across saying, ‘I’m a Sooner!’ ” said Debbie Green, a city employee and event organizer. Some children come dressed as pio-

neers. Much like the ’89ers, children will line up, wait for a sign to run and dash their way to stake a claim. Then, they must bring that stake number back to a deed office where they are given a replica of actual deeds given out at the time. The event also will feature wheelbarrow races, gunfight shows, blacksmithing demonstrations, Indian and Irish dancers plus food vendors and period music. Green said 1,800 students are expected to race over the course of the two days, and the public is welcome to enjoy the entertainment and vendors and watch the land runs. For more information, go to www. choctawfestival.org or call 390-8276.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Egypt and how his view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance.

“I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said. Using the example of

the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current

funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said.

However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates

awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery,

chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for kids to explore are just a few of the activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs

that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

BAM Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

into Oklahoma’s entertainment scene blog.newsok.com/ bamsblog and in Weekend Look.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as required by title 19, United States Code, section 1607 et seq of seizure at Oklahoma, on the dates specified below, of the following merchandise, liable to forfeiture to the United States under provisions of various statutes cited. Any person claiming such property is hereby notified to file his claim at the Customhouse, 7501 Esters Blvd., Suite 160, Irving, Texas 75063 (or by mail to P.O. Box 619050, D/FW Airport, Texas 75261), within 20 days (or 35 days if case if denoted as C.A.F.R.A.) after the first publication of this notice together with a bond in the amount of $5000 or 10% of the value of the claimed property, whichever is lower, but not less than $250, with approved sureties as provided for in title 19, United States Code, section 1608. The cost bond amount, if required, is specified below for each referenced case. Once the cost bond and/or claim to the merchandise has been filed, the case will be forwarded to the United States Attorney for the institution of forfeiture proceedings in federal district court. If you are indigent (needy and poor) you may not be required to post the bond. If no claim is filed or bond given as provided in the aforesaid statute, the property herein described will be declared forfeited to the Government of the United States and disposed of in conformity with the laws and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury: 2011550400006301: 13,786 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted to Bank of America Cashier’s Check #0385633 valued at $285,350.00 $ – in violation of 18USC 981 & 18USC 1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and /or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and 18USC 981 & 18USC1952, because it is unlawful to travel in interstate or foreign commerce or use the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce, with intent to distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity; or commit any crime of violence to further any unlawful activity; or otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on May 11, 2011 at Edmond, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550400001501: 297 pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0385948 valued at $6,565.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on December 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001401: 1034 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0400010 valued at $30,690.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and in violation of 31USC5332, because it is unlawful to knowingly conceal more than $10,000.00 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual or in any conveyance, article of luggage, merchandise, or other container, and to transport or transfer or attempt to transport or transfer such currency or monetary instruments from a place within the United States to a place outside of the United States, or from a place outside the United States to a place within the United States. - seized on February 09, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001501: 165 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0399982 valued at $8,800.00-in violation of Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(b)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person to use any conveyance, including any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft, that has been or is being used in the commission of a violation of subsection (a), in that a conveyance was being used to transport undocumented aliens into the United States, the gross proceeds of such violation, and any property traceable to such conveyance or proceeds, shall be seized and subject to forfeiture and Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person who, knowing that a person is an alien, brings to or attempts to bring to the United States in any manner whatsoever such person at a place other than a designated port of entry or place other than as designated by the Commissioner, regardless of whether such alien has received prior official authorization to come to, enter, or reside in the United States and regardless of any future official action which may be taken with respect to such alien-seized on February 14, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required)

Other Legal Notices NOTICE OF SALE PODS Oklahoma City, hereby publishes notice, as required by Oklahoma Self-Service Storage Facility Lien Act (OK Stat. 191.7) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. PODS Oklahoma City reserves the right to reject any bids, Auction is located at: 6601 S. Air Depot Blvd. Suite A Oklahoma City 73135 and will be held at 3 PM on Friday April 27,2012 CUSTOMER Container # Aduddell Group, David Aduddell: 236B74, 8063B74, 267B74, 142B74 Barr, Joyce 25B74: McGee, Angela 149B74: Sanchez, Kim 235B74: Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

Amazing Space Storage 3405 Bart Conner Dr. Norman, Oklahoma 73072 (405) 360-9186 Date of Auction: April 27, 2012 Time of Auction: Directly Following RitePlace’s Katia Sevilla 3808 Bristol Dr. Norman, OK 73072 Chairs, lamp, furniture, saw, boxes, etc Diane Grady 513 SW 39th St. Moore, OK 73160 Boxes, chair, plastic tubs, etc. David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Chair, table, golf bag/clubs, furniture, etc David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Christmas decorations, boxes, plastic tubs, etc. Allison Sharp 6300 S County Club Dr. OKC, OK 73159 Boxes, furniture, etc.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Notice of Public Sale April 27, 2012 10:00 A.M. RitePlace Storage 8706 S. Shields Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Phone # 405-634-6008 Advertisement of Warehouseman’s Sale Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 196 of Oklahoma Statutes.

Title 42, the undersigned warehouseman claims lien upon the goods stored, held for the account as set forth below, to-wit: Anthony Davis: 4324 S.E. 38th Street: Del City, OK 73115 Dryer Cody Floyd: 915 N.W. 5th St.: Moore, OK 73160 Dresser, child bed, microwave, toys, lamps, chairs and miscellaneous items. Kevin Williams: 2100 N.W. 60th ST: Oklahoma City, OK 73159 Television, Chairs, Furniture and Lots of other miscellaneous items. Juan Hernandez: 2202 S.W. 22nd: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 Duffle bags and other miscellaneous items. Josh Cummings: 9516 S. Shields: Oklahoma City, OK 73160 Television, Radio, chest, totes lots of other miscellaneous items. BIANCA’S BARGAINS: 8481 N. E. 23rd Suite B: Oklahoma City, OK 73141 Bicycle, Drum Set, storage trunks, totes, boxes, furniture, Dining Booth Seats and Table, totes, boxes Chairs and other lots of miscellaneous items.

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All creditors having claims against Milfred L. Buckingham, Deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interests and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the named Administrators, Mr. Damon Buckingham and Mr. Gregory Buckingham through their attorney of record, S. Solola Webb, 228 Robert S. Kerr, suite 630, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, thirty days from receipt of this notice, or the same will be forever barred. Notice of Application for Merger of Bank Holding Companies Valliance Financial Corp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to merge with another bank holding company, Valliance Texas Financial Holdings, Inc., McKinney, Texas. We intend to acquire control of Valliance Bank, McKinney, Texas.

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The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198. The comment period will not end before May 19, 2012 and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President, at (816) 8812633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The Special Services Department of the Midwest City-Del City School System is committed to the goal of identifying and locating every disabled child who resides within the boundaries of the district, and who is not receiving Special Education services. Some children with severe impairments may be eligible for services as early as age three (3). If you have knowledge of any special needs individual between the ages of three (3) through twenty-one (21) years of age, who may be in need of special education services, please refer their parents to Special Services at 739-1696.

Vin: 1FFWKT3C783002192, 2008 Motor Scooter, Miles 1,822. Sale Price $650.00, Contact Loretta 688-7777 Sale date 4-20-2012 Anyone having any legal interest in: Nicoma Trailer 7X10 Utility Vin: 1L9SF10196S238832 Call Bob at 1-405-706-0216


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INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight among 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

II

17A

IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

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Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


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Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 13A

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

NORTH

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

TITANIC DINNER RAISES MONEY Women FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-theme fundraiser for the Rose State College Foundation’s scholarship fund. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the RMS Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10-course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. Menu items included filet mignon, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State

Portraying the first officer, Roger Ford greets guests as they enter the Titanic-theme fundraiser.

students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose

State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns. “This was really a no-brainer for us,” Rose State Foundation director Lisa Pitsiri said. “It’s a chance to put some historical information out there for people and to have a little bit of fun.” Pitsiri said there is a growing demand for scholarship money at the school. Rose State has more than 8,000 students and 60 degree programs. “We always have many more applicants for scholarships than we can fund, and the need isn’t going away,” Pitsiri said. “That’s the focus and mission of the foundation.”


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State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and Egypt and how his view of democracy has been influ-

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

enced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance. “I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said. Using the example of

the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple

as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

20 finalists selected Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos in school contest FROM STAFF REPORTS FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne; Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger

Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administra-

tive assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City; Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma regents ponder new formula for funding BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive

funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said. However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional

certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

City YWCA race will aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery, chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the

RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for the kids to explore are just a few of the family friendly activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

NOTICE TO FREELANCE WRITERS, DON GAMMILL PHOTOGRAPHERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS:

MR. KNOW IT

The Oklahoman, in partnership with Ebyline, is seeking YOU! He’s serious. He’sTofun. in your community. signHe’s up, visit Ebyline.com

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MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investiga-

tion is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police report Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to send-

ing multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

TREE DEDICATION REMEMBERS 9/11 ATTACKS, MURRAH BOMBING

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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SENIORS OKLAHOMA COUNTY SENIOR MENUS For April 23-27 Monday — Salisbury steak with gravy, mashed potatoes, spinach, wheat bread, chocolate pudding and milk. Tuesday — Pinto beans and ham, tomato relish, creamy slaw, cornbread, oranges and milk. Wednesday — Spaghetti and meat sauce, green beans, green salad, Italian bread, cinnamon applesauce and milk. Thursday — Tuna salad, corn chowder, carrot salad, wheat bread, pears and milk. Friday — Chicken breast with gravy, broccoli rice casserole, beets, wheat bread, fruit crisp and milk.

Ron Vega, director of design and construction for the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum, points to a seedling from the Sept. 11 Survivor Tree while speaking during the tree dedication.

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Menus are subject to change without notice. For more information, call 949-2709.

NUTRITION SITES The Oklahoma County Senior Nutrition Program operates 17 dining sites, open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. To find a site, call 949-2709.

ACTIVITIES Senior activities are available daily at Will Rogers Senior Activity Center, 3501 Pat Murphy Drive, and Woodson Park Senior Activity Center, 3401 S May Ave. For a schedule, call Will Rogers at 942-4339 or Woodson Park at 681-3266.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Survivors, rescue workers and family members affected by the 9/11 attacks in New York joined Murrah Building survivors on Wednesday on the campus of Oklahoma Christian University for a tree-planting ceremony and dedication of a memorial plaque. Members of 4/19 Outreach, a nonprofit organization of survivors, family members and rescue workers, donated a seedling from the Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and a piece of granite salvaged from the ruins of the Murrah Building to the students, faculty and alumni of Oklahoma Christian for their support and encouragement since the April 19, 1995, bombing. Survivors and rescue workers from the 9/11 attacks drove from New York City with a cutting from the tree that survived the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and a cross cut from the steel of the fallen north tower. In a show of solidarity between the two cities, the trees were planted alongside each other as a symbol of hope and resilience.

From left, Sarri Singer, Glenn Radalinsky, Charlie Kaczorowski and Tom Canavan shovel the last bits of soil on a seedling from the Oklahoma City Survivor Tree during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University. Singer is a survivor of a terrorist attack in Israel and the director of One Heart, an organization that brings together survivors of terrorist attacks. Radalinsky is a ground zero rescue worker who because of injuries suffered during the rescue and recovery is now retired disabled from the Nassau County Police Department. Kaczorowski is a survivor of the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, survivor of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and was the site supervisor for recovery and cleanup at ground zero for 10 months. Canavan is a 9/11 survivor who dug himself out of the north tower of the World Trade Center. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

People pray during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University.

BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

Common Cause plans meeting FROM STAFF REPORTS

Andrew Tevington, general counsel of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, will speak Saturday during the monthly meeting of the Common Cause board of directors. The board meets at 9:30 a.m. in Oklahoma City’s Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave. The public is invited. Common Cause is a national, nonpartisan volunteer organization dedicated to open government. For more information, call O. Gail Poole at (212) 729-8553.

Other Legal 777 Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as required by title 19, United States Code, section 1607 et seq of seizure at Oklahoma, on the dates specified below, of the following merchandise, liable to forfeiture to the United States under provisions of various statutes cited. Any person claiming such property is hereby notified to file his claim at the Customhouse, 7501 Esters Blvd., Suite 160, Irving, Texas 75063 (or by mail to P.O. Box 619050, D/FW Airport, Texas 75261), within 20 days (or 35 days if case if denoted as C.A.F.R.A.) after the first publication of this notice together with a bond in the amount of $5000 or 10% of the value of the claimed property, whichever is lower, but not less than $250, with approved sureties as provided for in title 19, United States Code, section 1608. The cost bond amount, if required, is specified below for each referenced case. Once the cost bond and/or claim to the merchandise has been filed, the case will be forwarded to the United States Attorney for the institution of forfeiture proceedings in federal district court. If you are indigent (needy and poor) you may not be required to post the bond. If no claim is filed or bond given as provided in the aforesaid statute, the property herein described will be declared forfeited to the Government of the United States and disposed of in conformity with the laws and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury:

Elementary math educator is selected as teacher of year for Norman district NORMAN — Sara Leader, a math resource teacher at Adams Elementary School, has been named Norman’s teacher of the year. Leader was honored Tuesday during the district’s annual celebration of excellence. She was among five finalists for the award. She is in her first year as a teacher at Adams. She taught second and third grades at Jackson Elementary School from 1993 to 2011. She was Jackson’s site teacher of the year in 1998. Leader credits a child development professor at the University of Oklahoma for inspiring her career. After watching Deb Parkinson interact with her students, Leader said, “I wanted to learn everything I could from her to be that teacher who is completely engaged with the student in front of her while simultaneously making other

Other Legal Notices

Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” CHERYL PANTALONE, ART TEACHER FROM A LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR LEADER’S NOMINATION

2011550400006301: 13,786 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted to Bank of America Cashier’s Check #0385633 valued at $285,350.00 $ – in violation of 18USC 981 & 18USC 1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and /or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and 18USC 981 & 18USC1952, because it is unlawful to travel in interstate or foreign commerce or use the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce, with intent to distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity; or commit any crime of violence to further any unlawful activity; or otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on May 11, 2011 at Edmond, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550400001501: 297 pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0385948 valued at $6,565.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on December 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001401: 1034 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0400010 valued at $30,690.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and in violation of 31USC5332, because it is unlawful to knowingly conceal more than $10,000.00 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual or in any conveyance, article of luggage, merchandise, or other container, and to transport or transfer or attempt to transport or transfer such currency or monetary instruments from a place within the United States to a place outside of the United States, or from a place outside the United States to a place within the United States. - seized on February 09, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001501: 165 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0399982 valued at $8,800.00-in violation of Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(b)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person to use any conveyance, including any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft, that has been or is being used in the commission of a violation of subsection (a), in that a conveyance was being used to transport undocumented aliens into the United States, the gross proceeds of such violation, and any property traceable to such conveyance or proceeds, shall be seized and subject to forfeiture and Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person who, knowing that a person is an alien, brings to or attempts to bring to the United States in any manner whatsoever such person at a place other than a designated port of entry or place other than as designated by the Commissioner, regardless of whether such alien has received prior official authorization to come to, enter, or reside in the United States and regardless of any future official action which may be taken with respect to such alien-seized on February 14, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required)

Sara Leader

students feel a sense of love and belonging.” During her teaching career, Leader said, she has come to realize “the smallest touch or glimpse of truth can make all the difference. I want every person I work with, tall or small, to know that I truly see them. I am profoundly joyful to have them by my side. Our greatest achievements don’t come with big pronouncements or dropping balloons. They are a collection of genuine gestures over time.” In a letter of support for Leader’s nomination, art

Other Legal Notices

teacher Cheryl Pantalone wrote, “Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” Her interaction with students “infects you with a desire to have that kind of passion in your own profession — whatever that may be.” Leader was founder and chairwoman of the annual

Jackson Elementary Art Auction and served as faculty liaison for a partnership with the Firehouse Art Center. She served as co-chair of the Professional Learning Community at Jackson and was a delegate to the National Reading Conference in San Francisco, among other honors. She holds a degree in early childhood education from OU and serves as an instructor at OU.

NOTICE OF SALE PODS Oklahoma City, hereby publishes notice, as required by Oklahoma Self-Service Storage Facility Lien Act (OK Stat. 191.7) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. PODS Oklahoma City reserves the right to reject any bids, Auction is located at: 6601 S. Air Depot Blvd. Suite A Oklahoma City 73135 and will be held at 3 PM on Friday April 27,2012 CUSTOMER Container # Aduddell Group, David Aduddell: 236B74, 8063B74, 267B74, 142B74 Barr, Joyce 25B74: McGee, Angela 149B74: Sanchez, Kim 235B74: Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

Amazing Space Storage 3405 Bart Conner Dr. Norman, Oklahoma 73072 (405) 360-9186 Date of Auction: April 27, 2012 Time of Auction: Directly Following RitePlace’s Katia Sevilla 3808 Bristol Dr. Norman, OK 73072 Chairs, lamp, furniture, saw, boxes, etc Diane Grady 513 SW 39th St. Moore, OK 73160 Boxes, chair, plastic tubs, etc. David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Chair, table, golf bag/clubs, furniture, etc David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Christmas decorations, boxes, plastic tubs, etc. Allison Sharp 6300 S County Club Dr. OKC, OK 73159 Boxes, furniture, etc.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Notice of Public Sale April 27, 2012 10:00 A.M. RitePlace Storage 8706 S. Shields Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Phone # 405-634-6008 Advertisement of Warehouseman’s Sale Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 196 of Oklahoma Statutes.

Title 42, the undersigned warehouseman claims lien upon the goods stored, held for the account as set forth below, to-wit: Anthony Davis: 4324 S.E. 38th Street: Del City, OK 73115 Dryer Cody Floyd: 915 N.W. 5th St.: Moore, OK 73160 Dresser, child bed, microwave, toys, lamps, chairs and miscellaneous items. Kevin Williams: 2100 N.W. 60th ST: Oklahoma City, OK 73159 Television, Chairs, Furniture and Lots of other miscellaneous items. Juan Hernandez: 2202 S.W. 22nd: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 Duffle bags and other miscellaneous items. Josh Cummings: 9516 S. Shields: Oklahoma City, OK 73160 Television, Radio, chest, totes lots of other miscellaneous items. BIANCA’S BARGAINS: 8481 N. E. 23rd Suite B: Oklahoma City, OK 73141 Bicycle, Drum Set, storage trunks, totes, boxes, furniture, Dining Booth Seats and Table, totes, boxes Chairs and other lots of miscellaneous items.

Other Legal Notices

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All creditors having claims against Milfred L. Buckingham, Deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interests and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the named Administrators, Mr. Damon Buckingham and Mr. Gregory Buckingham through their attorney of record, S. Solola Webb, 228 Robert S. Kerr, suite 630, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, thirty days from receipt of this notice, or the same will be forever barred. Notice of Application for Merger of Bank Holding Companies Valliance Financial Corp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to merge with another bank holding company, Valliance Texas Financial Holdings, Inc., McKinney, Texas. We intend to acquire control of Valliance Bank, McKinney, Texas.

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The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198. The comment period will not end before May 19, 2012 and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President, at (816) 8812633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The Special Services Department of the Midwest City-Del City School System is committed to the goal of identifying and locating every disabled child who resides within the boundaries of the district, and who is not receiving Special Education services. Some children with severe impairments may be eligible for services as early as age three (3). If you have knowledge of any special needs individual between the ages of three (3) through twenty-one (21) years of age, who may be in need of special education services, please refer their parents to Special Services at 739-1696.

Vin: 1FFWKT3C783002192, 2008 Motor Scooter, Miles 1,822. Sale Price $650.00, Contact Loretta 688-7777 Sale date 4-20-2012 Anyone having any legal interest in: Nicoma Trailer 7X10 Utility Vin: 1L9SF10196S238832 Call Bob at 1-405-706-0216


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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight between 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363 2 Burial plots + companion headstone w/ perpetual care at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Valued @ $6700, Sell for $5000 Call Bob @ 405-247-1197 MEMORIAL PARK CEMETERY Section 28---6 Spaces Available 1 Space $1600-2 or more spaces $1450 ea Lanny Gardner Owner/Agent 405-691-1691 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com Resthaven Cemetery, Garden of Serenity spaces 3 & 4, lot 157, sec. 30 - Asking $1695 each. Call 831-0951 for more info. 2 cemetery plots with bronze headstone. $5000. OBO. Sunny Lane, Del City. 405-694-1743 or 405-737-0758


18A

III

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

NW 39

66

Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


CAPITOL

EDUCATION

Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 14A

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

SOUTH

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

TITANIC DINNER RAISES MONEY Women FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-theme fundraiser for the Rose State College Foundation’s scholarship fund. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the RMS Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10-course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. Menu items included filet mignon, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State

Portraying the first officer, Roger Ford greets guests as they enter the Titanic-theme fundraiser.

students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose

State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns. “This was really a no-brainer for us,” Rose State Foundation director Lisa Pitsiri said. “It’s a chance to put some historical information out there for people and to have a little bit of fun.” Pitsiri said there is a growing demand for scholarship money at the school. Rose State has more than 8,000 students and 60 degree programs. “We always have many more applicants for scholarships than we can fund, and the need isn’t going away,” Pitsiri said. “That’s the focus and mission of the foundation.”


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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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Edmond’s Farmers Market opens Saturday

Fresh cantaloupes tempt buyers at the Edmond Farmers Market at Festival Market Place in July.

A customer searches through tomatoes at the Edmond Farmers Market in August.

People search for fresh produce at the Edmond Farmers Market in August. This year’s market starts Saturday.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street. Edmond Farmers Market is a registered market with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and meets all licensure requirements with the Oklahoma Department of Health. Parks department officials are still taking applications for vendor spaces.

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from

local farmers and vendors will once again be available in Edmond at the Farmers Market on Saturday. Locally grown and produced products have been available here since 1988. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department program manager. “They have been able to get a jump-start. There are vegetables out there.” The market is expected to offer 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El

LEARN MORE For more information, call 216-7635.

Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond. Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets, which include the junior market, are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Right: Crowds of shoppers look through produce, flowers and baked goods at the Edmond Farmers Market in July. This year’s market opens Saturday and runs through October.

Norman plans events to celebrate Earth Day FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — More than 50 organizations will offer activities, exhibits and demonstrations at an Earth Day Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins Ave. The free event also will include a tree giveaway, sponsored by the city of Norman. About 450 trees will be distributed on a first-come basis. The giveaway is being made possible through donations from the Apache Foundation and the Oklahoma Tree Bank Foundation. The day’s activities also will include a 5k run, bicycle games and live entertainment, all designed to highlight the need to protect the Earth’s resources. Other Earth Day celebrations in the city will include lectures and a nature walk at the Discovery Cove Nature Center at Lake Thunderbird on Saturday. The center is off State Highway 9 on Clear Bay

Camryn Williams plants a flower during the 2010 Earth Day celebration in Norman. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Boulevard, across from the Turkey Pass campground. Beginning at 10 a.m., naturalist Kathy Furneaux will discuss “What Are Trees Good For?” At 11 a.m., she will lead a discussion about insects with children ages 5 and up. At 1:30 p.m., Furneaux will present a slideshow on bats. She will lead a nature walk beginning at 3 p.m. On Sunday, the Keystone XL Pipeline will be the featured topic of a round-table discussion

from 5 to 7 p.m. at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church at Brooks Street and McGee Drive. A light vegetarian dinner will precede the panel discussion. Speakers will be Roy Knapp, a retired petroleum and geology professor who taught at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Texas; Charles Wesner, chairman of the Oklahoma chapter of the Sierra Club, and Mary Francis, an environmental activist.

Choctaw Land Run Festival scheduled Thursday, Friday BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

CHOCTAW — Thursday and Friday, students will have a chance to re-enact the Oklahoma Land Run of 1889 during the Choctaw Land Run Festival. The ninth annual festival starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. both days, with a kids’ land run race each hour at Choctaw Creek Park, 2001 N Harper. “It’s so much fun to watch the kids ... they’ll get in line and try to sneak across saying, ‘I’m a Sooner!’ ” said Debbie Green, a city employee and event organizer. Some children come dressed as pio-

neers. Much like the ’89ers, children will line up, wait for a sign to run and dash their way to stake a claim. Then, they must bring that stake number back to a deed office where they are given a replica of actual deeds given out at the time. The event also will feature wheelbarrow races, gunfight shows, blacksmithing demonstrations, Indian and Irish dancers plus food vendors and period music. Green said 1,800 students are expected to race over the course of the two days, and the public is welcome to enjoy the entertainment and vendors and watch the land runs. For more information, go to www. choctawfestival.org or call 390-8276.

IN BRIEF BISHOP TO GIVE FREE LECTURE NORMAN — The United

Church of Norman-UCC will host a free lecture Friday by Bishop John Shelby Spong. He will speak at 7 p.m. in the Great Hall of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave. A pioneer of progressive Christianity, Spong will speak on “Why Christianity Must Change or Die — The Old Paradigm Is Not Working.” Spong is a scholar, pastor, priest and bishop who has made a life’s study of the Bible. For more information, go to www. normanucc.org.

EARTH DAY ARTS MARKET SET NORMAN — An Earth Day Arts Market will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the West Wind Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1309 W Boyd St. The event will include fine art, jewelry, ceramics and glasswork by local artists. The Norman Belly Dance Club will perform. Visitors are asked to bring individually wrapped snacks for children as a donation to agencies in Norman that serve children. The event is in conjunction with Child Abuse Prevention Month.

STAMP CLUB HOSTS PRESENTATION NORMAN — The Norman Public Library will host “Stamp Collecting 101” at 1 p.m. Saturday in the Campbell Gallery Room at the Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave. Members of the Norman Stamp Club will discuss the hobby and give tips on how to get started with a collection.

EARTH DAY CRAFT PROJECT PLANNED NORMAN — Teenagers are invited to make things from recycled or unwanted items at an Earth Day program at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Norman Public Library, 225 N Webster Ave. “Teens on the Make” is for students in grades 6 through 12. The library will provide a variety of materials but participants are encouraged to bring their own as well. Registration is encouraged by calling 701-2620 or going to www.justsoyouknow.us/norman. FROM STAFF REPORTS


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Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Egypt and how his view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance.

“I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said. Using the example of

the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current

funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said.

However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates

awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery,

chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for kids to explore are just a few of the activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs

that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

CHILD WAS SNATCHED AFTER SHOOTING

Keith Schuchardt, right, is comforted Wednesday in Spring, Texas. AP PHOTO

Nurse suspected in baby abduction had miscarriage BY MICHAEL GRACZYK AND JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

SPRING, Texas — A Texas woman accused of killing a young mother and abducting her 3-day-old boy had suffered a miscarriage and intended to “adopt” the newborn as her own, authorities said Wednesday. Verna McClain, 30, is charged with capital murder after confessing to killing the new mother and grabbing tiny Keegan Golden from outside a pediatrician’s office in suburban Houston. Keegan was found unharmed hours later with McClain’s sister. The Montgomery County sheriff’s office said Wednesday that McClain — estranged from her husband, with whom she had raised three children — had told her fiance she was pregnant and had given birth to his child. Instead, McClain had miscarried, Capt. Bruce Zenor said. McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, told authorities that she had talked about needing to “do the adoption” soon after taking Keegan. Her fiance, who was not identified Wednesday, is being interviewed by authorities. Officials said they did not believe anyone else was involved in the shoot-

ing and abduction. Sheriff Tommy Gage said Kala Golden had placed Keegan into her pickup Tuesday afternoon after leaving Northwoods Pediatric Center in Spring, about 20 miles north of Houston. The suspected shooter was parked next to her, Gage said. During the confrontation, the woman repeatedly shot Golden, then snatched the child from her truck and drove away, according to witness accounts. The dying woman leaned into the vehicle and tried to take the boy back, screaming, “My baby!” but her attacker sped off. Two detectives spotted a vehicle later Tuesday outside a nearby apartment complex that matched witnesses’ descriptions, Gage said. Though McClain’s apartment was empty, she later arrived and talked to authorities. “During her interview with detectives, information was obtained which led detectives to a residence in Harris County where her sister lives and a possible location of the child,” Gage said. McClain was later arrested. Police say she admitted carrying out the attack. McClain is a vocational nurse. She does not work at the pediatric center, according to a clinic receptionist, Jackie Longoria.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

TREE DEDICATION REMEMBERS 9/11 ATTACKS, MURRAH BOMBING

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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SENIORS OKLAHOMA COUNTY SENIOR MENUS For April 23-27 Monday — Salisbury steak with gravy, mashed potatoes, spinach, wheat bread, chocolate pudding and milk. Tuesday — Pinto beans and ham, tomato relish, creamy slaw, cornbread, oranges and milk. Wednesday — Spaghetti and meat sauce, green beans, green salad, Italian bread, cinnamon applesauce and milk. Thursday — Tuna salad, corn chowder, carrot salad, wheat bread, pears and milk. Friday — Chicken breast with gravy, broccoli rice casserole, beets, wheat bread, fruit crisp and milk.

Ron Vega, director of design and construction for the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum, points to a seedling from the Sept. 11 Survivor Tree while speaking during the tree dedication.

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Menus are subject to change without notice. For more information, call 949-2709.

NUTRITION SITES The Oklahoma County Senior Nutrition Program operates 17 dining sites, open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. To find a site, call 949-2709.

ACTIVITIES Senior activities are available daily at Will Rogers Senior Activity Center, 3501 Pat Murphy Drive, and Woodson Park Senior Activity Center, 3401 S May Ave. For a schedule, call Will Rogers at 942-4339 or Woodson Park at 681-3266.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Survivors, rescue workers and family members affected by the 9/11 attacks in New York joined Murrah Building survivors on Wednesday on the campus of Oklahoma Christian University for a tree-planting ceremony and dedication of a memorial plaque. Members of 4/19 Outreach, a nonprofit organization of survivors, family members and rescue workers, donated a seedling from the Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and a piece of granite salvaged from the ruins of the Murrah Building to the students, faculty and alumni of Oklahoma Christian for their support and encouragement since the April 19, 1995, bombing. Survivors and rescue workers from the 9/11 attacks drove from New York City with a cutting from the tree that survived the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and a cross cut from the steel of the fallen north tower. In a show of solidarity between the two cities, the trees were planted alongside each other as a symbol of hope and resilience.

From left, Sarri Singer, Glenn Radalinsky, Charlie Kaczorowski and Tom Canavan shovel the last bits of soil on a seedling from the Oklahoma City Survivor Tree during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University. Singer is a survivor of a terrorist attack in Israel and the director of One Heart, an organization that brings together survivors of terrorist attacks. Radalinsky is a ground zero rescue worker who because of injuries suffered during the rescue and recovery is now retired disabled from the Nassau County Police Department. Kaczorowski is a survivor of the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, survivor of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and was the site supervisor for recovery and cleanup at ground zero for 10 months. Canavan is a 9/11 survivor who dug himself out of the north tower of the World Trade Center. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

People pray during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University.

BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” CHERYL PANTALONE, ART TEACHER FROM A LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR LEADER’S NOMINATION

Other Legal Notices

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Other Legal Notices

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2011550400006301: 13,786 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted to Bank of America Cashier’s Check #0385633 valued at $285,350.00 $ – in violation of 18USC 981 & 18USC 1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and /or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and 18USC 981 & 18USC1952, because it is unlawful to travel in interstate or foreign commerce or use the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce, with intent to distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity; or commit any crime of violence to further any unlawful activity; or otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on May 11, 2011 at Edmond, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550400001501: 297 pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0385948 valued at $6,565.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on December 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001401: 1034 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0400010 valued at $30,690.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and in violation of 31USC5332, because it is unlawful to knowingly conceal more than $10,000.00 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual or in any conveyance, article of luggage, merchandise, or other container, and to transport or transfer or attempt to transport or transfer such currency or monetary instruments from a place within the United States to a place outside of the United States, or from a place outside the United States to a place within the United States. - seized on February 09, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001501: 165 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0399982 valued at $8,800.00-in violation of Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(b)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person to use any conveyance, including any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft, that has been or is being used in the commission of a violation of subsection (a), in that a conveyance was being used to transport undocumented aliens into the United States, the gross proceeds of such violation, and any property traceable to such conveyance or proceeds, shall be seized and subject to forfeiture and Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person who, knowing that a person is an alien, brings to or attempts to bring to the United States in any manner whatsoever such person at a place other than a designated port of entry or place other than as designated by the Commissioner, regardless of whether such alien has received prior official authorization to come to, enter, or reside in the United States and regardless of any future official action which may be taken with respect to such alien-seized on February 14, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required)

Sara Leader

in front of her while simultaneously making other students feel a sense of love and belonging.” During her teaching career, Leader said, she has come to realize “the smallest touch or glimpse of truth can make all the difference. I want every person I work with, tall or small, to know that I truly see them. I am profoundly joyful to have them by my side. Our greatest achievements don’t come with big pronouncements or dropping balloons. They are a

Other Legal Notices

collection of genuine gestures over time.” In a letter of support for Leader’s nomination, art teacher Cheryl Pantalone wrote, “Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” Her interaction with students “infects you with a desire to have that kind of passion in your own profession — whatever that may be.”

Leader was founder and chairwoman of the annual Jackson Elementary Art Auction and served as faculty liaison for a partnership with the Firehouse Art Center. She served as co-chair of the Professional Learning Community at Jackson and was a delegate to the National Reading Conference in San Francisco, among other honors. She holds a degree in early childhood education from OU and serves as an instructor at OU.

Common Cause plans meeting

Suicide prevention sessions set

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Andrew Tevington, general counsel of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, will speak Saturday during the monthly meeting of the Common Cause board of directors. The board meets at 9:30 a.m. in Oklahoma City’s Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave. The public is invited. Common Cause is a national, nonpartisan volunteer organization dedicated to open, honest and accountable government, according to a news release. For more information, call O. Gail Poole at (212) 729-8553.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as required by title 19, United States Code, section 1607 et seq of seizure at Oklahoma, on the dates specified below, of the following merchandise, liable to forfeiture to the United States under provisions of various statutes cited. Any person claiming such property is hereby notified to file his claim at the Customhouse, 7501 Esters Blvd., Suite 160, Irving, Texas 75063 (or by mail to P.O. Box 619050, D/FW Airport, Texas 75261), within 20 days (or 35 days if case if denoted as C.A.F.R.A.) after the first publication of this notice together with a bond in the amount of $5000 or 10% of the value of the claimed property, whichever is lower, but not less than $250, with approved sureties as provided for in title 19, United States Code, section 1608. The cost bond amount, if required, is specified below for each referenced case. Once the cost bond and/or claim to the merchandise has been filed, the case will be forwarded to the United States Attorney for the institution of forfeiture proceedings in federal district court. If you are indigent (needy and poor) you may not be required to post the bond. If no claim is filed or bond given as provided in the aforesaid statute, the property herein described will be declared forfeited to the Government of the United States and disposed of in conformity with the laws and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury:

Elementary math educator is selected as teacher of year for Norman district NORMAN — Sara Leader, a math resource teacher at Adams Elementary School, has been named Norman’s teacher of the year. Leader was honored Tuesday during the district’s annual celebration of excellence. She was among five finalists for the award. She is in her first year as a teacher at Adams. She taught second and third grades at Jackson Elementary School from 1993 to 2011. She was Jackson’s site teacher of the year in 1998. Leader credits a child development professor at the University of Oklahoma for inspiring her career. After watching Deb Parkinson interact with her students, Leader said, “I wanted to learn everything I could from her to be that teacher who is completely engaged with the student

Other Legal Notices

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Police inves-

tigated another apparent suicide in Edmond on Tuesday. The body of a 20-yearold man was found Tuesday morning, police said. If the state medical examiner rules the death a suicide, it would be the seventh this year in Edmond. Fifteen people have attempted suicide this year. Last year, only four suicides were reported. The increasing number of suicides and attempts is the reason behind a community suicide prevention summit scheduled for Monday.

“Our goal of the summit is to prevent any future suicides in our community by providing information and resources to people who are suicidal, or to those who might know someone who is, to help get them the help they need,” police Maj. Steve Thompson said. The summit is from 6 to 8 p.m. at the University of Central Oklahoma Nigh Center Constitution Hall. The summit is open to anyone over age 12. Sponsors are the Edmond Police Department, Edmond School District, Edmond Family Counseling, University of Central Oklahoma Student Counseling Center, OU Medical

Center Edmond and HeartLine. The summit will include a general session followed by breakout sessions. Multiple sessions about the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) approach to suicide intervention and prevention will be held for groups of 30 people. Parents Helping Parents, a nonprofit group that offers free parenting help and support, will conduct a session. HeartLine’s HELP Youth Suicide Prevention Training also will present one of the breakout sessions. If help is needed, call (800) 273-TALK (8255). For information about the summit, call 359-4402.

NOTICE OF SALE PODS Oklahoma City, hereby publishes notice, as required by Oklahoma Self-Service Storage Facility Lien Act (OK Stat. 191.7) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. PODS Oklahoma City reserves the right to reject any bids, Auction is located at: 6601 S. Air Depot Blvd. Suite A Oklahoma City 73135 and will be held at 3 PM on Friday April 27,2012 CUSTOMER Container # Aduddell Group, David Aduddell: 236B74, 8063B74, 267B74, 142B74 Barr, Joyce 25B74: McGee, Angela 149B74: Sanchez, Kim 235B74: Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

Amazing Space Storage 3405 Bart Conner Dr. Norman, Oklahoma 73072 (405) 360-9186 Date of Auction: April 27, 2012 Time of Auction: Directly Following RitePlace’s Katia Sevilla 3808 Bristol Dr. Norman, OK 73072 Chairs, lamp, furniture, saw, boxes, etc Diane Grady 513 SW 39th St. Moore, OK 73160 Boxes, chair, plastic tubs, etc. David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Chair, table, golf bag/clubs, furniture, etc David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Christmas decorations, boxes, plastic tubs, etc. Allison Sharp 6300 S County Club Dr. OKC, OK 73159 Boxes, furniture, etc.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Notice of Public Sale April 27, 2012 10:00 A.M. RitePlace Storage 8706 S. Shields Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Phone # 405-634-6008 Advertisement of Warehouseman’s Sale Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 196 of Oklahoma Statutes.

Title 42, the undersigned warehouseman claims lien upon the goods stored, held for the account as set forth below, to-wit: Anthony Davis: 4324 S.E. 38th Street: Del City, OK 73115 Dryer Cody Floyd: 915 N.W. 5th St.: Moore, OK 73160 Dresser, child bed, microwave, toys, lamps, chairs and miscellaneous items. Kevin Williams: 2100 N.W. 60th ST: Oklahoma City, OK 73159 Television, Chairs, Furniture and Lots of other miscellaneous items. Juan Hernandez: 2202 S.W. 22nd: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 Duffle bags and other miscellaneous items. Josh Cummings: 9516 S. Shields: Oklahoma City, OK 73160 Television, Radio, chest, totes lots of other miscellaneous items. BIANCA’S BARGAINS: 8481 N. E. 23rd Suite B: Oklahoma City, OK 73141 Bicycle, Drum Set, storage trunks, totes, boxes, furniture, Dining Booth Seats and Table, totes, boxes Chairs and other lots of miscellaneous items.

Other Legal Notices

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All creditors having claims against Milfred L. Buckingham, Deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interests and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the named Administrators, Mr. Damon Buckingham and Mr. Gregory Buckingham through their attorney of record, S. Solola Webb, 228 Robert S. Kerr, suite 630, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, thirty days from receipt of this notice, or the same will be forever barred. Notice of Application for Merger of Bank Holding Companies Valliance Financial Corp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to merge with another bank holding company, Valliance Texas Financial Holdings, Inc., McKinney, Texas. We intend to acquire control of Valliance Bank, McKinney, Texas.

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The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198. The comment period will not end before May 19, 2012 and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President, at (816) 8812633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The Special Services Department of the Midwest City-Del City School System is committed to the goal of identifying and locating every disabled child who resides within the boundaries of the district, and who is not receiving Special Education services. Some children with severe impairments may be eligible for services as early as age three (3). If you have knowledge of any special needs individual between the ages of three (3) through twenty-one (21) years of age, who may be in need of special education services, please refer their parents to Special Services at 739-1696.

Vin: 1FFWKT3C783002192, 2008 Motor Scooter, Miles 1,822. Sale Price $650.00, Contact Loretta 688-7777 Sale date 4-20-2012 Anyone having any legal interest in: Nicoma Trailer 7X10 Utility Vin: 1L9SF10196S238832 Call Bob at 1-405-706-0216


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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight among 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363 2 Burial plots + companion headstone w/ perpetual care at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Valued @ $6700, Sell for $5000 Call Bob @ 405-247-1197 MEMORIAL PARK CEMETERY Section 28---6 Spaces Available 1 Space $1600-2 or more spaces $1450 ea Lanny Gardner Owner/Agent 405-691-1691 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com Resthaven Cemetery, Garden of Serenity spaces 3 & 4, lot 157, sec. 30 - Asking $1695 each. Call 831-0951 for more info. 2 cemetery plots with bronze headstone. $5000. OBO. Sunny Lane, Del City. 405-694-1743 or 405-737-0758


18A

IV

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

NW 39

66

Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


CAPITOL

EDUCATION

Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 13A

IN BRIEF

METRO | STATE A 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EAST

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

TITANIC DINNER RAISES MONEY Women FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-theme fundraiser for the Rose State College Foundation’s scholarship fund. PHOTOS BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the RMS Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10-course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. Menu items included filet mignon, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State

Portraying the first officer, Roger Ford greets guests as they enter the Titanic-theme fundraiser.

students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose

State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns. “This was really a no-brainer for us,” Rose State Foundation director Lisa Pitsiri said. “It’s a chance to put some historical information out there for people and to have a little bit of fun.” Pitsiri said there is a growing demand for scholarship money at the school. Rose State has more than 8,000 students and 60 degree programs. “We always have many more applicants for scholarships than we can fund, and the need isn’t going away,” Pitsiri said. “That’s the focus and mission of the foundation.”


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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and Egypt and how his

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance. “I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said.

Using the example of the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current

funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said.

However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates

awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE

sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam.

For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery, chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for kids to explore are just a few of the activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs that benefit victims of

Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

Nurse suspected in baby abduction had miscarriage BY MICHAEL GRACZYK AND JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

SPRING, Texas — A Texas woman accused of killing a young mother and abducting her 3-day-old boy had suffered a miscarriage and intended to “adopt” the newborn as her own, authorities said Wednesday. Verna McClain, 30, is charged with capital murder after confessing to killing the new mother and grabbing tiny Keegan Golden from outside a pediatrician’s office in suburban Houston. Keegan was found unharmed hours later with McClain’s sister. The Montgomery County sheriff’s office said Wednesday that McClain — estranged from her husband, with whom she had raised three children — had told her fiance she was pregnant and had given birth to his child. Instead, McClain had miscarried, Capt. Bruce Zenor said. McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, told authorities that she had talked about needing to “do the adoption” soon after taking Keegan. Her fiance, who was not identified Wednesday, is being interviewed by authorities. Officials said they did not believe anyone else was involved in the shoot-

ing and abduction. Sheriff Tommy Gage said Kala Golden had placed Keegan into her pickup Tuesday afternoon after leaving Northwoods Pediatric Center in Spring, about 20 miles north of Houston. The suspected shooter was parked next to her, Gage said. During the confrontation, the woman repeatedly shot Golden, then snatched the child from her truck and drove away, according to witness accounts. The dying woman leaned into the vehicle and tried to take the boy back, screaming, “My baby!” but her attacker sped off. Two detectives spotted a vehicle later Tuesday outside a nearby apartment complex that matched witnesses’ descriptions, Gage said. Though McClain’s apartment was empty, she later arrived and talked to authorities. “During her interview with detectives, information was obtained which led detectives to a residence in Harris County where her sister lives and a possible location of the child,” Gage said. McClain was later arrested. Police say she admitted carrying out the attack. McClain is a vocational nurse. She does not work at the pediatric center, according to a clinic receptionist, Jackie Longoria.


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond’s Farmers Market opens Saturday

Fresh cantaloupes tempt buyers at the Edmond Farmers Market at Festival Market Place in July.

A customer searches through tomatoes at the Edmond Farmers Market in August.

People search for fresh produce at the Edmond Farmers Market in August. This year’s market starts Saturday.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street. Edmond Farmers Market is a registered market with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and meets all licensure requirements with the Oklahoma Department of Health. Parks department officials are still taking applications for vendor spaces.

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from

local farmers and vendors will once again be available in Edmond at the Farmers Market on Saturday. Locally grown and produced products have been available here since 1988. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department program manager. “They have been able to get a jump-start. There are vegetables out there.” The market is expected to offer 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El

LEARN MORE For more information, call 216-7635.

Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond. Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets, which include the junior market, are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Right: Crowds of shoppers look through produce, flowers and baked goods at the Edmond Farmers Market in July. This year’s market opens Saturday and runs through October.

Norman plans events to celebrate Earth Day FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — More than 50 organizations will offer activities, exhibits and demonstrations at an Earth Day Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins Ave. The free event also will include a tree giveaway, sponsored by the city of Norman. About 450 trees will be distributed on a first-come basis. The giveaway is being made possible through donations from the Apache Foundation and the Oklahoma Tree Bank Foundation. The day’s activities also will include a 5k run, bicycle games and live entertainment, all designed to highlight the need to protect the Earth’s resources. Other Earth Day celebrations in the city will include lectures and a nature walk at the Discovery Cove Nature Center at Lake Thunderbird on Saturday. The center is off State Highway 9 on Clear Bay

Camryn Williams plants a flower during the 2010 Earth Day celebration in Norman. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Boulevard, across from the Turkey Pass campground. Beginning at 10 a.m., naturalist Kathy Furneaux will discuss “What Are Trees Good For?” At 11 a.m., she will lead a discussion about insects with children ages 5 and up. At 1:30 p.m., Furneaux will present a slideshow on bats. She will lead a nature walk beginning at 3 p.m. On Sunday, the Keystone XL Pipeline will be the featured topic of a round-table discussion

from 5 to 7 p.m. at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church at Brooks Street and McGee Drive. A light vegetarian dinner will precede the panel discussion. Speakers will be Roy Knapp, a retired petroleum and geology professor who taught at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Texas; Charles Wesner, chairman of the Oklahoma chapter of the Sierra Club, and Mary Francis, an environmental activist.

Choctaw Land Run Festival scheduled Thursday, Friday BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

CHOCTAW — Thursday and Friday, students will have a chance to re-enact the Oklahoma Land Run of 1889 during the Choctaw Land Run Festival. The ninth annual festival starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. both days, with a kids’ land run race each hour at Choctaw Creek Park, 2001 N Harper. “It’s so much fun to watch the kids ... they’ll get in line and try to sneak across saying, ‘I’m a Sooner!’ ” said Debbie Green, a city employee and event organizer. Some children come dressed as pio-

neers. Much like the ’89ers, children will line up, wait for a sign to run and dash their way to stake a claim. Then, they must bring that stake number back to a deed office where they are given a replica of actual deeds given out at the time. The event also will feature wheelbarrow races, gunfight shows, blacksmithing demonstrations, Indian and Irish dancers plus food vendors and period music. Green said 1,800 students are expected to race over the course of the two days, and the public is welcome to enjoy the entertainment and vendors and watch the land runs. For more information, go to www. choctawfestival.org or call 390-8276.


METRO | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

TREE DEDICATION REMEMBERS 9/11 ATTACKS, MURRAH BOMBING

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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SENIORS OKLAHOMA COUNTY SENIOR MENUS For April 23-27 Monday — Salisbury steak with gravy, mashed potatoes, spinach, wheat bread, chocolate pudding and milk. Tuesday — Pinto beans and ham, tomato relish, creamy slaw, cornbread, oranges and milk. Wednesday — Spaghetti and meat sauce, green beans, green salad, Italian bread, cinnamon applesauce and milk. Thursday — Tuna salad, corn chowder, carrot salad, wheat bread, pears and milk. Friday — Chicken breast with gravy, broccoli rice casserole, beets, wheat bread, fruit crisp and milk.

Ron Vega, director of design and construction for the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum, points to a seedling from the Sept. 11 Survivor Tree while speaking during the tree dedication.

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Menus are subject to change without notice. For more information, call 949-2709.

NUTRITION SITES The Oklahoma County Senior Nutrition Program operates 17 dining sites, open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. To find a site, call 949-2709.

ACTIVITIES Senior activities are available daily at Will Rogers Senior Activity Center, 3501 Pat Murphy Drive, and Woodson Park Senior Activity Center, 3401 S May Ave. For a schedule, call Will Rogers at 942-4339 or Woodson Park at 681-3266.

FROM STAFF REPORTS

Survivors, rescue workers and family members affected by the 9/11 attacks in New York joined Murrah Building survivors on Wednesday on the campus of Oklahoma Christian University for a tree-planting ceremony and dedication of a memorial plaque. Members of 4/19 Outreach, a nonprofit organization of survivors, family members and rescue workers, donated a seedling from the Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and a piece of granite salvaged from the ruins of the Murrah Building to the students, faculty and alumni of Oklahoma Christian for their support and encouragement since the April 19, 1995, bombing. Survivors and rescue workers from the 9/11 attacks drove from New York City with a cutting from the tree that survived the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and a cross cut from the steel of the fallen north tower. In a show of solidarity between the two cities, the trees were planted alongside each other as a symbol of hope and resilience.

From left, Sarri Singer, Glenn Radalinsky, Charlie Kaczorowski and Tom Canavan shovel the last bits of soil on a seedling from the Oklahoma City Survivor Tree during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University. Singer is a survivor of a terrorist attack in Israel and the director of One Heart, an organization that brings together survivors of terrorist attacks. Radalinsky is a ground zero rescue worker who because of injuries suffered during the rescue and recovery is now retired disabled from the Nassau County Police Department. Kaczorowski is a survivor of the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, survivor of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and was the site supervisor for recovery and cleanup at ground zero for 10 months. Canavan is a 9/11 survivor who dug himself out of the north tower of the World Trade Center. PHOTOS BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

People pray during the 4/19 - 9/11 Survivor Tree dedication at Oklahoma Christian University.

BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” CHERYL PANTALONE, ART TEACHER FROM A LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR LEADER’S NOMINATION

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2011550400006301: 13,786 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted to Bank of America Cashier’s Check #0385633 valued at $285,350.00 $ – in violation of 18USC 981 & 18USC 1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and /or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and 18USC 981 & 18USC1952, because it is unlawful to travel in interstate or foreign commerce or use the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce, with intent to distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity; or commit any crime of violence to further any unlawful activity; or otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on May 11, 2011 at Edmond, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550400001501: 297 pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0385948 valued at $6,565.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on December 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001401: 1034 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0400010 valued at $30,690.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and in violation of 31USC5332, because it is unlawful to knowingly conceal more than $10,000.00 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual or in any conveyance, article of luggage, merchandise, or other container, and to transport or transfer or attempt to transport or transfer such currency or monetary instruments from a place within the United States to a place outside of the United States, or from a place outside the United States to a place within the United States. - seized on February 09, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001501: 165 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0399982 valued at $8,800.00-in violation of Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(b)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person to use any conveyance, including any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft, that has been or is being used in the commission of a violation of subsection (a), in that a conveyance was being used to transport undocumented aliens into the United States, the gross proceeds of such violation, and any property traceable to such conveyance or proceeds, shall be seized and subject to forfeiture and Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person who, knowing that a person is an alien, brings to or attempts to bring to the United States in any manner whatsoever such person at a place other than a designated port of entry or place other than as designated by the Commissioner, regardless of whether such alien has received prior official authorization to come to, enter, or reside in the United States and regardless of any future official action which may be taken with respect to such alien-seized on February 14, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required)

Sara Leader

in front of her while simultaneously making other students feel a sense of love and belonging.” During her teaching career, Leader said, she has come to realize “the smallest touch or glimpse of truth can make all the difference. I want every person I work with, tall or small, to know that I truly see them. I am profoundly joyful to have them by my side. Our greatest achievements don’t come with big pronouncements or dropping balloons. They are a

Other Legal Notices

collection of genuine gestures over time.” In a letter of support for Leader’s nomination, art teacher Cheryl Pantalone wrote, “Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” Her interaction with students “infects you with a desire to have that kind of passion in your own profession — whatever that may be.”

Leader was founder and chairwoman of the annual Jackson Elementary Art Auction and served as faculty liaison for a partnership with the Firehouse Art Center. She served as co-chair of the Professional Learning Community at Jackson and was a delegate to the National Reading Conference in San Francisco, among other honors. She holds a degree in early childhood education from OU and serves as an instructor at OU.

Common Cause plans meeting

Suicide prevention sessions set

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Andrew Tevington, general counsel of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, will speak Saturday during the monthly meeting of the Common Cause board of directors. The board meets at 9:30 a.m. in Oklahoma City’s Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave. The public is invited. Common Cause is a national, nonpartisan volunteer organization dedicated to open, honest and accountable government, according to a news release. For more information, call O. Gail Poole at (212) 729-8553.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as required by title 19, United States Code, section 1607 et seq of seizure at Oklahoma, on the dates specified below, of the following merchandise, liable to forfeiture to the United States under provisions of various statutes cited. Any person claiming such property is hereby notified to file his claim at the Customhouse, 7501 Esters Blvd., Suite 160, Irving, Texas 75063 (or by mail to P.O. Box 619050, D/FW Airport, Texas 75261), within 20 days (or 35 days if case if denoted as C.A.F.R.A.) after the first publication of this notice together with a bond in the amount of $5000 or 10% of the value of the claimed property, whichever is lower, but not less than $250, with approved sureties as provided for in title 19, United States Code, section 1608. The cost bond amount, if required, is specified below for each referenced case. Once the cost bond and/or claim to the merchandise has been filed, the case will be forwarded to the United States Attorney for the institution of forfeiture proceedings in federal district court. If you are indigent (needy and poor) you may not be required to post the bond. If no claim is filed or bond given as provided in the aforesaid statute, the property herein described will be declared forfeited to the Government of the United States and disposed of in conformity with the laws and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury:

Elementary math educator is selected as teacher of year for Norman district NORMAN — Sara Leader, a math resource teacher at Adams Elementary School, has been named Norman’s teacher of the year. Leader was honored Tuesday during the district’s annual celebration of excellence. She was among five finalists for the award. She is in her first year as a teacher at Adams. She taught second and third grades at Jackson Elementary School from 1993 to 2011. She was Jackson’s site teacher of the year in 1998. Leader credits a child development professor at the University of Oklahoma for inspiring her career. After watching Deb Parkinson interact with her students, Leader said, “I wanted to learn everything I could from her to be that teacher who is completely engaged with the student

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Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Police inves-

tigated another apparent suicide in Edmond on Tuesday. The body of a 20-yearold man was found Tuesday morning, police said. If the state medical examiner rules the death a suicide, it would be the seventh this year in Edmond. Fifteen people have attempted suicide this year. Last year, only four suicides were reported. The increasing number of suicides and attempts is the reason behind a community suicide prevention summit scheduled for Monday.

“Our goal of the summit is to prevent any future suicides in our community by providing information and resources to people who are suicidal, or to those who might know someone who is, to help get them the help they need,” police Maj. Steve Thompson said. The summit is from 6 to 8 p.m. at the University of Central Oklahoma Nigh Center Constitution Hall. The summit is open to anyone over age 12. Sponsors are the Edmond Police Department, Edmond School District, Edmond Family Counseling, University of Central Oklahoma Student Counseling Center, OU Medical

Center Edmond and HeartLine. The summit will include a general session followed by breakout sessions. Multiple sessions about the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) approach to suicide intervention and prevention will be held for groups of 30 people. Parents Helping Parents, a nonprofit group that offers free parenting help and support, will conduct a session. HeartLine’s HELP Youth Suicide Prevention Training also will present one of the breakout sessions. If help is needed, call (800) 273-TALK (8255). For information about the summit, call 359-4402.

NOTICE OF SALE PODS Oklahoma City, hereby publishes notice, as required by Oklahoma Self-Service Storage Facility Lien Act (OK Stat. 191.7) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. PODS Oklahoma City reserves the right to reject any bids, Auction is located at: 6601 S. Air Depot Blvd. Suite A Oklahoma City 73135 and will be held at 3 PM on Friday April 27,2012 CUSTOMER Container # Aduddell Group, David Aduddell: 236B74, 8063B74, 267B74, 142B74 Barr, Joyce 25B74: McGee, Angela 149B74: Sanchez, Kim 235B74: Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

Amazing Space Storage 3405 Bart Conner Dr. Norman, Oklahoma 73072 (405) 360-9186 Date of Auction: April 27, 2012 Time of Auction: Directly Following RitePlace’s Katia Sevilla 3808 Bristol Dr. Norman, OK 73072 Chairs, lamp, furniture, saw, boxes, etc Diane Grady 513 SW 39th St. Moore, OK 73160 Boxes, chair, plastic tubs, etc. David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Chair, table, golf bag/clubs, furniture, etc David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Christmas decorations, boxes, plastic tubs, etc. Allison Sharp 6300 S County Club Dr. OKC, OK 73159 Boxes, furniture, etc.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Notice of Public Sale April 27, 2012 10:00 A.M. RitePlace Storage 8706 S. Shields Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Phone # 405-634-6008 Advertisement of Warehouseman’s Sale Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 196 of Oklahoma Statutes.

Title 42, the undersigned warehouseman claims lien upon the goods stored, held for the account as set forth below, to-wit: Anthony Davis: 4324 S.E. 38th Street: Del City, OK 73115 Dryer Cody Floyd: 915 N.W. 5th St.: Moore, OK 73160 Dresser, child bed, microwave, toys, lamps, chairs and miscellaneous items. Kevin Williams: 2100 N.W. 60th ST: Oklahoma City, OK 73159 Television, Chairs, Furniture and Lots of other miscellaneous items. Juan Hernandez: 2202 S.W. 22nd: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 Duffle bags and other miscellaneous items. Josh Cummings: 9516 S. Shields: Oklahoma City, OK 73160 Television, Radio, chest, totes lots of other miscellaneous items. BIANCA’S BARGAINS: 8481 N. E. 23rd Suite B: Oklahoma City, OK 73141 Bicycle, Drum Set, storage trunks, totes, boxes, furniture, Dining Booth Seats and Table, totes, boxes Chairs and other lots of miscellaneous items.

Other Legal Notices

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All creditors having claims against Milfred L. Buckingham, Deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interests and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the named Administrators, Mr. Damon Buckingham and Mr. Gregory Buckingham through their attorney of record, S. Solola Webb, 228 Robert S. Kerr, suite 630, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, thirty days from receipt of this notice, or the same will be forever barred. Notice of Application for Merger of Bank Holding Companies Valliance Financial Corp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to merge with another bank holding company, Valliance Texas Financial Holdings, Inc., McKinney, Texas. We intend to acquire control of Valliance Bank, McKinney, Texas.

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The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198. The comment period will not end before May 19, 2012 and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President, at (816) 8812633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The Special Services Department of the Midwest City-Del City School System is committed to the goal of identifying and locating every disabled child who resides within the boundaries of the district, and who is not receiving Special Education services. Some children with severe impairments may be eligible for services as early as age three (3). If you have knowledge of any special needs individual between the ages of three (3) through twenty-one (21) years of age, who may be in need of special education services, please refer their parents to Special Services at 739-1696.

Vin: 1FFWKT3C783002192, 2008 Motor Scooter, Miles 1,822. Sale Price $650.00, Contact Loretta 688-7777 Sale date 4-20-2012 Anyone having any legal interest in: Nicoma Trailer 7X10 Utility Vin: 1L9SF10196S238832 Call Bob at 1-405-706-0216


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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight between 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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METRO | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

NW 39

66

Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


CAPITOL

EDUCATION

Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 14A

IN BRIEF

EDMOND | STATE A 11

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

EDMOND FARMERS MARKET Women BEGINS FRESH, NEW SEASON get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

CHOCTAW

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL, FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

People search for fresh produce in August at the Edmond Farmers Market. This year’s market starts Saturday. PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from local farmers and vendors will once again be available at the Edmond Farmers Market on Saturday. Locally grown and produced products have been available here since 1988. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department program manager. “They have been able to get a jump-start. There are vegetables out there.” The market is expected to offer 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El

A customer searches through tomatoes in August at the Edmond Farmers Market.

Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond.

Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the

Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets, which include the junior market, are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15. Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street. Edmond Farmers Market is a registered market with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and meets all licensure requirements with the Oklahoma Department of Health. Parks department officials are still taking applications for vendor spaces.

Learn more For more information, call 216-7635.


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EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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Texas nurse suspected in baby’s abduction BY MICHAEL GRACZYK AND JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

SPRING, Texas — A Texas woman accused of killing a young mother and abducting her 3-day-old boy had suffered a miscarriage and intended to “adopt” the newborn as her own, authorities said Wednesday. Verna McClain, 30, is charged with capital mur-

der after confessing to killing the new mother and grabbing tiny Keegan Golden from outside a pediatrician’s office in suburban Houston. Keegan was found unharmed hours later with McClain’s sister. The Montgomery County sheriff’s office said Wednesday that McClain — estranged from her husband, with whom she had raised three children —

had told her fiance she was pregnant and had given birth to his child. Instead, McClain had miscarried, Capt. Bruce Zenor said. McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, told authorities that she had talked about needing to “do the adoption” soon after taking Keegan. Her fiance, who was not identified Wednesday, is being interviewed by au-

thorities. Officials said they did not believe anyone else was involved in the shooting and abduction.

About the attack Sheriff Tommy Gage said Kala Golden had placed Keegan into her pickup Tuesday afternoon after leaving Northwoods Pediatric Center in Spring, about 20 miles north of Houston.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery,

WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS:

The Oklahoman, in partnership with Ebyline, is seeking YOU! To sign up, visit Ebyline.com http://blog.newsok.com/knowit/ Welcome to the Virtual Newsroom.

E byline

chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for kids to explore are just a few of the activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs

that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

The suspected shooter was parked next to her, Gage said. During the confrontation, the woman repeatedly shot Golden, then snatched the child from her truck and drove away, according to witness accounts. The dying woman leaned into the vehicle and tried to take the boy back, screaming, “My baby!” but her attacker sped off. McClain is a vocational

nurse, a job that involves providing basic nursing services under the direction of registered nurses and doctors. She does not work at the pediatric center, according to a clinic receptionist, Jackie Longoria. Golden’s mother, Linda Golden, told the AP that she had been baby-sitting when someone at the scene called her using her daughter’s cellphone.


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EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and Egypt and how his

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance. “I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said.

Using the example of the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said. However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that

perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the

proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite

200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

BAM Other Legal Notices

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into Oklahoma’s entertainment scene blog.newsok.com/ bamsblog and in Weekend Look.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as required by title 19, United States Code, section 1607 et seq of seizure at Oklahoma, on the dates specified below, of the following merchandise, liable to forfeiture to the United States under provisions of various statutes cited. Any person claiming such property is hereby notified to file his claim at the Customhouse, 7501 Esters Blvd., Suite 160, Irving, Texas 75063 (or by mail to P.O. Box 619050, D/FW Airport, Texas 75261), within 20 days (or 35 days if case if denoted as C.A.F.R.A.) after the first publication of this notice together with a bond in the amount of $5000 or 10% of the value of the claimed property, whichever is lower, but not less than $250, with approved sureties as provided for in title 19, United States Code, section 1608. The cost bond amount, if required, is specified below for each referenced case. Once the cost bond and/or claim to the merchandise has been filed, the case will be forwarded to the United States Attorney for the institution of forfeiture proceedings in federal district court. If you are indigent (needy and poor) you may not be required to post the bond. If no claim is filed or bond given as provided in the aforesaid statute, the property herein described will be declared forfeited to the Government of the United States and disposed of in conformity with the laws and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury: 2011550400006301: 13,786 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted to Bank of America Cashier’s Check #0385633 valued at $285,350.00 $ – in violation of 18USC 981 & 18USC 1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and /or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and 18USC 981 & 18USC1952, because it is unlawful to travel in interstate or foreign commerce or use the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce, with intent to distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity; or commit any crime of violence to further any unlawful activity; or otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of smuggling of controlled substances into the United States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale, receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on May 11, 2011 at Edmond, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550400001501: 297 pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0385948 valued at $6,565.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances - seized on December 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001401: 1034 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0400010 valued at $30,690.00– in violation of 18USC981 & 18USC1956, because the property was involved in transactions that involved the proceeds of drug sales and/or represents the proceeds of specified unlawful activity related to the smuggling of controlled substances into the Untied States, in that it facilitated the carrying on of the illicit transportation, sale , receipt, and/or possession of controlled substances and in violation of 31USC5332, because it is unlawful to knowingly conceal more than $10,000.00 in currency or other monetary instruments on the person of such individual or in any conveyance, article of luggage, merchandise, or other container, and to transport or transfer or attempt to transport or transfer such currency or monetary instruments from a place within the United States to a place outside of the United States, or from a place outside the United States to a place within the United States. - seized on February 09, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required) 2012550500001501: 165 Pieces of U.S. Currency converted into Cashier’s Check #0399982 valued at $8,800.00-in violation of Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(b)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person to use any conveyance, including any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft, that has been or is being used in the commission of a violation of subsection (a), in that a conveyance was being used to transport undocumented aliens into the United States, the gross proceeds of such violation, and any property traceable to such conveyance or proceeds, shall be seized and subject to forfeiture and Sec. 274(a)(1)(A)(i) of the INA [8 U.S.C. § 1324(a)(1)(a)], because it is unlawful for any person who, knowing that a person is an alien, brings to or attempts to bring to the United States in any manner whatsoever such person at a place other than a designated port of entry or place other than as designated by the Commissioner, regardless of whether such alien has received prior official authorization to come to, enter, or reside in the United States and regardless of any future official action which may be taken with respect to such alien-seized on February 14, 2012 at Tulsa, Oklahoma (CAFRA No Cost Bond Required)

Other Legal Notices NOTICE OF SALE PODS Oklahoma City, hereby publishes notice, as required by Oklahoma Self-Service Storage Facility Lien Act (OK Stat. 191.7) of a public sale of the property listed below to satisfy a landlords lien. All sales are for cash to the highest bidder and are considered final. PODS Oklahoma City reserves the right to reject any bids, Auction is located at: 6601 S. Air Depot Blvd. Suite A Oklahoma City 73135 and will be held at 3 PM on Friday April 27,2012 CUSTOMER Container # Aduddell Group, David Aduddell: 236B74, 8063B74, 267B74, 142B74 Barr, Joyce 25B74: McGee, Angela 149B74: Sanchez, Kim 235B74: Contents include but not limited to: Household items, books, exercise equipment, stereo equipment and more.

Amazing Space Storage 3405 Bart Conner Dr. Norman, Oklahoma 73072 (405) 360-9186 Date of Auction: April 27, 2012 Time of Auction: Directly Following RitePlace’s Katia Sevilla 3808 Bristol Dr. Norman, OK 73072 Chairs, lamp, furniture, saw, boxes, etc Diane Grady 513 SW 39th St. Moore, OK 73160 Boxes, chair, plastic tubs, etc. David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Chair, table, golf bag/clubs, furniture, etc David Biles 3807 Cedar Ridge Rd. Norman, OK 73072 Christmas decorations, boxes, plastic tubs, etc. Allison Sharp 6300 S County Club Dr. OKC, OK 73159 Boxes, furniture, etc.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION Notice of Public Sale April 27, 2012 10:00 A.M. RitePlace Storage 8706 S. Shields Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73149 Phone # 405-634-6008 Advertisement of Warehouseman’s Sale Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 196 of Oklahoma Statutes.

Title 42, the undersigned warehouseman claims lien upon the goods stored, held for the account as set forth below, to-wit: Anthony Davis: 4324 S.E. 38th Street: Del City, OK 73115 Dryer Cody Floyd: 915 N.W. 5th St.: Moore, OK 73160 Dresser, child bed, microwave, toys, lamps, chairs and miscellaneous items. Kevin Williams: 2100 N.W. 60th ST: Oklahoma City, OK 73159 Television, Chairs, Furniture and Lots of other miscellaneous items. Juan Hernandez: 2202 S.W. 22nd: Oklahoma City, OK 73108 Duffle bags and other miscellaneous items. Josh Cummings: 9516 S. Shields: Oklahoma City, OK 73160 Television, Radio, chest, totes lots of other miscellaneous items. BIANCA’S BARGAINS: 8481 N. E. 23rd Suite B: Oklahoma City, OK 73141 Bicycle, Drum Set, storage trunks, totes, boxes, furniture, Dining Booth Seats and Table, totes, boxes Chairs and other lots of miscellaneous items.

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All creditors having claims against Milfred L. Buckingham, Deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interests and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the named Administrators, Mr. Damon Buckingham and Mr. Gregory Buckingham through their attorney of record, S. Solola Webb, 228 Robert S. Kerr, suite 630, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, thirty days from receipt of this notice, or the same will be forever barred. Notice of Application for Merger of Bank Holding Companies Valliance Financial Corp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to merge with another bank holding company, Valliance Texas Financial Holdings, Inc., McKinney, Texas. We intend to acquire control of Valliance Bank, McKinney, Texas.

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The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of banks we own in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198. The comment period will not end before May 19, 2012 and may be somewhat longer. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Dennis Denney, Assistant Vice President, at (816) 8812633. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. The Special Services Department of the Midwest City-Del City School System is committed to the goal of identifying and locating every disabled child who resides within the boundaries of the district, and who is not receiving Special Education services. Some children with severe impairments may be eligible for services as early as age three (3). If you have knowledge of any special needs individual between the ages of three (3) through twenty-one (21) years of age, who may be in need of special education services, please refer their parents to Special Services at 739-1696.

Vin: 1FFWKT3C783002192, 2008 Motor Scooter, Miles 1,822. Sale Price $650.00, Contact Loretta 688-7777 Sale date 4-20-2012 Anyone having any legal interest in: Nicoma Trailer 7X10 Utility Vin: 1L9SF10196S238832 Call Bob at 1-405-706-0216


EDMOND | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Task force recommends approval of project budget BY DIANA BALDWIN Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Capital Projects and Financing Task Force members this week recommended approval of a proposed budget that includes $11 million for the Covell Road and Interstate 35 project, despite questions about the city’s involvement in a privatepublic partnership. Some members didn’t like spending money from a special capital improvement sales tax for development of a hotel and conference center and indoor sports complex without specific details nailed down. The capital improvement budget recommendation is needed now because the city budget must be approved by June 25.

For and against Edmond Mayor Charles Lamb called the $11 million an investment, not an incentive, and an economic

development move that could lead to an increase in the city’s sales tax money. Negotiations are ongoing between the city and the developers. The $11 million would go to infrastructure improvements, the purchase of 26.1 acres of land and to help build a conference center. Steve Auchter, task force vice chairman, and member Matt Burns voted against recommending the proposed capital projects budget. Six members voted yes. City council members will make the final decision. “I feel uncomfortable,” Auchter said. “I believe it is an incentive not an investment. You can throw words around.” Member David Tew said he likes the sports facility and conference center proposal. “I think it is a good idea,” Tew said. “I think Edmond needs a place to have a meeting.” Tew made the motion with the stipulation task

force members have a chance to review and make recommendations on any expenditures associated with the development project.

By the numbers Covell 35 Development and Partners in Development propose to build a 165-room Hilton Gardens Inn with a 20,000square-foot conference center that would seat 800 people for a banquet. The $25 million hotel and conference center is part of a master plan that contemplates the eventual development of about 300 acres of property on three corners of I-35 and Covell. The 170,000-squarefoot indoor sports complex would have two indoor soccer fields, 10 basketball courts and 18 volleyball courts. City council members are expected Monday to consider signing a memorandum of understanding with the developers. Assistant City Manager

Steve Commons said the document would not be binding but indicates the city wants to continue negotiations. Council members also are expected to discuss on Monday the purchase of 7.1 acres of land for the hotel and conference center for $2.2 million.

Welders & Mechanics

needed ASAP Top Pay. Full Benefits. Apply in person: 14024 S. Meridian Ave. (Exit 110 on I-44W, OKC)

German Shepherds AKC 8 wks V/W POP LH & SH Blk/Tan & Sable training started beautiful show quality lg pups $500. 405-420-4515

Raider camper shell, fits small Toyota pickup, $275 obo, 641-2799.

Great Dane Pups Registered pups. POP Several colors and prices.Harlys, blues, blacks Shots and wormed. Will meet. $250 and up 580-435-2391 ojnelson@pldi.net

1972 VW Ghia conv, new top, runs great, $4950; 1931 A-Model Ford Dlx Cpe, rumble seat, mohair, exc cond, $16,500; 227-6670 » 942-3456

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Shih Tzu Pups, AKC, ready May 1st, 3M, S/W, POP, $400 each, (405) 385-0063 or 714-3350, Stillwater, OK

2011 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid loaded, 2660 miles, as new, $31,000. 285-6494

WOLF PUPS 6weeks 4f wormed $350ea . (405) 226-5444; 627-5739 Yorkie, ACA, 1M $300, 1F $400; Golden Morkies $300 & $400. 405-288-2018

Answer Service Operator Edmond. Must type 45 wpm. Shift: Mon 4p-12midnight; Tue off; Wed & Thur 4:30p-1a; Fri 12p-7p; Sat 4p-11p; Sun off; $12 per hour ¡ 285-4316

GOBER BUILDINGS LLC Post Framed Buildings: 30x40x10, (2) 12x8 overhead (1) entry door, and concrete $12,500. Call 405-650-2556

Land Loans Lots and Acreages. McClain Bank 527.6503 Member FDIC

OK Reptile Expo April 21-22 10am-4pm 913-609-9343 www. OKReptileExpo.com Drink & Snack Rte Grt Loc Guaranty Must Sell now Fin avail. 800-648-2124 Rabbits For Sale: Fryers, Hollands, 5 wks, brown & white, New Zealand whites for breeding, $10-$30, 405-348-7590

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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I believe it is an incentive not an investment.” STEVE AUCHTER

TASK FORCE VICE CHAIRMAN

I think Edmond needs a place to have a meeting.” DAVID TEW

TASK FORCE MEMBER


16A

I

EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight between 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

I

17A

IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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www.mercer-adams.com 3925 N Asbury, Bethany 495-4363 2 Burial plots + companion headstone w/ perpetual care at Resurrection Memorial Cemetery. Valued @ $6700, Sell for $5000 Call Bob @ 405-247-1197 MEMORIAL PARK CEMETERY Section 28---6 Spaces Available 1 Space $1600-2 or more spaces $1450 ea Lanny Gardner Owner/Agent 405-691-1691 McNeil's Mustang Funeral Service 405-376-1616 www.mcneilsmustangfs.com Resthaven Cemetery, Garden of Serenity spaces 3 & 4, lot 157, sec. 30 - Asking $1695 each. Call 831-0951 for more info. 2 cemetery plots with bronze headstone. $5000. OBO. Sunny Lane, Del City. 405-694-1743 or 405-737-0758


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EDMOND | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

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Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


CAPITOL

EDUCATION

Petition may get bill a hearing House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing. Backers of the measure say it is a statement that Oklahomans value life. PAGE 12A

Arab Spring University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman spoke on Wednesday about uprisings in the Middle East. PAGE 14A

IN BRIEF

NORMAN | STATE

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Proposal to allow bow hunting is pondered by city water trust BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Staff Writer mkimball@opubco.com

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust will consider dueling recommendations when it debates a proposed city ordinance that would allow bow hunting for deer at the

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge and Lake Stanley Draper. The Oklahoma City Parks Commission voted 5-1 Wednesday to recommend against allowing archery hunting in the areas. It follows a previous unanimous vote by the city Game and Fish Commis-

sion to allow it. The proposed ordinance would have to be approved by the water trust and the city council for it to become law, and both bodies will be advised of the commissions’ stances. The ordinance would allow 20 hunters in each area to use bows to hunt

deer during deer season in October. The 20 hunters would be chosen by lottery. It’s a similar system to one in which duck hunters use shotguns during duck season. The parks commissioners based their decision upon comments from city police, who raised safety

concerns about the hunt. Police, who expressed the same concerns with the game and fish commissioners, said their already thin resources would be stretched to regulate the hunt, and that police and paramedics would have SEE HUNT, BACK PAGE

PARADE, WAGON TRAIN ACCENT Women EVENTS IN NORMAN ’89ER DAY get new start in program PLAN AIDS ADDICTS WHO FACE PRISON

BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

An honors high school graduate, Brooke Larson never thought that within a decade she would be a drug addict facing a 10year prison sentence. An addict in prison, Larson never expected she would someday be sitting next to Oklahoma’s governor and shaking her hand at the state Capitol. Larson, 32, was among 18 women who recently completed the Women in Recovery program, an alternative to incarceration for nonviolent women in Tulsa County who have alcohol and drug addictions. It is the program’s sixth graduating class. Fallin told the graduates and more than 100 attending Wednesday’s ceremony that Oklahoma ranks first in the nation with the rate of incarcerated nonviolent female offenders. “With programs like Women in Recovery, we are starting to buck that trend, save lives and families in the process,” Fallin said. “This being the largest graduating class in the program’s history shows that these women are dedicated to a life that is substance-free and ready to contribute to society.” Fallin said her mother often consoled her when she faced personal struggles and challenges by SEE RECOVERY, BACK PAGE

WILDFIRE INFO MEETING SET A town hall meeting to help residents prepare for wildfire season is set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Harmony Christian Church, 7100 S Choctaw Road. It is one in a series of meetings being presented by public education officers with the Oklahoma City Fire Department. “Targeting Wild Land Fires” is an outreach effort of the department designed to educate people on steps they can take to help protect homes and property during wildfire season, Battalion Chief Tim Adams said. To arrange a presentation, call 297-3318 and ask for a public education officer. FROM STAFF REPORTS

DURANT

30-YEAR TERM GIVEN IN DEATH A Bryan County man, who was involved in a revenge drug plot, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison, a prosecutor said Wednesday. Wesley D. Kelley, 19, of Durant, pleaded guilty April 12 in Bryan County District Court for his involvement in the slaying of Jaron “D.J.” Jones, 19, of Denison, Texas, who failed to deliver marijuana, District Attorney Emily Redman said. Also charged in the death is Alora Dannin Hix, 21, and Harold Ray Hass, 23, both of Denison, Texas, and Dustin Metcalf, 28, of Calera. SHEILA STOGSDILL,

Covered wagons line up for last year’s ’89er Day Parade in downtown Norman.

FOR THE OKLAHOMAN

OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

NORMAN — Norman will celebrate ’89er Day this weekend with the arrival of a wagon train and a downtown parade. About 25 wagons plus some horse and mule riders left Friday from a campout at Lebanon, near the Texas border, for the ’89er Sooner Teamsters and Trail Riders Association’s 34th annual Land Run Ride. The nearly 140-mile trek will end in Norman with a campout at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds on Friday night and a downtown parade Saturday. Bill and Teena Nations are this year’s parade marshals. The parade begins at 10 a.m. in front of Norman High School, 911 W Main,

Lil’ cowpokes Alyssa Jones and Adler Minson watch last year’s ’89er Day Parade in downtown Norman. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

and will travel east on Main to Crawford. This year’s theme, “Back in the Saddle … Again,” celebrates the an-

niversary of Oklahoma’s Land Run, which opened the “Unassigned Lands” in central Oklahoma for settlement on April 22, 1889.

Residents are invited to the fairgrounds Friday night to visit with participants in the annual re-enactment of the Land Run.


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NORMAN | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

State Senate votes to keep vision-impaired vendors BY MEGAN ROLLAND, Staff Writer AND BARBARA HOBEROCK, Tulsa World

The state Senate defeated a bill termed “mean spirited” by one lawmaker that would have taken snack bar space in the state Capitol from a program intended for the vision impaired and put it up instead for free-market competition. “Our job is to protect the most vulnerable in society,” said Sen. Earl Garrison, D-Muskogee. “There is no reason in the world to do it.” House Bill 2119 passed the House with only one no vote, but was defeated in the Senate 15-27. Author of the bill, House Pro Tem Jeff Hickman, RFairview, said the service provided by the blind and vision-impaired vendors was not meeting the needs and demands of the busy Capitol. The bill would have exempted the Capitol from a stateadopted federal law that gives preference to vision-impaired vendors in state and county buildings with few exceptions, such as hospitals and golf courses. It also stipulated, however, that proceeds from renting the spaces to private vendors would go to the Department of Rehabilitation Services to help fund programs such as their Business Enterprise Program that trains vision-impaired clients to run their own vending stands in state

and federal buildings. “Members, this is not a mean-spirited bill,” said Sen. Dan Newberry, R-Tulsa. “This is a fiscally responsible bill that will help them generate large dollars in their department and help them receive training.” Newberry, the Senate author, said nothing in the bill would prevent anyone with visual impairments from bidding on the contract. Newberry held the bill on a motion to reconsider the vote by which it failed. He could bring it up again for another vote. Matthew Jones, 32, who currently runs the newly renovated and reopened snack bar on the fourth floor of the Capitol, said he was relieved and grateful the bill failed, adding he hopes it doesn’t come back again. Jones lost his vision in 2009 and worked with the Department of Rehabilitation Services’ Business Enterprise Program to get back on his feet working again. He said the program has been invaluable to him. Senate Minority Leader Sean Burrage, D-Claremore, said he was offended the measure made it to the Senate floor. The Oklahoma Legislature has given hundreds of millions of dollars to special interest groups, Burrage said. “They are not asking for tax credits,” he said. “They are asking for dignity. Vote no.”

Backers of personhood measure worry state House won’t hear it BY MICHAEL MCNUTT Capitol Bureau mmcnutt@opubco.com

House members may be asked to sign a petition to get the so-called personhood bill heard on the House floor if leadership doesn’t bring it up for a hearing, a backer of the measure said Wednesday. Rep. Mike Reynolds, ROklahoma City, said a discharge petition effort will be undertaken if House Speaker Kris Steele, RShawnee, doesn’t bring the bill up for a hearing on the House floor. The petition needs 68 signatures

of the 98 House members; the House usually has 101 members but three seats are vacant. The deadline for Senate Bill 1433 to be heard on the House floor is April 26. The measure, which has been weighted down with 22 amendments, became eligible to be heard on the House floor Wednesday.

About the bill Supporters and opponents showed up Wednesday afternoon in the House gallery. Backers wore blue T-shirts and opponents wore pink T-shirts. Backers of SB 1433 say it

is a statement that Oklahomans value life and that nothing in the measure would prohibit contraception or in vitro fertilization. Opponents fear the bill could lead to restrictions on abortions, birth control, in vitro fertilization and stem cell research. No decision has been made on the fate of SB 1433 in the House, said Steele’s spokesman, John Estus. “The floor leader will decide when to hear it once all the amendments are evaluated and the caucus has a chance to discuss it.” Reynolds, who authored

a similar measure, said that if SB 1433 doesn’t come up for a hearing that at least 68 members would sign a petition to get the bill heard. If SB 1433 isn’t heard, it likely will cause more people to sign an initiative petition drive to put a similar measure on the Nov. 6 ballot, Reynolds said. The constitutional amendment, which is similar to a bill that Reynolds wrote but later withdrew, would define a fertilized human egg as a human being and would ban abortions and outlaw certain forms of birth control.

Bill would allow employers to create their own workers’ comp BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

AT A GLANCE REACTION TO MEASURE MIXED

The Oklahoma Senate on Wednesday passed a measure that would allow some employers to create their own workers’ compensation plans. The controversial House Bill 2155 passed by a vote of 28-17 and returns to the House. Mark Schell, senior vice president and general counsel of Unit Corp., a Tulsa-based oil and gas company, said the measure would allow companies with higher claims and costs than the average company to create their own plans. The measure provides that certain minimum benefits will go into the plan and follow what is already in the workers’ com-

Oklahoma City-based Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. supports the measure, said Beck Robinson, assistant vice president risk manager. She said Texas has a similar program. On average, a cost for an injured employee in Texas is $1,800, compared to $8,600 in Oklahoma, she said. Farmers Insurance Group is opposed to the bill because it would harm the workers’ compensation market and employees, said Kim Decker, manager of government and industry affairs for the insurer in Oklahoma. She said it is not a proven system, and the measure creates a lot of unanswered questions.

pensation system, he said. Critics disagreed, saying the measure would give injured workers fewer benefits and protections. “This bill, if enacted, what it will do is allow an Oklahoma employer to opt out of the work comp sys-

tem and decide what kind of injures will be covered, how long medical bills will be covered, what kind of medical care workers receive, how long temporary benefits will be paid and what, if any, benefits (are paid for) catastrophic inju-

ries and amputations,” said Sen. Richard Lerblance, D-Hartshorne. Schell said the measure takes the adversarial nature out the system so employees would be able to get to their doctors, get healed and back to work without having to go through a drawn-out legal process. Schell said the measure would better enable companies to control costs. Critics said that those still in the state system would see higher premium costs because of companies leaving the system. Schell disagreed. “Most of the companies won’t be able to leave the compensation system because they don’t have high cost or claims,” he said. “You are taking the higher claims and cost out of the system, which will have the reverse effect.”

Students can appeal diploma’s denial BY BARBARA HOBEROCK Tulsa World barbara.hoberock@ tulsaworld.com

Gov. Mary Fallin on Wednesday signed a measure that creates an appeals process for students denied a diploma because they could not pass four out of seven end-of-instruction tests. This is the first year graduating seniors must pass the exams to receive the diploma. House Bill 2970 requires the State Board of Education to create an appeals process for those students. Students would have 30 days after being denied a diploma to appeal the decision to the board. The board would have 45 days to take action on the appeal. Tulsa Public Schools

HOUSE BILL 2970 I What happened: Gov. Mary Fallin signed it. I What it does: It creates an appeals process for high school seniors who can’t pass four out of seven end-ofinstruction exams required to get a diploma. I Effective date: Immediately.

Superintendent Keith Ballard lauded the legislature for passing the measure and Fallin for signing it. “I think there definitely needs to be an appeals process,” Ballard said. But he would have preferred that the appeal go to

the local board of education. Ballard said the issue is complicated. He said he is not opposed to having the testing as the standard, but there are legitimate reasons a student would need an appeals process. “On behalf of all students in Oklahoma who have completed the required course work for graduation from their local high schools but who have extenuating circumstances that have rendered them unable to complete the ACE-related testing, thanks to the Legislature’s and governor’s willingness to offer those students an opportunity to have their unique situations heard through an appeal process before the state Board of Education,” Jenks Superintendent Kirby Lehman said in a statement.

Educators are asking the state Department of Education to act quickly so seniors who have unusual situations can receive a hearing to determine if they have earned the right to graduate and have a fighting chance for gainful employment, Lehman said. Currently, the state Department of Education has alternative routes for students who can’t pass the test. Those routes include retesting, alternative testing or completion of a project that shows mastery in the coursework. Students who have extenuating circumstances can also seek recourse. Extenuating circumstances are situations that are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond the student’s control.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

BILL UPDATES DHS At stake: House Bill 2251 requires an investigation to be conducted when a drug-endangered child is identified by the Department of Human Services. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING At stake: House Bill 2518 expands the definition of human trafficking to include the recruiting, harboring and transporting of a minor for the purpose of prostitution. It also prohibits claiming consent of the minor as a means of defense. What happened: Signed by the governor. What’s next: Takes effect Nov. 1.

LAKE MURRAY At stake: Senate Bill 1913 would allow the state Tourism and Recreation Department to spend $15 million from a fund that gets money from royalty earnings on oil and natural gas wells at three state parks to build a new lodge at Lake Murray State Park. What happened: Passed the House 75-16. What’s next: Goes to the governor. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU

IN BRIEF INSURANCE MEASURE CHALLENGED The House passed a measure Wednesday that backers said would give Oklahomans the opportunity to buy insurance from companies across the nation. But opponents said the measure would allow out-of-state companies to avoid providing required coverage that in-state insurance companies provide. Senate Bill 1059 passed 57-35. It now goes to the Senate. Oklahoma has about 36 mandates that require health insurers to pay for treatment of certain ailments. A health insurance mandate is a requirement that an insurance company or health plan offer benefits for these ailments. Democratic House members said people have fought for decades to persuade legislators to pass laws requiring insurance companies to cover such things as mammography screenings, diabetes treatments, prostate cancer screenings and other procedures. SB 1059 would allow Oklahoma to enter compacts with other states that allow the sale of insurance products across state lines. Rep. Lewis Moore, R-Arcadia, the House author of SB 1059, said it would increase competition for Oklahomans’ insurance business and potentially drive down prices while providing a greater array of products. Moore said many of the mandates are federal requirements and still would be covered, as would mandates that are covered in the home state of the insurance company. House Minority Leader Scott Inman, D-Del City, said the mandates were necessary because insurance companies otherwise wouldn’t provide coverage. “Who are you going to stand with — a faceless out-of-state insurance company or your constituents?” he asked members during debate.

STATE RECEIVES TOBACCO FUNDS Oklahoma has received $74.6 million from the tobacco industry for its annual tobacco settlement payment. Of that amount, 75 percent went directly into the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund, state Treasurer Ken Miller said. Interest on the fund, which totals $710 million, generates money for use in cutting-edge medical research, prevention and reduction of tobacco addiction, and to address other health concerns, said Miller, who also serves as chairman of the trust fund’s board of investors. A payment of $55.9 million was deposited into the fund; the remainder was divided between a fund used for appropriation by the Legislature and the attorney general’s evidence fund. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund was created by a voter-approved amendment to the Oklahoma Constitution in 2000, which specifies that only the earnings from the trust fund may be spent on programs to improve the health and well being of residents, particularly children and senior adults. In August 1996, Oklahoma became the 14th state to file a lawsuit against the tobacco companies, asking for restraints against the industry and monetary damages for state funds spent treating smokingrelated illnesses. The national Master Settlement Agreement, announced in November 1998, imposed sweeping changes in tobacco advertising, banned tobacco companies from targeting children, allocated funding for tobacco education efforts and provided annual payments based on the number of cigarettes sold in the country. Payments received by Oklahoma so far top $975 million and will continue as long as cigarettes are sold.

CANDIDATE DISPUTES ALLEGATIONS Fred E. Smith, a Republican seeking to unseat Sen. Susan Paddack, refuted allegations Wednesday that the Democratic lawmaker made in papers that challenged his candidacy. Smith, of Ada, said he never was convicted of embezzlement in another state. Paddack, of Ada, claimed that Smith is not a registered voter and is ineligible to be a candidate because of his conviction. Smith said he is a registered voter. The state Election Board will hear evidence Monday on Paddack’s allegations. MICHAEL MCNUTT, CAPITOL BUREAU


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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Edmond’s Farmers Market opens Saturday

Fresh cantaloupes tempt buyers at the Edmond Farmers Market at Festival Market Place in July.

A customer searches through tomatoes at the Edmond Farmers Market in August.

People search for fresh produce at the Edmond Farmers Market in August. This year’s market starts Saturday.

BY DIANA BALDWIN

Crafts also are available from 8 a.m. to 1p.m. on the second Saturdays from June to October at Festival Market Place, just west of Broadway off First Street. Edmond Farmers Market is a registered market with the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry and meets all licensure requirements with the Oklahoma Department of Health. Parks department officials are still taking applications for vendor spaces.

Staff Writer dbaldwin@opubco.com

EDMOND — Goods from

local farmers and vendors will once again be available in Edmond at the Farmers Market on Saturday. Locally grown and produced products have been available here since 1988. “We are excited because the weather has been good, and our vendors have produce,” said Diane Self, the city’s parks and recreation department program manager. “They have been able to get a jump-start. There are vegetables out there.” The market is expected to offer 30 vendors. Besides vegetables and fruits, there will be wine from Sand Hill Vineyards in El

LEARN MORE For more information, call 216-7635.

Reno, dog treats from Barker and Friends in Oklahoma City, cheese from the Cheese Factory in Kingfisher and pasta from Tall Girl Specialty Pasta of Edmond. Merrick Valley Farms from Guthrie will be there with organic products. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday through Oct. 27 except May 5, the day of the Edmond Arts Festival. Wednesday markets, which include the junior market, are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 through Aug. 15.

PHOTOS BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Right: Crowds of shoppers look through produce, flowers and baked goods at the Edmond Farmers Market in July. This year’s market opens Saturday and runs through October.

Norman plans events to celebrate Earth Day FROM STAFF REPORTS

NORMAN — More than

50 organizations will offer activities, exhibits and demonstrations at an Earth Day Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday at Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins Ave. The free event also will include a tree giveaway, sponsored by the city of Norman. About 450 trees will be distributed on a first-come basis. The giveaway is being made possible through donations from the Apache Foundation and the Oklahoma Tree Bank Foundation. The day’s activities also will include a 5k run, bicycle games and live entertainment, all designed to highlight the need to protect the Earth’s resources. Other Earth Day celebrations in the city will include lectures and a nature walk at the Discovery Cove Nature Center at Lake Thunderbird on Saturday. The center is off State Highway 9 on Clear Bay

Camryn Williams plants a flower during the 2010 Earth Day celebration in Norman. OKLAHOMAN ARCHIVES

Boulevard, across from the Turkey Pass campground. Beginning at 10 a.m., naturalist Kathy Furneaux will discuss “What Are Trees Good For?” At 11 a.m., she will lead a discussion about insects with children ages 5 and up. At 1:30 p.m., Furneaux will present a slideshow on bats. She will lead a nature walk beginning at 3 p.m. On Sunday, the Keystone XL Pipeline will be the featured topic of a round-table discussion

from 5 to 7 p.m. at St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church at Brooks Street and McGee Drive. A light vegetarian dinner will precede the panel discussion. Speakers will be Roy Knapp, a retired petroleum and geology professor who taught at the University of Oklahoma and the University of Texas; Charles Wesner, chairman of the Oklahoma chapter of the Sierra Club, and Mary Francis, an environmental activist.

Choctaw Land Run Festival scheduled Thursday, Friday BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

CHOCTAW — Thursday and Friday, students will have a chance to re-enact the Oklahoma Land Run of 1889 during the Choctaw Land Run Festival. The ninth annual festival starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. both days, with a kids’ land run race each hour at Choctaw Creek Park, 2001 N Harper. “It’s so much fun to watch the kids ... they’ll get in line and try to sneak across saying, ‘I’m a Sooner!’ ” said Debbie Green, a city employee and event organizer. Some children come dressed as pio-

neers. Much like the ’89ers, children will line up, wait for a sign to run and dash their way to stake a claim. Then, they must bring that stake number back to a deed office where they are given a replica of actual deeds given out at the time. The event also will feature wheelbarrow races, gunfight shows, blacksmithing demonstrations, Indian and Irish dancers plus food vendors and period music. Green said 1,800 students are expected to race over the course of the two days, and the public is welcome to enjoy the entertainment and vendors and watch the land runs. For more information, go to www. choctawfestival.org or call 390-8276.

IN BRIEF GOLF TOURNEY TEES OFF MAY 7 MIDWEST CITY — St. Chris-

topher’s Episcopal Church will hold a four-person scramble golf tournament to benefit the outreach ministries of the church. The tournament will be at 1 p.m. May 7 at John Conrad Golf Course with registration beginning at 11 a.m. The $70 registration fee per person includes 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch and various awards. Sponsorships are available for $100 per hole. For sponsorship information or to register, call the church at 732-4802.

ARTISTS SOUGHT FOR PROGRAM MIDWEST CITY — Midwest City officials announced a public art program titled, Ponies on Parade, featuring life-size, fiberglass Shetland ponies transformed into multimedia works of art. It’s a continuation of Midwest City’s motto, “Where the Spirit Flies High.” Local artists are encouraged to modify the saying to match their design. Finished ponies will be placed in public outdoor spaces. The application deadline is April 30. For information call 7391229, email astarr@ midwestcityok.org or visit ww.midwestcityok.org.

ANNUAL TRACK MEET IS PLANNED MIDWEST CITY — Midwest City Parks and Recreation and Midwest City Kiwanis Club will host the Hershey Track and Field Meet at 6 p.m. Friday at Carl Albert Middle School/High School track. The meet is open to boys and girls 7-14. Events include races as well as field events such as the standing long jump or softball throw. Those who qualify will advance to the state Hershey Track and Field Meet. For an application, go online to www.hersheys trackandfield.com or call 739-1292.

IOWA SOCIETY TO HOST DINNER The Iowa Society of Oklahoma will hold its 75th annual dinner meeting at 5 p.m. April 26 at the Golden Corral, 5720 Northwest Expressway. Anyone who is interested in or has ties to Iowa is welcome to attend. For information call 721-2561.

ACTIVITIES TO MARK EARTH DAY NICHOLS HILLS — Earth Day 2012 will be celebrated in

Nichols Hills on Saturday with a one-mile fun run for children and an Eco-Expo tent featuring exhibits relating to sustainable living, including a worm composting demonstration and giveaways. The event takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1203 Sherwood Lane in Nichols Hills. The fun run begins at 9:30 a.m. Recycling for Nichols Hills residents include hazardous waste and dry-cleaning materials as well as e-waste. FROM STAFF REPORTS


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NORMAN | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Issues on Arab Spring discussed at UCO event BY VALLERY BROWN Staff Writer vbrown@opubco.com

EDMOND — University of Central Oklahoma President Don Betz and New York Times Deputy Foreign Editor Michael Slackman on Wednesday spoke about uprisings in the Middle East and what Americans can learn from the events. The uprisings and demonstrations that began in 2010 have become known as the Arab Spring. Rulers have been forced from power in many countries, including Egypt and Libya, and civil protests in many Middle Eastern countries have resulted in violent clashes between protesters and government officials. Slackman described a personal account while he was reporting in the region. In a morgue he saw a man, firmly clutching his dead brother’s hand. “We tend to focus on big moments,” Slackman said. “But in the sweep of history, individual decisions can be just as important. ... That’s what the Arab Spring is — Individual people making history.” Slackman spoke about reporting in Bahrain and

Michael Slackman speaks on the Arab Spring at UCO. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

Egypt and how his view of democracy has been influenced during his time there. He summarized democracy in three words: values, diversity and tolerance.

“I think one of the key variables for Americans is to understand the people of this region, not as stereotypes, but as individuals,” Betz said. Using the example of

the fall of the Iron Curtain and other regional revolutions, Betz explained that what’s happening in the Middle East isn’t as simple as one religion or one group against another. “We are observing literally an awakening of a region,” he said. U.S. foreign policy and the sentiments of citizens here do affect how the government reacts to these uprisings. Betz and Slackman said while many in the Middle East are fond of Americans, they are critical of U.S. foreign policy. Betz said this is particularly true when it comes to the issue of Israel and Palestine. “Those critical voices are muted here,” Betz said. Slackman’s presentation is a part of a series of events leading up to Betz’s inauguration as UCO president Friday. He’s been in the position since August, and formerly worked for the United Nations on Middle East issues. Betz also serves as a member of the founding implementation committee for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project.

20 finalists selected in state’s top superintendent competition FROM STAFF REPORTS

The Oklahoma Association of School Administrators has selected the finalists for its annual Superintendent of the Year contest. The association selected 20 district winners throughout the state. The winners and their school districts are: Keith Ballard, Tulsa; Todd Bunch, Ninnekah; Harvey Brumley, Holly Creek; Eddie Coleman, Kiamichi CareerTech Center; Donny Darrow, Elmore City; Terry Davidson, Comanche; Glen Elliott, Burlington; Buddy Enis, Wilburton; Rick Garrison, Cheyenne;

Howard Hampton, Bishop; Shawn Hime, Enid; James Mathews, Sasakwa; D.B. Merrill, Hilldale; Aaron Newcomb, Calera; David Pennington, Ponca City; Matt Posey, Oilton; Don Raleigh, Pryor; Roger Sharp, Muldrow; Wade Stafford, Hardesty; and Pam Twidwell, Midwest City-Del City. In addition to superintendents, the association has selected the 20 district winners for the Assistant Superintendent/Central Office Administrator of the Year. The winners and their districts are Steve Beall, assistant superintendent for Shawnee; Michelle

Bryson, assistant superintendent for Guymon; Rodney Calhoun, finance director for Duncan; Bruce Campbell, associate superintendent for Francis Tuttle CareerTech Center; Linda Clinkenbeard, assistant superintendent for Fort Gibson; Clayton Edwards, assistant superintendent for Stigler; Tom Fisher, assistant superintendent for Woodward; Ron Flanagan, administrative assistant for Muldrow; April Grace, executive director of human resources for Putnam City; Jason James, assistant superintendent for Clinton; Nancy Niemann, assistant superintendent for Ponca City;

Bruce May, assistant superintendent for Altus; Shirley Morgan, director of federal programs for Ardmore; Fred Rhodes, assistant superintendent for Yukon; Jerry Rutledge, assistant superintendent for Oologah-Talala; Curtis Shelton, director of operations for Bristow; Sue Shilling, assistant superintendent for Kingston; Craig Wall, interim superintendent for Valliant; Gary Watts, chief financial officer for Sand Springs; and Karl White, chief financial officer for Enid. The administrators will be honored at an awards banquet in June in Oklahoma City.

Regents ponder new funding formula BY SILAS ALLEN Staff Writer sallen@opubco.com

Officials are looking to revamp the way the Oklahoma System of Higher Education distributes certain funds to colleges and universities. At a meeting Wednesday, members of the state Regents for Higher Education discussed a proposal to move toward a performance-based funding formula for new money. The board is scheduled to take action on the proposal Thursday. In March 2011, system Chancellor Glen Johnson appointed a task force to examine the possibility of replacing the current

funding formula with one that would be based on institutions’ performance in a number of categories, including student retention and graduation rates. Under the current formula, universities receive funding based on funding levels of similar universities in other states. That formula only applies to new money, or any funding the system receives beyond its current base level, said Amanda Paliotta, vice chancellor for budget and finance. The system hasn’t been appropriated new money since 2008. Unlike the current formula, the proposed formula is strictly performance driven, Paliotta said.

However, it provides safeguards for schools that historically have relatively low per-student funding levels. The system is designed to encourage an emphasis on student retention and degree completion rates by rewarding schools that perform well in those areas, Johnson said. That focus is in line with a broader emphasis on increasing the number of degrees and professional certifications Oklahoma produces. College completion has been a watchword of state and federal higher education officials in recent years. Johnson has called for an additional 20,400 degrees and certificates

awarded in Oklahoma over the next 12 years. That goal is a part of Complete College America, a nationwide initiative designed to boost college completion. Oklahoma’s college completion efforts were identified as a national model for the initiative. Johnson said those efforts will be the system’s chief priority for the next 12 years, until the initiative ends. Regents will vote on the proposal at a meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the State Regents Office, 655 Research Parkway, Suite 200. Before that meeting, the board will hold a public hearing on tuition and fees at 9 a.m.

Race to aid sexual assault programs BY TIFFANY POOLE For The Oklahoman

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and the YWCA of Oklahoma City is hoping to raise funds and promote advocacy for victims. From 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, runners and walkers from across the state will show their support at the YWCA’s fourth annual 2-Minute 5k. The race will be held at Regatta Park, 701 S Lincoln Blvd. “Every two minutes someone in the U.S. becomes a victim of sexual

Janet L. Peery YWCA of Oklahoma City CEO

assault, and we think that hurts way too many people,” said Janet L. Peery,

chief executive officer of the YWCA of Oklahoma City in a news release. “This race not only raises funds for us to assist victims of sexual assault, but it also raises awareness about a serious issue that many people don’t realize happens right here in our own community.” Live music, awards, a Kiddie K, a visit from the RedHawks’ mascot, and a fire truck for kids to explore are just a few of the activities available in addition to the race. All proceeds from the race go to YWCA programs

that benefit victims of sexual assault. That includes the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program, which provides a volunteer nurse and advocate for emotional support when a victim of sexual assault is taken to the hospital for a forensic exam. Runners, walkers and joggers can find more information and register online for $20 at www.ywca okc.org until 6 p.m. Thursday. Registration is also available on-site the day of the race for $30, beginning at 8 a.m.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

SOUTHMOORE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES

Teacher’s aide admits sending nude photos FROM STAFF REPORTS

MOORE — A teacher’s assistant and assistant soccer coach at Southmoore High School admitted to sending nude photographs of herself to three students, police said. The 26-year-old woman has not been arrested, so her name will not be released until the investigation is turned over to the district attorney, Moore police Sgt. Jeremy Lewis said. A parent of one of the students filed a police re-

port Tuesday night after finding the photographs on her son’s cellphone, Lewis said. The woman was interviewed by police Wednesday and admitted to sending multiple nude images of herself to three students over the past two or three weeks, he said. The investigation is not concluded, but the woman faces a charge of lewd acts with a minor, Lewis said. The woman has been suspended from the school district pending the outcome of the investigation, he said.

CHILD WAS SNATCHED AFTER SHOOTING

Keith Schuchardt, right, is comforted Wednesday in Spring, Texas. AP PHOTO

Nurse suspected in baby abduction had miscarriage BY MICHAEL GRACZYK AND JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press

SPRING, Texas — A Texas woman accused of killing a young mother and abducting her 3-day-old boy had suffered a miscarriage and intended to “adopt” the newborn as her own, authorities said Wednesday. Verna McClain, 30, is charged with capital murder after confessing to killing the new mother and grabbing tiny Keegan Golden from outside a pediatrician’s office in suburban Houston. Keegan was found unharmed hours later with McClain’s sister. The Montgomery County sheriff’s office said Wednesday that McClain — estranged from her husband, with whom she had raised three children — had told her fiance she was pregnant and had given birth to his child. Instead, McClain had miscarried, Capt. Bruce Zenor said. McClain’s sister, Corina Jackson, told authorities that she had talked about needing to “do the adoption” soon after taking Keegan. Her fiance, who was not identified Wednesday, is being interviewed by authorities. Officials said they did not believe anyone else was involved in the shoot-

ing and abduction. Sheriff Tommy Gage said Kala Golden had placed Keegan into her pickup Tuesday afternoon after leaving Northwoods Pediatric Center in Spring, about 20 miles north of Houston. The suspected shooter was parked next to her, Gage said. During the confrontation, the woman repeatedly shot Golden, then snatched the child from her truck and drove away, according to witness accounts. The dying woman leaned into the vehicle and tried to take the boy back, screaming, “My baby!” but her attacker sped off. Two detectives spotted a vehicle later Tuesday outside a nearby apartment complex that matched witnesses’ descriptions, Gage said. Though McClain’s apartment was empty, she later arrived and talked to authorities. “During her interview with detectives, information was obtained which led detectives to a residence in Harris County where her sister lives and a possible location of the child,” Gage said. McClain was later arrested. Police say she admitted carrying out the attack. McClain is a vocational nurse. She does not work at the pediatric center, according to a clinic receptionist, Jackie Longoria.


NORMAN | STATE

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Norman swimmers speak out for water-based cultural center BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

NORMAN — About 40 people wearing “support swimming” stickers urged city council members at a public forum to consider building a swim complex on land promised to the city in the University North Park Addition. Supporters of a swim complex far outnumbered others who came to the forum Tuesday to make suggestions for the land, which would be set aside for a cultural center once it is donated. Developers of the University North Park Addition have said they will give land — possibly four acres — to the city for construction of a cultural center in the retail district on the east side of Interstate 35 between Robinson Street and Tecumseh Road. The district is a tax increment financing district, which means a portion of the sales tax and ad valorem tax generated goes to developing infrastructure to support the district. According to a master plan for the area, about $8.5 million in revenue would be set aside for construction of a cultural center. However, Mayor Cindy Rosenthal warned, “That is not money in the bank. That is money that would build up over time from the district’s revenue stream.” Councilman Dave Spaulding said he was not convinced a swim com-

That seems more like a sports complex to me.” COUNCILMAN DAVE SPAULDING

plex qualified as a cultural center. “That seems more like a sports complex to me,” he said.

Pisces Project pipes up Resident Nancy Yoch said an aquatic center would contribute to the health of the community “from the youngest to the oldest.” A state-of-the-art swim center “would vastly improve the quality of life in Norman and draw people here from all surrounding areas,” she said. The cultural center is supposed to serve as a regional draw to boost Norman’s economy, she said, “and this is what a swim complex would do.” Ann Schroeder said Norman’s swimming pools are old and overcrowded. “Our citizens need this. There are very few sports that last a lifetime, but swimming is one of them,” she said. All those who spoke in favor of a swim complex are members of the Pisces Project, a community-based

effort to raise money and educate the public on the need for a state-of-theart swimming complex in Norman. Diane Moershel said a preliminary design developed by the Pisces Project includes a competitive pool, a recreational pool “with slides and all the bells and whistles” and a shallow, warm-water pool accessible to wheelchairs and for people whose arthritis or other diseases would benefit from water therapy.

Other ideas David Hopper said he favors a weather museum as an appropriate cultural center in Norman. “For about 10 years now, there has been a concerted effort to make Norman the weather capital of the world,” he said. Museum supporters are looking at other possible locations besides the University North Park Addition, Hopper said. Stephen Koranda, executive director of Norman’s Visitors and Tourism Bureau, suggested the city build an exhibition hall that could be used for multiple purposes. Other suggestions for a cultural center that have been introduced include an international gymnastics hall of fame and a cheerleading center. Tuesday’s meeting was not a decision-making meeting, Rosenthal said. “These are just ideas. Construction of any kind of cultural center would be down the road,” she said.

Elementary math educator is selected as teacher of year for Norman district BY JANE GLENN CANNON Staff Writer jcannon@opubco.com

a math resource teacher at Adams Elementary School, has been named Norman’s teacher of the year. Leader was honored Tuesday during the district’s annual celebration of excellence. She was among five finalists for the award. She is in her first year as a teacher at Adams. She taught second and third grades at Jackson Elementary School from 1993 to 2011. She was Jackson’s site teacher of the year in 1998. Leader credits a child development professor at the University of Oklahoma for inspiring her career. After watching Deb Parkinson interact with her students, Leader said, “I wanted to learn everything I could from her to be that teacher who is completely engaged with the student

Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” CHERYL PANTALONE, ART TEACHER FROM A LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR LEADER’S NOMINATION

Sara Leader

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ROSE STATE STUDENTS WILL STAY AFLOAT

After getting their photo taken, Gary and Nancy Orendorff look for their table during a Titanic-themed fundraiser for the Rose State scholarship fund. PHOTO BY BRYAN TERRY, THE OKLAHOMAN

Titanic dinner raises money for scholarships BY MATT PATTERSON Staff Writer mpatterson@opubco.com

MIDWEST CITY — A dinner replicating the final meal served on the Titanic raised several thousand dollars for scholarships to Rose State College. The Saturday night event focused on the final meal on the luxury ship before it sank on April 15, 1912. Many of the 160 guests for the Rose State event wore period dress and dined on the 10course meal that was served to first-class passengers. There was also a toast and a prayer for the victims of the sinking. The first-class menu items included filet mig-

non, glazed roast duckling, lamb with mint sauce and Waldorf pudding. Guests were there to financially assist current and future Rose State students through the Rose State College Foundation. Tickets were $125 a person and $200 per couple. Sponsorships were available for $1,250. “It’s a unique event in history that captures people’s imagination,” Rose State spokesman Ben Fenwick said. “The scholarships are like lifeboats for our students in many ways. They are very important.” Some couples attended the dinner wearing period top hats, tuxedos and ball gowns.

IN BRIEF

in front of her while simultaneously making other students feel a sense of love and belonging.” During her teaching career, Leader said, she has come to realize “the smallest touch or glimpse of truth can make all the difference. I want every person I work with, tall or small, to know that I truly see them. I am profoundly joyful to have them by my side. Our greatest achievements don’t come with big pronouncements or dropping balloons. They are a

collection of genuine gestures over time.” In a letter of support for Leader’s nomination, art teacher Cheryl Pantalone wrote, “Sara sees beauty and greatness in everyone. Not only does she see it, she fosters it, exposes it, uncovers it, reflects it, shines a light on it and nurtures it.” Her interaction with students “infects you with a desire to have that kind of passion in your own profession — whatever that may be.”

Leader was founder and chairwoman of the annual Jackson Elementary Art Auction and served as faculty liaison for a partnership with the Firehouse Art Center. She served as co-chair of the Professional Learning Community at Jackson and was a delegate to the National Reading Conference in San Francisco, among other honors. She holds a degree in early childhood education from OU and serves as an instructor at OU.

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NORMAN — The United Church of Norman-UCC will host a free lecture Friday by Bishop John Shelby Spong. He will speak at 7 p.m. in the Great Hall of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 Chautauqua Ave. A pioneer of progressive Christianity, Spong will speak on “Why Christianity Must Change or Die — The Old Paradigm Is Not Working.” Spong is a scholar, pastor, priest and bishop who has made a life’s study of the Bible. For more information, go to www. normanucc.org.

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VI

BISHOP TO GIVE FREE LECTURE

NORMAN — Sara Leader,

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NORMAN — An Earth Day Arts Market will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the West Wind Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1309 W Boyd St. The event will include fine art, jewelry, ceramics and glasswork by local artists. The Norman Belly Dance Club will perform. Visitors are asked to bring individually wrapped snacks for children as a donation to agencies in Norman that serve children. The event is in conjunction with Child Abuse Prevention Month.

SCHOOL FOUNDATION HAS MEETING NORMAN — The Norman Public School Foundation will hold its annual meeting at 8:15 a.m. April 26 at 131 S Flood Ave. For more information, call 3665947. FROM STAFF REPORTS


16A

VI

NORMAN | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

INCIDENT INVOLVED 96-YEAR-OLD PATIENT

Nursing home abuse video sparks firings BY JULIANA KEEPING Staff Writer jkeeping@opubco.com

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has fired employees accused of abusing a 96year-old patient with dementia, according to a statement issued Wednesday. Police on Monday arrested Lucy Waithira Gakunga, 23, and Caroline Kaseke, 28, both of Oklahoma City, on one complaint each of neglect by caretaker. The nursing assistants are accused of abuse after being caught on a camera hidden by the victim’s family. The family placed the camera in the room because they suspected someone was stealing from the patient’s room. An incident report police released Tuesday states the video shows Gakunga shoving latex gloves into the patient’s mouth and forcibly holding them there as Kaseke watches. The video also shows Gakunga lift the patient into bed and then pushes the side of her face to force her to lie down, the police report states. In a statement, the administrator of the nursing home, 13500 Brandon Place, said the acts of two employees accused of abuse are not representative of the home’s 116 employees.

Lucy Gakunga

Caroline Kaseke

“As stewards of our residents’ well-being, we share in the community’s outrage over these inhumane acts,” Amanda Penrod said in a statement. “We hold ourselves to the highest of standards and have zero tolerance for such behavior or conduct, which is why we immediately contacted the police.” The for-profit facility is owned by Westlake Nursing Home L.P. of Dallas, Texas, according to the state Health Department. The most recent inspection by the state showed it has 92 residents in its care.

OKC slaying suspect surrenders to officers BY BRYAN DEAN Staff Writer bdean@opubco.com

A man wanted on a murder complaint in a January shooting at an apartment complex in northwest Oklahoma City surrendered Wednesday, authorities said. Hershell Eugene Anderson, 20, surrendered to the Oklahoma County sheriff’s warrant team through his attorney. A spokesman for the sheriff said Anderson is wanted in the Jan. 17 shooting death of Donte Deshawn McCarther, 21.

McCarther was found shot to death near a breezeway at an apartment complex in the 1400 block of N Council Road. Anderson was booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon on a murder complaint. He has at least two previous arrests involving alleged violence, including a 2008 arrest following a carjacking in which a woman was shot. He was 16 at the time. Anderson also faces an assault with a deadly weapon charge after a February arrest in Oklahoma City.

Fight between 10 girls breaks out on campus FROM STAFF REPORTS

A fight broke out Wednesday in Douglass High School before the Rev. Jesse Jackson arrived for a visit, police said. Two 18-year-old female students were taken to the Oklahoma County jail on disorderly conduct complaints, police Master Sgt. Gary Knight said. Eight other girls were taken to a juvenile deten-

tion center on disorderly conduct complaints, Knight said. No serious injuries were reported. The altercation broke out before Jackson arrived, Oklahoma City School District spokeswoman Kathleen Kennedy said. Kennedy said the disturbance happened about 8:30 a.m. in a hallway. “It was cleared out for Jesse Jackson,” she said.

2 teen girls are killed in unrelated crashes FROM STAFF REPORTS

Teenage girls from Harrah and Fort Gibson died in crashes Tuesday on state roads, authorities said. Sara Rogers, 16, Harrah About 4 p.m., Rogers was pulling out of the Sonic Drive-In on NE 23 near Dobbs Road when she collided with another vehicle, Harrah police officer Phil Stewart said. Rogers died at a hospital. The other driver was not hurt, he said.

Kambrin Dennis, 17, Fort Gibson About 4:25 p.m., Dennis was driving north on State Highway 16, about five miles south of Wagoner, when she crossed the median and hit a southbound pickup, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported. Dennis died at the scene. The driver of the pickup, Jacob Stilwell, 33, of Wagoner, was treated at a hospital and released, troopers said. Dennis was not wearing a seat belt.

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Edmond attorney wins $3M award for widow BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Kentucky jury has awarded more than $3 million to a woman represented by a metro-area attorney in a wrongful death action. Mark Cox, an Edmond resident and attorney with Merritt & Associates Law Offices in Oklahoma City, successfully represented Vickie Herd, of Jacksonville, Ark., who sued one of Kentucky’s largest construction companies after her truck driver husband slammed into a concrete barrier and died. Herd alleged in a 2009 civil complaint that Scotty’s Contracting & Stone, of Bowling Green, Ky.,

BACKGROUND Vickie Herd’s husband was traveling north on Interstate 65 in Simpson County about 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2007, when he merged into an access lane for trucks that was supposed to be closed when there is construction activity, Cox said. The truck driver was 15 miles from his intended destination when his truck hit the barrier and burst into flames, the attorney said.

provided inadequate construction signs and road markings along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 65 near Franklin, Ky., that was under construction at the time of her husband’s death. Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding in favor of Herd on Thursday and awarded her $3,078,490.25 in compen-

satory and punitive damages, Cox said Tuesday. The construction company, Cox alleged at trial, failed to close off a construction zone access lane with orange safety barrels and post warning signs, which confused, and ultimately contributed to the death of Fate Herd III, 46. Aaron Silletto, an attorney for the construction

company, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Silletto claimed the barrels were in place at the time of the crash, and argued that Herd was inattentive or asleep, Cox said. A construction company employee testified that she put the barrels in place, Cox said. But a truck driver following Herd when the crash occurred testified that he didn’t see the barrels, and two other witnesses, an investigating trooper and a deputy sheriff, also said they didn’t see any barrels, Cox said. “The jury obviously didn’t believe her,” he said, adding that Scotty’s never offered more than $1,000 to settle the case.

Three are sought on murder charges in triple homicide in Oklahoma City FROM STAFF REPORTS

Arrest warrants were issued Wednesday for three men in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Oklahoma City early Saturday. Genaro Hernandez, 25; Luis Humberto Solis, 24; and Jesus Solis-Acosta, 26, are wanted on charges of first-degree murder and shooting with intent to kill, according to court documents. Officers responding to an assault call with report-

ed shots fired found James Lumpkin, 42, dead on the lawn of the home and the bodies of Kayla Ramirez, 19, and Francisco Grajeda, 19, inside the home, 3221 S Durland Ave., just after midnight, according to the arrest affidavit.

Shootings witnessed A witness told police Juan Carlos Hernandez fled after the shooting in Grajeda’s vehicle. The witness said his brother, Jose Lucio Hernandez, lived in the home

and was there before the shootings, but was not at the residence when they occurred, according to the affidavit. Juan and Jose Hernandez were arrested Tuesday on complaints of possession of a firearm in commission of a felony, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a sawed-off shotgun after officers located drugs and firearms at the residence during the homicide investigation.

During a police interview, Juan Hernandez admitted to being at the house when the shooting occurred and told officers shots were fired at him, but he was able to flee without injury. Genaro Hernandez was identified as the man who shot Ramirez, Solis as the man who shot Grajeda and Solis-Acosta as the man who shot Lumpkin, according to the affidavit. All three men were identified by both their name and photograph.

3 suspected gang members sought FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City police are searching for three suspected gang members wanted on racketeering complaints. Master Sgt. Gary Knight said officers have issued arrest warrants for Joel Perez, 27, Mauricio Martinez, 21, and Andy Duran, 22. Anyone with information about their whereabouts is asked to call 911.

Joel Perez

Mauricio Martinez

Andy Duran

Maryland man charged with stealing wallet BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

A Maryland man is accused of taking a wallet containing $2,000 that was left on a counter at Will Rogers World Airport. Terrence Bradford Tarver, 32, of Silver Springs, Md., was charged Wednesday in Oklahoma

County District Court with grand larceny in the Dec. 2 theft at the Continental Airlines counter, court records show. Tarver allegedly took the wallet from a Continental employee who had found it on the counter and asked Tarver if it belonged to him, according to a probable cause affidavit. When the real owner of

the wallet returned to the counter looking for it, the worker said another person had already claimed it, Oklahoma City police reported. The worker told police she then approached the man to whom she had given the wallet and he denied having it. The man was confronted by a police officer and

handed over the wallet after the officer told him there was video of him putting the wallet in his pocket. When the officer checked the wallet, $2,000 was missing. The man denied having the money, then pulled it out of his pocket and handed it to the officer, the affidavit claims.

Conspirator in fraud case drops her claims BY TIM WILLERT Staff Writer twillert@opubco.com

An Oklahoma City woman who pleaded guilty to conspiring with a former auditor to steal money from the state has withdrawn a letter to a judge in which she suggested lying with the knowledge of her attorney during her plea. Shelly Rae Stejskal, 59, told Oklahoma County District Judge Ray C. El-

liott on Tuesday that she “got confused” about the details of her plea agreement with state prosecutors, and that there was “no scheme” to perjure herself or withdraw her plea. “I just misunderstood,” she told the judge.

Multiple charges Stejskal pleaded guilty April 9 to multiple charges, including computer crimes, forgery and con-

spiracy, as part of a deal with prosecutors. She received a 5-year deferred sentence and was ordered to pay nearly $10,000 in restitution. Stejskal was accused of helping LaTisha Raye Reid, a former internal auditor at the state treasurer’s office, steal money from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund. Reid pleaded guilty to 23 of 24 charges on April 12, and is awaiting trial with

another co-defendant on a conspiracy charge.

Attorneys replaced In the letter to Elliott, Stejskal alleged misconduct on the part of her former attorneys, who the judge replaced when told prosecutors could call Stejskal as a witness at Reid’s trial. When Elliott asked Stejskal on Tuesday if her former lawyers did anything wrong, she replied, “No.”

Second arrest made in Easter Sunday slaying BY STAFF REPORTS

LEXINGTON — A second arrest has been made in the Easter Sunday shooting death of a Lexington man, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation reported Wednesday. Authorities arrested

Russell Lee Blackwood, 40, of Purcell, on a murder complaint in connection with the death of Gary Norton Sr., 55, who was found shot to death in his Lexington home April 8. Blackwood was in the McClain County jail on unrelated charges.

Agents questioned Blackwood on Wednesday, arrested him, and booked him into the Cleveland County jail. Richard Dean Landsdale, 37, of Purcell, was arrested at home Monday in connection with the killing. Landsdale also was

booked into Cleveland County jail. An autopsy revealed Norton died of a gunshot wound to the head, the OSBI reported. Several residents called 911 and said they heard gunshots in the area between 12:30 and 12:45 a.m.


THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Deaths

NORMAN | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

VI

17A

IN BRIEF

ARDMORE

Riggs, Thomas Jefferson “Tommy,” 80, welder for Texas Granite, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Harvey-Douglas, Ardmore).

ATOKA

Hill, Cecil Orlon, 68, laborer, died April 12. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown’s, Atoka).

BARTLESVILLE

Embrey, Robert Leroy, 68, retired lawn service owner, died Wednesday. Services pending (Stumpff-Nowata, Nowata). Newman, Dorothy Marie, 78, died Monday. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bartlesville Southern Baptist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Parsons, J.L., 95, died Monday. Private services (Stumpff, Bartlesville). Tinker, Carl Fred, 78, retired purchasing agent, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, Seventh-day Adventist Church (Stumpff, Bartlesville). White, Tom, 64, died Wednesday. Services pending (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

BETHANY

Houston, John Wesley, 77, died Monday. Services pending (MercerAdams, Bethany).

CARTER

Thompson, Leroy, 81, truck driver, died Tuesday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Thursday, Carter Cemetery (Martin, Elk City).

CHICKASHA

Best, Francis Marion, 92, composing foreman, died Wednesday. Mass 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Name Catholic Church (Sevier’s Chickasha, Chickasha).

DUNCAN

Pryor, Shirley Chambless, 75, homemaker, died Tuesday. Graveside services 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Ninnekah Cemetery (Callaway-SmithCobb, Marlow).

ENID

Brumfield, Joseph D. Jr. “Jody,” 63, salesman, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Ladusau-Evans, Enid).

HENRYETTA

Caldwell, Jolly Gene, 71, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Dustin (Integrity, Henryetta).

HINTON

Bradford, Shaun David, 34, welder, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Rock of Restoration Church, Geary (Turner, Hinton).

HOLDENVILLE

Hemingway-Baxter, Theta Mae, 87, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Allen Cemetery (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville). Rives, Bernice, 93, homemaker, died April 16. Services 1 p.m. Monday, Barnard Memorial United Methodist Church (Hudson-Phillips, Holdenville).

ANADARKO

GUNSHOT FATAL FOR OFFICER Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation agents are investigating the fatal shooting of an offduty officer inside the Anadarko Police Department early Wednesday. Officials said officer Ashley Burrus, 34, walked into the department about 2:30 a.m., sat on a lobby chair and apparently fired one shot into his chest. Paramedics were called and pronounced Burris dead at the scene. Agents searched Burrus’ home for evidence after the shooting and discovered that he was trying to work through domestic issues. The shooting remains under investigation. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Oklahoma City). Hale, Helen Margaret “Peggy,” 84, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. April 28 (Hahn-Cook/Street & Draper, Oklahoma City). Khoury, Randal Ray, 70, business owner, died April 13. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Brown Dugger, Perry). McClung, Cherlyn, 58, died April 9. Services 11 a.m. Thursday, Creston Hills Church of Christ (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Mitchell, Sherral, 59, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Saturday (HowardHarris, Oklahoma City). Orr, Ercel “Kay,” 66, died April 13. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Mark’s United Methodist Church (Bill Merritt, Bethany). Reid, Gary D., 70, died April 12. Graveside services were Wednesday (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Rustin, William D. “Bill,” 72, retired judge, died April 14. Services Saturday in Wichita, Kan. (Downey and Lahey East, Wichita, Kan.). Williams, Richard D. “Butch,” 63, self-employed construction worker, died April 11. Services 11 a.m. Friday, New Harvest Fellowship (McKayDavis, Oklahoma City).

PARKLAND

Reedy, Gerald Keith, 76, farmer, died KINTA Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Ulrich, Cora Mae Weatherton Upton, General Assembly Church of the 84, homemaker, died April 9. Services Firstborn (Palmer & Marler, Cush10 a.m. Saturday (Mallory-Martin, ing). Stigler).

LINDSAY

Keeler, Mary Etta McCord, 85, homemaker, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday, Missionary Baptist Church (B. G. Boydston, Lindsay).

MCALESTER

Cravins, James W., 85, truck driver, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). DeLana, Ottilie “Ottie,” 83, factory worker, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester). Murray, Olive Ruth, 98, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Thursday (Brumley-Mills, McAlester).

MEDFORD

Richardson, Marie Lone, 67, nurse’s aide, died April 17. Services 2 p.m. April 24 (Lanman, Helena).

MIDWEST CITY

Gepfert, Jean W., 83, homemaker, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Ford, Midwest City).

MOORE

PAULS VALLEY

Garton, Kathryn, 68, teacher, died Wednesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church (Ray and Martha’s, Mountain View).

NORMAN

Edwards, Wanda Lee, 85, died Tuesday. Services pending (Havenbrook, Norman).

OKLAHOMA CITY

Blassengill, James, 69, minister, died April 12. Services 11 a.m. Friday, Bethlehem Star Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Bowen, Calvin L., 63, died April 15. Services 11 a.m. Monday, Tabernacle Baptist Church (Howard-Harris, Oklahoma City). Gonzales, Patricia Ann, 42, died Monday. Services 10 a.m. Friday, Crossings Comunidad (Resthaven,

Records RECORDS

Jan. 25, 1958 - Apr. 16, 2012

MIDWEST CITY Marilyn Phyllis Griffin, 54, of Midwest City passed away April 16, 2012. She was born January 25, 1958 in Knoxville, TN, to Leon and Betty Nell (Brookshire) Taylor. Marilyn went to Saddlewood High School in Jacksonville, FL. She worked at TAFB for 12 years. Survived by husband of 29 years, Mark; sons, Jamie Austin, Jeremy and Joshua Griffin; grandchildren, Riley Austin, and Lily and Peyton Griffin; sister, Pamela Adcock and husband Cecil; brothers, Craig Taylor and wife Melissa, and Steve Taylor and wife Jan; and numerous friends and family. Preceded in death by son Jessie, father, and sister Lynette Gast. Funeral Service will be 2:00 pm, Friday, April 20, 2012, at Bill Eisenhour Southeast Chapel with interment at Sunny Lane Cemetery. Leave your condolences at www.eisenhourfuneral.com

October 20, 1937 - April 17, 2012

EDMOND Ronald Edward Hickman was a husband, father, grandfather, friend, and teacher. He was a graduate of Capitol Hill High School. Ronald was a U.S. Postal Carrier for 35 years. He loved his church family at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church, worshiping, and serving them well. He enjoyed learning and teaching about computers. Preceding him in death is his wife, Goldie Hickman. Surviving him in death is his 4 children, Chris, Nancy, David, and Kim; 5 grandchildren; and 4 great-grandchildren. We love you daddy and we’ll miss you. Services will be 10:00am, Friday, April 20, 2012 at Bryant Avenue Baptist Church with burial to follow at Memorial Park Cemetery.

RAMONA

Adcock, William “Bill,” 70, field service superintendent, died Tuesday. Services 11 a.m. Friday (Walker Brown, Bartlesville).

Kamary Danielle Van Patten

SHAWNEE

June 17, 1982 - April 13, 2012

Corbin, Sandra Kaye, 58, died Wednesday. Graveside services 11 a.m. Friday, Fairview Cemetery (John M. Ireland, Moore). Dixson, Marshall “Floice,” 77, died Monday. Services 2 p.m. Friday (Cooper, Tecumseh).

SPIRO

Moore, Samantha Ashley, 21, communications, died April 11. Services 1 p.m. Saturday, Community Free Will Baptist Church, Pocola (MalloryMartin, Spiro).

STIGLER

TUTTLE

Hensley, Jearld Dean, 76, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, First Baptist Church, Verden (Huber-Reynolds, Minco).

WILLIS

Yates, Barbara Lou, 77, died Monday. Graveside services 2 p.m. Saturday, Willis Cemetery (Watts, Madill).

WOODWARD

Peil, Steven R., 62, painter and dry waller, died Sunday. Services 9 a.m. Thursday (Billings, Woodward).

YUKON

Ennis, David “Ray,” 59, died Tuesday. Services 10 a.m. Saturday (Yanda and Son, Yukon). Organ donor Rajeev Ramgopal, 29, and Britney Lauren Martin, 26. Raed Hassan Najib, 43, and Enayat Abdelmajid Mohammad Yousef, 41. Walter Eugene Threatts, 57, and Robin Rochelle Maupin, 43. Brandon Wayne Martin, 28, and Lysonia Daylene West, 35. Russell Lynn Moore Jr., 25, and Jena Renae Smith, 27. LaTerrance Eugene Gage, 40, and Lynn LaMorris White, 29. Jeffrey Wayne Delester, 43, and Erica Lynne Knox, 27.

Editor’s note: The Oklahoman will publish free birth and adoption announcements as space permits. Include full names of parents, sex of child, and hospital or county of adoption. You can mail the information to The Oklahoman, P.O. Box 25125, Oklahoma City, OK 73125. The Oklahoman has discontinued publishing birth announcements from DIVORCES ASKED hospitals that do not provide full Birdow, Lanita June v. Ralph Fredrick names of parents. Bone, Shana v. Matthew Bryant, Melissa J. v. Douglas S. MARRIAGE LICENSES Fernando Flores, 35, and Candis Shea Constable, Jason E. v. Marianna Fipps, Shannon C. v. Shara Denise Whitson Johnson, 28. George, Kennith E. v. Shannon D. Colton Lavoe Brown, 23, and April Griffis, Stephen C. v. Angela R. Dawn Burris, 23. Huskey, Andrea Lynn v. Muzigo, Brad Kirt Lee Lloyd, 48, and Rachaun Fabrice Rulinda Damita Johnson, 44. Kagiri, Christine Wambui v. Ndirangu, Charles Anthony McClung, 35, and Simon Kagiri Chelsea Mechelle Chambers, 28. Kinsinger, Jane Hamlin Barclay v. James Rufes Aldridge Jr., 27, and John William Danielle Jaye Cloud, 28. Logan, Brandy N. v. Reo W. Andres Martinez Jr., 42, and Angela McCalister, Tamara v. Willie Rae Solis, 37. Ryan Lyle Lemons, 26, and Alexis Mae McKenzie, Dane v. Shana Lynn Taylor, Alicia Michelle v. Earl Donte’ Cunningham, 18. Van Der Noord, Timothy James v. Michael Varughese Mathew, 27, and Chelsea Susan Jane Rachel Varughese, 26. Walinski, Kimberly F. v. Martinez, Alexander Joseph Salanitro, 21, and Irving Symbolene Livinia King, 19. Walker, Judith Ann v. James Newton Juan Antonio Tores Tores, 22, and Lisbeth Araceli Delgado Aguinaga, 19.

Edward Lewis Moore, Jr.

March 26, 1941 - April 10, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.” Edward Lewis Moore, Jr. 71 died on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 after his battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born March 26, 1941, in Cherokee, Oklahoma to E.L. “Buck” Moore and Hazel Meunier Moore. Following graduation from Cherokee High School in 1959 he attended the University of Oklahoma and earned a BBA in 1963 and a JD in 1965. He returned to Cherokee and practiced law for over 22 years as a partner in the firm of Ginder & Moore, served as County Attorney and later as parttime District Attorney. In 1989 he moved to Oklahoma City and was employed by Browne Enterprises until his death. Edward was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his son Jay Moore of Edmond, daughter Stephanie Cricklin and husband Richard, grandchildren Kyle and Sydney Cricklin of Oklahoma City, sister Kathie Moore of Kiowa, Kansas, numerous cousins on his mother’s side, and former wives Betty Carol Coffey and Linda Moore. In addition he is survived by and wished to remember his extended family of friends in Oklahoma City, Cherokee and Nebraska. He was a rabid sports fan, especially OU sports, and avid golfer. He was a member St. Eugene’s Catholic Church. He was extremely proud of his children and especially the “apples of his eyes”, Kyle and Sydney. At his request his body was donated to OU Medical Center. A memorial service for Edward will be held Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at St. Eugene Catholic Church, Oklahoma City. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Special Care, St. Eugene Catholic Church, the Mount Fund at Mount St Mary’s High School or your favorite charity. As Edward always said “it was bound to happen sooner or later.”

NEWALLA Betty Jane Cure born September 5, 1930 in St. Paul, MN, passed away April 5, 2012 in Newalla, OK. She was retired from Tinker. She loved animals and rescued any and all stray dogs. She loved OU football and all casinos. She was preceded in death by son Greg Cure. She is survived by daughters, Holly Daugherty (Ken) of OKC, Pam Williams (Al) of Del City, Dana McCutcheon (Dennis) of Newalla and son, Brian Cure of OKC. She is also survived by 6 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren and 1 on the way. A memorial service will be held Sunday, April 22, 2012, at 2pm at the Community in Christ Church, 3333 Vickie Dr., Del City, OK.

MIDWEST CITY John R. Carroll passed away March 29, 2012 while residing at the VA Nursing Home in Norman, Oklahoma. He was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 12, 1931 to Henry & Lucille Carroll. He was the youngest of two sons. He enlisted in the Air Force at the age 18 and served during the Korean War for four years and was also in the Reserves. John had many talents that included a successful refrigeration business in Ohio.. He was also a Vo-Tech teacher and taught Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning at the local high school VoTech in Xenia, Ohio. Although he was only 5'2" and weighed about 138lbs., his favorite work was in construction where he worked in Engineering and Pipe Fitting in the construction of Nuclear Power Plants. John had many hobbies. His favorite pastime was Metal Detecting & Treasure Hunting. John is survived by his wife Wanda of 48 years and their three adult children: Shawn, Sheena & Merlin Carroll. Shawn & his wife Lisa have 2 beautiful daughters, Lori Anne & Alexis, that will be high school seniors next year. John was loved by his family and by his many friends. Interment Service 2pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Ft. Gibson National Cemetery, Ft. Gibson, OK.

Dec. 21, 1949 - April 15, 2012

Ronald Edward Hickman

OKLAHOMA CITY Kamary Danielle Van Patten passed away in her sleep on April 13, 2012. Kamary was born in Oklahoma City and lived here all her life. She was a psychology student with the goal of serving atrisk adolescents. She worked seven years for OSU-OKC at the school’s switchboard and admissions office. Kamary is a published poet, most notably her 2007 “Baby Superhero: For my Precious Draven.” She sang beautifully and enjoyed photography, computer research and networking, and spending time with family and friends. She touched countless lives with her sense of humor and intelligence. Blessed with a giving, caring, and accepting spirit, Kamary kept her heart and hand open to everyone. We are all forever changed and better people for her presence in our lives. The love she gave lives in us forever. Kamary is survived by her mother, Kathleen Marie Miller; sister, Shanti Kathleen Van Patten; brothers, Maximillian Glen Mautz and Grant Michael Mautz; nephews, Draven Layne Mullings and Micah Ray Stanley; nieces, Tristan Dawn Marie Mautz and Alivia Penelope Mautz; aunts and uncles, Michele Woods (Jack), Monica Gouker, Jane Gouker, Rebecca Gouker, Cynthia (Mark) Davis, and Christine Gouker; and cousins, Shawn, Carolyn, Leyna, Lauren, Shawn, Joshua, and Aaron. Her passing was preceded by those of her brother, Neil Phillip Mautz; uncle, Michael Kevin Gouker; great-grandmother, Florence S.B. Davis; grandmother, Virginia Breece Davis; very special friends, Bill Madron and Corey Barrett; and aunts, Valerie Friend, Anne Gouker, and Deborah Gouker. Memorial Services will be 2:00 PM, Friday, April 20, 2012, at The Crossings Community Church Chapel, 14600 N. Portland Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73134. Flowers, cards and contributions can be sent to Kamary Van Patten or Kathleen Miller, c/o Crossings Community Church.

John R. Carroll

November 12, 1931 - March 29, 2012

Deborah Louise Yandell

Marilyn Phyllis Griffin

Williams, Elizabeth, 104, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. Saturday (Stufflebean-Coffey, Pauls Valley).

Tillman, Wanda, 80, homemaker, Gordon, John Bunyan Sr., 96, teacher, died Tuesday. Services 2 p.m. died Monday. Services 2 p.m. SatMonday (Mallory-Martin, Stigler). urday (John M. Ireland, Moore). Griffey, Peter F., 74, truck driver, died STILLWATER Black, Marjorie Leona, 87, died Monday. Services pending (AffordSaturday. Services 2 p.m. Friday, able Cremation, Oklahoma). Countryside Baptist Church (Palmer Slaughter, Jonathan Kelly, 18, died & Marler, Stillwater). Tuesday. Services 4 p.m. Saturday, Hickey, Donna Gaye, 71, died MonEastern Avenue Church (John M. day. Services 10 a.m. Friday (Palmer Ireland, Moore). & Marler, Stillwater).

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Betty Jane Cure

September 5, 1930 - April 5, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY Deborah Louise Yandell, 62, passed away April 15, 2012. She was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma to Alexander and Virginia Riley on December 21, 1949. Deborah was a wonderful mother, grandmother and friend. She will be greatly missed. Deborah is survived by her children Courtney, Luke and John; and her grandchildren Kaitlyn, Jay, Julia, Alexander, Riley, Jackson, Gage and Braidyn. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 20, 2012, at 2:00 pm, in Resthaven Funeral Home Chapel with interment to follow in Resthaven Memory Gardens.

Robert E. Borum

July 15, 1942 - Apr. 16, 2012

Charles Martin "Marty" Kalb

October 12, 1935 - April 17, 2012

OKLAHOMA CITY On April 17, 2012, Charles Martin “Marty” Kalb went home to be with his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Marty was born October 12, 1935, in Germany, but was raised in New York City. As a child, he joined the Boy Scouts, where he received the Eagle Scout Award. He continued in the Scouts throughout the years and eventually became a Scout Master. In 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and in 1963, he was honorably discharged at the rank of Sgt. While he was in the service at Ft. Sill, OK, he met and married Joyce Moore of Anadarko, OK, in 1959. They moved to New York where he worked as a service technician. In 1978, he was transferred to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death. They were married for 52 years and had three children. Marty loved the Lord and was a longtime member of Southern Hills Church of God. He was active in different areas of the church. He loved his church family and thoroughly enjoyed their fellowship. In his free time, he enjoyed camping, boating, hiking and building things by hand - including model sailboats. His first love was spending time with his family and friends, and he loved to make people laugh. The family would like to thank Dr. Michael Keefer of Mercy Hospital and his nurses for their exemplary care these last four years. They would also like to thank Hospice nurses Jenny and Becky for their care and compassion. Marty was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Kalb; his mother, Gertrude M. Kalb; four brothers-in-law and two sisters-in-law. He is survived by his wife, Joyce Kalb; two sons, Martin Kalb, Jr. and his wife Karen, Gregory Kalb and his wife Juliette; one daughter, Cynthia Kalb; one granddaughter, Haley Kalb; four brothers-inlaw, seven sisters-in-law; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M., Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Southern Hills Church of God, 1029 W. I-240 Service Rd., OKC. Interment will be held at 3:00 P.M., at Memory Lane Cemetery, Anadarko, OK. Services are under the direction of the John M. Ireland Funeral Home & Chapel, Moore, OK.

KINGSTON Robert “Bob” Borum, 69, of Kingston, OK, lost his battle with cancer, Monday, April 16, 2012. Bob loved life, family and sports. He is preceded in death by his father, Robert S. Borum, and mother, Frances L. Borum. Survivors include wife, Shirley Borum; daughter, Kelley Essary and husband Leonard; son, Tony Borum and wife Kelly; four grandchildren, Matt Borum & wife Megan, Taylor Borum and finance’ Jared Epling, David Borum and Courtney Essary; great-grandson, Tristan Borum. Also three sisters, Beverly Greer & husband David, Kay Goodin & husband Ben, Betti Finklea & husband Terry; and many nieces and nephews. You will be greatly missed! The family will be receiving friends Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 5pm-7:30pm at Bill Eisenhour Funeral Home Northeast. Services will be at 2:00pm Friday, April 20, 2012, at Douglas Blvd. UMC, Midwest City, with burial to follow at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Oklahoma City. If you would like to send condolences, please visit www.eisenhourfuneralhome.com

In Loving Memory and to Celebrate the Life of Wallace H. Hoyt 1924 - 2011 We will be celebrating his life and remembering him with love at a Pancake Breakfast, 8:30am to 10:30am at the Village United Methodist Church on Saturday, April 20, 2012. Please join his family and friends as we memorialize his life and share one of his favorite experiences.

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NORMAN | STATE

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Recovery: Program helps ease crowding in prisons

Tom Hardy walks his dogs Holly Berry and Sugar in March at the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY PAUL HELLSTERN, THE OKLAHOMAN

Hunt: Residents, police are worried it would be unsafe FROM PAGE 11A

Council

Morgan

Kilpatrick Turnpike

Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

Sara

trouble responding to the remote areas around Draper and Stinchcomb if there were an emergency. “There’s some concern we’re writing an ordinance that we don’t have the ability to enforce,” said Parks Commission Chairman Alen Paine. Property owners near the proposed hunting sites told both commissions they were worried that legalized hunting would lead to an increase in poaching, trespassing and other illegal activity that already occurs in those areas. Some city residents also were concerned that hunting would pose risks for people using Stinchcomb and Draper for other recreational activities. Alice Huff said she often kayaks with her friends at Stinchcomb, and she’s worried there are too many people who use the area for it also to be used safely for

Wilshire

NW 39

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Lake Overholser THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

hunting. “If you were to go out there on a Saturday or Sunday, you’d be amazed at the number of children, everywhere from 5 years old and up, who are out there in a kayak,” said Huff, 75. Game and fish commissioners, some of whom at-

tended the meeting in support of the ordinance, were adamant that the hunt would be safe and should be allowed. “Recreational hunting has been going on at Stinchcomb for years and at Draper for years,” said game commissioner Joe McCrary.

Woman with pot felony might be released early BY CARY ASPINWALL Tulsa World cary.aspinwall@tulsaworld.com

Grassroots support may evolve into early parole for a Kingfisher mother who was handed a strict prison sentence for a first-time offense of selling $31 worth of marijuana. Oklahoma’s Pardon and Parole Board unanimously voted Wednesday to recommend parole for Patricia Spottedcrow, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence for selling marijuana to a police informant in Kingfisher County in 2009. Spottedcrow, 26, was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge. After her story came to be known publicly, a groundswell of support emerged. In October, a Kingfisher County judge reduced her sentence by four years. Spottedcrow’s advocates expressed concern for possible racial bias, disparate sentences for drug crimes, Oklahoma’s No. 1 female incarceration rate per capita, and the effects on children growing up with their parents incarcerated.

Children penalty Because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge of possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor was added. Her mother, Delita Starr, also was charged with the crime, but was given a 30year suspended sentence so she could care for Spottedcrow’s four children while their mother was incarcerated. Board member Marc Dreyer, senior pastor at Tulsa’s Memorial Baptist Church, was instrumental in getting Spottedcrow’s case early consideration. He said he requested to

Patricia Spottedcrow sits on her bunk recently in a dorm at Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Facility in Taft. PHOTO BY JOHN CLANTON, TULSA WORLD

meet Spottedcrow while visiting Eddie Warrior Correctional Center in Taft a few months ago, after reading about her case in the Tulsa World. “Based on the quantity of drugs involved and the desperation of her situation at the time, it was my view that she ought to have consideration by the board for parole, as there were some extenuating circumstances,” Dreyer said. He requested that her case be moved to the board’s April hearing. Her attorney, Josh Welch, and mother spoke to the board Wednesday about why Spottedcrow deserved parole, especially so she could raise her children, who are 2, 4, 5 and 10 years old. Starr told the board of her struggle to care for her grandchildren while earning just $8 an hour at a truck stop. Spottedcrow took responsibility for her crime, and told the board that things in her life at the time of her arrest were spiraling out of control, and prison may have saved her life, Dreyer said. “I think the board just sensed that Ms. Spottedcrow had really learned her lesson,” he said. “She had a

real wake-up call from having a pretty significant slap on the wrist for this crime, and she deserved an opportunity to prove she was rehabilitated.”

Governor’s decision The board recommended her parole with the conditions of substance abuse treatment and counseling. Now that recommendation goes before Gov. Mary Fallin, who has 30 days to approve or deny it under Oklahoma law. Laura Deskin, an attorney working with Welch on Spottedcrow’s case, said if Fallin approves the parole, it could be as many as 120 days until Spottedcrow is finally released from prison. Spottedcrow’s original 12-year sentence was “extraordinarily harsh” and “excessive” for someone with no previous criminal record, Deskin said. “Oklahoma benefits more from her being out (of prison),” Deskin said. “I’m sure that the board felt that the whole family was better served by her being out. She wants an education, to go to college. She’s smart, and a hard worker. She just made a really poor choice.”

Gov. Mary Fallin speaks at the Women in Recovery graduation Wednesday in the Blue Room of the state Capitol. PHOTOS BY DAVID MCDANIEL, THE OKLAHOMAN FROM PAGE 11A

telling her that she wasn’t the first to face problems. “You’re not the first, ladies,” she said. “You’re not the first Oklahomans that have had to struggle with some type of challenge in your life. “God allows U-turns,” she said. “You’ve made that U-turn in life and today is a celebration of your new life, of your recovery, of your commitment to have a different life, to give your children a better future in our state.” House Speaker Kris Steele has proposed sweeping changes to state corrections policy the past two years. The changes are intended to alleviate prison overcrowding, in part by sending nonviolent drug offenders to alternative sentencing programs such as Women in Recovery. Steele told the graduates they could learn from automobile designers. “When they designed the car for us to drive, you know that they make the windshield great big and the rearview mirror is relatively small in comparison,” said Steele, RShawnee. “They understand that what’s in front of you is much more important than what’s behind you. ... You’ve got the rest of your life ahead of you and tremendous opportunities in front of you.” Women who complete the Women in Recovery program are still convicted and sentenced, but they serve their sentences out of prison. Individual programs are developed for each woman, but it usually takes about a year of intensive treatment and services to complete it. To quality, candidates must be at least 18 years old, ineligible for other diversion services or courts and must have a history of substance abuse. The 18 graduates were addicted for a combined total of 228.6 years. Women with children have a high priority for admission. Upon completion, they are required to maintain jobs and be good mothers. The program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and operated by Family and Chil-

Brook Larson shakes hands with House Speaker Kris Steele during her graduation Wednesday.

Teresa Jones hugs Gov. Mary Fallin Wednesday during the graduation ceremony.

dren’s Services in Tulsa. Mimi Tarrasch, director of the Women in Recovery program, said it wasn’t that long ago that each of the 18 graduates was living a life of despair while immersed in their addiction. “They envisioned little or no hope of recovery, nor were they able to see any hope for their future,” she said. “To use their words, they felt like they were a lost cause — a failure as a person, a parent, a daughter, a spouse, a failed human being.” Most have their GED or a high school diploma and three are starting college, she said. “All are working and paying taxes except for one, who is on disability,” Tarrasch said. Larson said she went to college, got married and was a stay-at-home mom, not realizing her husband was a drug addict. They had two children and, eight years after they were married, he died of an overdose. She remarried and had two more children, and her second husband, who used drugs, started abusing her. He was arrested, and she started using and selling drugs.

ONLINE

Addiction Find resources on addiction. KNOWIT.NEWSOK. COM/ADDICTIONOKLAHOMA

She was arrested and was serving a 10-year sentence for drug trafficking and a five-year sentence for distribution when she asked that her case go up for judicial review. A Tulsa County judge referred her to the Women in Recovery program, she said. “From start to finish, I did 16 months in the custody of the Department of Corrections before Women in Recovery accepted me and began to help me change my life,” Larson said. “I’ve become empowered to make decisions that ... are safe and healthy for my children and for me.”


RETAIL

NATION

Get to know your food Some farmers are adding community-supported agriculture programs and veggie clubs to their plate as one avenue to get their products into consumers’ homes.

New vehicle crimp The U.S. auto industry is facing shortages of parts and materials that could limit the number of new vehicles in showrooms later this year and crimp a historic turnaround. PAGE 3B

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BUSINESS

B THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Deal may put CEO, investors at odds

OILMAN IN TOP 100

CEO HAS BORROWED UP TO $1.1B AGAINST HIS STAKE IN CORPORATION’S WELLS

BACK PAGE

IN BRIEF

Editor’s note: Following are excerpts from a Reuters story published Wednesday and an exchange between Chesapeake and Reuters. Go to NewsOK.com to read the stories in their entirety.

MARKETS Coverage, 5B [ DOW JONES 82.79, 13,032.75 [ NASDAQ 11.37, 3,031.45 [ OIL $1.53, $102.67

BY ANNA DRIVER AND BRIAN GROW Reuters

Aubrey K. McClendon is one of the most successful energy entrepreneurs of recent decades. But he hasn’t always proved popular with shareholders of the company he cofounded, Chesapeake Energy Corp., the secondlargest natural gas producer in the United States. McClendon, 52, helped cause Chesapeake shares to plummet amid the financial crisis when he sold hundreds of millions of dollars in stock to raise cash for himself. Later, to settle a lawsuit by shareholders, he agreed to buy back a $12 million map collection that he’d sold to Chesapeake. Now, a series of previously undisclosed loans to McClendon could once again put Chesapeake’s CEO and shareholders at odds. McClendon has borrowed as much as $1.1 bilSEE DEAL, PAGE 4B

Excerpts from the Q&A Here are excerpts from a Q&A between Reuters and Chesapeake Energy Corp.: Q: More than a dozen academics, attorneys, Wall Street analysts and corporate governance experts who have reviewed the loan agreements say that the mere existence of as much as $1.1 billion in loans taken out by Mr. McClendon against his share of the company’s wells raises the potential for conflict of interest in multiple ways. As a result, they say the loans should be disclosed in more detail than is currently provided by the references to “financing transactions” in the annual proxy. What is Chesapeake’s response to this view? SEE Q&A, PAGE 4B

Oklahoma oilman Harold Hamm was tabbed Wednesday one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time magazine. The magazine billed its list, which includes President Barack Obama and likely GOP opponent Mitt Romney, as “the people who inspire us, entertain us, challenge us and change our world.”

♦ NATURAL GAS

No change, $1.951 X CATTLE $0.30, $120.27 [ WHEAT $0.06, $6.713⁄4

Chesapeake Energy Corp. CEO Aubrey McClendon walks March 26 through the French Quarter in New Orleans. PHOTO PROVIDED BY REUTERS

Chesapeake stock dips on news of CEO loans BY ADAM WILMOTH, JAY F. MARKS AND PAUL MONIES Business Writers

Chesapeake Energy Corp. shares tumbled 5.5 percent Wednesday after a published report showed that CEO Aubrey McClendon has borrowed up to $1.1 billion against his stake in Chesapeake wells. Reuters reported Wednesday that the loans were to fund McClendon’s investment in Chesapeake’s Founder Well Participation Program, under which McClendon can take a 2.5 percent stake in every well drilled by the company. Sources quoted in the article questioned whether McClendon’s personal debt level on the company wells has created a conflict of interest and whether the company should have more thoroughly disclosed the financing deals. Chesapeake has denied conflict or wrongdoing in the matter. “The Founders Well Participation Program (FWPP) has been in place since the company’s founding and was reapproved by shareholders by a wide margin in 2005,”

Chesapeake said in a statement Wednesday. “The terms and procedures for the program are clear and detailed in every proxy for all shareholders to see.” Under terms of the program, McClendon can buy into a stake in all the company’s wells, but he cannot choose to participate only in some of the wells. While the well participation program has been included in Securities and Exchange Commission filings, Chesapeake has not disclosed that McClendon has used his stake in the wells as collateral for loans. Records discovered by Reuters show McClendon has borrowed up to $1.1 billion, which is the same amount Forbes estimates to be McClendon’s net worth. Chesapeake said the program is legal and ethical and that it provides an additional incentive for McClendon to work hard for the success of the company. “Loans secured by oil and gas assets are commonplace in the industry and have been employed by Chesapeake corporately during its 23-year existence and by Mr. McClendon during the 20 years

The Chesapeake Energy Corp. campus is shown Wednesday at NW 63 and Western in Oklahoma City. PHOTO BY STEVE LACKMEYER, THE OKLAHOMAN

the FWPP has been in existence, thus increasing the alignment of interest between Mr. McClendon and the company because both have loans and pay interests on the capital provided through such loans,” Chesapeake General Counsel Henry J. Hood

said in a statement. The news drew a wide range of reaction Wednesday on Wall Street. The company’s stock price dipped more than 10 percent early in the day before recovering to a loss of 5.5 SEE STOCK, PAGE 4B

Old swindle acquires new legs in Oklahoma City home listings BY RICHARD MIZE Real Estate Editor richardmize@opubco.com

Catherine Vaughan, a real estate agent with The Covington Co., had this town house in Oklahoma City listed for sale when it popped up on Craigslist listed for rent in a scam. PHOTO PROVIDED

Oklahoma City’s relatively healthy housing market has not made it immune to Internet real estate scams. False rental listings that depict real houses actually for sale, not for rent, which have hit all over the coun-

try for years, have been hitting here lately. Catherine Vaughan, an agent with The Covington Co., said her listing for a town house for sale near NW Grand Boulevard and N May Avenue wound up on Craigslist advertised as a rental, complete with all the specs on the home and a photo — all lifted from the Oklahoma City Metro

Association of Realtors’ multiple listing service. The owner, who has since sold the place, was a single woman in her 70s who was upset to learn why so many people were stopping at her home and wanting to look inside. Vaughan said she did let some strangers in — wouldSEE SCAM, BACK PAGE

KEYSTONE ROUTE FILED WASHINGTON —

The company planning the disputed Keystone XL oil pipeline has proposed a new route through Nebraska that avoids the state’s environmentally sensitive Sandhills region. Calgary-based TransCanada submitted a series of proposed routes — including a preferred alternative — late Wednesday to Nebraska environmental officials. The state has become a focus of concern for the 1,700-mile pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast. President Barack Obama blocked the pipeline earlier this year, citing uncertainty over the Nebraska route, which would travel above an aquifer that provides water to eight states. Details of the route were not available. A spokesman for the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality said officials hope to post the full proposal as soon as Thursday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

GAS PRICES AAA’s average for regular unleaded: Nation State $3.669 Week ago $3.915 $3.719 Month ago $3.842 $3.663 Year ago $3.835 $3.691 Record $4.114 $3.955 (set) 7-17-08 7-16-08 Wednesday $3.899

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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

RETAIL UPDATE

RETAIL

DR PEPPER SCORES BIG WITH BEARS

COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS DELIVER FARMERS’ BOUNTY WEEKLY

Consumers get to know farmers, try new foods BY JENNIFER PALMER Business Writer jpalmer@opubco.com

Some farmers are adding community supported agriculture programs and veggie clubs to their plate as one avenue to get their products into consumers’ homes. A community supported agriculture program is like a subscription for food. Members commit up front by paying in advance — or in some cases, making a deposit — then receive a basket of fresh, local produce each week throughout the farming season. Often they will pickup their basket at the farm or a farmer’s market, or at a set drop-off site. Farmers benefit by receiving cash early in the season, which helps with cash flow and planting decisions. Consumers receive access to fresh, local food, a variety of vegetables (some of which they may have never tried before) and the opportunity to develop a relationship with their farmer. However, they shoulder some of the risk of crop failure. Local community supported agriculture programs and veggie clubs are kicking off in the coming weeks. Merradyth McCallister and her husband, Jack, joined Acadian Family Farm’s veggie club last year as a way to incorporate more organic vegetables into their healthy lifestyle. She picks up products at Vibrant Life Wellness Center in Oklahoma City, where she often shops anyway. “Even if it wasn’t convenient, I would do it because I like to support organic farmers,” she said. Blanchard farmer Larry Hocking, who owns Berry Creek Farm and operates a small community supported agriculture program, said his members have a variety of reasons for joining — convenience, health reasons and taking

Two soda makers with northern Texas ties scored wins recently in the tug of war for more soda fountain and retail space. Plano-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group said Tuesday that it had signed a seven-year marketing agreement with the Chicago Bears to be the exclusive provider of sodas and other nonalcoholic drinks at Soldier Field. It’s the company’s first category-exclusive vending and pouring rights deal with an NFL franchise, and one of its biggest professional sports team sponsorships. Also PepsiCo Inc., parent of Plano-based FritoLay Inc., recently signed a multiyear deal to sell its drinks in 7,100 Family Dollar stores, which previously sold only Coca-Cola beverages. As the overall growth rate for carbonated soft drink slows, soda makers are looking to steal share from one another. “There are always customers up for grabs, and the major beverage companies fight for every ounce of business,” said John Sicher, editor and publisher of Beverage Digest, a trade publication. One of the highest-profile deals for Dr Pepper is its displacement of Coke at Chicago’s stadium. The nation’s third-largest soft drink maker becomes a “Hall of Fame partner” for the Bears and will be the title partner of the team’s training camp in Bourbonnais, Ill., starting in July. It will have an in-stadium and game day presence at Soldier Field, called Dr Pepper Patio, and will work with the team on local community outreach, advertising and retail promotions. Terms were not disclosed. Published reports pegged the value of the deal at $3 million. KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

WINDOW SHOPPING PENN SQUARE TO HOST MOM’S NIGHT Penn Square Mall will host Mom’s Nite Out from 5 to 8 p.m. on May 10. The free event gives moms a chance to network and provides activities, live demonstrations, food and store discounts.

CLASS SET FOR FOOD BUSINESSES

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS SCHOELEN, THE OKLAHOMAN GRAPHICS

the guesswork out of what to cook that week. He asks his members to commit in January and pay around $700 for the entire 24-week season; in exchange, they have a say in what he plants — a certain variety of tomato, for instance — and they have the option of adding eggs or extra fruit. From May through October, his members pick up their weekly basket. “It’s (for) the guy that really wants to make a statement and force themselves to eat seasonally,” he said, unlike at a grocery store where most produce is shipped in and available year round. Last summer’s extreme heat destroyed many of his

crops. Some members were not happy and dropped out midseason, forfeiting their investment. But many returned this year, which so far, shows promise for a good crop. A vegetable club like the one offered by Acadian Family Farm carries less risk than a community supported agriculture program. Members pay a $100 deposit at the beginning of the season but it’s refunded at the end (they don’t pay for the last four weeks’ baskets.) “We felt like if our crop fails, that’s not our customers’ fault,” said Nanette Ardoin, who runs the farm near Fort Cobb with her husband, Rod. They deliver baskets to mem-

bers once a week at five drop-off sites — two in Oklahoma City and one each in El Reno, Lawton and Edmond. Two of those locations are new this year to accommodate demand. Ardoin said they try to keep the value of what’s in each week’s box equivalent to the cost of organic fruits and vegetables at a grocery store like Whole Foods Market. Some of her members want produce that is inexpensive and “from the country,” and others are more concerned with their food being organic, “green” and local. “Ours is much fresher and you can know where you’re getting it. You can come see it at our farm,” she said.

Coach CEO says learning key in firm success BY LAURIE WINSLOW

of this year compared to $30 million when it was under the distributorship. The company also has bought back its business in Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan.

Tulsa World laurie.winslow@tulsaworld.com

TULSA — Magic and logic work in tandem at Coach Inc. to help differentiate it from other luxury brands. While many recognize the American designer and maker of luxury lifestyle handbags and accessories, not everyone is familiar with the corporation’s mindset that helps mold the brand. Tuesday, Jerry Stritzke, president and CEO, spoke about how the company’s innate curiosity and emphasis on learning helps push it to new horizons and differentiate itself from the crowd. He spoke at the Friends of Finance luncheon on the University of Tulsa campus. Stritzke, who received a bachelor’s degree from Oklahoma State University and a law degree from the University of Oklahoma, has come a long way from growing up on a farm chasing cows. He admitted to wearing a turquoise-green suit to his senior prom and being “not a fashion expert” when he joined the fashion industry. But he’s learned a lot since then. “To do great leather handbags, you need someplace where cows have a nice, easy life,” Stritzke said during the question-answer part of his presentation. He noted that Coach uses leather from Europe and the United States. Stritzke, 51, has enjoyed an eclectic career, which along the way included working as an attorney in Tulsa. From 1999 through August 2007, he held several senior executive positions at Limited Brands Inc., including serving as chief operating officer and co-leader of Victoria’s Secret. He also has served as the CEO of

Counterfeit challenge

Jerry Stritzke, CEO of Coach Inc., spoke Tuesday during the Friends of Finance luncheon at the University of Tulsa. PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE TULSA WORLD

MAST Industries. Stritzke joined Coach in 2008 to help with its international business.

Humility and learning “I can tell you when you walk into a country with a sense of humility, you will learn a lot more about who those people are, what motivates them — their hopes, their dreams and what it means to be relevant and to have a relationship with them,” he said. At the time Stritzke joined the company, Coach had a distributorship in China that ran its business while Coach controlled many of the elements such as building the stores and providing the visual merchandising. A few years ago, however, Coach decided to take back the business in China and run it, and now is looking at a $300 million business by the end

Answering questions, Stritzke also spoke about the difference between the Asian and American customer as well as the international challenges that come with trying to stop counterfeit goods. He said there probably are 10 times as many counterfeits as there are real Coach products on the market. “It is a real problem,” he said. “We fight it every day. … Every luxury provider in the world struggles with it.” The world has become a much smaller place, and Asian customers are attuned to fashion in the United States and Europe. Asian women buy a handbag to make a statement and may even spend two months’ salary on the purchase. In the United States, women customers look for handbags that convey independence and exclusivity. That consumer demand for choice prompts Coach to introduce new products more frequently in the U.S. than it does in Asia, he said. He said within the last few weeks the Coach store in Utica Square has started carrying men’s products. “Our business is moving. It’s dynamic,” Stritzke said. “We’re pushing into space that we don’t know the answer. It takes people who can learn and find their way. We’re a very curious organization.” He said that within five years, 50 percent of Coach’s growth will come from international expansion. “We can see it. We’ve begun to deliver on it. We have momentum … and it’s exciting for us.”

STILLWATER — A marketing workshop will be held May 10 at Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center. The course is designed for the center’s basic training graduates and small businesses, and will cover how to move food products into retail grocery stores, food service and restaurant suppliers, and gourmet/specialty food shops. Registration is $100 and includes lunch and materials. The deadline to register is April 26 and space is limited to 50 participants. For more information or to register online, visit www.fapc.biz/marketingwork shop.html.

LIGHTING EARNS REBATE FOR MARKET EDMOND — A lighting upgrade earned Sunflower

Farmers Market in Edmond a rebate worth $14,300 from the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority’s Demand and Energy Efficiency Program. “The lighting upgrade project reduced Sunflower Farmers Market store’s electrical demand by 106.8 kilowatts and will save over 650,000 kilowatt hours of energy annually,” said Tom Willis, Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority’s member services energy engineer. The program provides rebates to commercial and industrial customers that reduce their electricity demand at peak times, including lighting, heating and cooling, refrigeration, commercial food service equipment, pumps and motor upgrades.

RAIN LUCKY FOR THREE COUPLES Three couples won BC Clark’s “Pray for Rain” promotion after storms hit Oklahoma City on Saturday and the day’s rainfall surpassed 1 inch. Each couple will get their engagement rings free, up to $5,000.

SAM’S TO SHOWCASE GRILLING It’s grilling season and Sam’s Club locations nationwide will explore grilling options April 27-29. From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day stores will showcase grilling merchandise, unexpected ingredients and offer shoppers free samples. Nonmembers will not be charged a service fee during the threeday event. FROM STAFF REPORTS

IN STOCK YUM BRANDS Yum Brands Inc., owner of the Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and KFC chains, said Wednesday its firstquarter net income rose 73 percent after continuing strong overseas sales packaged with a rebounding U.S. performance led by its once-beleaguered Taco Bell business. Upbeat about its prospects, the company raised its earnings-per-share growth forecast for the full year to at least 12 percent, or at least $3.22 per share.

AGRICULTURE/FOOD COMPANY

CLOSING PRICE

Archer Daniels Campbell Soup Caterpillar Conagra Deere & Co. General Mills HJ Heinz Hormel Monsanto Pepsico Sara Lee Seaboard Smithfield Sysco Corp. Tyson

$30.93 $33.67 $109.21 $26.04 $80.94 $39.11 $52.83 $28.30 $76.76 $66.21 $21.68 $1,903.73 $20.21 $29.67 $18.03

-0.19% +7.06% +1.60% +2.09% +7.33% +16.21% +0.93% -0.95% +4.37% +2.06% +1.40% -2.95% +0.23% -1.23% -0.25% -3.02% +0.84% +6.70% +1.63% -0.29% +2.17% +15.38% +2.59% -11.04% -1.22% -16.45% +1.33% +0.75% -0.28% -11.23%

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

$29.17 $21.85 $98.54 $20.71 $3.48 $66.75 $117.15 $15.97 $57.38 $35.51 $37.91

+5.04% -3.79% +4.01% -2.82% -7.20% +0.47% +2.03% +2.18% +0.31% +7.35% +2.35%

+20.54% +23.38% +19.54% +30.83% -21.09% -0.12% +28.74% +12.31% +12.25% +7.41% +2.63%

CLOSING PRICE

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

RETAIL COMPANY Ann Taylor Avon Dollar Tree Federated Martha Stewart Procter & Gamble Sherwin Wms Staples Target Co. Walgreen Co. Williams Sonoma

WEEK CHG.

YTD CHG.

RESTAURANT COMPANY Brinker Int’l Darden Restaurants Krispy Kreme McDonalds Panera Bread YUM Foods Dunkin’ Brands

$27.97

+2.91%

+5.91%

$50.23 $7.26 $97.34 $156.78 $72.94 $31.25

+0.76% +7.72% -1.24% -2.35% +4.04% +1.46%

+12.50% +11.35% -1.52% +15.12% +24.53% +26.93%


BUSINESS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

ALSO ... AIR POLLUTION RULES LAUDED Environmental groups applauded the EPA’s new air pollution rules for the natural gas industry. Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune called them “an important first step in closing loopholes for the natural gas industry.” Brune said the rules address dangerous air quality levels in areas where hydraulic fracturing is used to produce oil and natural gas. “The natural gas industry dumps massive amounts of air pollutants into our air every day, sickening families and children,” he said. “An industry that touts its ability to efficiently drill thousands of wells thousands of feet into the earth is crying wolf when it claims it can’t build enough tanks to capture wellhead pollution. “It’s time we clean up the natural gas industry’s dirty and reckless practices.” David McCabe, senior scientist with the Clean Air Task Force, said the EPA rules should only be a beginning. “They are a solid start, but we need to keep working to reduce pollution from the gas industry all the way from the well to the customer,” he said. “People who live near compressors and equipment already in use need to see their air cleaned up as well. Unfortunately, these rules won’t do that.”

GREEN COMPLETION TECHNIQUES ARE REQUIRED BY 2015

EPA issues standards for hydraulic fracturing BY JAY F. MARKS Business Writer jmarks@opubco.com

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday issued the first federal clean air standards for hydraulic fracturing. The new rules are meant to reduce harmful air pollution associated with oil and natural gas production. Officials said the rules will not go into effect until 2015 to allow the industry to build up the necessary equipment to curb hazardous emissions, although many producers already use “green completion” methods to prevent gas from escaping their wells. “Because they rely on technologies and practices that are already in use by many companies and required by some states, the standards are practical, flexible, affordable and they’re achievable,” said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator of EPA’s office of air and radiation. Howard Feldman, director of regulatory and scientific affairs for the American Petroleum Institute, said the rules accommodate oil and gas production. “The industry has led efforts to reduce emissions by developing new technologies that were adopted in the rule,” Feldman said. “EPA has made some improvements in the rules that allow our companies to continue reducing emissions while producing the oil and natural gas our country needs. “This is a large and complicated rule making for an industry so critical to the economy, and we need to thoroughly review

the final rule to fully understand its impacts.” EPA officials said existing techniques and equipment are capable of capturing up to 95 percent of the smog-producing methane released during the completion of oil and gas wells. Flaring, or burning, the gas also reduces emissions. McCarthy said recovered gas can be sold to offset the cost of the pollution controls. She estimated the process can yield up to $19 million a year for the industry. Devon Energy Corp., one of the pioneers of hydraulic fracturing, already uses green completions on most of its wells, but spokesman Chip Minty said federal regulators are overstating the technology’s economic benefits. “That is because the estimated emissions reduction from green completions is at least 1,000 percent and as much as 1,400 percent higher than actuality,” he said. “EPA staff arrived at these numbers through misusing a limited data set from the agency’s Natural Gas STAR program and then drawing inaccurate conclusions by making false assumptions.” Minty said EPA has overstepped its authority by trying to regulate greenhouse gases. “The EPA can regulate emissions of volatile organic compounds, but it does not have authority to regulate greenhouse gases. Under the provision it released today, it would regulate both,” he said Wednesday. “EPA claims the rule is intended to regulate volatile organic compounds, but a significant portion of the justification

of the rule is devoted to a reduction in methane emissions. “Methane is not a compound that is currently under Clean Air Act jurisdiction,” he said. Two members of Oklahoma’s congressional delegation also criticized the new EPA rules. “The Obama EPA has been working aggressively to assert control over natural gas production so that they can regulate it out of existence — and this rule is just the latest in that grand scheme,” said U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Tulsa. “It’s no secret that EPA has been trying hard to manufacture a correlation between groundwater contamination and hydraulic fracturing, but in each case, they were unable to find sound scientific evidence to make this link. “So now, they’re attempting to usurp control through air regulations.” U.S. Rep. John Sullivan, R-Tulsa, said the new rules take a significant toll on independent oil and gas producers. “When it comes to our national energy policy, this administration preaches ‘all of the above’ but has practiced a ‘nothing from below’ approach,” Sullivan said. “EPA’s failure to consider the impact their regulatory agenda is having on jobs, domestic energy production and economic recovery keeps moving us further from our goal of powering our nation with affordable and stable sources of Americanmade energy. “The oil and natural gas sitting under our feet is a precious resource that we cannot afford to ignore.”

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

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EUROPEAN BANKS MAY CUT LENDING WASHINGTON — The International Monetary Fund warned Wednesday that European banks are under pressure to preserve capital and could cut back sharply on lending over the next two years, slowing the region’s growth. The predicted credit crunch is a major reason why Europe’s economy is expected to suffer a mild recession this year and barely grow in 2013, the IMF said in a report on the global financial system released Wednesday. The 17 countries that use the euro will see their economies shrink by 0.3 percent this year, and expand by only 0.9 percent in 2013, the IMF has forecast.

PHARMACY BENEFITS MERGER SET SXC Health Solutions Corp. plans to buy fellow pharmacy benefits manager Catalyst Health Solutions Inc. in a deal worth more than $4 billion, less than a month after competitor Express Scripts Inc. closed a $29.1 billion acquisition. SXC Health said Wednesday it will pay $28 in cash and a portion of its stock valued at $53.02 per share for each share of Catalyst. That equals a purchase price of $81.02 per share, a premium of about 28 percent over Catalyst’s Tuesday closing price of $63.54. The companies valued the deal at $4.4 billion, including debt. Catalyst had about 50.2 million shares outstanding as of Feb. 1, which would equate to a total value for the deal of about $4.1 billion.

AMERICAN AIRLINES LOOKS AT CUTS DALLAS — American Airlines wants to eliminate 1,200 nonunion jobs as it cuts costs while under bankruptcy protection. That pushes the company’s overall job-cut target to 14,200. It announced plans in February to cut 13,000 union pilots, flight attendants and ground workers. American, the nation’s third-biggest airline, has about 73,000 workers. American outlined the cuts for many nonunion workers on Tuesday. The company wants to outsource the jobs of all airport skycaps and cargo agents, cancel a planned lump-sum payment that was due for nonunion workers next year, freeze their pension plan, cut vacation and paid holidays, and reduce medical benefits. The airline says it will close a reservations call center in Tucson, Ariz., and lounges at Washington’s Dulles Airport and Kansas City International Airport.

INTERNET ADVERTISING SETS RECORD NEW YORK — Revenue from Internet advertising in

the U.S. hit a record $31 billion last year, according to a study released Wednesday. That’s up 22 percent from $26 billion in 2010, the previous record. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, an industry group, conducted the quarterly study with PricewaterhouseCoopers. About half of the ad revenue, $14.8 billion, came from the search category. Those are the text-based ads that are sold by Google and others and that are targeted to search terms and other keywords.

ROCHE GIVES UP BID TO BUY ILLUMINA

Shortages may slow U.S. automotive industry BY TOM KRISHER Associated Press

DETROIT — The U.S. auto industry, already stretching to meet rising demand for cars and trucks, is facing shortages of parts and materials that could limit the number of new vehicles in showrooms later this year and crimp a historic turnaround. The most immediate problem — a shortage of a crucial plastic resin, caused by an explosion March 31 at a plant in Germany — could surface in a few weeks. And later this year or beyond, automakers could be confronted with an even bigger crisis, running short of parts simply because there aren’t enough factories and people to make them. No one is entirely sure how many plants or models will be affected by either problem. Automakers say they are working to avoid shortages in both cases. But it may be tough to manage the intricate chain of companies that make most of the 3,000 parts that go into every car, from tiny valves and computer chips to heavy metal castings for transmissions. “A lot of them are under pressure because they reduced their staff and temporarily mothballed some of their factories,” said Jim Gillette, an analyst with IHS Automotive. “A number of them are struggling to keep up at the moment.” The broader parts shortage dates to

Workers are seen on a General Motors plant assembly line. AP PHOTO

the auto industry’s near-collapse in 2008 and 2009, when sales plummeted and General Motors and Chrysler were forced into bankruptcy protection. From 2008 to 2011, parts makers cut back on people, closed factories and sold off equipment.

Downturn hurt parts makers During the downturn, at least 57 parts makers closed, were bought out or went into bankruptcy, according to the Original Equipment Suppliers Association. Nearly 20 percent of auto parts workers — more than 100,000 people — lost their jobs from 2008 through 2011. U.S. auto sales dropped to a 30-

year low of 10.4 million in 2009 but are on the rebound. Last year, they grew to 12.8 million, and analysts are predicting 14.5 million or more this year. If sales rise above 15 million, some automakers will run short of parts, crimping the supply of certain models, said J. Scot Sharland, executive director of the Automotive Industry Action Group, a trade association. “There’s a genuine concern that if that happens, we’re going to certainly have some spot outages” at auto assembly plants, Sharland said. “There’s still a significant amount of pent-up demand in the market.” Global automakers are vulnerable to such disruptions because they don’t keep big stockpiles of parts the way they did two decades ago. Instead, to hold down warehouse and inventory costs, they rely on a “just in time” system in which parts are delivered just days or hours ahead of when they are needed. The problem already has surfaced at GM, which has been forced to slow production of the hot-selling Chevrolet Equinox midsize SUV because a parts supplier can’t keep up. GM wouldn’t identify the part but has been telling dealers they cannot order as many four-cylinder Equinoxes as they might want. The automaker said the situation is nearly fixed. GM is aware of the broader problem and is working with parts companies to help deal with rising demand.

Entrepreneurs encouraged to apply for grant FROM STAFF REPORTS

The board of Economic Development Generating Excellence is accepting applications from Oklahoma entrepreneurs seeking funding for research and technology development that would help strengthen and diversify the state’s economy. Those eligible to receive EDGE funding include private or public Oklahoma institutions of higher education, nonprofit Oklahoma research foundations or other nonprofit organizations, and forprofit enterprises. “Oklahoma is home to many creative and innovative ideas, but too often

FOR MORE INFORMATION Details of the EDGE Fund, pre-proposal submissions and the EDGE Innovative Ideas Program are on the EDGE website, www.okedge.org. For further information, contact the EDGE office, 319-8288 or EDGE@okedge.org.

these ideas are not moved to the stage of commercialization,” said Paul Risser, EDGE Fund Policy Board executive director. “Oklahoma needs economic development funding programs such as EDGE to help get these innovative ideas to market — to help the businesses grow, add jobs and contribute tax revenue.” Established by the Leg-

islature in 2004, EDGE is designed to bolster Oklahoma’s long-term economic growth by investing the earnings from an endowment in the state’s knowledge infrastructure. Because the fund is an endowment, only the interest earned on the original investment is used for funding and no additional state money is required to fund projects.

In 2010-2011, EDGE invested more than $11 million in seven projects that resulted in eight new businesses, and leveraged more than $100 million in grants and contracts. Pre-proposals are due by May 30. The EDGE Fund Policy Board will review these pre-proposals and invite the applicants with the highest potential to submit full proposals, which will be due in September. A one-year grant, the EDGE Innovative Ideas Program also is available. The grant provides funds of less than $25,000 to up to five innovative early stage science and technology projects.

NEW YORK — Swiss drugmaker Roche Holding AG

will end its offer to acquire U.S. diagnostics firm Illumina Inc. for about $6.5 billion after forecasting that Illumina shareholders will reject its dissident slate of directors. Roche had announced in January an offer to buy the San Diego company’s shares for $44.50 each. It then raised that to $51 last month, after Illumina’s board rejected the bid. But Roche said Wednesday it decided not to extend the latest offer past an April 20 expiration. Two shareholder advisory firms have recommended that Illumina shareholders reject Roche’s offer, and Illumina had said the new offer remained insufficient.

FACEBOOK PAYS CITY FOR GROWTH MENLO PARK, Calif. — A Silicon Valley city where

Facebook recently opened its new headquarters approved a deal that will allow the company to bring in thousands more employees. The Menlo Park City Council unanimously agreed Tuesday to let the social networking giant make annual payments totaling nearly $10 million to cover the impact that the influx of new workers will have on city infrastructure. Facebook will also pay for more than $1 million in capital improvements, such as pedestrian and bicycle paths, and set up high school internship and job training programs. The agreement establishes a $500,000 fund for the nearby city of East Palo Alto, where unemployment is high and the median income is low. In exchange, Menlo Park will expedite permits and not levy unexpected city fees on the company.

GOOGLE CEO TESTIFIES IN COURT SAN FRANCISCO — Google CEO Larry Page has

spent nearly an hour in a federal courtroom Wednesday deflecting questions about his role in a copyright dispute. The case is over some of the technology in his company’s Android software for smartphones. The taciturn Page often looked uncomfortable on the witness stand as he sparred with David Boies, a tenacious lawyer who grilled former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates in an antitrust lawsuit filed by the U.S. government in 1990s. In this trial, Boies is working for Oracle Corp. That company alleges Google Inc. built its Android software by stealing pieces of the technology from Java, a programming platform that Oracle now owns. Page rarely looked at Boies and frequently said he couldn’t remember seeing some of the internal Google documents that Oracle is using to build its case.

WORLD

SPAIN REPORTS TOTAL OF BAD LOANS MADRID — The amount of bad loans on Spanish banks’ books has risen to an 18-year high of 8.15 percent, central bank figures show. The Bank of Spain said Wednesday that bad loans accounted for (euro) 143.8 billion ($188.84 billion) of a loan total of (euro) 1.76 trillion in February. The figure was up (euro) 3.79 billion up from January, when it represented 7.91 percent. The bank added that the total figure for loans was down by (euro) 6.36 billion in February compared to a month earlier. Spanish banks’ bad loans and toxic assets are among the chief reasons investors are concerned about the country’s ability to handle its finances and avoid seeking an international bailout. FROM WIRE REPORTS


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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Stock: Analyst says deal isn’t illegal FROM PAGE 1B

percent, or $1.06 a share, to close at $18.06. The price drop erased nearly $640 million of the company’s value of $11.6 billion. Chesapeake was the second most actively traded stock on Wednesday with more than 93.5 million shares changing hands, more than five and a half times the average volume of almost 16.9 million shares exchanged. Industry analyst Fadel Gheit dismissed the controversy. “It could appear as something not politically correct, but it is not illegal or unethical,” said Gheit, an analyst with Oppenheimer in New York. “As a shareholder, I might frown on it. I might not like it, but it has no negative impact on my view of his management skills.” Gheit said McClendontold him the numbers in the Reuters story were exaggerated. Analyst Mike Breard agreed that the loan is McClendon’s personal business, but he said it still should have been more thoroughly disclosed.

“If he borrowed $2 million to build a house, that’s not anyone’s business. But when it’s $1 billion and it involves oil and gas with Chesapeake, that’s to some extent the stockholders’ business,” said Breard, a research analyst with Hodges Capital Management in Dallas. “It’s just a scale kind of thing. I guess a billion dollars isn’t as much to Aubrey as it would be to me.” At least five law firms throughout the country — including one led by the former attorney general of Louisiana — on Wednesday launched investigations into whether Chesapeake and its directors violated state or federal regulations by not fully disclosing the details of the well participation program. Chesapeake’s directors reaffirmed their support for the well program Wednesday. “The board of directors is fully aware of the existence of Mr. McClendon’s financing transactions and the fact that these occur is disclosed in the proxy,” the directors said in a statement Wednesday. “Ad-

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

OKLAHOMA BRIEFS TEXTS TARGET BANK CUSTOMERS

ditionally, the total amount of his cost obligations and revenue attributable to the FWPP for each year are detailed in the proxy. The Founders Well Participation program fully aligns the interests of Mr. McClendon with the company, and the board of directors supports this program as does the majority of its shareholders.” While the disclosure does not specifically state that McClendon may use his stake in the wells as collateral for loans, Chesapeake director and former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating said that was the clear intention of the program, considering the company participated in more than 2,000 wells in 2011 alone. “Obviously it’s assumed that Aubrey, as the participant, would on occasion borrow money to pay for these developmental costs,” Keating said. “From an ethical and a business standpoint, it’s certainly constructed properly and it was approved by the shareholders. I have full faith in Aubrey McClendon.”

Hundreds of Oklahomans have received bogus text messages warning them that their bank card has been deactivated, the Oklahoma Bankers Association said Wednesday. The senders use the messages in an attempt to gather financial information from unsuspecting customers, the association said. The messages have been received by people living in northwest Oklahoma, all Pioneer Telephone mobile customers, who are warned about an account with Community State Bank in Hennessey. Neither the bank nor Pioneer have been breached, the association said. The criminals send out large numbers of text messages hoping to get a response from customers of banks they are mimicking. Anyone who receives the text should not call the provided number and instead notify their bank of the text message, officials said.

HACKER SHARES PROTECTION TIPS Internet security expert and 20-year hacker Jayson Street will share how small business owners can protect themselves against cyber criminals in a free workshop sponsored by the FBI and Small Business Administration, among others. The event will be 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday at Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business. Street says networking with social media has increased threats, with leading vulnerabilities being misconfigured Wi-Fi, which can allow hackers access to company data, and lack of properly configured firewalls or continuously updated antivirus software. Today, free downloadable and configured tools make hacking easy, he said. Firms, he said, are just as likely to be attacked by a hacker in Texas as one in Tulsa or Russia. To register, call 609-8000 or visit www.sba.gov/ok.

Deal: CEO disputes conflict exists FROM PAGE 1B

lion in the last three years by pledging his stake in the company’s oil and natural gas wells as collateral, documents reviewed by Reuters show. The size and nature of the loans raise concerns about whether McClendon’s personal financial deals could compromise his fiduciary duty to Chesapeake investors, according to more than a dozen academics, analysts and attorneys who reviewed the loan agreements for Reuters. “If Mr. McClendon has $1 billion in debt through his own companies — companies operating in the

same industry as Chesapeake — he has or could have a high degree of risk for conflicts of interest. As in, whose interest will he look out for, his own or Chesapeake’s?” said Joshua Fershee, an associate professor of energy and corporate law at the University of North Dakota. The revelation of McClendon’s bout of borrowing comes as he is scrambling to help Chesapeake avert a multibillion-dollar cash shortfall amid a plunge in natural gas prices. It also exposes a potentially serious gap in how U.S. regulators scrutinize corporate executives, a decade after those rules were

tightened in the wake of major accounting scandals. The loans portend a number of possible problems, the analysts said. McClendon’s biggest lender is simultaneously a major investor in two units of Chesapeake. That connection raises questions about whether Chesapeake’s own financing terms could be influenced by its CEO’s personal borrowing. Another concern: A clause in the deals requires McClendon “to take all commercially reasonable action” to ensure that other owners and operators of the wells — including Chesapeake — “comply with ... covenants and

agreements” of the loans. Such clauses are common in energy-finance deals, but it is rare for the CEO of a major energy company to be personally subject to one involving the corporation that he runs. That means McClendon could have an incentive to influence Chesapeake to act in the interest of his lenders, rather than of his shareholders. Both McClendon and Chesapeake say the loans are purely private transactions that the company has no responsibility to disclose or even to vet. And they disputed the view that the deals could create a conflict of interest.

MCAFEE & TAFT GIVES $200K TO OU Oklahoma-based McAfee & Taft has donated $200,000 to the University of Oklahoma College of Law to establish an endowment that will provide $10,000 in underwriting funds each year for the Oklahoma Law Review’s annual symposium. “It is our hope that this gift will allow OU Law to continue its tradition of providing high-quality symposiums where the important issues and challenges of our day are presented and discussed,” said Richard Nix, managing director of McAfee & Taft. The donation also makes possible a new cafe on the first floor of OU Law. Construction of the cafe is scheduled to begin this summer. McAfee & Taft is the state’s largest law firm.

VERIZON EXPANDS 4G REACH Beginning Wednesday, Verizon Wireless customers in Ponca City can access the company’s speedier 4G Long Term Evolution network. Access to the faster data requires the proper 4G device. Verizon Wireless on Wednesday is introducing the faster network in 27 new markets, including Ponca City. “This week’s launch of 4G LTE in Ponca City reinforces Verizon’s commitment to lead the way in 4G LTE and to provide our customers the best products and services available,” said Dean Taylor, president of the South Central Region of Verizon Wireless.

Q&A: Chesapeake and Reuters talk FROM PAGE 1B

A: The question is improper on a number of levels. First, it does not specify the supposed conflict of interests nor does it include any analysis that reflects the information reviewed by the speaker, the information the speaker considered important, the speaker’s experience in the oil and gas industry or what assumptions were made by the speaker. Thus, one cannot tell if the conclusion was based on a short email with a leading narrative (as we have seen from your emails that have been provided to us), incomplete information or a thorough review of the pertinent information. Second, the concept of an “expert” is that the individual’s reputation and training supports a conclusion that the person’s opinion on a given topic is worthy of respect. That is OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Wednesday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. — $99.25 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. — $87.25 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted Mar. 27: COMPLETION Alfalfa: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Baldwin Trust 35-26-12 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 35-26N-12W; 160 barrels oil per day, 353,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 10,315. Blaine: Continental Resources Inc.; Elias No. 1-12H Well; S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 12-14N-12W; 4,198,000 cu-ft gas per day, 46 barrels oil per day; TD 18,070. Continental Resources Inc.; Rother No. 1-4H Well; W1⁄2 W1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 04-16N-12W; 1,970,000 cu-ft gas per day, 84 barrels oil per day; TD 15,245. Ellis: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Brown 7-18-25 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 07-18N-25W; 66 barrels oil per day, 470,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,625. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Hunter 5-19-24 No. 1H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 05-19N-24W; 75 barrels oil per day, 368,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,273. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Letha 10-19-25 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 1 S ⁄2 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 10-19N-25W; 640 barrels oil per day, 1,789,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,568. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Sherrill No. 1-13H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 13-18N-22W; Dry TD 13,770. Pittsburg: Continental Resources Inc.; Delphia No. 1-34H Well; NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 (SL) of 03-05N-16E; Horizontal Hole TD 15,917. Roger Mills: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Angora Ranch 26-16-22

inconsistent with hiding one’s identity, analysis or bias. Third, disclosure is an intricate regulatory scheme of multiple laws and rules that can be made unworkable by adding multiple disclosures of transaction details just because a small group of shareholders might think it is helpful. This is exacerbated where there are multiple small groups, each with their own special data request to fit their own special agendas. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we believe that there are no conflicts of interest arising from the “mere existence of the loans.” Loans secured by oil and properties are standard in the industry, and even Chesapeake has substantial loans and obligations that are secured or supported by oil and properties. As a result we do not believe the “mere ex-

istence of the loans” changes Mr. McClendon’s alignment with the Company. Q: Chesapeake says it has a first lien on production, equipment and leases in the event that Mr. McClendon defaults, which are superior to his lenders’ rights. Can you please provide the documents which lay out Chesapeake’s first lien rights and their superiority to Mr. McClendon’s lenders? A: A full explanation of the rights of an operator on a payment default by a non-operator is too complicated to fully explain here. However, in short, Mr. McClendon is required by the FWPP (Founders Well Participation Program) to pay all joint interest billings immediately on receipt. The Model Form Operating Agreement (a copy of which is attached)

has been used for virtually every well drilled in the country since 1954 and Article VII grants the operator a lien and mortgage on the non-operator’s interest in the well to secure the non-operator’s obligations. Chesapeake files of record a Ratification and Memorandum of Joint Operating Agreement (an example of which is attached) for each well which includes grant and perfection language for the lien. The lenders are aware of and consent to this prior lien, and each assignment to Mr. McClendon specifically references the Joint Operating Agreement (an example is attached). In addition, state law provides for a number of protections and liens for operators that are in addition to the rights under the Joint Operating Agreement.

No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 26-16N-22W; 13 barrels oil per day, 47,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 14,350. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Benge 29-16-24 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 29-16N-24W; 111 barrels oil per day, 383,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,164. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Cockrell 3-15-26 No. 1H Well; SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 03-15N-26W; 33 barrels oil per day, 278,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,287. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Washita River USA 15-15-26 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 15-15N-26W; 287 barrels oil per day, 395,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 13,325. Woods: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Edward 10-28-14 No. 1H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 10-28N-14W; 27 barrels oil per day, 37,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 9,928.

2-34 Well; NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 34-27N-05W; TD 8,124. Kay: International Energy Corp.; Blubaugh No. 21-3 Well; SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 21-25N-01E; TD 5,000. Kingfisher: Husky Ventures Inc.; Oliver No. 1-24H Well; SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 24-16N-05W; TD 11,350. Nowata: CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Doenges Ranch No. 68 Well; C NW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 11-26N-14E; TD 1,434. Rocky Top Energy LLC; Spurgeon No. 2A Well; C W1⁄2 SE1⁄4 NW1⁄4 of 18-26N-15E; TD 1,300. Rocky Top Energy LLC; Spurgeon No. 3A Well; C N1⁄2 S1⁄2 NW1⁄4 of 18-26N-15E; TD 1,300. Okmulgee: WFD Oil Corp.; Patterson No. 1-30 Well; SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 30-15N-11E; TD 3,700. Pawnee: New Gulf Resources LLC; Robinson No. 1H-1 Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 01-20N-06E; TD 7,647. Washington: CEP Mid-Continent LLC; Bennett No. 6 Well; C S1⁄2 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 19-24N-14E; TD 1,191. Woods: SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Bella SWD No. 1-15 Well; SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 of 15-29N-19W; TD 9,275.

$81.50-$89.50. 750-1000 lb. Light weight cows Average dressing $80.50- $85; High dressing $87.50-89.50; Low dressing not tested. Slaughter Bulls: 1,450-2,250 lbs. Average dressing $110-$114; High dressing $115.50-$120.50; Low dressing $104-$108, Very Low $97-$103. The estimated dressed cost at the Oklahoma National Stockyards; Lean $189.50; Boners $186.75; Breakers $175; Lightweight carcasses $181.50; Bulls $201. Replacement Cows: Pre-tested for pregnancy and age. Medium and Large No. 1-2: Heifers 950 lbs. 6 months bred high quality $1,275/head; 2-4 year old 775-1,125 lb. cows 5-7 months bred average quality black $1,050-$1,185/head; 2-9 year old 750-1,100 lb. cows 3-7 months bred average quality $900-$1,000/head. Pairs: Medium and Large No. 1-2: 2-4 year old 900-1,100 lb. cows with 125-150 lb. calves high quality black $1750-$1,850/pair; 2-6 year old 900-1,200 lb. cows with 100-250 lb. calves average quality black $1,425- $1,560/pair; 5-8 year old 900-1,100 lb. cows with 100-200 lb. calves average quality $1,225-$1,360/pair.

INTENT TO DRILL Alfalfa: Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Brady 17-27-12 No. 1H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 17-27N-12W; TD 10,559. Chesapeake Operating Inc.; Owen 5-27-12 No. 1H Well; S1⁄2 S1⁄2 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 05-27N-12W; TD 10,457. Beaver: Unit Petroleum Co.; Reeves No. 1-15H Well; SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SE1⁄4 (SL) of 15-01N-24E; TD 12,100. Canadian: Marathon Oil Co.; Cowboy No. 11-21H Well; SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 21-12N-09W; TD 17,525. Marathon Oil Co.; Sooner No. 12-21H Well; SE1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 SW1⁄4 (SL) of 21-12N-09W; TD 17,572. Creek: Juno Operating Co. II LLC; Stroud Prue Sand Unit TR 11 No. 10 Well; SW1⁄4 NE1⁄4 NE1⁄4 SE1⁄4 of 08-14N-07E; TD 3,000. Grant: SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Kiara SWD No.

SOURCE: OIL-LAW RECORDS CORP. LIVESTOCK Wednesday’s livestock report from the Oklahoma City Stockyards: Receipts: 585; Last week: 434; Year ago: 1,317 Compared to last week: Slaughter cows steady to $2 higher. Slaughter bulls $1-$2 higher. Packer demand good. Total of 307 cows and bulls sold with 67 percent going to packers. Slaughter Cows: 1,000-1,800 lbs. Average dressing Boners and Breakers $90-$94.50; Lean cows $87-$89; High dressing $92.50-$99.50; Low dressing

HOGS Receipts: 70 Compared to Tuesday: Barrows and Gilts: $2 higher. U.S. Nos. 1-3 220-270 lbs., $50 Sows: Steady. U.S. Nos. 1-3 300-500 lbs., $44-$50 U.S. Nos. 1-3 500-600 lbs., $52 U.S. Nos. 1-3 600-700 lbs., not tested Boars: 200-250 lbs., $20; over 250 lbs., $10 SOURCE: USDA-OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MARKET NEWS SERVICE

ONEOK INC. ANNOUNCES DIVIDEND TULSA — ONEOK Inc. will pay a quarterly dividend of 61 cents a share on May 15, the company announced Wednesday. The dividend is unchanged from the previous quarter. ONEOK has indicated it expects to increase its dividend by 5 cents in July, pending board approval. The company has increased its dividend 13 times since January 2006, with payouts rising 113 percent during that period. FROM STAFF REPORTS

State Grains

CASH WHEAT 6 cents lower. 5.71-6.12 Alva . . . . . . . . . 6.03 Banner. . . . . . .6.08 Buffalo. . . . . . . 6.03 Cherokee . . . . 6.06 Clinton . . . . . . . 6.01 Davis . . . . . . . . 5.71 El Dorado . . . . 6.06 El Reno . . . . . .6.08 Frederick. . . . . 5.81 Geary . . . . . . . .6.08 Hobart . . . . . . . 6.01 Hooker. . . . . . . 5.86 Keyes . . . . . . . . 5.81 Lawton . . . . . . 5.81 Manchester . . . . 6.04 Medford . . . . . 6.07 Miami. . . . . . . . 6.04 Okarche . . . . .6.08 Okeene . . . . . . 6.08 Perry . . . . . . . . 6.12 Ponca City . . . . 6.12 Shattuck. . . . . 5.94 Stillwater . . . . 6.12 Temple . . . . . . 5.86 Watonga . . . . 6.08 Weatherford . . . 6.03 Gulf. . . . . . . . . . . . 6.96 FEED GRAINS MILO Alva . . . . . . . 10.37 Buffalo. . . . . 10.37 Hooker. . . . . 10.44 Keyes . . . . . . 10.39 Manchester10.39 Medford . . . .10.41 Miami. . . . . . 10.32 Ponca City . . 10.39 Shattuck. . . .10.41 Weatherford . .10.41 Gulf. . . . . . . . . .N/A

SOYBEANS Alva . . . . . . . 13.46 Buffalo. . . . . Hooker. . . . . .13.19 Medford . . . Miami. . . . . . . 13.71 Ponca City . . Shattuck. . . 13.09 Stillwater . . Gulf. . . . 14.68 3/4

CORN $ 5.73-$ 6.35 per bushel. COTTON Grade 41, Leaf 4, Staple 34 cotton in southwestern OK 82.00 cents per pound, FOB rail car or truck. KANSAS CITY GRAIN Wheat, No.2 Hard, bu..........$5.79-$6.08 1/2 Corn, No. 2 yellow..........$6.05 1/2-$6.39 1/4 Milo............................................................$9.99-$10.33 Soybeans, No. 1...................$13.83 3/4-$14.24

Agri Markets

Open High Low Settle CORN (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

May 12 602 618.25 599.50 601.75 Jul 12 595 609.25 591.75 594 Sep 12 539.75 544 535 539.75 Dec 12 530 533 525.25 528.75 Est. sales 1,007,745 Tue’s. sales 312,759 Tue’s open int 1,355,022 off 5864.00

Chg.

-15 -13.25 -1.75 -1

OATS (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 12 319.50 322.50 319.25 Jul 12 323 325 322 Sep 12 327.50 327.50 326.50 Dec 12 335 335 334 Est. sales 2,212 Tue’s. sales 2,980 Tue’s open int 11,046 off 37.00

320.75 322.75 326.50 334.25

May 12 389.70 395.50 386.50 Jul 12 393.20 399.00 390.00 Aug 12 386.80 391.80 384.70 Sep 12 374.20 380.70 372.70 Est. sales 196,676 Tue’s. sales 94,929 Tue’s open int 266,125 up 2552.00

390.60 393.90 388.90 376.90

-3.20 -3.40 -2.00 -2.90

May 12 55.25 56.08 55.15 Jul 12 55.58 56.48 55.55 Aug 12 55.84 56.46 55.74 Sep 12 56.00 56.84 55.92 Est. sales 251,606 Tue’s. sales 94,929 Tue’s open int 388,560 up 4356.00

55.19 55.60 55.79 55.95

-.57 -.56 -.55 -.57

May 12 1404.50 1434 1403.75 1407.75 Jul 12 1415 1440 1409.50 1413.50 Aug 12 1406 1425 1398 1402 Sep 12 1390.25 1390.25 1363.75 1368.25 Est. sales 436,447 Tue’s. sales 235,106 Tue’s open int 811,832 up 12823.00

-18 -18 -17.25 -17

May 12 Jul 12

-4.75 -4.50

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) 100 tons- dollars per ton

SOYBEANS (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

WHEAT (CBOT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 618.75 623.25

604.25 609.25

Settle

Chg.

Sep 12 634.75 639 625 Dec 12 655.50 661.75 647.25 Est. sales 291,178 Tue’s. sales 92,706 Tue’s open int 468,429 up 582.00

Open

High

Low

631.75 654.50

-3 -1.25

May 12 626 631 625 Jul 12 635.50 644.50 633.25 Sep 12 654.75 659 649 Mar 13 691.25 691.25 687 Tue’s. sales 16,171 Tue’s open int 147,024 up 998.00

626 634.50 649 687

-6 -6.25 -6.75 -5.25

Apr 12 121.70 122.05 119.77 Jun 12 116.62 116.92 114.50 Aug 12 119.55 119.90 117.85 Oct 12 125.15 125.15 123.80 Est. sales 14,638 Tue’s. sales 47,541 Tue’s open int 349,958 up 828.00

120.27 114.82 118.15 123.95

-1.33 -1.75 -1.50 -1.27

Apr 12 151.70 151.75 150.70 May 12 153.22 153.47 151.75 Aug 12 156.85 157.20 155.32 Sep 12 158.57 158.82 157.02 Est. sales 1,192 Tue’s. sales 7,812 Tue’s open int 40,413 off 50.00

151.40 152.02 155.52 157.42

+.05 -1.10 -1.18 -1.03

May 12 88.52 89.00 86.82 Jun 12 89.10 89.67 87.30 Jul 12 90.05 90.22 88.17 Aug 12 90.20 90.52 88.35 Est. sales 14,045 Tue’s. sales 49,791 Tue’s open int 262,323 up 12416.00

87.25 87.35 88.37 88.42

-2.55 -2.42 -2.03 -2.30

WINTER WHEAT (KCBT) 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel

CATTLE (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) 60,000 lbs- cents per lb

614.50 613

-.75 -1 -.75

13.46 13.50 13.58 13.57

610.75 615.75

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

HOGS-Lean (CME) 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.

WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS:

The Oklahoman, in partnership with Ebyline, is seeking YOU! To sign up, visit Ebyline.com http://blog.newsok.com/knowit/ Welcome to the Virtual Newsroom.

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BUSINESS

DOW 13,032.75

q

NASDAQ 3,031.45

-82.79

q

q

S&P 500 1,385.14

-11.37

q n Money&Markets

Today 1,380 1,320

3,120

Close: 1,385.14 Change: -5.64 (-0.4%)

3,040

1,440

1,280

2,600

O

N

D

J

F

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NYSE

NASD

3,403 3,371 1004 2016 53 43

1,552 1,511 733 1725 56 52

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

2,400

A HIGH 13114.56 5330.34 459.44 8058.08 3045.04 1390.78 982.07 14603.73 809.41

O

N

D

LOW 13027.49 5280.04 456.55 8013.93 3023.91 1383.29 974.86 14520.05 800.55

J

CLOSE 13032.75 5303.61 458.06 8030.37 3031.45 1385.14 977.87 14542.42 803.32

F

CHG. -82.79 -6.52 -0.92 -33.71 -11.37 -5.64 -3.56 -61.31 -7.31

M

%CHG. -0.63% -0.12% -0.20% -0.42% -0.37% -0.41% -0.36% -0.42% -0.90%

A YTD +6.67% +5.66% -1.42% +7.40% +16.36% +10.14% +11.23% +10.25% +8.42%

CONS 243-.'2(:7-+7).'/38:7-+7 King’s market share fell from 17 percent a decade ago to 12 percent last year. Burger King’s turnaround plans come at a time of increased competition and industry shifts. Health concerns have paved the way for restaurants like Subway to draw customers away. There’s also competition ,742:589'7981/0+/;+:>8 Burgers and Fries. The new menu items could be a flop if diners dismiss them as mere imitations of McDonald’s recent offerings.

Backed by Burger King’s biggest marketing campaign, 10 new menu items, including smoothies, snack wraps and salads, were added this month. Franchisees are being given incentives to remodel aging restaurants. 85'794, '5/9'1851'3 to overhaul operations, corporate headcount has been reduced by 40 percent; and general and administrative expenses were slashed by $107 million in Burger King’s first year as a private company.

Top five hamburger chains by market share Headquarters: Miami, FL Operations: 12,500 locations, in 81 countries; 90 percent of restaurants rants ts are owned by franchisees Net income 2011: $107 million CEO: Bernardo Hees Ticker: Traded under “BKC” between 2006-10, new ticker yet to be announced

Others

27

Others

42%

14 2002

12 12

17

Burger King

2011

PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES (PNC)

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 1-year T-note 2-year T-note 5-year T-note

Price-earnings ratio (Based on past 12 months’ results): 11

52-WEEK RANGE

$42.70

64.85

Total return this year: 11.9%

Market Value: $33.6 Billion

Dividend: $1.60

Total returns through April 17

Close: $34.17 1.51 or 4.6% The oil services company’s firstquarter profit rose as the oil industry aggressively searched for new North American oil fields. $40

40

30

30

$57.77

held by Spanish banks is rising. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 82.79, or 0.6 percent, to 13,032.75. The S&P 500 fell 5.64, or 0.4 percent, to 1,385.14. The Nasdaq fell 11.37, or 0.4 percent, to 3,031.45. URI Polaris Industries PII

Close: $45.75 4.84 or 11.8% The heavy-equipment-rental company reported a first-quarter profit that easily topped what Wall Street analysts were expecting. $50

35 A

70 J

F M 52-week range

$12.81

A $46.70

Vol.: 8.5m (4.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $2.88 b

Yahoo

Illumina

Close: $15.49 0.48 or 3.2% The Internet company said that is first-quarter net income rose 28 percent under its new chief executive officer Scott Thompson. $17

Close: $80.50 7.37 or 10.1% Thanks to strong sales of its offroad vehicles and motorcycles, the company said its first-quarter profit jumped 27 percent. $90 80

Vol.: 29.5m (1.9x avg.) PE: 10.5 Mkt. Cap: $31.54 b Yield: 1.1% YHOO

PE: 33.2 Yield: ... ILMN

Close: $44.51 0.51 or 1.2% Swiss drugmaker Roche said it will end its offer to buy the U.S. diagnostics firm. The deal was worth about $6.5 billion. $60

60

40

60

$11.09 Vol.: 36.6m (2.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $18.8 b SOURCE: Sungard

$18.84 PE: 18.9 Yield: ...

30

J

F M 52-week range

$25.57 Vol.: 26.3m (6.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $5.49 b

A $79.40 PE: 71.8 Yield: ...

CHSI

Close: $85.23 21.69 or 34.1% SXC Health Solutions plans to buy the fellow pharmacy benefits manager in a deal the companies said was worth $4.4 billion. $100

15

40

J

F M 52-week range

$45.35 Vol.: 12.5m (25.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.28 b

FuturesTrading

1YR AGO

EXP.

.06 .12 .19 .27 .84

.07 .12 .19 .27 .86

-0.01 ... ... ... -0.02

.05 .10 .22 .64 2.05

1.97 3.13

2.00 3.14

-0.03 -0.01

3.35 4.42

PVS

NET CHG

1YR AGO

Barclays LongT-BdIdx 2.64 Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.56 Barclays USAggregate 2.12 PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 7.30 RATE FUNDS Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.94 .13 YEST 3.25 Barclays US Corp 3.34 .13 6 MO AGO 3.25 PHLX Bank 48.19 .13 1 YR AGO 3.25

2.67 4.56 2.10 7.37 3.90 3.32 48.49

-0.03 ... +0.02 -0.07 +0.04 +0.02 -0.30

4.15 5.64 2.99 6.92 5.16 3.93 50.50

BONDS

CLOSE

PVS

.6237 .9904 6.3004

.6271 .9893 6.3030

CLOSE Euro Japanese yen Mexican peso

.7615 81.24 13.1374

OPEN

CLOSE

CH.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX) 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. May 12 104.22 102.67 Jun 12 104.69 103.12

-1.53 -1.52

Est. sales 615,976 Tue's. sales 676,818 Tue's open int 1,570,513 off 22261.00

NATURAL GAS (NYMX) 10,000 mm btu's, $ per mm btu May 12 1.950 1.951 Jun 12 2.048 2.042

-.006

Est. sales 278,410 Tue's. sales 315,887 Tue's open int 1,308,103 up 1615.00

GOLD (COMX) 100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz. Apr 12 1653.20 1638.80 -11.50 May 12 1650.70 1638.80 -11.40 Est. sales 114,463 Tue's. sales 149,670 Tue's open int 398,526 off 2339.00

CBOT SILVER 5000 oz. (CBOT) 5000 troy oz- dollars per troy oz Apr 12 31.564 31.564 -.079 May 12 31.706 31.573 -.084 Est. sales 28 Tue's. sales 127 Tue's open int 683 off 2.00

ForeignExchange

52-WEEK HI LO

NAME

LAST

CH.

YTD %CH. DIV

24.23 3.19 54.64 83.80 93.29 59.59 44.00 35.75 30.24 31.19 20.16 97.19 91.61 84.27 5.95 6.16 2.33 37.80 13.35 73.40 49.21 27.91

AAON s ADDvntgT AlliHold AllnceRes ApcoO&Gs BOK BncFstOK ChesEng ChesGran n ChesMidst Comprsco n ContlRes DevonE DollarTh EducDev GMX Rs GrayM rsh GulfportE HalconR rs HelmPayne LSB Inds LaredoP n

19.29 2.47 40.42 58.21 42.03 54.20 43.00 18.06 23.71 27.96 14.25 82.93 66.70 79.71 4.60 1.35 .35 25.66 9.19 52.42 37.30 24.71

-.43 +.01 -.27 +.74 -4.07 -1.11 -.09 -1.06 -1.27 -1.36 -.51 -.72 -1.49 +.16 -.02 -.07 -.02 -.41 -.11 -.15 -.80 -.63

-5.9 +17.9 -22.2 -23.0 -48.6 -1.3 +14.5 -19.0 -1.4 -3.6 -5.0 +24.3 +7.6 +13.5 -8.2 +8.0 -23.9 -12.9 -2.1 -10.2 +33.1 +10.8

14.64 1.90 38.00 50.42 45.59 43.77 30.50 19.00 18.48 23.93 13.46 42.43 50.74 50.94 3.80 0.86 0.30 18.72 1.80 35.58 24.85 17.25

NY HARBOR GAS BLEND (NYMX) 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon May 12 3.2274 3.2027 -.0313 Jun 12 3.1752 3.1489 -.0263

PVS .7611 80.80 13.0786

YLD

Est. sales 269,771 Tue's. sales 185,594 Tue's open int 367,926 up 2966.00

0.24 1.2 ... ... 2.55 6.3 3.96 6.8 0.08 .2 1.32 2.4 1.08 2.5 0.35 1.9 1.31 ... 1.56 5.6 1.55 10.9 ... ... 0.80 1.2 ... ... 0.48 10.4 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.28 .5 ... ... ... ...

A $85.30 PE: 61.3 Yield: ... AP

52-WEEK HI LO

NAME

LAST

CH.

YTD %CH. DIV

YLD

73.74 15.06 27.61 57.54 89.63 61.58 19.25 36.25 8.45 25.59 12.77 36.97 25.10 30.13 11.86 14.30 2.09 63.58 23.42 32.52 65.39

MagelMPtr MatrixSv NGL EPt n OGE Engy ONEOK Oneok Pt s OrchidsPP PanhO&G PostRockE RoseRck n SandRdge SandRMiss SandRdg n SemGroup SonicCorp SwstBc Syntrolm h Unit WPX En n WmsCos WmsPtrs

70.89 13.65 20.29 51.99 80.93 54.00 18.25 26.15 2.31 23.55 7.21 29.23 22.56 30.55 7.09 9.15 .86 39.67 15.54 32.28 54.03

-.67 -.20 +.14 -.36 -.16 -.15 +.19 -.61 -.31 +.03 -.12 -.61 -.11 +.65 -.09 +.38 -.02 -1.00 -.51 +.53 -.14

+2.9 +44.6 -1.6 -8.3 -6.6 -6.5 +0.3 -20.3 -17.5 +14.4 -11.6 -5.9 -0.8 +17.2 +5.3 +53.5 -10.4 -14.5 -14.5 +19.7 -9.9

4.6 ... 6.9 3.0 3.0 4.5 4.4 1.1 ... 6.2 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3.2 5.6

51.00 7.34 18.00 40.56 58.61 36.31 8.53 25.00 2.22 19.00 4.55 18.76 14.88 16.55 6.35 3.75 0.76 33.56 14.20 17.88 45.39

ExchangeTradedFunds NAME Barc iPath Vix ST Direxion SCapBear 3x Direxion FinBear 3x Direxion SCapBull 3x iShares Brazil iShare Japan iShares Silver Trust iShs FTSEChina25 iShs Emerg Mkts iShares EAFE iShares Rus 2000 Mkt Vect Gold Miners PowerShs QQQ Trust ProSh UltraSht S&P SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr SPDR Homebuilders SPDR Energy SPDR Financial SPDR Industrial Vanguard Emg Mkts

TKR VXX TZA FAZ TNA EWZ EWJ SLV FXI EEM EFA IWM GDX QQQ SDS SPY XHB XLE XLF XLI VWO

FUND NAV American Funds BalA m 19.50 CapIncBuA m 51.05 CpWldGrIA m 34.84 EurPacGrA m 38.89 FnInvA m 38.75 GrthAmA m 32.39 IncAmerA m 17.36 InvCoAmA m 29.50 NewPerspA m 29.41 WAMutInvA m 30.11 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 31.73 Stock 111.71 Fidelity Contra 77.04 Magellan 71.93 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m 2.14 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv 12.96 Harbor IntlInstl d 58.91 PIMCO TotRetAdm b 11.19 TotRetIs 11.19 Vanguard 500Adml 127.74 500Inv 127.74 InstIdxI 126.91 InstPlus 126.92 TotBdAdml 11.02 TotIntl d 14.24 TotStIAdm 34.60 TotStIIns 34.61 TotStIdx 34.59 Welltn 33.12 WelltnAdm 57.20

LAST 18.25 19.18 21.83 56.16 61.92 9.78 30.64 37.54 42.23 53.26 80.21 46.63 66.61 15.49 138.61 20.79 69.21 15.34 36.87 42.62

CH.

CH. +.26 +.46 +.45 -1.50 -.34 -.02 -.16 +.02 -.20 -.28 -.61 -.50 -.17 +.10 -.47 -.29 -.14 -.10 -.16 -.19

%YTD -48.6 -27.6 -41.5 +25.2 +7.9 +7.4 +13.7 +7.7 +11.3 +7.5 +8.8 -9.3 +19.3 -19.7 +10.4 +21.6 +0.1 +18.0 +9.2 +11.5

PERCENT RETURN 4WK. 12MO. 3YR. 5YR. +7.9 +4.2 -2.2 -7.2 +3.0 +3.8 +5.4 +4.7 +1.0 +8.6

-.05 -.04 -.17 -.13 -.12 -.07 -.04 -.11 -.05 -.10

-0.8 -0.4 -2.6 -2.7 -1.7 -1.4 -0.7 -1.7 -1.1 -1.2

+15.6 +14.0 +14.1 +13.5 +17.3 +15.9 +16.9 +15.4 +17.4 +18.1

+3.3 +0.7 -0.6 -0.8 +1.1 +0.8 +1.7 +0.1 +1.8 +0.5

-.15 -.61

-5.1 -9.8 +15.1 -3.1 +1.5 +18.0

-3.5 -3.3

-.07 -.23

+0.3 +10.8 +20.5 -1.7 -1.7 +13.9

+4.4 -1.9

-.01

-1.3 +1.6 +17.4

+2.5

-.02

-1.3 +0.9 +10.1

+9.9

-.19

-3.8

-0.1

+.01 +.01

+1.6 +5.8 +1.6 +6.1

-.52 -.52 -.52 -.52 ... -.08 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.12 -.20

-1.2 -1.2 -1.2 -1.2 +1.2 -3.9 -1.4 -1.4 -1.5 -0.9 -0.9

-3.6 +18.5

+8.4 +8.3 +8.4 +8.4 +7.8 -8.9 +7.2 +7.2 +7.1 +6.7 +6.8

+9.2 +9.5

+8.3 +8.6

+19.3 +19.1 +19.3 +19.3 +7.0 +13.7 +20.0 +20.0 +19.9 +15.4 +15.4

+1.0 +0.9 +1.0 +1.0 +6.4 -3.4 +1.4 +1.5 +1.3 +3.9 +4.0

PERCENT RETURN 1YR 3YR

YTD

Conservative Allocation (CA) Moderate Allocation (MA) Health (SH) Natural Resources (SN) Real Estate (SR) Technology (ST)

4.68 7.06 10.05 3.39 9.95 17.90

3.93 3.75 8.13 -13.97 11.67 5.51

12.27 14.11 18.75 14.96 30.79 22.44

3.18 1.99 4.36 0.81 -1.07 5.26

5YR

5.21 6.21 6.76

3.15 2.62 3.56

12.81 14.06 14.85

1.86 1.12 1.06

12.23 10.98 12.50 9.46 11.62 13.44 6.96 5.64 9.73

-10.36 -9.94 -7.86 -7.86 -4.11 -5.13 -9.47 -1.17 -2.30

18.99 14.80 19.12 13.05 16.84 21.07 11.49 13.01 16.53

1.11 -5.21 -2.43 -4.24 -1.76 -1.97 -5.55 1.41 -1.32

BALANCED

INTERNATIONAL Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) Europe Stock (ES) Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) Foreign Large Blend (FB) Foreign Large Growth (FG) Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) Foreign Large Value (FV) World Allocation (IH) World Stock (WS)

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 31.66 14.96 31.97 27.29 75.13 18.73 6.63 1.39 28.74 20.65 41.98 33.09 3.70 2.30 88.70 57.11 134.13 73.04 12.71 4.92 80.65 56.01 11.41 6.79 111.21 50.80 74.48 63.34 81.50 58.65 18.36 13.29 55.20 38.08 28.37 12.30 88.13 67.03 36.62 17.39 18.83 8.53 59.97 33.31 57.77 27.21 52.15 28.13 21.89 12.41 46.49 27.85 68.05 59.08 100.94 74.57 91.61 66.36 32.29 18.07 47.10 25.61 43.93 27.33 105.46 65.91 95.80 55.47 117.89 66.36 7.62 3.60 84.48 54.90 8.45 2.22 33.10 24.72 23.74 16.51 29.00 9.05 87.66 28.89 12.44 7.15 6.45 2.10 62.00 33.72 35.71 9.30 27.09 17.31 98.19 68.63 46.33 30.49 81.79 60.74 40.48 32.28 62.63 48.31 10.91 6.55

NAME AAR AT&T Inc AdmRsc AlcatelLuc AMovilL s AEP AmShrd Anadarko Apache BkofAm Boeing Celestic g Cimarex CocaCola ConocPhil Dell Inc EngyTsfr EthanAl ExxonMbl GaylrdEnt Goodyear Group1 Hallibrtn HomeDp IntlBcsh JPMorgCh JohnJn LabCp LockhdM Lowes MetLife NobleCorp NobleEn OReillyAu OcciPet ParkDrl PlainsAA PostRockE RepubSvc Rollins SeagateT SearsHldgs SwstAirl SprintNex Starbucks Terex TetraTc 3M Co UMB Fn UPS B VerizonCm WalMart Xerox VALUE

SPECIALTY FUNDS

Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE)

3.26 ... 1.40 1.57 2.44 2.44 0.80 0.28 ... 1.45 ... 2.68 1.27 ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.04 3.05

Stocks of Local Interest

MutualFundCategories

A $81.38

Catalyst Health

80

A

F M 52-week range

Vol.: 3.4m (4.0x avg.) PE: 25.2 Mkt. Cap: $5.51 b Yield: 1.8%

50

F M 52-week range

J

$45.06

16

J

Div. yield: 2.5%

SOURCES: Morningstar; FactSet

Stocks fell Wednesday following mixed earnings reports. IBM and Intel reported stronger profits than expected but fell on disappointment about their revenue. Worries about Europe’s debt problems also hurt stocks: The amount of bad loans Halliburton HAL United Rentals

10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

PVS

The Oklahoman’s Top 30 Mutual Funds

$833 million, or $1.57 per share, a year earlier. Total revenue rose 3 percent to $3.7 billion from $3.6 billion in 2011. In March the bank acquired RBC Bank (USA), the U.S. retail banking division of the Royal Bank of Canada. The merger was costly in the first quarter. Expenses related to the deal reduced earnings per share by 18 cents.

Wednesday’s close: $63.78

$27.21

Burger King

PNC profit falls

PNC Financial Services’s net income fell in the first quarter on costs related to a major acquisition. Revenue rose in most areas, despite new regulations limiting the fees banks can charge when consumers swipe their debit cards at retailers. PNC’s net income fell to $766 million, or $1.44 per share, in the quarter ended March 31, from

F M 52-week range

50%

'3*/)+.4/+33/#4.3A"

Company Spotlight

J

McDonald’s

Wendy’s

Wendy’s

Source: FactSet; Technomic

AP

26

McDonald’s

-11.50

Oklahoma Inc. Stocks

Burger King 2.0 PROS

YEST

NET CHG

YEST

British pound Canadian dollar Chinese yuan

Burger King is getting ready to go public later this year. But can it tempt investors? $.+57/;'9++6:/9>@729.'9(4:-.99.+7+89':7'39).'/3/31'9+  '5/9'1</117+9:73 Burger King to the stock market by selling a 29 percent stake for $1.4 billion to Justice Holdings Ltd. Once the deal is complete, Justice will be renamed Burger King Wordwide and move its stock listing from London to the New York Stock Exchange.

q

GOLD $1,638.80

-.0006

5B

$31.14 MSFT $35 The Windows operating system ’12 $25.37 made Microsoft king of the PC 30 market. 25 But the software giant’s dominance is under threat as more 20 consumers buy mobile devices est. Operating $0.61 $0.58 and tablet computers with rival EPS operating systems. Its Windows 3Q ’11 3Q ’12 revenue has fallen from the previous year in four out of the past Price-to-earnings ratio: 11 five quarters. based on past 12 months’ results Will Microsoft’s third-quarter results today show another dip in Dividend: $0.80 Div. Yield: 2.6% Windows sales? Source: FactSet

TREASURIES

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 1.97 percent Wednesday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

2,800

1,200

14

Interestrates

10 DAYS

3,000

q

EURO 1.3133

-.03

.

Microsoft’s 3Q

3,200

1,360

1,120

Close: 3,031.45 Change: -11.37 (-0.4%)

q

GASOLINE $3.20

Like other air carriers, Southwest Airlines has been hiking air fares to offset rising fuel costs. The strategy didn’t dampen its ticket sales in the last three months of 2011, for which the company reported a profit. But it apparently fell short in the first quarter. The airline is expected to report a loss for the quarter today.

Nasdaq composite

2,960

10 DAYS

-.01

Southwest’s 1Q

$8.92 BAC $14 Historically low mortgage ’12 rates helped boost home 9 sales and mortgage refinancings in the first three months $12.82 of this year. 4 And it’s likely that they also Operating est. helped Bank of America’s $0.17 $0.09 EPS first-quarter results, out today. 1Q ’11 1Q ’12 Making home loans is a key revenue source for the Price-to-earnings ratio: 892 lender, which has been based on past 12 months’ results focused on cost-cutting and Dividend: $0.04 Div. Yield: 0.4% strengthening its balance sheet in recent months. Source: FactSet

S&P 500

30-YR T-BONDS 3.13%

6-MO T-BILLS .12%

-5.64

BofA’s earnings

1,440

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

SMALL-CAP MID-CAP LARGE-CAP

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

LAST 16.68 30.75 67.29 1.92 24.10 38.00 3.35 72.54 92.30 8.92 73.71 8.70 66.22 74.17 73.29 16.16 47.26 24.42 85.75 30.44 10.75 58.60 34.17 51.81 19.79 43.29 63.26 90.68 90.37 31.96 35.80 36.63 93.90 96.92 87.97 5.18 80.00 2.31 30.98 20.75 28.96 56.01 7.89 2.52 60.33 24.85 26.57 87.13 44.79 80.49 37.66 62.06 7.96 BLEND

YTD CH. %Ch. -.18 -13.0 -.14 +1.7 -2.71 +131.1 -.08 +23.1 -.10 +6.6 +.01 -8.0 +.01 +25.9 -1.21 -5.0 -2.25 +1.9 ... +60.4 -.38 +0.5 -.25 +18.7 -.76 +7.0 +.22 +6.0 -.97 +0.6 -.22 +10.5 +.01 +3.1 -1.00 +3.0 +.30 +1.2 +.02 +26.1 +.18 -24.1 -.02 +13.1 +1.51 -1.0 -.22 +23.2 -.43 +7.9 -.61 +30.2 -.96 -3.5 -.84 +5.5 -.23 +11.7 -.12 +25.9 -.49 +14.8 +.34 +21.2 -.85 -0.5 +1.38 +21.2 -.76 -6.1 -.15 -27.8 +.49 +8.9 -.31 -17.5 +.02 +12.5 +.05 -6.6 +1.07 +76.6 -1.37 +76.2 -.19 -7.8 -.09 +7.7 +1.67 +31.1 +1.34 +83.9 -.28 +23.1 -.32 +6.6 -.50 +20.2 +.19 +10.0 -.08 -6.1 +.19 +3.8 -.04 ... GROWTH

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

6.0 2.2 15.2 -3.3

LV

10.9 10.3 18.4 2.6

LB

16.8 16.2 22.0 3.6

LG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

9.5 1.2 21.8 -0.3

MV

11.4 5.8 24.9 3.0

MB

14.0 3.4 24.1 3.5

MG

YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR

8.8 2.8 24.9 2.6

SV

10.3 -1.5 22.3 1.4

SB

9.5 1.3 23.2 3.3

SG

BOND FUNDS Interm-Term Bond (CI) Interm. Government (GI) High Yield Muni (HM) High Yield Bond (HY) Muni National Interm (MI) Muni National Long (ML) Muni Short (MS)

1SVI1YXYEP*YRHWPMWXIHEX2I[W3/GSQ

2.25 0.89 5.63 5.29 2.02 3.67 0.79

6.43 6.70 16.83 3.75 9.88 14.13 3.78

9.58 5.39 13.09 18.14 6.54 8.29 3.05

5.70 5.55 2.37 5.49 4.74 4.34 3.11


6B

.

BUSINESS

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

WEATHER 78/50

Altus

6 p.m. today

weather updates.

Billings 59/38

Okla. City

Enid

80/51

Lawton

Some sun, 75

Some sun, 76

Cloudy, 46 Cloudy, 55

Some sun, 80

79/54

Houston 82/62

Showers

-10s -0s

Some sun, 79 Sunshine, 75

M/cloudy, 55

Clouds, 58

Some sun, 59 Clouds, 54

Cloudy, 58

What’s ahead for Oklahoma City Friday 64/41

Saturday 70/48

Sunday 79/52

Monday 81/54

Winds: NNW 15-25 mph

Winds: N 10-20 mph

Winds: N 7-14 mph

Winds: S 6-12 mph

Regional forecast

Major lake levels

For the record

Arkansas: Pleasant today with a full day of sunshine. Clear tonight. A shower or thunderstorm around tomorrow; not as warm in the north and west. Texas: Partly sunny today; pleasant in the east and central areas. A couple of showers and a thunderstorm in the panhandle tonight. New Mexico: Mostly sunny today, except some clouds in the north. A couple of showers in the north and on the Plains tonight; clear elsewhere. Kansas: Clouds and sun today; a couple of showers and a thunderstorm, but dry in the west and south. A couple of showers and a thunderstorm tonight. Missouri: A couple of showers and a thunderstorm today; any time in the west and north, in the afternoon in central parts of the state. Colorado: Mostly cloudy today. A couple of showers; a thunderstorm later; however, dry in the west and east.

As of 7 a.m. yesterday Lake Normal Altus 1,559.0 Arbuckle 872.0 Arcadia 1,006.0 Brok. Bow 599.5 Canton 1,615.4 Copan 710.0 Eufaula 585.0 Ft. Cobb 1,342.0 Ft. Gibson 554.0 Ft. Supply 2,004.0 Foss 1,642.0 Grand 745.0 Hudson 619.0 Hulah 733.0 Kaw 1,009.1 Kerr 460.0 Keystone 723.0 Oologah 638.0 Salt Plains 1,125.0 Skiatook 714.0 Tenkiller 632.0 Texoma 615.0 Thunderbird 1,039.0 Webb. Falls 490.0 Wister 478.0

Yesterday in Oklahoma City:

Yesterday’s pollen Very High High Moderate Low Very Low

Trees Weeds Grasses Mold Mold and pollen counts courtesy of the Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic.

Current 1,534 872.96 1,007 600.68 1,608 710.91 586.50 1,340 554.36 2,004 1,635 745.17 620.67 737.76 1,012 459.76 726.59 644.31 1,125 706.64 633.47 617.11 1,037 489.11 478.42

Total Precipitation

Tuesday 77/58

Yesterday in the state:

Jan. 1 - This date in 2012 ......................... 11.84 Normal Jan. 1 - This date ........................... 7.73 Oklahoma City annual precip. is ....... 35.85

CONTINENTAL RESOURCES CEO AMONG 100 NAMED

Time names Hamm to its influential list ALSO ... PERFORMING AT HIGH LEVEL Continental Resources Inc. expects its first-quarter production to be about 13 percent higher than the previous quarter, the Oklahoma Citybased oil producer said Wednesday. Continental’s production is expected to average about 85,000 barrels of oil equivalent for the first quarter, up from about 75,000 barrels a day in the fourth quarter of last year. That first-quarter figure is 65 percent higher than the same period of last year, when Continental averaged about 51,000 barrels a day. “We’re performing at an exceptionally high level in the Bakken of North Dakota and Montana, and in the Anadarko Woodford in Oklahoma,” CEO Harold Hamm said. “A mild winter and early spring has helped, but the primary factor has been the combination of faster cycle times between wells and strong well results overall.” Continental is ahead of its operations plan for the year. The company currently is operating 35 rigs, down from 43 at the end of 2011.

BY JAY F. MARKS Business Writer jmarks@opubco.com

Oklahoma oilman Harold Hamm was tabbed Wednesday one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time magazine. The magazine billed its list, which includes President Barack Obama and likely GOP opponent Mitt Romney, as “the people who inspire us, entertain us, challenge us and change our world.” Hamm is the founder and CEO of Oklahoma City-based Continental Resources Inc., one of the country’s largest independent oil companies. “The Time 100 recognition is a great honor not only for myself, but also for the entire Continental Resources team,” Hamm said. “As we work to significantly increase our nation’s energy supply, this distinction adds to the momentum of our mission to help make America energy independent within the next decade.”

New era of energy Hamm’s biography for the Time list was penned by U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, RTulsa. It touches on how Hamm has built Continental into a billion-dollar company. Hamm said he isn’t sure how he ended up on the Time list, but acknowledged it could be a result of his efforts to shed light on the advance of the U.S. oil industry. “We have an American energy renaissance taking place. It’s just phenomenal,” he told The Oklahoman in an interview. “It

Wednesday 80/60

Winds: SSW 15-25 mph

H L Prc. 79 52 .00 Midnight 56 Enid 1 a.m. 57 Gage 81 55 .00 2 a.m. 55 Guymon 83 48 .00 3 a.m. 53 Hobart 80 50 .00 4 a.m. 55 McAlester 76 50 .00 5 a.m. 54 Ponca City 80 56 .00 6 a.m. 53 77 54 .00 7 a.m. 52 Tulsa 8 a.m. 54 Chickasha 78 47 .00 74 51 .00 9 a.m. 59 Durant 77 50 .00 10 a.m. 64 El Reno 11 a.m. 68 Guthrie 78 54 .00 Noon 72 Idabel 75 46 .00 1 p.m. 75 Miami 75 49 .00 2 p.m. 76 Norman 76 54 .00 3 p.m. 77 OKC 78 52 .00 4 p.m. 77 76 54 .00 5 p.m. 78 Shawnee Stillwater 79 54 .00 6 p.m. 76 7 p.m. 74 Woodward 79 57 .00 One year ago in Oklahoma City: 92/64 Normal high/low in Oklahoma City: 73/50 Record high/low: 96 in 1925/30 in 1953 National extremes yesterday: Death Valley, CA, 100; Alamosa, CO, 18

Jan. 1 - This date in 2009 .......................... 5.58 Jan. 1 - This date in 2010 ........................... 8.59 Jan. 1 - This date in 2011 ............................ 2.22

Atlanta 73/58

El Paso 87/60

Cloudy, 57

M/cloudy, 57 Forecasts and graphics provided by Accu Weather.com ©2012

Los Angeles 79/61

Cloudy, 76

Cloudy, 51

Overcast, 52

Washington 70/52

Miami 84/71

82/57

Some sun, 79

6 a.m. tomorrow

New York 70/54

Detroit 68/51

Kansas City 73/49

Ardmore

81/58

Chicago 66/44

Denver 63/36

McAlester

83/56

Some sun, 77

Minneapolis 54/37

Idabel

77/55

Ada

Some sun, 69

M/cloudy, 70

Tulsa

82/54

83/54 81/57

Sunshine, 67

Seattle 60/48

A breezy and dry day will prevail with clouds and sun today. As somewhat cooler air arrives tonight and tomorrow, expect a shower or thunderstorm. Winds: S 15-25 mph.

Woodward

75/45

ACROSS THE U.S.

SCAN IT

Up-to-date video, forecasts, Scan the QR maps, radar and codewarnings, at left to get the latest go to NewsOK.com

San Francisco 67/53

Some sun Guymon

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Harold Hamm Continental Resources Inc. CEO

was fun to start talking about that. I think everybody’s caught on pretty quickly.” He said the industry recently was accused of exaggerating its oil and natural gas reserves, but advances like horizontal drilling have resulted in unprecedented production. “It’s just opened up a whole new era of energy in America. I call it the golden era, if you want to think about it that way,” Hamm said. “That’s really what it is. “A resurgence of American supplies of both oil and gas.”

Business as usual Hamm said the recognition will not change the way he or his company does business. “I have an awful big job, a growing, thriving oil company to run,” he said. “I have to keep doing what I do.” Time’s annual list of influential people appears in the magazine’s April 30 issue, which hits newsstands Thursday.

Winds: S 6-12 mph

Yesterday in the world: Amsterdam Baghdad Calgary Dublin Frankfurt Geneva Hong Kong Kabul London Madrid Manila Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio Riyadh Rome Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

H 54 87 43 52 58 56 80 72 54 57 95 75 50 53 93 52 81 88 64 47 73 64 51 57

L 39 60 34 40 41 40 72 47 42 45 76 48 30 42 71 41 70 66 43 30 63 52 28 43

Sky Rain Sun Snow Shwr Shwr Shwr Tstrm PtCl Rain PtCl Sun PtCl Sun Cldy PtCl Rain PtCl Sun PtCl PtCl Rain PtCl PtCl Rain

Sun, moon: Sunrise today: 6:52 a.m. Sunset today: 8:07 p.m. Moonrise 5:45 a.m. Moonset 6:58 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow: 6:51 a.m. Sunset tomorrow: 8:07 p.m.

New

First

Full

Last

Apr 21

Apr 29

May 5

May 12

0s

Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Cheyenne Chicago Cleveland Colo. Springs Columbus, OH Dal-Ft. Worth Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fairbanks Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS Jacksonville Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Mnpls-St. Paul Mobile Nashville New Orleans New York City Omaha Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Providence Raleigh Reno St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sault Ste. Marie Seattle Shreveport Sioux Falls Spokane Tampa-St. Pete Tulsa Washington, DC Wichita

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Yesterday H L Prec. 80 43 86 52 49 35 68 59 1.69 61 53 .12 60 36 .08 74 55 .02 54 39 .01 64 48 .01 62 50 87 66 59 31 83 58 57 50 .42 64 31 73 39 Tr 62 40 71 41 68 46 81 53 72 33 75 55 .07 59 35 51 35 .35 90 57 54 29 65 45 58 41 .02 83 70 83 55 68 43 76 51 85 67 .09 78 49 88 65 76 47 78 55 71 46 75 48 83 72 71 38 Tr 63 50 .04 77 57 .04 74 48 .01 79 60 64 49 .01 76 53 .02 58 54 Tr 95 64 64 43 60 44 59 47 .04 67 52 .01 69 57 .18 69 48 76 49 57 50 .01 85 59 69 54 65 51 46 27 .15 56 45 .06 79 50 63 47 52 40 .01 86 72 77 54 62 53 .05 78 53

Today H L Sky 81 50 Sunny 77 42 Sunny 52 37 Sunny 73 58 PtCldy 61 49 PtCldy 59 38 Shwrs 78 58 Sunny 56 33 Shwrs 66 51 PtCldy 60 48 PtCldy 84 67 Cloudy 66 49 Cloudy 77 62 PtCldy 76 48 PtCldy 57 34 Cloudy 66 44 Shwrs 68 51 PtCldy 63 36 T-storm 74 53 PtCldy 81 62 PtCldy 63 36 T-storm 67 43 Rain 68 51 Shwrs 48 29 Shwrs 87 60 Sunny 52 34 PtCldy 68 45 PtCldy 59 39 Cloudy 85 70 PtCldy 82 62 PtCldy 76 54 PtCldy 82 52 Sunny 83 62 T-storm 73 49 T-storm 87 71 Sunny 78 54 Sunny 79 61 PtCldy 78 56 Sunny 78 57 Sunny 84 71 T-storm 56 40 Rain 54 37 Rain 84 58 Sunny 78 56 Sunny 81 63 Sunny 70 54 PtCldy 69 43 Shwrs 71 50 Sunny 92 72 Sunny 73 51 PtCldy 59 40 PtCldy 63 54 Rain 64 46 PtCldy 73 54 PtCldy 73 49 PtCldy 76 56 PtCldy 63 50 PtCldy 80 63 PtCldy 69 61 PtCldy 67 53 PtCldy 50 32 PtCldy 60 48 Rain 79 58 Sunny 57 34 Rain 56 46 Cloudy 84 70 T-storm 77 55 PtCldy 70 52 Sunny 76 50 T-storm

Tomorrow H L Sky 73 51 Sunny 67 40 PtCldy 55 38 Sunny 78 60 PtCldy 66 55 PtCldy 66 46 Cloudy 80 60 PtCldy 59 37 PtCldy 76 53 PtCldy 70 47 PtCldy 89 65 PtCldy 65 39 Cloudy 81 62 T-storm 80 53 Sunny 60 39 PtCldy 52 39 Rain 70 46 T-storm 62 37 PtCldy 76 53 T-storm 67 47 T-storm 66 39 PtCldy 56 38 Cloudy 59 41 Rain 50 29 PtCldy 82 59 Sunny 53 32 PtCldy 74 50 PtCldy 69 46 Cloudy 85 70 PtCldy 82 56 T-storm 72 50 Rain 81 59 T-storm 84 65 T-storm 56 37 Cloudy 90 68 Sunny 75 51 T-storm 84 62 Sunny 80 58 T-storm 81 58 T-storm 85 73 Shwrs 50 39 Rain 58 36 PtCldy 83 62 PtCldy 81 58 PtCldy 81 65 T-storm 71 56 PtCldy 59 35 PtCldy 76 55 PtCldy 98 68 Sunny 78 53 Sunny 64 42 PtCldy 66 49 Shwrs 71 50 PtCldy 78 58 PtCldy 80 52 PtCldy 65 43 Rain 71 51 PtCldy 77 53 T-storm 75 59 Sunny 69 52 PtCldy 50 30 PtCldy 60 46 Shwrs 77 51 Rain 56 34 PtCldy 64 44 Shwrs 84 70 T-storm 61 42 T-storm 76 58 PtCldy 60 37 PtCldy

Scam: Agents say be wary FROM PAGE 1B

be renters for a town house that was not for rent — before anyone figured out what was happening.

Local scammer Unlike many such scams, the scammer did not claim to be unavoidably detained in Nigeria, the West Indies or some other odd locale. Vaughan said this false rental listing included an Oklahoma City phone number. Vaughan said she had an email exchange with the pretend owner but could not make contact by phone. “This is not the first time I have had this happen. I had sold a condo in Sutton Place (near Britton Road and N May Avenue) to another client and about a year later it was listed as a rental on Craigslist, again with pictures taken from the MLS,” she said. Vaughan said police told The Covington Co. that there is “no way of fighting it.” Oklahoma City white collar crime detectives seldom receive reports of anyone being bilked by the scams, said police Master Sgt. Gary Knight.

Rent at a steal Heather Davis, an agent with Churchill-Brown & Associates Realtors, said she has a for-sale listing now that is getting tapped by people wanting to rent it, and last fall she had a rental advertised by a scammer for less than one-third the asking rent. “The rental rate was $1,400 a month and the scammers were advertising it for $400 a month,” she said. “Our phone and email were crazy busy with people wanting this great rate. Some would Google the address and get our contact info, but I heard from others that if they contacted the scammer that posted the ad, that he encouraged them to mail the deposit of $400 to him to ‘hold’ the house and not

Catherine Vaughan

Heather Davis

Linda Finch

Lisa Noon

lease to anyone else. It sounds like that is the scam and why it’s worth their while.”

“Craigslist, in particular, has been a site that housing experts have warned visitors to beware of when it comes to real estate transactions,” Noon said. Noon said some situations go further than others. “In January, a couple from Lynchburg, Va., were scammed out of $1,000 and confronted by the police because of a fake rental listing they’d responded to on Craigslist. In this particular case, the couple actually received keys to the home and moved in, only to have police arrive at their front doorstep,” she said. So how do you avoid being scammed? “A simple online search for a rental or sale property is one way that you can avoid being duped: If the home appears somewhere else on the Internet for sale or rent and it’s from someone else, consider this a definite red flag,” Noon said. “It’s also a good idea to work with a reputable property manager when seeking a rental.” She also pointed to an online quiz that points out some red flags when looking at a rental property: www.rentvine.com/tools/ rentalscamquiz/

Supercheap rent A scammer claiming to be in Africa tried a religious angle to scam off one of agent Linda Finch’s listings. “I had a few calls about six months ago about a listing that I had sold but not closed on yet. The people were asking about it being for rent. It was listed on Trulia, not Craigslist,” said Finch, an agent with Paradigm AdvantEdge Real Estate. “The guy was claiming he was doing missionary work and just wanted to find someone who would take care of their home. “It was supercheap rent. He went on to say, ‘Don’t pay any attention to real estate signs or anything you see on the Internet’ — that it was no longer for sale.” Lisa Noon, CEO of the Oklahoma Association of Realtors, said the only thing new about the scams appears to be the recent spate of them in Oklahoma City. A Realtor in Owasso reported a rash of Internet scams involving Tulsa properties in 2009.


NCAA GYMNASTICS

BARONS

Dalton, Sooners shoot for title

OKC getting tougher on defense

Oklahoma will host the NCAA Gymnastics Championships beginning Thursday in Norman.

With Taylor Chorney a possibility to return from injury for Thursday’s playoff opener in Houston, the Barons should be even better on the blue line.

PAGE 5C

PAGE 2C

INSIDE

SPORTS

OSU FOOTBALL

C THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

Jenni Carlson jcarlson@ opubco.com

COMMENTARY

BCS trophy comes crashing down SACRED TROPHIES | CRYSTAL BALL NOT

THE BEST OF DESIGNS

A

labama is withholding information. It won’t say who broke the crystal. No doubt you’ve heard that the crystal football sitting atop the Crimson Tide’s recently won BCS national championship trophy came to a crashing halt over the weekend. All we know is that the father of one of the current players tripped on some carpet, bumped into the trophy and sent the glassware smashing onto the floor. Who done it? Who knows? But why not come clean? After all, this isn’t exactly the first time there’s been trophy trouble. I mean, the BCS hardware itself has had issues over the years. Florida State had not one but two trophies stolen in 2004. Then in 2008, the trophy at Florida was destroyed when a recruit accidentally knocked it over. The Gators came clean about his identity. It was tight end Orson Charles. Maybe it was easier for Florida to finger the culprit since Charles ultimately signed with Georgia. Or maybe the Gators knew that trophy mishaps are hardly a rarity. Last year, Real Madrid won the coveted Spanish Cup. At least everyone thought it was coveted. Sergio Ramos dropped the darn thing off the roof of the team bus as it paraded through the streets, then everyone watched in horror as the bus ran over it. The whole episode was caught on video and has been watched over a mil-

SEE CARLSON, PAGE 2C

Harden’s homecoming THUNDER 109, SUNS 97 | GUARD RETURNS TO ARIZONA, SCORES CAREER-HIGH 40 POINTS

PAGE 5C

OU FOOTBALL

Laith Harlow’s OU football career is over before it even began. A back injury will keep the high school star from playing college football, but OU will still honor Harlow’s scholarship.

jrohde@ opubco.com

THUNDER | NBA

PAGE 6C

ONLINE NEW PHOTO STREAM Want to look at the day in sports via photos, not headlines? Check out our new photo stream at http://newsok.com/ photostream/sports

LIVE CHAT WITH BERRY TRAMEL Join columnist Berry Tramel at 11 a.m. on Thursday for the Power Lunch live chat. Get your sports questions ready and log on at NewsOK.com/sports to join in.

SCAN IT OKC’s James Harden, right, looks to pass against the Suns’ Sebastian Telfair during action on Wednesday in Phoenix. Harden recorded a career-high 40 points in a 109-97 win. AP PHOTO

fun.” Harden shot 12 for 17 (missing his last two attempts) from the field, 5 for 8 from 3-point range and 11 for 11 from the freethrow line, all in a span of 35 minutes, 45 seconds.

Former Oklahoma coach John MacLeod was inducted into the Phoenix Suns’ Ring of Honor at halftime of Wednesday’s game against the Thunder at US Airways Center. PAGE 5C

SEE THUNDER, PAGE 3C

CONTACT US

Summitt resigns from Tennessee BY CHRIS DUFRESNE Los Angeles Times

You won’t start many arguments by suggesting Pat Summitt will be remembered as one of the greatest coaches of any sport, of any gender, of any generation. Sadly, though, a legendary career that stretched almost four decades ended sooner than anyone anticipated. Summitt, 59, announced her resignation as Tennessee’s women’s bas-

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INSIDE

WOMEN’S NCAA BASKETBALL

Pat Summitt is stepping aside as Tennessee’s women’s basketball coach and taking the title of "head coach emeritus." AP PHOTO

The head coach will sit down with assistants after Saturday’s ‘Spring Finale’ and discuss who should be No. 1 going into fall camp.

HARLOW’S CAREER OVER

John Rohde

PHOENIX — Before Wednesday night’s game against the Thunder, Phoenix Suns coach Alvin Gentry called his shot. Actually, he called James Harden’s shot. Before the game, Gentry proclaimed Harden might be the third best No. 2 guard in the NBA behind Kobe Bryant and Dwyane Wade. Gentry also said Harden reminded him of some of the unselfish players from the 1980s who sacrificed starting in favor of being a spark off the bench. This came as a shock to Harden, who was born in 1989. When the Thunder played the Suns before a crowd of 14,873 at US Airways Center, Harden made Gentry look like the smartest man in the building, scoring a career-high 40 points in a 109-97 victory. Harden excelled at Arizona State and the more often he returns to the Valley of the Sun, the louder fans seem to scream their approval. Wednesday’s reactions were a steady mix of fanaticism and thorough frustration from the home folk. Harden visited his college campus on Tuesday and the fun continued Wednesday night against a Phoenix team that had been 18-9 since the AllStar Break.. “It’s always good,” Harden said of playing in Arizona. “It was special, family coaches, friends. It was

GUNDY MULLING QB OPTIONS

ketball coach Wednesday, less than a year after she was diagnosed with earlyonset Alzheimer’s disease. Longtime assistant Holly Warlick will take over as head coach with Summitt remaining at the school as “head coach emeritus.” Summitt said she intends to continue “mentoring and teaching life skills.” “I loved being the head coach at Tennessee for 38 years,” she said in a statement. “But I recognize

that the time has come to move into the future and to step into a new role.” Summitt’s Tennessee teams won eight NCAA championships and 1,098 games with 208 losses. She led the Lady Vols to 22 Final Four appearances, 18 with the NCAA and four with the now-defunct AIAW. Her teams won 16 Southeastern Conference regular-season titles and 16 SEC Tournament SEE SUMMITT, PAGE 5C

The Oklahoman Sports Department P.O. Box 25125 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 Phone: (405) 475-3313 (800) 375-6397 ext. 3313 Fax: (405) 475-3315 Website: NewsOK.com Email: sportsdesk@ oklahoman.com

› › › ›

Mike Sherman, Sports Editor (405) 475-3164 msherman@ opubco.com


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THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

TUNING IN

PAGE 2

Thursday HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL 7:30 p.m.

Barons to get deeper on defense Ryan Aber raber@ opubco.com

BARONS The Barons were among the best defensive teams this season in the American Hockey League. During the regular season, the Barons allowed 176 goals in 76 games, second-best in the league. Only Toronto, which finished second to the Barons in the Western Conference, allowed fewer (175). The way the Barons have done it has been remarkable, with an evershuttling lineup of defensemen playing in front of goaltenders Yann Danis and David LeNeveu. With Taylor Chorney possibly returning from injury for Thursday’s firstround playoff opener in Houston, the Barons should be even better on the blue line. Chorney hasn’t played since suffering an upperbody injury March 25 against Grand Rapids.

“That will be big for us,” Barons general manager Bill Scott said. “When we get him back and have (Colten) Teubert back, that’s huge for us on that end.” With Alex Plante missing significant time with two concussions and Teubert spending 24 games over several stints with Edmonton, the Barons have not had their full array of defensemen all season. Veteran Bryan Helmer was the only defenseman to play more than 50 games during the regular season for Oklahoma City. “It’ll definitely be nice when we get all of those guys back,” Danis said last week. “I don’t know what we’ll do with all of those guys together, finally.” The Barons have used 17 defensemen this season, including Central Hockey League fill-in Andrew Martens, who played 12 games beginning in late December after Plante was hurt for the first time. While Bryan Rodney struggled at times with Syracuse before being traded in a deal that sent Ryan O’Marra to the Ana-

BARONS AT HOUSTON AEROS I What: Game 1 of a best-of-5, first-round American Hockey League playoff series I When: 7:05 p.m. Thursday I Where: Toyota Center, Houston I Radio: KXXY-FM 96.1 I Scouting report: The Barons were 7-0-1 against the Aeros during the regular season, including 3-0-1 at Houston. ... Four of the meetings went to a shootout, with the Barons winning three. ... The Barons are 33-0-4 when leading after two periods. ... Philippe Cornet scored four goals against the Aeros this season. ... Yann Danis, the AHL’s Outstanding Goaltender, played in every game against Houston for the Barons. ... The Barons haven’t scored on their last 30 power-play chances, dating back to the second period of the March 24 game against Grand Rapids. ... The Barons signed goaltender Tyler Bunz to an amateur tryout contract. Bunz was the Oilers’ fifth-round pick in 2010 and recently finished his fourth season with the Western Junior Hockey League’s Medicine Hat Tigers. ... The franchise will host a watch party for Thursday’s and Friday’s games at the Buffalo Wild Wings on Northwest Expressway. ... The series returns to Oklahoma City for Game 3 at 7 p.m. Sunday. ... First-round tickets for the upper level at the Cox Center are $10. ... Tickets can be purchased by calling (405) 232-4625, at any Ticketmaster outlet and at Ticketmaster.com.

Sunday at San Antonio. If Chorney isn’t ready to go, rookie Martin Marincin figures to get the call. In six games since signing an amateur tryout contract following the end of his junior season, Marincin is plus-4 and has shown flashes of why the Oilers made him their second-round pick in 2010.

UCO softball team extends win streak to 34

SOONERS WHIP MEAN GREEN Keilani Ricketts pitched effectively in relief and added her 12th homer of the season Wednesday as No. 5-ranked Oklahoma held off North Texas 9-4 in softball at Marita Hynes Field in Norman. Ricketts finished with two hits and two RBIs. She also scored twice to help the Sooners (36-6) recover from an early 1-0 deficit. Ricketts took over for struggling starting pitcher Michelle Gascoigne in the fourth

Carlson FROM PAGE 1C

lion times on YouTube. Apparently, Ramos made the ol’ drop-atrophy-off-the-top-of-abus routine popular among soccer players. A month later, Maarten Stekelenburg and his Ajax teammates were riding atop their team bus after winning the Dutch League Championship when Stekelenburg bobbled the trophy. Lucky for him, it was a plate, and it rolled safely away from the bus. He’ll have to try a little harder next time if he wants the bus to run over it, too. There have also been plenty of instances of trophy trouble where you can hardly blame operator error. Back in 1991, pro bowler Pete Weber won the U.S. Open and was given this trophy with a ceramic eagle on top of it. We

fourth consecutive year. OCU is one of nine sites to host a five-team, doubleelimination tournament; the champion at each site advances to the NAIA World Series in Lewiston, Idaho. The NAIA will announce team assignments May 6. The Opening Round regionals begin May 10.

OSU SIGNEE NAMED ALL-AMERICAN

UCO’s Amanda McClelland delivers against Midwestern State on Wednesday. PHOTO BY NATE BILLINGS, THE OKLAHOMAN

inning. Ricketts allowed one run, one hit, one walk and struck out six.

COWGIRLS BEAT TULSA Ari Morrison had three hits and scored twice Wednesday as Oklahoma State hammered Tulsa 8-3 at Cowgirl Softball Stadium. The game was tight until the bottom of the sixth inning, when OSU (22-16) scored five runs off starting pitcher Lacey Middlebrooks. Reliever Kat Espinosa threw well for the Cowgirls, blanking Tulsa (30-10) on three hits and no walks over two innings.

COWBOYS RALLY TO BEAT RIVERHAWKS Oklahoma State scored two runs during the sev-

know it was ceramic because when Weber lifted the trophy over his head, the eagle separated from its wooden-base perch, fell to the floor and busted into a million pieces. Then in 2008, the Spokane Chiefs, a major junior hockey team, won the Canadian Hockey League. Their spoil was the massive Memorial Cup, which featured a big silver cup on top of a huge wooden base. The team captain took the trophy first and lifted it above his head triumphantly without any problem. But when he started to hand it to a teammate, the cup broke off the base and whole thing crashed to the ice. Give the Chiefs credit. They used both pieces to celebrate and gave players twice as many chances to lift the trophy — or a piece of it, at least — above their heads. (In case anyone is wondering, there are some folks right here in the Oklahoma City metro

6 p.m.

Cox 3

enth and eighth innings Wednesday, rallying for a 6-4 baseball victory over Northeastern State at Reynolds Stadium in Stillwater. Robbie Rea had a two-run homer in the bottom of the seventh inning that gave the Cowboys the lead for good, 4-3. OSU (19-17) added two runs in the eighth inning. Reliever Jake Abbott was effective for the Cowboys, blanking Northeastern State (20-20) on three hits, a walk and six strikeouts over four innings.

OCU TO HOST TOURNAMENT The Oklahoma City University baseball program that will host an Opening Round regional that leads up to NAIA World Series. The NAIA chose OCU as an Opening Round host for the

area who know a thing or two about doing trophies right. MTM Recognition in Del City does everything from the NCAA championship trophies to NASCAR trophies to Bassmaster Classic trophies. And near as anyone knows, none of them have ever broken apart upon contact.) Listen, all sorts of trophies over the years have been poorly designed. Hockey great Chris Chelios won the Norris Trophy as the NHL’s top defenseman in 1993. He accepted it at a fancyschmancy, black-tie event. “It means a lot to me,” he said on the microphone at the podium. Just as he uttered those words, though, the lid on top of the silver cup fell off and clattered onto the stage. “Maybe it doesn’t mean a lot to me,” Chelios deadpanned. Who thinks a trophy with a detachable part is really that great of an

Oklahoma State men’s basketball signee Marcus Smart was named to the All-America Elite Team by ESPNHS. Smart was one of five first-team selections for the nation. The Flower Mound Marcus (Texas) star averaged 15.1 points, 9.2 rebounds and 5.0 assists while leading his high school team to consecutive Class 5A state championships.

COFFEE CREEK HOSTS GOLF CLINICS Coffee Creek Golf Club will have five weeks of summer clinics for youngsters. Kids will be separated in two groups — ages 6-8 and 9 and older — for five, one-hour classes. The clinic will cover all aspects of golf with teaching methods designed to entertain and challenge participants. Clinics will be scheduled for two weeks in June, two weeks in July and one week in August. Registration fee is $80. For enrollment information, call Tosh Hays at (405) 340-4653 or go to www.CoffeeCreekGolfClub.com. FROM STAFF REPORTS

idea? I don’t know about you, but at the end of the BCS national championship game, I hold my breath as someone takes that crystal football off the trophy and hands it to the winning coach, who always lifts it into the air, then hands it to some player who starts passing it around. These are college guys, for crying out loud. They are sweaty. They are giddy. It’s a wonder that crystal hasn’t been dropped and busted right there on the field after the game. That Alabama had it for three whole months without breaking seems like something of a miracle really. An eight-pound crystal football perched atop three spindles on a nearly three-foot tall base? Yeah, that’s not a recipe for disaster at all. The folks in Tuscaloosa shouldn’t be ashamed that the thing got dropped. At least they didn’t run over it with a bus, too.

Oklahoma City at Nashville (DH)

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

11:30 a.m. Noon 12:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 9 p.m.

NBA

7 p.m. 9:30 p.m.

NHL

6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m.

GOLF

2 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

AHL 7 p.m.

Chicago Cubs at Miami L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee Cincinnati at St. Louis Texas at Detroit Houston at Washington Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees Oakland at L.A. Angels

KGHM-AM 1340

WGN (Cox 2) MLBN (Cox 264) Cox 3/FSPLUS (Cox 68) FSOK (Cox 37) FSPLUS (Cox 68) MLBN (Cox 264) MLBN (Cox 264)

Chicago at Miami L.A. Clippers at Phoenix

TNT (Cox 31) TNT (Cox 31)

Florida at New Jersey Boston at Washington Phoenix at Chicago St. Louis at San Jose

NHLNET (Cox 263) NBCSN (Cox 251) CNBC (Cox 41) NBCSN (Cox 251)

Valero Texas Open LPGA: Lotte Championship

GOLF (Cox 60) GOLF (Cox 60)

Oklahoma City at Houston

KXXY-FM 96.1

COLLEGE BASEBALL 6:30 p.m.

Tennessee at Mississippi State

ESPNU (Cox 253)

COLLEGE SOFTBALL 7 p.m.

Alabama at Georgia

ESPN2 (Cox 28)

Friday MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m.

Oklahoma City at Nashville

KGHM-AM 1340

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 9 p.m.

NBA heim organization, he’s been solid for the Barons. Rodney was minus-11 in 41 games for Syracuse but is plus-9 in 26 games for OKC since the trade. Helmer, Plante, Rodney and Teubert will play in the postseason opener. Dan Ringwald played for the first time since Feb. 25 in the regular-season finale

OKLAHOMA SCENE

The Central Oklahoma softball team’s schoolrecord win streak remained intact Wednesday, when it swept Midwestern State (Texas) in a doubleheader in Edmond. The Bronchos have 34 consecutive victories after 8-6 and 8-4 decisions. UCO is tied for the sixth-longest win streak in NCAA Division II history; the record is 55 straight wins. Kacie Edwards sparked No. 3-ranked UCO (36-3) on Wednesday with eight RBIs. She was 5 for 7 with two homers and the first triple of her college career. Brittany Weaver added to the drama, hitting a tworun walk-off homer in the bottom of the seventh inning of the first game. That helped cap a comeback in a game the Bronchos trailed 4-0 after 5 1/2 innings.

High School Softball Game

MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

6 p.m. 8:30 p.m. 9 p.m.

NHL

6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.

N.Y. Yankees at Boston St. Louis at Pittsburgh Colorado at Milwaukee Chicago White Sox at Seattle

MLBN (Cox 264) FSPLUS (Cox 68) MLBN (Cox 264) WGN (Cox 2)

Boston at Atlanta ESPN (Cox 29) L.A. Lakers at San Antonio ESPN (Cox 29) Oklahoma City at Sacramento FSOK (Cox 37) WWLS-AM 640/98.1 FM Philadelphia at Pittsburgh Detroit at Nashville

NBCSN (Cox 251) NBCSN (Cox 251)

AUTO RACING

6 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Formula One Practice Sprint Cup Practice Truck Series Practice Sprint Cup Practice TORC Off-Road Jam

SPEED (Cox 67) SPEED (Cox 67) SPEED (Cox 67) SPEED (Cox 67) SPEED (Cox 67)

GOLF

11:30 a.m. Liberty Mutual Legends 2 p.m. Valero Texas Open 5:30 p.m. LPGA: Lotte Championship

AHL

7:30 p.m.

GOLF (Cox 60) GOLF (Cox 60) GOLF (Cox 60)

Oklahoma City at Houston

KXXY-FM 96.1

COLLEGE BASEBALL 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Texas Tech at Oklahoma State Alabama State at Oklahoma

KSPI-FM 93.7 KREF-AM 1400

COLLEGE SOFTBALL 6 p.m. 7 p.m.

Mississippi at LSU Missouri at Oklahoma

CST (Cox 269) Cox 3

MEN’S LACROSSE 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

BOXING 8 p.m.

ACC Semifinal Colgate at Bucknell ACC Semifinal

ESPNU (Cox 253) CBSS (Cox 249) ESPNU (Cox 253)

Adonis Stevenson vs. Noe Gonzalez

ESPN2 (Cox 28)

MORNING ROUNDUP

Source: Ivan Rodriguez to retire Ivan Rodriguez plans to announce his retirement Monday, ending a 21-year major league career that included a record 13 Gold Gloves at catcher. A person familiar with the arrangements said Rodriguez intends to make the announcement in Arlington, Texas, where the Rangers start a homestand Monday against the New York Yankees. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the team had not made an announcement. A 14-time All-Star, “Pudge” spent his first 12 major league seasons with the Rangers and won the 1999 American League MVP with Texas, when he hit .332 with 35 homers and 113 RBIs. He returned to the Rangers briefly in 2009. Rodriguez finishes with a .296 batting average, 2,884 hits, 311 home runs and 1,332 RBIs. He broke the record of 10 Gold Gloves at catcher that had been held by Binger native Johnny Bench and hit .300 or better 10 times. He was a World Series champion with the Florida Marlins in 2003.

BAYLOR WINS 21ST STRAIGHT BASEBALL GAME Baylor set a school baseball record and matched the Big 12 mark with its 21st consecutive victory. The Bears (32-7) set the mark Wednesday with an 11-1 victory over Texas A&M-Commerce, a game called after seven innings because of the 10-run rule. Since Big 12 baseball play began in 1997, Baylor and Texas (in 2010) are the only teams to win 21 straight.

BROWN INTERESTED IN SMU JOB Larry Brown is serious about getting back to coaching and the vacancy at SMU. Brown said Wednesday that he hasn’t yet been offered the men’s basketball coaching job, but had spoken again with SMU athletic director Steve Orsini since they first met on Monday. The 71-year-old Hall of Fame coach said he expected his longtime agent, Joe Glass, to have further conversations with Orsini. “They haven’t offered me the job, I haven’t accepted the job, and I would never do it without Joe’s blessing,” Brown told The Associated Press. “I think before anything happens, Steve would probably have to have his blessing from his president. That’s where we are.” SMU, which is moving from Conference USA to the much tougher Big East in 2013, fired Matt Doherty last month after six seasons. The Mustangs haven’t won an NCAA Tournament game since 1988, the year Brown led Kansas to the national championship in his last season as a college coach. Brown, the only coach to win both an NBA championship and NCAA title, hasn’t coached since leaving the Charlotte Bobcats in December 2010 after the team’s 9-19 start. His contract there was to run through the end of this season.

LIN, TEBOW MAKE TIME LIST Jeremy Lin and Tim Tebow made Time magazine’s list of “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World.” Not bad for the Jets quarterback and Knicks point guard. Lin and Tebow were the only Americans among the six athletes on the list. The others were tennis player Novak Djokovic, soccer player Lionel Messi, runner Oscar Pistorius and golfer Yani Tseng. FROM WIRE REPORTS


SPORTS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Thunder: Durant scores 29 FROM PAGE 1C

Just two games prior at Minnesota, Harden returned from missing one game with a sore right knee to shoot 1 for 11 from the field and 0 for 8 from 3-point range. Asked if he might have returned too soon from the injury, Harden shrugged and said, “I just didn’t shoot it well. … People have bad games sometimes.” All but a cinch to win the NBA Sixth Man of the Year Award, Harden did little wrong against the Suns, also finishing with seven rebounds, three assists and a game-high four steals. “It was good when you get on a roll like that,” Harden said afterward. “I just wanted to be aggressive. It’s not particularly (because of) the Suns. I’ve just had two bad games, especially coming off that bad second half against the Clippers. We wanted to bounce back and try to spark some energy off the bench.” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said of Harden: “Obviously, he had a terrific game. He had everything going. … He was a big factor in our win.” It didn’t look good early

for the Thunder. A 21-8 start by the Suns meant OKC had been outscored 70-33 in its last 30 minutes of basketball after being outscored 49-25 in the second half of Monday night’s loss at the Los Angeles Clippers. But the Thunder outscored Phoenix 101-76 from that point forward, led by Harden, who entered the game with OKC trailing 21-11. Also excelling for the Thunder was Kevin Durant, who had 29 points, 11 rebounds, five assists and two blocked shots. Even more impressive might have been Durant’s leadership on the court, often conversing with coaches on adjusting certain plays. “I think Kevin is continuing to mature in front of our eyes when doing those things,” Brooks said. “He saw some plays with some situations that he thought we could take advantage of, and he was giving (of) himself. He was looking for others and trying to make the extra pass, but that’s what we have to do. We’re a good team when all five guys participate on both ends of the floor.” The Thunder plays at Sacramento at 9 p.m. Friday.

Thunder center Kendrick Perkins, left, battles Suns center Marcin Gortat for the ball during the first half of Wednesday’s game in Phoenix. AP PHOTO

THUNDER 109, SUNS 97 OKLAHOMA CITY Durant... Ibaka ..... Perkins.. Westbrk Seflsha . Collisn ... Harden .. Mhmmd Fisher.... Cook ......

Min

FG M-A

FT M-A

Reb O-T A PF PTS

40:55 10-20 8-8 0-11 5 18:09 4-8 1-2 2-3 0 27:39 2-5 1-1 4-9 0 30:41 6-16 3-4 2-6 5 30:57 0-2 0-0 0-1 1 21:09 1-2 4-5 1-3 1 35:45 12-17 11-11 1-7 3 10:21 0-1 0-0 1-4 2 17:19 1-7 3-3 0-1 0 7:05 0-2 0-0 0-1 0

4 2 3 4 2 2 2 2 2 3

29 9 5 15 0 6 40 0 5 0

Totals.... 240:00 36-80 31-34 11-46 17 26 109

Percentages: FG .450, FT .912. 3-Point Goals: 6-16, .375 (Harden 5-8, Durant 1-2, Cook 0-1, Ibaka 0-1, Fisher 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 15 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Durant 2, Sefolosha 2, Ibaka, Mohammed). Turnovers: 13 (Durant 5, Harden 3, Westbrook 3, Perkins, Sefolosha). Steals: 8 (Harden 4, Westbrook 2, Collison, Durant). Technical Fouls: Perkins, 4:16 fourth. PHOENIX Dudley..... Frye ......... Gortat ..... Nash........ Brown...... Telfair...... Morris ..... Chldrss .... Redd ........ Lopez.......

FG FT Min M-A M-A

Reb O-T A PF PTS

36:27 7-14 5-10 2-6 1 27:16 5-13 2-2 3-8 2 33:53 2-13 5-6 2-12 2 28:21 3-6 5-5 0-1 5 26:21 3-9 0-0 0-1 2 19:39 2-7 0-0 1-2 4 16:55 1-3 2-4 1-2 1 23:07 4-6 0-0 2-8 1 13:54 3-7 1-1 1-1 0 14:07 4-5 3-4 0-2 0

1 3 2 3 1 4 2 3 0 2

Totals ...... 240:00 34-83 23-32 12-43 18 21

21 13 9 12 7 4 5 8 7 11 97

Percentages: FG .410, FT .719. 3-Point Goals: 6-20, .300 (Dudley 2-5, Morris 1-1, Nash 1-2, Brown 1-3, Frye 1-4, Childress 0-1, Redd 0-1, Telfair 0-3). Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 14 (14 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Frye, Gortat, Lopez, Nash). Turnovers: 14 (Nash 5, Morris 4, Telfair 2, Childress, Frye, Redd). Steals: 3 (Brown, Childress, Gortat). Technical Fouls: Coach Gentry, 2:07 third; Nash, 2:07 third; Lopez, 4:16 fourth; Telfair, 1:13 fourth. Oklahoma City ................ 29 23 30 27 — 109 Phoenix............................ 25 20 32 20 — 97 A—14,873 (18,422). T—2:28. Officials—Jason Phillips, John Goble, Scott Twardoski.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

...

3C

NBA NOTEBOOK

Bobcats’ Thomas, Silas have confrontation The frustration of losing has started to boil over for the NBA-worst Charlotte Bobcats. A Bobcats executive confirmed there was an altercation Sunday night in the team locker room between coach Paul Silas and forward Tyrus Thomas. The incident, first reported by Yahoo!, took place after Charlotte’s 94-82 loss to the Boston Celtics. It was confirmed by President of Basketball Operations Rod Higgins. According to the report, Silas took exception to Thomas for fraternizing with some Celtics players and yelled at him after the game. Shouting ensued and the 68-year-old Silas shoved Thomas toward his locker stall and the two were separated. Higgins says the incident has been handled internally. Silas declined to comment. When asked prior to Wednesday night’s game against Chicago if he and Thomas are on the same page, Silas responded, “we

always were.” Thomas has three years remaining on his contract and is owed $26 million by the Bobcats. The team also owes the Bulls a protected first-round pick for Thomas as part of the trade that brought him to Charlotte. Thomas is averaging just 5.6 points and 3.9 rebounds per game. Before the game, Thomas was asked about the incident and said, “Rod made a statement initially and we’re going to leave it at that.” Thomas said he and Silas have put the incident behind them. “We’re great,” Thomas said. “We’ve had a game since and Rod made a statement on it and that’s all that is necessary.”

Wednesday, calling it a “physical taunt.” West had been called for fouling Hayward away from the ball then walked after him to give him what he called a “wet willy.”

MAVS’ WEST FINED $25,000

Denver Nuggets forward Wilson Chandler needs surgery to repair a labral tear in his left hip and is done for the season. ... ESPN.com is reporting that Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry likely won’t return this season because of an ankle injury. Curry has missed the past 22 games.

Mavericks guard Delonte West has been fined $25,000 by the NBA for jabbing his finger into the ear of Jazz swingman Gordon Hayward during the second quarter of Utah’s 123-121 triple-overtime win over Dallas on Monday. The NBA issued the fine

CELTICS NEARLY TRADED ALLEN Boston Celtics coach Doc Rivers told ESPN.com that the team nearly traded Ray Allen at last month’s trading deadline. Yahoo! Sports had reported that the deal would have sent Allen to the Memphis Grizzlies for a package that included O.J. Mayo and a draft pick. Rivers called it a “scary moment.”

BRIEFLY

FROM WIRE REPORTS


4C

SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

...

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

NBA SCOREBOARD W

y-Chicago............. y-Miami ............... x-Indiana ............. y-Boston.............. x-Atlanta ............. x-Orlando............. New York ............. Philadelphia......... Milwaukee........... Detroit ................. New Jersey.......... Toronto ................ Cleveland............. Washington......... Charlotte .............

47 44 40 37 37 36 33 32 29 23 22 22 20 16 7

L

15 17 22 26 25 26 29 30 32 39 41 41 41 46 54

Eastern Conference

Pct

GB

.758 .721 .645 .587 .597 .581 .532 .516 .475 .371 .349 .349 .328 .258 .115

— 21⁄2 7 101⁄2 10 11 14 15 171⁄2 24 251⁄2 251⁄2 261⁄2 31 391⁄2

L10

6-4 7-3 9-1 7-3 7-3 4-6 6-4 4-6 5-5 4-6 4-6 4-6 3-7 4-6 0-10

Str

W-1 W-4 W-6 W-1 W-2 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 L-1 L-3 L-2 L-3 W-2 L-18

Home

Away

24-7 26-4 21-8 22-9 20-9 20-12 21-11 19-14 15-15 16-14 9-23 12-20 10-21 9-22 4-26

Conf

23-8 18-13 19-14 15-17 17-16 16-14 12-18 13-16 14-17 7-25 13-18 10-21 10-20 7-24 3-28

36-9 34-10 27-17 30-15 30-16 29-18 26-19 25-19 22-21 18-27 16-29 14-31 12-33 12-32 5-40

W

y-San Antonio ..... y-Oklahoma City x-L.A. Lakers ....... x-L.A. Clippers..... Memphis.............. Dallas................... Denver ................. Utah..................... Phoenix................ Houston............... Portland............... Minnesota ........... Golden State ....... Sacramento ......... New Orleans........

45 45 39 39 37 35 34 33 32 32 28 25 22 20 19

L

16 17 23 23 25 28 28 30 30 30 35 38 38 42 43

Western Conference

Pct

GB

.738 .726 .629 .629 .597 .556 .548 .524 .516 .516 .444 .397 .367 .323 .306

— 1 ⁄2 61⁄2 61⁄2 81⁄2 11 111⁄2 13 131⁄2 131⁄2 18 21 221⁄2 251⁄2 261⁄2

L10

8-2 5-5 7-3 8-2 7-3 5-5 6-4 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 0-10 2-8 2-8 6-4

Str

W-5 W-1 L-1 W-5 W-2 W-1 L-1 W-2 L-1 L-5 L-4 L-11 L-5 L-1 L-1

Home

Away

25-5 25-6 25-7 23-9 23-7 22-10 19-13 22-8 18-12 20-11 20-13 13-18 12-18 15-16 10-22

Conf

20-11 20-11 14-16 16-14 14-18 13-18 15-15 11-22 14-18 12-19 8-22 12-20 10-20 5-26 9-21

31-13 32-12 30-14 28-18 25-22 25-22 19-26 23-23 22-22 21-24 20-25 19-27 15-27 15-30 12-32

x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division

Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 103, Cleveland 87 Chicago 100, Charlotte 68 Washington 121, Milwaukee 112 Atlanta 116, Detroit 84 Miami 96, Toronto 72 New York 104, New Jersey 95 Memphis 103, New Orleans 91 Boston 102, Orlando 98 Dallas 117, Houston 110 L.A. Clippers 104, Denver 98 San Antonio 127, Sacramento 102 Utah 112, Portland 91 Oklahoma City 109, Phoenix 97 L.A. Lakers at Golden State Thursday’s Games Milwaukee at Indiana, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Results Indiana 102, Philadelphia 97 Detroit 116, Cleveland 77 Memphis 91, Minnesota 84 New York 118, Boston 110 San Antonio 112, L.A. Lakers 91 Wednesday’s Games 76ERS 103, CAVALIERS 87

I Jrue Holiday made five 3pointers and scored 19 of his 24 points in the third quarter as the Philadelphia 76ers kept their hold on a playoff spot. Holiday made four of his 3s during a stunning 24-2 run when the Sixers blew open a tight game. Igudla ....... Brand ....... Vucvic ...... Holidy....... Meeks ...... Allen ........ Willms ..... Turne........ Hawes...... TYong....... SYung.......

33:46 20:49 7:58 28:59 24:52 29:06 26:03 25:12 16:04 21:44 5:27

8-15 6-10 0-0 9-14 1-3 2-5 3-7 4-11 4-5 6-10 0-2

0-1 1-13 7 0-0 2-4 1 0-0 0-3 0 0-0 1-2 5 3-3 0-2 1 0-0 2-5 5 2-2 1-4 5 2-2 0-4 4 0-0 2-7 1 0-0 0-2 3 1-2 0-0 0

0 2 3 2 1 4 1 2 3 1 1

19 12 0 24 5 4 8 10 8 12 1

Totals ....... 240:00 43-82 8-10 9-46 32 20 103

Percentages: FG .524, FT .800. 3-Point Goals: 9-15, .600 (Holiday 6-6, Iguodala 3-8, Turner 0-1). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Allen, Iguodala, Turner). Turnovers: 16 (Iguodala 4, Vucevic 3, Brand 2, Meeks 2, Turner 2, Allen, Hawes, Holiday). Steals: 9 (Williams 3, Iguodala 2, T.Young 2, Brand, Holiday). Technical Fouls: , . CLEVELAND Parkr ........ Jamisn ..... Thmpsn.... Irving ....... Harris....... Samels..... Sloan........ Casspi ...... Walton ..... Hudson..... Harngdy ...

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

21:46 28:21 22:31 19:38 21:41 25:10 28:41 26:14 6:17 26:19 13:22

2-4 5-13 5-6 4-10 3-8 6-11 2-5 2-6 0-0 6-13 1-3

0-0 1-2 2-2 0-0 1-4 3-4 0-0 2-2 0-0 1-2 0-0

0-3 1-4 1-5 0-3 2-3 1-5 0-2 0-4 0-0 0-0 0-4

2 3 0 4 3 0 7 1 2 0 0

Totals ....... 240:00 36-79 10-16 5-33 22

0 2 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 2 0

5 11 12 9 7 15 4 7 0 15 2

9

87

Percentages: FG .456, FT .625. 3-Point Goals: 5-14, .357 (Hudson 2-3, Casspi 1-2, Parker 1-2, Irving 1-3, Harris 0-2, Jamison 0-2). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Casspi, Jamison, Samuels). Turnovers: 13 (Harris 3, Jamison 3, Sloan 2, Casspi, Irving, Parker, Thompson, Walton). Steals: 2 (Hudson, Thompson). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 6:44 first. Philadelphia ................... 28 25 31 19 — 103 Cleveland ........................ 22 27 17 21 — 87 A—14,678 (20,562). T—1:58. Officials—Dan Crawford, Tony Brown, James Williams.

BULLS 100, BOBCATS 68

I Richard Hamilton scored 22 points in just 24 minutes as the Bulls took a step closer to wrapping up the Eastern Conference’s No. 1 seed. Despite playing without leading scorers Derrick Rose and Luol Deng, the Bulls shot 48 percent from the floor and connected on 9 of 19 shots from 3-point range to bounce back from Tuesday night’s 87-84 loss to the Wizards. CHICAGO Brewr ..... Boozer.... Noah....... Watsn .... Hamltn ... Gibson .... Lucas ...... Butler ..... Asik ........ Korver .... James..... Sclbrne ...

FG FT Min M-A M-A

24:00 2-3 21:20 5-12 23:56 5-6 21:24 3-7 24:00 9-13 26:40 3-9 26:36 5-11 24:00 2-6 21:14 3-6 19:08 3-8 4:52 0-2 2:50 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

1-2 0-5 5 0-0 2-7 4 2-2 1-5 2 1-1 2-6 3 0-0 0-2 6 3-4 3-12 0 0-0 0-1 3 1-2 1-3 0 3-8 7-15 2 0-0 0-0 4 0-0 0-0 0 0-0 0-1 0

0 2 3 2 3 4 2 1 0 0 0 0

5 10 12 9 22 9 12 5 9 7 0 0

Totals ..... 240:00 40-83 11-19 16-57 29 17 100

Percentages: FG .482, FT .579. 3-Point Goals: 9-19, .474 (Hamilton 4-5, Lucas 2-4, Watson 2-4, Korver 1-6). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Gibson 2, Noah 2, Asik, Boozer). Turnovers: 9 (Asik 2, Boozer, Butler, Gibson, Hamilton, James, Noah, Watson). Steals: 3 (Gibson, James, Lucas). Technical Fouls: , . CHARLOTTE Brown..... Biymbo ... Mullns .... Walkr...... Hendrsn . Moon ...... Thoms .... Higgns.... Carroll .... White .....

FG FT Min M-A M-A

30:21 33:08 33:36 28:35 30:46 17:39 2:52 19:25 17:14 26:24

7-13 2-10 3-11 4-12 6-12 0-1 0-3 0-7 1-8 2-7

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-2 3-6 0 3-5 6-13 3 3-4 1-3 1 7-8 0-3 5 1-1 0-1 2 0-0 1-4 0 0-0 1-1 0 2-2 0-1 3 0-0 1-1 0 1-1 1-5 1

2 3 3 0 4 1 0 2 0 0

Totals ..... 240:00 25-84 17-23 14-38 15 15

14 7 9 16 13 0 0 2 2 5 68

Percentages: FG .298, FT .739. 3-Point Goals: 1-8, .125 (Walker 1-3, Higgins 0-1, Mullens 0-1, Carroll 0-3). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Biyombo 2, Moon 2, Brown, Carroll). Turnovers: 6 (Mullens 2, Brown, Henderson, Walker, White). Steals: 5 (White 2, Biyombo, Brown, Higgins). Technical Fouls: Mullens, 1:24 third. Chicago ........................... 34 18 25 23 — 100 Charlotte ........................ 20 17 22 9 — 68 A—14,221 (19,077). T—2:03. Officials—Monty McCutchen, Mark Ayotte, Tommy Nunez.

HAWKS 116, PISTONS 84

I Tracy McGrady led six players in double figures and the playoff-bound Hawks built a 37-point lead in the first half. DETROIT Daye ....... Maxill ..... Monroe... Knight .... Stucky .... Villanva .. Gordon ... Wilkins... Macklin .. Bynum.... Jerbko .... Russll Jr .

FG FT Min M-A M-A

29:45 14:13 24:46 26:55 20:32 19:54 14:46 19:04 23:14 15:32 18:52 12:27

1-11 2-5 7-13 2-9 0-3 5-11 3-11 0-4 3-7 1-5 3-5 5-8

2-5 0-0 3-4 0-0 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-2 2-2 0-0 0-0 4-4

Reb O-T A PF PTS

1-5 1-5 2-5 0-2 0-2 3-6 1-2 2-5 4-9 0-1 0-8 1-2

0 0 1 3 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 1

0 3 3 1 0 4 4 1 3 0 0 0

Totals ..... 240:00 32-92 13-19 15-52 17 19

4 4 17 5 0 14 8 0 8 2 7 15 84

Percentages: FG .348, FT .684. 3-Point Goals: 7-25, .280 (Villanueva 2-5, Gordon 2-6, Jerebko 1-1, Russell Jr. 1-1, Knight 1-6, Bynum 0-2, Daye 0-2, Stuckey 0-2). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turn-

New York ........................ 38 26 14 26 — 104 New Jersey .................... 22 25 24 24 — 95

LOS ANGELES

A—18,711 (18,711). T—2:12. Officials—Dick Bavetta, Derek Richardson, Eric Dalen.

Butler ..... Griffin .... Jordan .... Paul ........ Foye........ Willms.... Martin .... Young ..... Simmns.. Bledse ....

WIZARDS 121, BUCKS 112

I Jordan Crawford equaled a season-high with 32 points, and John Wall had 14 points and 10 assists as the Wizards dealt the Bucks a crucial defeat in their attempt for the final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference.

Wizards point guard John Wall, right, shoots and scores past the Bucks’ Ekpe Udoh, a former Edmond Santa Fe standout, during the second half Wednesday’s game in Washington. The Wizards won 121-112. AP PHOTO overs: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Daye, Knight, Macklin, Villanueva). Turnovers: 14 (Knight 3, Russell Jr. 2, Villanueva 2, Bynum, Gordon, Jerebko, Macklin, Maxiell, Monroe, Stuckey). Steals: 4 (Wilkins 2, Monroe, Russell Jr.). Technical Fouls: , .

ATLANTA

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

PHILADELPHIA

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

his old team with a tip-in and blocked shot in the final halfminute. It was Los Angeles’ 13th win in 15 games.

JJonsn..... Smith ...... Collins ..... Teage ...... Hinrch ..... IJhnsn ..... Willms .... McGrdy ... Pargo....... Green ...... Stckhuse . Rdmnvic ..

22:20 4-9 19:20 4-8 15:07 3-3 20:30 3-6 16:57 2-4 32:53 6-10 18:46 3-9 17:24 6-10 27:30 4-9 25:40 3-9 12:27 1-4 11:06 3-4

4-4 1-4 2 4-4 1-9 3 1-2 0-1 0 0-0 0-3 5 0-0 0-1 2 4-6 1-10 0 4-4 1-7 0 4-5 1-4 4 0-0 0-2 8 3-4 1-3 3 0-0 0-2 0 0-0 0-4 0

1 2 0 1 2 4 1 0 2 1 0 3

Totals ...... 240:00 42-85 24-29 6-50 27 17

13 12 7 6 6 16 10 17 9 10 3 7

116

Percentages: FG .494, FT .828. 3-Point Goals: 8-28, .286 (Hinrich 2-3, McGrady 1-2, Radmanovic 1-2, Stackhouse 1-2, Green 1-5, J.Johnson 1-5, Pargo 1-5, Smith 0-1, Williams 0-1, Teague 0-2). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Green, McGrady, Smith, Williams). Turnovers: 7 (Pargo 2, Smith 2, Collins, I.Johnson, McGrady). Steals: 11 (J.Johnson 2, Pargo 2, Williams 2, Collins, I.Johnson, McGrady, Stackhouse, Teague). Technical Fouls: , . Detroit ............................ 20 22 19 23 — 84 Atlanta ........................... 39 33 24 20 — 116 A—14,392 (18,729). T—2:03. Officials—Derrick Stafford, Olandis Poole, Brent Barnaky.

HEAT 96, RAPTORS 72

I LeBron James scored 28 points before taking the fourth quarter off, and the Heat continued tuning up for the postseason by pulling away in the second half. Miami’s Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh were given the night off. TORONTO Andrsn ... AJhnsn ... Gray........ Uzoh ....... DeRzn..... Davis ...... JJohnsn.. Forbes .... Alabi.......

FG FT Min M-A M-A

45:21 21:15 13:53 33:41 30:20 31:28 25:15 28:43 10:04

7-18 1-4 1-1 1-4 5-14 3-6 7-12 4-10 1-3

1-2 1-1 0-0 1-2 2-3 2-2 3-3 1-2 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-2 2-4 0-1 1-5 0-1 2-4 2-6 1-2 2-6

3 1 0 2 2 1 2 1 0

1 1 3 2 2 0 4 1 3

Totals ..... 240:00 30-72 11-15 10-31 12 17

15 3 2 3 12 8 18 9 2 72

Percentages: FG .417, FT .733. 3-Point Goals: 1-16, .063 (J.Johnson 1-2, DeRozan 0-2, Forbes 0-4, Anderson 0-8). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Davis 3, Alabi 2). Turnovers: 14 (A.Johnson 3, Alabi 2, Anderson 2, Forbes 2, Uzoh 2, DeRozan, Gray, J.Johnson). Steals: 7 (J.Johnson 3, Anderson, Davis, DeRozan, Uzoh). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 4:14 third. MIAMI James .... Haslem... Pittmn.... Chalmrs.. Jones...... Battier ... Anthony . Miller ..... Cole ........ Harris..... Howard .. Curry ......

Min

FG FT M-A M-A

30:12 12-15 3-4 23:26 5-7 0-1 15:29 3-8 2-3 24:40 3-4 2-2 32:45 0-7 0-0 25:01 2-4 1-2 19:11 3-5 0-0 21:34 5-8 0-0 22:11 1-8 0-0 8:52 1-2 0-0 13:09 3-5 1-3 3:30 2-3 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-5 1-7 2-4 0-2 0-2 4-6 3-5 0-1 0-1 0-1 1-5 0-2

4 1 0 7 1 2 0 6 3 1 0 0

0 2 6 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0

Totals ..... 240:00 40-76 9-15 11-41 25 16

28 10 8 9 0 7 6 13 2 2 7 4 96

Percentages: FG .526, FT .600. 3-Point Goals: 7-17, .412 (Miller 3-4, Battier 2-4, Chalmers 1-1, James 1-1, Harris 0-1, Cole 0-2, Jones 0-4). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Anthony, Chalmers, Haslem). Turnovers: 14 (James 5, Battier 2, Chalmers 2, Cole 2, Anthony, Harris, Howard). Steals: 9 (Battier 2, Chalmers 2, James 2, Harris, Haslem, Miller). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 0:46 first. Toronto ............................. 24 25 11 12 — 72 Miami ............................... 25 26 23 22 — 96 A—19,600 (19,600). T—2:08. Officials—Ron Garretson, Tre Maddox, Leroy Richardson.

KNICKS 104, NETS 95

I Carmelo Anthony scored 21 of his 33 points in the first quarter, and the Knicks beat the Nets in their last trip to New Jersey. Continuing his torrid stretch without Amare Stoudemire and Jeremy Lin, Anthony hit his first six shots. NEW YORK Anthny... Fields ..... Chandlr .. Bibby...... Shmprt... Smith..... Douglas.. Walker ... Novak..... Harrllsn.. Jordan....

Min

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

35:05 11-21 6-6 0-7 4 19:27 1-5 1-2 1-3 1 37:04 5-7 8-11 6-10 2 36:15 3-10 0-0 0-3 8 28:14 4-6 0-0 1-3 5 30:18 6-16 0-0 0-8 2 7:50 0-2 3-4 0-0 0 8:34 1-3 1-1 0-0 0 26:44 3-8 0-0 0-3 0 8:05 1-4 0-0 1-4 0 2:24 1-1 0-0 0-0 0

3 0 2 3 4 3 0 1 1 0 0

33 3 18 8 8 15 3 3 9 2 2

Totals..... 240:00 36-83 19-24 9-41 22 17 104

Percentages: FG .434, FT .792. 3-Point Goals: 13-35, .371 (Anthony 5-7, Novak 3-8, Smith 3-9, Bibby 2-6, Fields 0-1, Harrellson 0-1, Walker 0-1, Shumpert 0-2). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Chandler 2, Anthony, Harrellson, Novak). Turnovers: 9 (Chandler 2, Fields 2, Anthony, Bibby, Douglas, Shumpert, Smith). Steals: 11 (Shumpert 4, Chandler 3, Bibby, Douglas, Fields, Smith). Technical Fouls: , . NEW JERSEY Wallace ... Hmphrs ... JWillms... Gaines ..... Brooks..... Petro ....... Green ...... Morrow ... Johnson .. Stevnsn...

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

31:23 38:23 12:28 28:30 20:57 6:41 25:14 31:23 11:54 33:07

7-14 2-11 2-2 7-13 2-6 1-1 5-12 3-10 3-4 3-5

6-8 1-5 1 4-4 7-15 4 0-0 0-2 0 0-0 0-6 6 1-1 0-0 1 0-0 0-0 0 2-2 0-7 2 2-2 1-3 0 0-0 0-1 0 0-0 0-5 2

5 1 1 3 1 1 4 1 1 3

Totals ...... 240:00 35-78 15-17 9-44 16 21

21 8 4 18 5 2 12 10 6 9 95

Percentages: FG .449, FT .882. 3-Point Goals: 10-25, .400 (Gaines 4-5, Stevenson 3-5, Morrow 2-8, Wallace 1-3, Brooks 0-1, Green 0-3). Team

Delfno ... Ilyasva... Goodn.... Jenngs .. Ellis ....... Udoh...... Dunlevy. Udrih ..... Livngstn Ma Mute ..... Brckmn..

Min

FG FT M-A M-A

Reb O-T A PF PTS

13:56 2-5 31:53 3-9 34:19 7-16 37:30 8-19 41:32 14-25 13:01 1-5 34:42 4-6 6:07 0-3 10:52 0-1

0-0 0-1 1 7-8 5-11 1 7-9 6-12 6 6-6 0-5 4 2-2 0-3 6 0-0 2-4 0 0-0 0-3 2 0-0 1-2 1 1-2 1-4 1

0 3 4 3 3 3 3 0 1

4 14 21 25 31 2 8 0 1

15:28 0:38

0-0 0-0

0 1

6 0

3-4 0-0

0-2 0 0-1 0

Totals.... 239:58 42-93 23-27 15-48 22 21

112

Percentages: FG .452, FT .852. 3-Point Goals: 5-19, .263 (Jennings 3-6, Ilyasova 1-2, Ellis 1-6, Udoh 0-1, Delfino 0-2, Dunleavy 0-2). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 10 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Ellis 2, Udoh 2, Mbah a Moute). Turnovers: 10 (Ilyasova 4, Ellis 3, Dunleavy 2, Gooden). Steals: 8 (Ellis 3, Ilyasova 3, Gooden 2). Technical Fouls: None. WASHINGTON Min

CSngltn . Vesely.... Serphn... Wall ....... Crawfrd . Martin ... JSngltn.. Nene ...... Mack...... Evans..... Almond.. Cook.......

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

16:53 4-6 0-0 0-5 0 26:23 4-6 0-0 3-10 3 28:44 6-12 2-2 1-5 0 35:07 5-13 4-7 0-3 10 33:37 11-17 9-12 1-4 3 17:01 2-2 1-2 0-2 0 21:23 5-8 0-0 2-5 0 18:13 7-12 0-1 0-4 1 12:53 1-3 0-0 0-0 6 23:31 3-8 0-1 2-3 0 5:44 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0:32 0-0 0-0 0-0 0

0 3 2 2 2 2 3 1 0 3 0 0

Totals .... 240:01 49-88 16-25 9-41 23 18

10 8 14 14 32 7 11 14 2 7 2 0

121

Percentages: FG .557, FT .640. 3-Point Goals: 7-13, .538 (Martin 2-2, C.Singleton 2-3, J.Singleton 1-2, Crawford 1-3, Evans 1-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 10 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Nene 2, J.Singleton, Wall). Turnovers: 10 (Wall 4, Crawford 3, Seraphin, J.Singleton, Vesely). Steals: 6 (C.Singleton 2, J.Singleton 2, Crawford, Vesely). Technical Fouls: None.

DENVER Gallnri ...... Farid......... Koufs ....... Lawsn ...... Afflalo...... Harrngtn .. Miller ....... McGee...... Brewr .......

Aminu ... Thoms ... Smith .... Vasqez .. Belinlli... Watkis .. Landry ... Henry .... Dyson .... Ayon......

FT M-A

Reb O-T A PF PTS

31:16 1-6 3-4 0-2 0 14:27 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 18:24 6-8 0-0 1-4 0 25:59 4-9 1-1 1-1 9 35:40 7-16 0-0 0-4 1 28:32 0-2 2-2 6-13 1 21:05 4-4 8-9 0-1 1 24:48 1-3 1-4 0-2 1 26:38 5-7 14-16 0-3 2 13:11 1-4 2-2 3-4 0

2 1 2 0 1 4 1 2 3 0

Totals.... 240:00 29-60 31-38 11-35 15 16

5 0 12 9 16 2 16 3 24 4

91

Percentages: FG .483, FT .816. 3-Point Goals: 2-7, .286 (Belinelli 2-5, Vasquez 0-2). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 24 (27 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Thomas 2, Watkins 2, Aminu, Landry). Turnovers: 22 (Vasquez 7, Henry 5, Aminu 3, Dyson 3, Watkins 2, Landry, Smith). Steals: 8 (Dyson 3, Aminu 2, Vasquez 2, Belinelli). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 5:49 third; Defensive three second, 10:33 third. MEMPHIS Gay ......... Spights... Gasol ...... Conley .... Allen....... Randlph.. Mayo ...... Pargo...... Pondxtr .. Cnnghm.. Hadddi.... Selby ......

FG FT Min M-A M-A

30:08 9-14 14:43 1-4 23:13 3-3 30:25 8-11 19:04 2-7 23:32 5-9 32:05 7-14 15:27 2-7 15:59 2-6 18:50 2-5 15:42 1-2 0:53 0-1

5-5 0-0 0-0 2-3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 2-2 2-2 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

3-5 1-3 0-3 0-2 1-2 1-6 1-1 0-0 1-2 2-4 2-3 0-0

4 0 4 5 1 3 2 2 0 0 1 0

0 0 1 2 4 2 1 3 2 3 6 0

26 2 6 20 4 10 15 4 6 6 4 0

Totals ..... 240:01 42-83 11-13 12-31 22 24 103

Percentages: FG .506, FT .846. 3-Point Goals: 8-22, .364 (Gay 3-5, Conley 2-4, Pondexter 2-4, Mayo 1-6, Pargo 0-1, Randolph 0-1, Speights 0-1). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 11 (12 PTS). Blocked Shots: 8 (Haddadi 4, Gay 2, Allen, Gasol). Turnovers: 11 (Haddadi 2, Mayo 2, Allen, Conley, Cunningham, Gay, Pargo, Randolph, Speights). Steals: 12 (Mayo 3, Allen 2, Gasol 2, Pargo 2, Conley, Gay, Pondexter). Technical Fouls: None. New Orleans .................. 21 27 12 31 — 91 Memphis ........................ 23 24 37 19 — 103 A—14,507 (18,119). T—2:15. Officials—David Guthrie, Scott Wall, Michael Smith.

MAVERICKS 117, ROCKETS 110

I Dirk Nowitzki scored 21 of his 35 points in the fourth quarter as the Mavericks rallied for a win over the Rockets, whose playoff hopes took another blow. HOUSTON Parsns.... Scola ...... Camby.... Dragic .... Lee ......... Pattrsn .. Lowry..... Budngr ... Dalmbrt .

FG FT Min M-A M-A

30:52 30:10 36:59 31:56 38:47 21:19 18:35 25:07 6:16

4-13 6-11 5-11 8-12 6-14 3-4 4-9 6-10 1-2

Reb O-T A PF PTS

2-2 2-4 4 6-6 1-6 1 1-2 5-17 1 2-3 1-2 10 0-0 0-2 0 0-0 2-3 2 1-1 1-1 5 0-1 0-3 0 0-0 2-4 0

2 6 2 3 3 2 5 1 0

Totals..... 240:01 43-86 12-15 14-42 23 24

12 18 11 20 16 6 11 14 2

110

Percentages: FG .500, FT .800. 3-Point Goals: 12-28, .429 (Lee 4-7, Dragic 2-4, Lowry 2-5, Budinger 2-6, Parsons 2-6). Team Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: 12 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Patterson). Turnovers: 12 (Dragic 6, Camby 2, Lee 2, Lowry, Scola). Steals: 7 (Dragic 2, Lee 2, Scola 2, Camby). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 2:23 third. DALLAS Marin ... Nwtzki . Haywod Kidd...... West .... Terry .... Carter... Mhnmi . Beabis.. Wright .

Min

FG M-A

FT M-A

25:57 2-6 0-0 38:32 10-18 12-12 14:52 1-4 1-2 34:53 4-7 0-0 20:57 5-9 1-1 32:41 6-11 4-5 29:32 8-18 6-6 12:14 2-2 0-0 9:38 1-2 0-0 20:46 2-2 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-6 0-5 3-4 0-3 0-2 1-4 3-4 0-3 0-4 3-5

1 2 0 8 3 3 3 0 1 0

1 3 0 1 1 3 1 4 2 0

Totals... 240:02 41-79 24-26 10-40 21 16

4 35 3 12 11 19 23 4 2 4

117

Percentages: FG .519, FT .923. 3-Point Goals: 11-26, .423 (Kidd 4-7, Nowitzki 3-4, Terry 3-6, Carter 1-6, Beaubois 0-1, West 0-2). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 12 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Wright). Turnovers: 12 (Terry 3, West 3, Beaubois, Carter, Haywood, Kidd, Mahinmi, Marion). Steals: 6 (Marion 2, West 2, Carter, Nowitzki). Technical Fouls: None. Houston .......................... 27 28 29 26 — 110 Dallas.............................. 27 28 23 39 — 117 A—20,508 (19,200). T—2:15. Officials—Ken Mauer, Gary Zielinski, Karl Lane.

CLIPPERS 104, NUGGETS 98

I Kenyon Martin helped beat

0-0 2-6 0-0 4-5 2-2 3-3 3-4 0-0 0-0 0-0

0-4 4-7 2-9 1-4 0-2 0-3 1-1 1-2 0-1 1-2

1 5 0 8 0 4 1 0 0 2

1 5 2 5 2 4 1 4 1 3

14 12 4 21 12 19 7 13 0 2

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

28:28 25:23 23:17 36:30 37:37 32:18 26:18 14:35 15:35

0-7 4-6 5-6 9-14 5-11 4-12 5-10 3-4 1-3

4-4 4-7 2-2 4-5 1-2 4-4 2-2 0-0 0-0

1-3 4-6 3-9 0-4 0-3 0-8 0-4 0-1 0-1

2 0 1 6 1 1 8 0 0

3 3 3 0 1 1 4 2 4

4 12 12 24 12 14 12 6 2 98

Percentages: FG .493, FT .808. 3-Point Goals: 5-18, .278 (Lawson 2-3, Harrington 2-5, Afflalo 1-3, Brewer 0-1, Miller 0-2, Gallinari 0-4). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 17 (29 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Koufos 2, Brewer). Turnovers: 15 (Miller 5, Lawson 3, Afflalo 2, Gallinari 2, Brewer, Faried, Harrington). Steals: 5 (Harrington 2, Afflalo, Gallinari, Lawson). Technical Fouls: Miller, 4:53 third; Faried, 1:45 fourth. L.A. Clippers................... 22 25 29 28 — 104 Denver ............................ 34 19 23 22 — 98 A—17,219 (19,155). T—2:24. Officials—Scott Foster, Zach Zarba, Brian Forte.

JAZZ 112, TRAIL BLAZERS 91

I Devin Harris had 27 points, including a career-high six 3pointers, and Utah continued to jockey for a playoff spot. The Jazz, with just three games to play, are locked in a battle for the remaining playoff spots in the Western Conference with Houston, Phoenix, Dallas and Denver. Carrll ...... Millsap ... Jeffrsn ... Harris ..... Haywrd .. Favors .... Kanter .... Burks...... Tinsly ..... Evans ..... Ahern .....

FG Min M-A

5-10 5-12 2-2 8-19 4-9 6-11 2-5 5-8 0-1 1-1

Totals ....... 240:01 36-73 21-26 8-39 19 21

A—14,141 (20,278). T—2:11. Officials—Ed Malloy, Mark Lindsay, Haywoode Workman.

I Rudy Gay scored 26 points and Mike Conley added 20 as the Grizzlies clinched a playoff berth for the second straight season.

22:43 29:54 30:12 34:39 20:18 28:00 29:56 25:04 5:55 13:21

Reb O-T A PF PTS

Percentages: FG .487, FT .700. 3-Point Goals: 14-24, .583 (Butler 4-5, Williams 4-7, Young 3-4, Foye 2-3, Paul 1-3, Martin 0-1, Simmons 0-1). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 17 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Jordan 3, Martin 2, Paul, Simmons). Turnovers: 17 (Griffin 4, Paul 3, Jordan 2, Young 2, Bledsoe, Butler, Foye, Martin, Simmons, Williams). Steals: 11 (Paul 3, Griffin 2, Young 2, Bledsoe, Butler, Martin, Williams). Technical Fouls: Jordan, 8:05 fourth.

UTAH

GRIZZLIES 103, HORNETS 91

FG FT Min M-A M-A

Totals ..... 240:02 38-78 14-20 10-35 21 28 104

Milwaukee...................... 31 31 19 31 — 112 Washington ................... 28 32 28 33 — 121

NEW ORLEANS

PORTLAND Batum .... Hicksn .... Thabet.... NSmth.... Mtthws .. Thoms .... Babbtt .... Flynn ...... CSmth ....

FG FT Min M-A M-A

15:28 38:52 16:44 39:25 37:06 19:16 35:15 25:26 12:28

1-6 0-0 4-11 8-10 1-2 2-2 7-16 1-2 7-15 4-4 1-3 1-2 6-17 2-2 3-7 5-7 1-2 0-0

Reb O-T A PF PTS

0-2 4-9 3-6 1-3 0-4 2-5 1-5 1-2 1-3

3 3 0 0 2 0 0 7 3

0 3 2 4 3 3 2 1 2

Totals ..... 240:00 31-79 23-29 13-39 18 20

Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: ( PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Humphries 2, Stevenson, J.Williams). Turnovers: 17 (Humphries 4, Wallace 3, Gaines 2, Green 2, Petro 2, Brooks, Morrow, Stevenson, J.Williams). Steals: 2 (Gaines, Humphries). Technical Fouls: , .

MILWAUKEE

Percentages: FG .475, FT .813. 3-Point Goals: 10-17, .588 (Harris 6-10, Hayward 3-4, Burks 1-1, Ahearn 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 15 (6 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Evans, Favors, Jefferson, Kanter). Turnovers: 14 (Burks 2, Carroll 2, Favors 2, Millsap 2, Tinsley 2, Ahearn, Harris, Hayward, Kanter). Steals: 9 (Carroll 2, Hayward 2, Jefferson 2, Millsap 2, Evans). Technical Fouls: None.

FG FT Min M-A M-A

25:04 24:44 29:15 29:37 33:46 17:23 17:14 27:20 18:23 11:56 5:18

3-10 2-8 4-14 8-15 8-11 2-2 4-5 5-9 0-0 2-3 0-3

Reb O-T A PF PTS

2-2 2-4 1 2-2 0-8 2 3-4 4-10 4 5-6 0-4 4 4-4 1-4 1 1-2 2-4 2 2-2 0-2 0 6-8 1-5 5 0-0 0-2 1 1-2 2-6 3 0-0 0-0 0

1 3 2 0 0 4 1 3 1 2 1

Totals ..... 240:00 38-80 26-32 12-49 23 18

8 6 11 27 23 5 10 17 0 5 0

112

2 16 4 16 21 3 16 11 2

91

Percentages: FG .392, FT .793. 3-Point Goals: 6-20, .300 (Matthews 3-7, Babbitt 2-7, N.Smith 1-5, Batum 0-1). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 17 (26 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Hickson 2, Thabeet 2, Babbitt). Turnovers: 17 (Hickson 3, Matthews 3, N.Smith 3, Thabeet 3, Batum 2, Flynn 2, Thomas). Steals: 7 (Babbitt 2, Batum 2, Matthews 2, N.Smith). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 3:46 second. Utah ................................ 26 31 24 31 — 112 Portland.......................... 23 16 21 31 — 91 A—20,545 (19,980). T—2:05. Officials—Joe Crawford, Marat Kogut, Rodney Mott.

SPURS 127, KINGS 102

I Tiago Splitter and Gary Neal scored 17 points each, leading the Spurs to their fifth straight win. Using their reserves extensively all game, the Spurs beat the Kings in Sacramento for an eighth straight time and remained a half-game in front of Oklahoma City for the top seed in the Western Conference. San Antonio, playing its third game in three nights, won decisively without veteran center Tim Duncan, who was given the night off to rest.

SACRAMENTO Evans ..... Thmpsn .. Cusins .... Thoms .... Thorntn .. Fredtte ... Hayes ..... Willms.... Greene.... Garcia..... Honyctt ..

Leonrd...... Diaw......... Blair ......... Parker ...... Green ....... Jacksn ...... Andrsn ..... Ginobli ..... Neal.......... Bonner ..... Splitter .... Mills.........

27:29 6-10 24:03 3-5 22:53 3-4 24:47 4-11 20:22 4-6 30:14 4-9 4:59 0-2 16:45 4-5 15:19 8-9 17:29 1-4 22:04 6-8 13:36 4-7

0-0 0-0 3-4 7-9 1-1 3-3 0-0 4-5 1-1 0-0 5-7 1-1

0-5 1-5 2-5 2-5 0-2 0-1 1-2 0-2 0-1 0-3 3-7 0-2

4 1 2 8 1 2 0 5 2 1 0 0

2 2 4 1 2 0 0 2 2 1 3 1

13 8 9 15 11 13 0 13 17 2 17 9

Totals ....... 240:00 47-80 25-31 9-40 26 20 127

Percentages: FG .588, FT .806. 3-Point Goals: 8-21, .381 (Diaw 2-2, Green 2-3, Jackson 2-5, Ginobili 1-1, Leonard 1-3, Anderson 0-1, Parker 0-1, Mills 0-2, Bonner 0-3). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 11 (7 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Bonner, Green, Splitter). Turnovers: 11 (Jackson 4, Diaw 2, Mills 2, Ginobili, Neal, Splitter). Steals: 7 (Blair 3, Leonard 2, Ginobili, Mills). Technical Fouls: None.

1-2 2-2 0-2 8-9 0-0 0-0 1-1 1-2 0-0 0-0 1-2

Reb O-T A PF PTS

1-3 2-6 4-9 0-2 3-3 1-3 1-4 1-2 0-1 1-2 0-1

1 1 1 8 0 2 0 8 0 1 0

1 2 6 2 1 2 5 1 1 2 0

5 10 18 21 20 9 3 8 2 5 1

Totals ..... 240:00 41-92 14-20 14-36 22 23 102

Percentages: FG .446, FT .700. 3-Point Goals: 6-21, .286 (Thornton 2-7, Williams 1-2, Fredette 1-3, Garcia 1-4, Thomas 1-4, Evans 0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 12 (21 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Thompson 2, Cousins, Garcia, Honeycutt). Turnovers: 11 (Evans 3, Thompson 2, Williams 2, Cousins, Greene, Thomas, Thornton). Steals: 4 (Cousins, Greene, Hayes, Thompson). Technical Fouls: None. San Antonio ................... 29 29 39 30 — 127 Sacramento .................... 28 29 29 16 — 102 A—16,954 (17,317). T—2:17. Officials—Greg Willard, Kane Fitzgerald, Violet Palmer.

Tuesday’s Late Game SPURS 112, LAKERS 91

SAN ANTONIO Leonrd ..... Duncn ...... Splittr...... Parkr........ Gren......... Bonnr ...... Ginobli..... Jacksn ..... Neal......... Diaw ........ Mills ........ Andrsn ....

Min

FG FT Reb M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

17:54 1-5 0-0 0-4 0 35:04 9-14 1-1 1-8 3 18:27 2-3 1-5 1-3 1 30:33 14-20 1-1 0-3 13 24:03 4-5 0-0 0-0 1 23:32 2-4 0-0 2-8 2 26:22 6-13 2-4 2-6 4 25:12 4-8 0-0 0-3 1 13:47 5-9 0-0 0-2 2 18:57 2-2 0-0 0-0 2 3:40 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 2:29 1-1 0-0 0-0 0

1 1 4 1 3 0 2 2 0 2 1 0

Totals ...... 240:00 50-84 5-11 6-37 29 17

3 19 5 29 11 5 15 8 10 4 0 3

112

Percentages: FG .595, FT .455. 3-Point Goals: 7-18, .389 (Green 3-4, Anderson 1-1, Bonner 1-2, Leonard 1-3, Ginobili 1-5, Parker 0-1, Jackson 0-2). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 12 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Green 2, Jackson 2, Bonner). Turnovers: 12 (Parker 7, Splitter 2, Green, Jackson, Mills). Steals: 8 (Duncan 2, Green 2, Diaw, Ginobili, Leonard, Parker). Technical Fouls: None. LOS ANGELES

SAN ANTONIO

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

FG FT Min M-A M-A

38:01 2-8 30:32 4-8 26:51 9-21 30:15 6-11 28:40 9-16 17:45 4-9 21:01 1-1 21:55 3-8 6:26 1-3 12:14 2-5 6:20 0-2

World Peace ....... Gasl.......... Bynm........ Sessns ..... Ebanks ..... Murphy .... Barnes...... Blake ........ McRbrts ... Hill ........... Morris ......

FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS

32:10 34:02 32:54 25:46 26:07 12:00 31:16 25:01 13:24 3:40 3:40

4-11 8-15 8-16 5-8 4-8 0-1 6-11 1-5 1-2 2-2 0-1

3-3 0-0 5-5 0-0 1-1 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

3-3 1-7 0-7 0-3 2-4 0-3 1-6 0-1 0-1 1-2 0-0

3 5 2 4 1 1 4 7 1 0 0

5 0 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 1 0

Totals ....... 240:00 39-80 11-11 8-37 28 14

11 16 21 10 9 0 16 2 2 4 0 91

Percentages: FG .488, FT 1.000. 3-Point Goals: 2-10, .200 (Barnes 2-4, Ebanks 0-1, Blake 0-2, World Peace 0-3). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 20 (26 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Ebanks, Gasol, Hill). Turnovers: 19 (Sessions 4, Barnes 3, Gasol 3, Blake 2, Bynum 2, World Peace 2, Ebanks, Morris, Murphy). Steals: 6 (World Peace 3, Ebanks, Hill, Sessions). Technical Fouls: None. San Antonio ................... 27 36 28 21 — 112 L.A. Lakers ..................... 28 19 23 21 — 91 A—18,997 (18,997). T—2:11. Officials—Tom Washington, Rodney Mott, Sean Wright.


SPORTS

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

Former Oklahoma coach John MacLeod was inducted into the Phoenix Suns’ Ring of Honor at halftime of Wednesday’s game against the Thunder at US Airways Center. MacLeod, who coached at OU from 1967-73 and went 90-69 (.566), becomes the 13th person inducted into the Ring and joins former OU great Alvan Adams, who was recruited by MacLeod. Now 74, MacLeod became the Suns’ coach at age 36 in 1973 remained until 1987 and finished with a record of 579-543. He is the winningest and longest-tenured coach in the franchise’s history. He then coached the Dallas Mavericks for three seasons and the New York Knicks for one. After coaching in the NBA, he coached at Notre Dame from 1991-99 and finished 106-124 (.461). MacLeod was welcomed into the Ring via video by fellow member Charles Barkley, who was unable to attend. The halftime ceremony ran long. Thunder players had to sit on their bench for eight minutes and gave MacLeod a standing ovation. A high school star in Indiana as well as a former high school coach, MacLeod also was inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame in 2005.

NO. 2 SEED With the Los Angeles Lakers’ loss at home to San Antonio on Tuesday night, the Thunder clinched no worse than the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference playoffs. “Really? Then we’re going to sit Russell (Westbrook) and Kevin (Durant) tonight,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks joked at Wednesday morning’s shootaround before turning serious and adding, “That doesn’t change our thinking at all. We still want to keep charging ahead, keep movin’, keep improvin’. It’s nothing we talked about, never even mentioned it to our guys.”

HIGH ON HARDEN Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry said he believes Thunder sixth man James Har-

den might rank as the thirdbest No. 2 guard in the league this season. “We were talking the other day as a coaching staff,” Gentry explained before Wednesday night’s game. “We named obviously Kobe (Bryant) and we named Dwyane Wade and then we said, ‘OK, who’s the next 2 guard you would take?’ Throw me out a name? “Seriously, he does everything pretty good. He shoots the ball well. If you want him to be a screenand-roll player, he can do that. He can take the ball to the basket. He gets to the foul line. You’d be hardpressed, other than those two guys, to come up with a guy who’s playing better than he (Harden) is this year. He’s really right there.” Harden then went out and scored 19 points in 17 firsthalf minutes, making 6 of 8 shots, including 3 for 4 from 3-point range and 4 for 4 from the free-throw line. Harden tied his career-high of 33 points with 10:48 still left in the game.

THE DAY AFTER Brooks said the reason he gave his team Tuesday off had nothing to do with what transpired in the second half against the Los Angeles Clippers the night before. OKC was outscored 49-25 after intermission in a 9277 loss to the Clippers, but the Thunder was given a chance to rest because it had played three games in a span of four days “That’s the main thing,” Brooks explained. “If we had won Monday, we would have had the day off. With the loss, we would have had the day off anyway.”

UP NEXT Game 4 of the Thunder’s five-game road trip is Friday at 9 p.m. in Sacramento. Game 5 is Sunday in Los Angeles against the Lakers at 2:30 p.m. OKC then returns home for the final two games of the season against Sacramento on Tuesday and Denver on Wednesday.

QUOTABLE Durant attended Tuesday night’s Arizona Diamondbacks game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Chase Field. During his rookie

season, Durant threw out the first pitch at a Seattle Mariners game. When asked if he threw a strike, Durant smiled and shook his head no. “It was more like a Hail Mary. I just wanted to make sure I got it to the plate, man.”

TECHNICAL ISSUE With 3:07 left in the third quarter, Phoenix point guard Steve Nash argued a call with official John Goble, who pleaded with Nash to stop arguing. When Nash kept going, Coble slapped Nash with a technical foul, which infuriated Gentry, who soon was slapped with a technical himself. Durant and Harden made two free throws each to give the Thunder a 73-67 lead. Durant lost track of the score and asked the scoreboard operator for one more point. When Durant later realized his mistake, he smiled and said, “Sorry, that’s my bad,” drawing laughter from the entire stat crew. Midway through the fourth quarter, Thunder center Kendrick Perkins and Phoenix center Robin Lopez were slapped with technicals for jawing and refusing to unlock arms while running down court. It was Perkins’ 12th technical of the season. One more will draw a one-game suspension.

HILL MISSING The Suns once again were without veteran forward Grant Hill, who missed his 11th game in the last 13 starts with a knee injury. Hill has a history of defending Durant well. “Obviously, we miss him because he’s our best defender,” Gentry said. “We’ve got find a way to get it done. I’m not going to be a guy to stick him out there unless I’m sure (he’s healthy).” Gentry has coached Hill nine seasons in the NBA and has known Hill since the 11th grade when he was being recruited to Kansas, where Gentry served as an assistant under coach Larry Brown. “He was at our Final Four in Kansas City that we won … in ’88 … against Oklahoma,” Gentry said with a smile. BY JOHN ROHDE

OSU FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK

Gundy still plans to name QB before summer Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy said Wednesday that he was not currently in a position to name a starting quarterback. He doesn’t expect he’ll be able to do it following Saturday’s spring finale, either. But he still maintains that he wants to peg either junior Clint Chelf, redshirt freshman J.W. Walsh or true freshman Wes Lunt as the Cowboys’ starter before summer workouts begin. “I would like to stay with what my goal was, and that’s to name one within maybe a week after (the spring finale),” Gundy said. “I was hoping to name one up through practice 9 or 10, but we didn’t feel like we were in a position to do that. “Unless somebody talks me out of it, we want to name a quarterback going into the summer.” Next week will be a critical part of the process, when Gundy, offensive coordinator Todd Monken and other staff members meet to review film and discuss the candidates. “I want to hear what they have to say before I offer my opinion,” Gundy said. “I don’t want to sway one way or the other. I want to hear what they have to say, and I want to know the reasons why. “And then I want to make a comparison to what I see and what I feel, and if it’s the same, then I don’t need to say anything. I just need to say, ‘OK.’ If it’s different, then we need to talk about it. And I want to know why and I want them to bring the evidence to the table of the reasons that this needs to happen.”

DETAILS FOR SPRING FINALE SURFACING The format of the conclusion of OSU’s spring practice has been a bit of a mystery, with the athletic department consistently calling it a spring “finale” rather than a spring “game.” Some details started to surface Wednesday, however. The Cowboys will be split into two teams and will hold a 75-play “thud” scrimmage, which means no tackling all the way to the ground. Monken will call plays for both teams, and all three quarterbacks will play for both teams. The rest of the offensive and defensive staffs will be split up. Gundy will watch from the middle of the field. More details about Saturday’s finale, which is set for 12:30 p.m. inside Boone Pickens Stadium, will be released Thursday morning.

...

5C

MEN’S GYMNASTICS

THUNDER NOTEBOOK

MacLeod honored by Suns

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

GUNDY ‘PLEASANTLY SURPRISED’ WITH WEDNESDAY’S SCRIMMAGE Though Saturday marks the conclusion of spring practice, the bulk of the Cowboys’ work is done after Wednesday’s 110-play scrimmage. And Gundy said he was “pleasantly surprised” with the entire team’s performance, especially given the results of last week’s scrimmages, when the defense dominated on Monday and the offense took charge on Friday. “Probably as equal a competition as we’ve had, where there were good plays on both sides of the ball,” Gundy said. “I thought our effort was good, our attitude was good, tempo was really good.”

WIDE RECEIVER DAVID GLIDDEN SPRAINS ANKLE Backup inside receiver David Glidden suffered a high ankle sprain during Monday’s practice and will be held out of Saturday’s spring finale. Gundy expects Glidden to be in a cast for 4-6 weeks. Glidden redshirted last season but has been getting several reps at receiver and punt returner this spring.

GUNDY UNSURE ABOUT SCRIMMAGING AGAINST OTHER SCHOOLS IN SPRING Reports surfaced earlier this week that one topic expected to be on the agenda when the American Football Coaches Association Board meets in Arizona next month is allowing schools to practice or scrimmage against other programs. Gundy said Wednesday that he hadn’t heard of the proposed rule change until an OSU official brought it up during the media session. And at first thought, he was unsure if he would want to scrimmage against another school in the spring. “I’d need to sit down and look at it, the pros and cons,” Gundy said. “What would happen is some of your more dominant schools with more money would bring schools in that they could scrimmage and beat up on. And some schools would do it for money. I bet you it would become a money issue.” Gundy half-joked that he wouldn’t be coaching anymore by the time the new rule would be introduced. “I’ll be retired before anybody ever puts it into play,” Gundy said. “Anything that comes up, (decision-makers) argue about it for six or eight years.” BY GINA MIZELL

OU to host NCAA Championship BY RJ YOUNG For The Oklahoman

NORMAN — Oklahoma

coach Mark Williams called for his gymnasts. Eighteen athletes assembled for instructions just days before competing for a national title. Among the gymnasts, seven-time All-American and reigning floor and vault national champion Jake Dalton stood confident. Dalton and the Sooners will shoot for OU’s ninth national title this weekend as the Sooners host the NCAA gymnastics championships. Dalton’s confidence and swagger are not for show. He rides a black Honda CBR 600 motorcycle. He dates OU All-American gymnast Kayla Nowak. The back of his iPhone case is adorned with a picture of himself performing a strength move in his Sooners singlet. “He’s who he is,” Dalton’s roommate Troy Nitzky said. “He likes to express himself in different ways, doing risky stuff, but I don’t think that should affect how anybody looks at him in any way.” Nitzky believes Dalton’s ability as a motivator and leader are overshadowed by his brilliant gymnastics.

NCAA GYMNASTICS CHAMPIONSHIP I When: Thursday through Saturday I Where: Lloyd Noble Center, Norman I Tickets: All-session tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for children and OU students. Single-session tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children and OU students. Schedule I Thursday: Qualifying sessions at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. I Friday: Team finals at 7 p.m. I Saturday: Event finals at 7 p.m.

“You couldn’t ask for a better teammate,” Nitzky said. “He’s a great friend, ever since the day he’s been here. You couldn’t ask for better honestly.” Dalton represents Oklahoma’s best chance to winning a spot on Team USA’s 2012 Olympic team. He’s not shying away from the pressure of competing at home as one of the nation’s top gymnasts. “There’s always pressure,” Dalton said. “But that’s what keeps us going, that’s what drives us. Pressure’s always good.” Dalton began gymnastics at age 6 and became serious about competing in the sport at 10. His mother, Denise, has watched his journey in elite gymnastics from its outset. Denise Dalton remembered coaches explaining her son was gifted. But it

Summitt FROM PAGE 1C

crowns. “Pat is one of those rare individuals whose influence crosses all boundary lines,” said Oklahoma women’s basketball coach Sherri Coale. “Literally thousands of coaches in a vast array of sports abide by her tenets, passing them on as gospel to their players. "On a personal level, I feel unbelievably blessed to have had the opportunity to compete against her. I, and an entire generation of women’s basketball coaches,

became real to her when he was asked to begin training for elite competition after just six months of formal gymnastics. “It was quite a shock,” Denise Dalton said. “I thought it was OK, but he was supposed to be my Atlanta baseball player.” Dalton chose his other favorite sport. “I think it fits my personality very well — I get bored really easily,” Dalton said. “I think gymnastics has a huge variety of skills to learn all the time.”

Listen to the OU Insider James Hale on SportsTalk 1400 AM weekdays 3-6 p.m. Listen live on any mobile device. www.sportstalk1400.com

will always be indebted to her for the culture of excellence she helped to create in our sport.” Summitt was more than a coach. She was a tough disciplinarian who demanded excellence from her players and staff. But she was also a mentor. Every player who completed her eligibility during her tenure at Tennessee left as a graduate. Summitt revealed her battle with dementia last Aug. 23 and relegated many duties this season to her coaching staff. Tennessee advanced to an NCAA regional final last season, but lost to eventual national champion Baylor. MCT Information Services


6C

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SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

MLB SCOREBOARD American League W

Texas ................... Seattle................. Oakland ............... Los Angeles.........

10 6 5 4 W

Detroit ................. Cleveland............. Chicago ................ Minnesota ........... Kansas City .........

9 5 6 4 3

W

Baltimore ............ Toronto ................ New York ............. Tampa Bay........... Boston .................

7 6 6 6 4

L

2 6 7 7 L

Pct

.833 .500 .417 .364 Pct

3 4 5 8 9 L

GB

— 4 5 51⁄2

WCGB

L10

— 1 ⁄2 11⁄2 2

9-1 5-5 4-6 3-7

Central Division GB

.750 .556 .545 .333 .250

— 21⁄2 21⁄2 5 6

WCGB

L10

— — — 21⁄2 31⁄2

7-3 5-4 6-4 4-6 2-8

East Division

Pct

5 5 6 6 8

West Division

GB

.583 .545 .500 .500 .333

— 1 ⁄2 1 1 3

WCGB

L10

— — 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄2 1 2 ⁄2

5-5 5-5 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str

Home

W-6 L-1 W-1 L-1

5-2 2-2 3-4 2-3

Str

Str

5-0 4-4 2-3 2-4

Home

W-4 W-4 W-1 W-1 L-7 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-3

Away

Away

5-1 1-4 3-3 2-4 0-6

4-2 4-0 3-2 2-4 3-3

Home

Away

3-3 4-4 3-3 3-0 3-3

4-2 2-1 3-3 3-6 1-5

National League W

Los Angeles......... Arizona ................ Colorado .............. San Francisco ...... San Diego ............

9 7 6 5 3

W

St. Louis .............. Milwaukee........... Pittsburgh ........... Cincinnati ............ Houston............... Chicago ................

9 6 5 4 4 3 W

Washington......... Atlanta ................ New York ............. Miami .................. Philadelphia.........

10 7 7 6 5

L

3 5 6 6 10 L

3 6 7 8 8 9 L

3 5 5 6 6

Pct

.750 .583 .500 .455 .231 Pct

.750 .500 .417 .333 .333 .250

Pct

.769 .583 .583 .500 .455

West Division GB

— 2 3 1 3 ⁄2 61⁄2

WCGB

L10

— — 1 11⁄2 41⁄2

7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5 3-7

Central Division GB

— 3 4 5 5 6

WCGB

L10

— 1 2 3 3 4

7-3 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 3-7

East Division GB

— 21⁄2 21⁄2 31⁄2 4

WCGB

L10

— — — 1 11⁄2

8-2 7-3 5-5 6-4 4-6

Str

Home

L-2 L-2 W-2 W-1 L-2 Str

W-4 W-2 W-2 L-2 L-4 L-4

Away

6-0 4-2 5-4 3-2 2-5

3-3 3-3 1-2 2-4 1-5

Home

Away

4-1 3-2 2-1 3-3 3-3 2-5

Str

5-2 3-4 3-6 1-5 1-5 1-4

Home

W-3 W-2 L-2 W-3 L-1

Away

6-1 5-1 4-2 4-2 3-3

4-2 2-4 3-3 2-4 2-3

AMERICAN LEAGUE Thursday’s Games Baltimore (Hammel 1-0) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 1-1), 1:10 p.m. Minnesota (Swarzak 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-2), 6:05 p.m. Texas (Darvish 1-0) at Detroit (Wilk 0-1), 6:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 1-0) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 0-0), 6:07 p.m. Oakland (Milone 1-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 2-0), 9:05 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 0-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-1), 9:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Thursday’s Games Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-0) at Miami (Nolasco 1-0), 11:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Harang 0-1) at Milwaukee (Wolf 0-1), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 0-0) at St. Louis (Wainwright 0-2), 12:45 p.m. Houston (Norris 0-0) at Washington (E.Jackson 1-0), 6:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 1-1) at Arizona (Collmenter 0-0), 8:40 p.m. Philadelphia (Worley 0-1) at San Diego (Wieland 0-1), 9:05 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Wednesday’s Games Minnesota 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Tampa Bay 12, Toronto 2 Texas 6, Boston 3 Chicago White Sox 8, Baltimore 1 Detroit 4, Kansas City 3 Oakland at L.A. Angels Cleveland at Seattle Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 2:05 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 6:05 p.m. Minn. at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m. Baltimore at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. Cleveland at Oakland, 9:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. Tuesday’s Results N.Y. Yankees 8, Minnesota 3 Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 3 Texas 18, Boston 3 Baltimore 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Detroit 3, Kansas City 1 Oakland 5, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland 9, Seattle 8 NATIONAL LEAGUE Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 14, N.Y. Mets 6 Pittsburgh 2, Arizona 1 Washington 3, Houston 2 Miami 9, Chicago Cubs 1 Milwaukee 3, L.A. Dodgers 2, (10) St. Louis 11, Cincinnati 1 Colorado 8, San Diego 4 Philadelphia at San Francisco Friday’s Games Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6:05 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m. San Francisco at N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Houston, 7:05 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 8:40 p.m. Philadelphia at San Diego, 9:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Results Washington 1, Houston 0 Miami 5, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 9, N.Y. Mets 3 Milwaukee 5, L.A. Dodgers 4 St. Louis 2, Cincinnati 1, (10) Colorado 5, San Diego 3 Pittsburgh 5, Arizona 4 San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 2

AMERICAN LEAGUE Wednesday’s Games RANGERS 6, RED SOX 3

TEXAS

Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamltn cf-lf Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf DvMrp lf Gentry ph-cf Napoli c Morlnd dh BSnydr 1b

Totals

ab r h bi

4 5 4 4 3 3 0 4 3 4

1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0

1 1 3 1 0 1 0 3 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 0 0

34 6 10 6

Three homers power RedHawks’ win NASHVILLE — The Oklahoma City RedHawks powered their way to a 7-5 Pacific Coast League baseball victory Wednesday over Nashville before 4,898 fans at Greer Stadium. The RedHawks (9-4) snapped a two-game losing streak while winning the opener of a four-game series that continues with a Thursday doubleheader and single game Friday.

AT THE PLATE I Justin Ruggiano, Brian Bixler and Scott Moore homered for Oklahoma City. Moore’s second homer of the season was a two-run blast in the fifth inning that gave Oklahoma City a 5-1 lead. Ruggiano finished with three hits, while Bixler, Moore and Fernando Martinez each had two. I Brooks Conrad had a two-run homer in the eighth inning to start a Nashville comeback. The Sounds (4-9) added another run in the bottom of the ninth.

ON THE MOUND I Dallas Keuchel, who was named Monday as the PCL Pitcher of the Week, had a solid game for Oklahoma City. The Tulsa native gave up two runs on five hits through seven innings. Keuchel (3-0) walked three and struck out three. The RedHawks’ bullpen strug-

PCL Standings American Conference North Division

W

Omaha (Royals)....................... Iowa (Cubs).............................. Nashville (Brewers) ................ Memphis (Cardinals)............... South Division

L Pct. GB

9 4 7 6 4 9 3 10 W

.692 — .538 2 .308 5 .231 6

L Pct. GB

New Orleans (Marlins) ............. 10 3 .769 — Oklahoma City (Astros) ........... 9 4 .692 1 Albuquerque (Dodgers)............. 5 8 .385 5 Round Rock (Rangers) .............. 5 8 .385 5

IP Texas

D.Holland W,2-0 Ogando Nathan Boston

Beckett L,1-2 F.Morales Albers

Pacific Conference North Division

Salt Lake (Angels) .................... Colorado Springs (Rockies)....... Tacoma (Mariners).................... Reno (Diamondbacks) ............... South Division

W

9 9 6 4

W

L Pct. GB

4 5 8 9

.692 — .643 1⁄2 .429 31⁄2 .308 5

L Pct. GB

Fresno (Giants) ....................... 10 3 .769 — Sacramento (Athletics) .......... 10 4 .714 1⁄2 Las Vegas (Blue Jays)............. 3 10 .231 7 Tucson (Padres) ...................... 3 11 .214 71⁄2

Wednesday’s Games Oklahoma City 7, Nashville 5 Colorado Springs 2, Tucson 0 Tacoma 2, Sacramento 1, (10) Reno at Fresno New Orleans at Memphis Omaha at Round Rock Las Vegas at Salt Lake Iowa at Albuquerque Thursday’s Games New Orleans at Memphis, 11:05 p.m. Tucson at Colorado Springs, 12:05 p.m. Oklahoma City at Nashville, 6:05 p.m., 1st game Omaha at Round Rock, 7:05 p.m. Iowa at Albuquerque, 7:35 p.m. Las Vegas at Salt Lake, 7:35 p.m. Oklahoma City at Nashville, 8:35 p.m., 2nd game Reno at Fresno, 9:05 p.m. Tacoma at Sacramento, 9:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Results Colorado Springs 8, Tucson 1

gled over the last two innings, but Jose Valdez notched his third save of the season after pitching the ninth.

BITS AND PIECES I The Houston Astros released RedHawks outfielder Collin Delome, almost five years after drafting him in the fifth round. Delome batted .176 through 10 games this season for Oklahoma City. He played

Shuck cf Bixler ss Martinez lf Moore 3b Ruggiano rf Wallace 1b Paredes 2b Corporan c Keuchel p Abreu p Snyder ph Valdez p

Totals

5 5 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 0 1 0

1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 2 2 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Schafer cf 4 Maysonet ss 2 Conrad 3b 3 Green 3b 3 Rivas p 0 Maldonado c 4 Halton 1b 3 Patterson rf 4 Farris lf 4 Rogers p 1 McClung p 1 Chulk p 0 Statia ph 2 38 7 12 6 Totals 31

0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0

2 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

57 5

Oklahoma City....................... 011 032 000 — 7 Nashville................................001 010 021 — 5 E — Bixler 1. LOB — OKC 11; Nashville 4. DP — OKC 2. 2B — Schafer (4). 3B — Bixler (1). SB — Shuck (2), Bixler (5), Ruggiano (2), Shafer (2), Farris (3). SF — Maysonet. CS — Maldonado (2). HR — Ruggiano (1), Bixler (2), Moore (2), Conrad (1).

IP H R ER BB SO Oklahoma City Keuchel, W 3-0 7.0 5 2 2 3 3 Abreu 1.0 1 2 2 1 0 Valdez, S (3) 1.0 1 1 0 0 0 Nashville Rogers, L 0-1 3.0 3 2 2 2 3 McClung 2.1 7 5 5 3 0 Chulk 2.2 2 0 0 1 2 Rivas 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 T — 3:04. A — 4,898.

89 games in 2011 for the RedHawks, batting .256. ... Outfielder Brad Snyder was activated from the disabled list. Snyder should bring more pop to the RedHawks’ lineup. ... First pitch for Game 1 of Thursday’s doubleheader is 6:05 p.m. Right-handers Jordan Lyles (2-0, 2.08) and Sergio Perez (1-0, 0.00) are the Hawks’ scheduled starters. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Thursday marks 50th anniversary of pro baseball returning to OKC BY SCOTT MUNN Assistant Sports Editor smunn@opubco.com

RedHawks hitting coach Leon Roberts was age 11. Pitching coach Burt Hooten was 12. Manager Tony DeFrancesco was not even born yet. He came a year and five days later. Thursday marks the 50th anniversary of professional baseball’s return to Oklahoma City. The 89ers opened brand new All Sports Stadium on the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds as the Triple-A affiliate of the National League expansion Houston Colt .45s. Connie Ryan was the 89ers’ manager, and his Opening Day batting order was J.C. Hartman (shortstop); Jack Waters (right field); Aaron Pointer (center field); Al Owen (left field); Von McDaniel (third base);

Connie Ryan First manager in 89ers history.

Clint Courtney (catcher); Dave Roberts (first base); Wayne Connally (second base); and Bill Griffin (pitcher). The 89ers played the Omaha Dodgers, led by power-hitting Joe Altobelli.

Tickets sold for $2 (box seats), $1.50 (reserved), $1.25 (general admission), and 50 cents (kids under age 12). A sold-out crowd of 10,102 squeezed into All Sports only to watch the 89ers lose 6-5 when Omaha rallied back in the ninth inning. Pro baseball had been in Oklahoma City for most of the 1904 through 1942 seasons, went dark for World War II, restarted in 1946 and lasted until financially dry team owner Jimmie Humphries shut down the franchise after the 1957 season. Oklahoma City baseball has been affiliated with the Colt .45s/Houston Astros from 1962-72; Cleveland Indians, 1973-75; Philadelphia Phillies, 1976-82; Texas Rangers, 1983-2010; and back to Houston since the 2011 season.

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

31 3 5 3

H

R

ER

— —

6 3

BB

SO

7 1 1

4 0 1

2 0 1

2 0 0

3 0 1

7 0 1

7 1 ⁄3 12⁄3

7 2 1

3 3 0

3 3 0

1 3 1

7 0 1

HBP—by F.Morales (Gentry). PB—Shoppach. TAMPA BAY

Jnnngs cf Zobrist rf C.Pena 1b Longori 3b Scott dh Kppngr 2b Brignc ss Joyce lf JMolin c SRdrgz ss-2b

Totals

4 4 4 4 5 3 2 5 3 2

2 2 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 2

1 1 0 1 2 0 0 3 1 1

0 2 1 1 4 0 0 1 1 2

36 12 10 12

ab r h bi

YEscor ss KJhnsn 2b Bautist rf Encrnc dh Lind 1b Lawrie 3b RDavis lf Vizquel ph Arencii c Rasms cf Mathis c Thams ph-lf

5 5 3 5 4 4 3 1 0 4 3

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

4 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 1

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0

Totals

38 2 12 2

Tampa Bay ..................... 210 102 006 Toronto ........................... 110 000 000

— —

12 2

E—Lawrie (2). DP—Tampa Bay 1, Toronto 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 11. 2B—Joyce 2 (2). HR—Zobrist (2), Scott (3), Joyce (3), S.Rodriguez (1), Mathis (1). SF—S.Rodriguez. Tampa Bay

Price W,2-1 W.Davis Jo.Peralta H,1 Howell

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

52⁄3 12⁄3 2 ⁄3 1

8 3 0 1

2 0 0 0

2 0 0 0

2 0 0 0

3 2 2 2

6 2 1

8 0 2

6 0 6

6 0 5

3 0 2

2 4 0

Toronto

Morrow L,0-1 L.Perez Villanueva

1 1

0 0

0 0

1 1

4 0

NEW YORK

Niwnhs cf DnMrp 2b DWrght 3b I.Davis 1b Bay lf Duda rf Thole c Nickes ph Cedeno ss Dickey p Batista p Baxter ph Parnell p Hairstn ph Byrdak p Rauch p Frncsc p Totals

ATLANTA

ab r h bi

4 4 5 5 3 5 4 1 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

3 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 2 2 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

39 6 14 6

ab r h bi

Bourn cf Prado lf Heywrd rf Uggla 2b Fremn 1b JFrncs 3b D.Ross c Pstrnck ss Jurrjns p CMrtnz p C.Jnes ph Durbin p Diaz ph LHrndz p

4 5 5 4 4 5 4 5 1 0 1 0 1 0

1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0

3 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0

2 2 0 2 3 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0

39 14 16 14

— —

6 14

E—Cedeno (1), Uggla (3). DP—Atlanta 1. LOB—New York 11, Atlanta 6. 2B—Nieuwenhuis 2 (2), D.Wright (1), Thole (3), Prado (3), Freeman (3), J.Francisco (2), D.Ross (2), C.Jones (1). 3B— Heyward (2). HR—I.Davis (3), Uggla (1), Freeman (1), J.Francisco (2). SB—Nieuwenhuis (1), Bay (1), Bourn (6). S—Jurrjens. SF—Freeman. IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

41⁄3 2 ⁄3 1 2 ⁄3 1 ⁄3 1

8 0 2 3 0 3

8 0 2 2 0 2

8 0 1 2 0 2

2 0 0 1 0 0

5 2 3 2 0 0

4 2 1 2

7 3 2 2

4 1 0 1

4 1 0 1

4 0 1 0

2 1 2 0

Atlanta

Jurrjens C.Martinez W,1-0 Durbin L.Hernandez

Jurrjens pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.

Presley lf Barmes ss McCtch cf Walker 2b McGeh 1b GJones rf Tabata rf PAlvrz 3b McKnr c JMcDnl p McLoth ph Lincoln p JHrrsn ph Resop p Watson p J.Cruz p Totals

ARIZONA

ab r h bi

3 3 3 4 4 3 1 3 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

31 2 7 2

ab r h bi

Blmqst ss A.Hill 2b Kubel rf MMntr c J.Upton pr RRorts 3b Overay 1b Pollock cf GParra lf DHdsn p DHrndz p Ziegler p

4 4 4 2 0 4 4 3 2 3 0 0

Totals

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

30 1 6 1

HBP—by Villanueva (J.Molina). WP—Villanueva.

Pittsburgh...................... 000 000 110 Arizona ........................... 100 000 000

TWINS 6, YANKEES 5

E—R.Roberts (2). DP—Pittsburgh 2, Arizona 3. LOB—Pittsburgh 6, Arizona 6. 3B—Bloomquist (2), A.Hill (1). HR—P.Alvarez (2). SB—Presley (2). CS—Pollock (1). S—Barmes.

NEW YORK

ab r h bi

5 5 4 5 4 4 4 4

1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0

1 1 1 1 3 2 1 0

0 1 1 0 3 0 1 0

4 0 3 0 39 6 13 6

ab r h bi

Jeter ss Grndrs cf Teixeir 1b Cano 2b Swsher dh Ibanez rf AnJons lf ErChvz 3b ENunez ph Martin c ARdrgz ph

5 4 5 4 4 4 3 2

2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0

3 0 2 2 1 2 0 1

1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Totals

36 5 11 5

— —

6 5

DP—Minnesota 2, New York 1. LOB—Minnesota 9, New York 7. 2B—J.Carroll (2), Mauer (3), Willingham (3), Parmelee (2), A.Casilla (2), Cano (6). HR—Morneau 2 (4), Jeter (4), Cano (1). SB— A.Casilla (2). Minnesota

Marquis W,1-0 Duensing H,1 Burton H,2 Capps S,3-3 New York

Kuroda L,1-2 Rapada

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

5 12⁄3 11⁄3 1

7 3 0 1

4 0 0 1

4 0 0 1

2 0 0 0

3 0 2 1

41⁄3 10 12⁄3 1

6 0

6 0

0 1

4 2

D.Hudson L,1-1 D.Hernandez Ziegler

2 1

H

R

ER

BB

SO

4 3 1 ⁄3 2 ⁄3 1

3 1 1 0 1

1 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0

1 3 0 0 0

2 4 0 0 1

72⁄3 1 ⁄3 1

6 1 0

2 0 0

2 0 0

3 0 0

5 0 1

Ja.McDonald Lincoln W,1-0 Resop H,1 Watson H,1 J.Cruz S,2-2 Arizona

— —

IP Pittsburgh

Schafer cf Lowrie ss T.Buck lf Maxwll lf Ca.Lee 1b Bogsvc rf CJhnsn 3b FRdrgz p Wrght p R.Cruz p JCastro c MGnzlz 2b Harrell p

ab r h bi

4 1 2 1

4 2 2 4 3 3 0 0 0 3 3 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Totals

27 3 5 3

— —

2 3

DP—Houston 1, Washington 2. LOB—Houston 3, Washington 8. 2B—J.Castro (2), M.Gonzalez (3), Zimmerman (4), Ankiel (2), Bernadina (3). SB—Schafer (6), Werth (2), Bernadina (2). SF— Ramos. IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Harrell 62⁄3 Fe.Rodriguez L,0-2 1⁄3 W.Wright 0 R.Cruz BS,1-1 1

4 1 0 0

1 2 0 0

1 2 0 0

3 2 1 1

4 0 0 0

4 2 0

1 1 0

1 1 0

0 0 0

3 0 1

Houston

Washington

Zimmermann Mattheus W,2-0 H.Rodriguez S,3-3

7 1 1

Fe.Rodriguez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Zimmermann (Bogusevic). Balk— Harrell.

WASHINGTON ab r h bi

Dsmnd ss Espinos 2b Zmrmn 3b LaRoch 1b Werth rf Ankiel cf Ramos c Berndn lf Zmrmn p Lmrdzz ph Matths p HRdrgz p

CHICAGO

RJhnsn rf Barney 2b SCastro ss DeWitt ph ASorin lf JeBakr 1b IStewrt 3b Soto c Byrd cf RLopez p Garza p Castillo p Mather cf Totals

4 0 0 0 3 4 3 2 4 2 3 2 0 0 0

1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

MIAMI

ab r h bi

4 4 3 1 4 4 3 3 3 0 2 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

32 1 6 1

ab r h bi

Reyes ss Bonifac cf HRmrz 3b Morrsn lf Coghln pr Stanton rf GSnchz 1b J.Buck c DMrph 2b Buehrle p Webb p

4 5 4 3 1 4 5 2 3 4 0

Totals

1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0

2 2 1 0 0 2 3 1 2 1 0

1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 3 1 0

35 9 14 9

Chicago ........................... 000 000 100 Miami.............................. 002 023 11x

— —

1 9

E—H.Ramirez (1). DP—Chicago 1, Miami 2. LOB—Chicago 4, Miami 9. 2B—Je.Baker (1), G.Sanchez (5), Do.Murphy (1). 3B—Reyes (2). HR—H.Ramirez (4), Do.Murphy (1). SF—Reyes, Do.Murphy. Chicago

Miami

Buehrle W,1-2 Webb

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

5 1 2

7 3 4

6 1 2

6 1 2

3 0 2

7 0 1

8 1

6 0

1 0

1 0

0 0

5 1

Garza pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. WP—Buehrle. Umpires—Home, Brian O’Nora;First, Alfonso Marquez;Second, Tom Hallion;Third, D.J. Reyburn.

CARDINALS 11, REDS 1 CINCINNATI

Cozart ss Stubbs cf Votto 1b Phillips 2b Bray p Bruce rf Rolen 3b Heisey lf Mesorc c Latos p LeCure p Ludwck ph Simon p Harris 2b Totals

ST. LOUIS

ab r h bi

3 3 3 4 0 4 4 4 4 1 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 1 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

32 1 9 1

ab r h bi

Furcal ss Beltran rf Komats rf Hollidy lf McCllln p Brkmn 1b MCrpnt ph Freese 3b YMolin c Jay cf Greene 2b JGarci p VMarte p Roinsn ph-lf

5 4 0 5 0 2 2 4 4 4 3 2 0

1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0

4 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 1 0

2 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 2 0

1 1 1 0

Totals

36 11 14 11

Cincinnati....................... 000 010 000 St. Louis ......................... 320 003 03x

— —

1 11

DP—Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 4. LOB—Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 4. 2B—Rolen (3), Furcal 2 (6), Freese (1), Y.Molina (5), Robinson (1). 3B—Heisey (1), J.Garcia (1). HR—Beltran (5), Greene (1). SB— Beltran (3), Berkman (1), Jay (2), Greene (1). Cincinnati

NATIONALS 3, ASTROS 2 HOUSTON

1 0 0 0

31 2 6 2

Garza L,1-1 Castillo R.Lopez

PIRATES 2, DIAMONDBACKS 1 PITTSBURGH

Totals

MARLINS 9, CUBS 1 Totals

New York........................ 012 011 010 Atlanta ........................... 024 022 22x

Dickey L,2-1 Batista Parnell Byrdak Rauch F.Francisco

Altuve 2b

Houston.......................... 000 100 010 Washington................... 000 000 12x

NATIONAL LEAGUE Wednesday’s Games BRAVES 14, METS 6

New York

TORONTO

ab r h bi

Minnesota...................... 401 010 000 New York........................ 301 000 001

ab r h bi

1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

RAYS 12, BLUE JAYS 2

Totals

Nashville

ab r h bi

Totals

0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

E—Beltre (1). DP—Texas 1, Boston 1. LOB— Texas 7, Boston 5. 2B—Napoli (1), Ortiz (7), Shoppach (4). HR—Napoli (4), Youkilis (1). SB— Aviles (1). CS—Aviles (1).

ACasill 2b

Wednesday’s Game SOUNDS 5, REDHAWKS 7 Oklahoma City

2 4 4 3 4 4 2 1 3 1 2 1 0

Texas............................... 001 200 030 Boston ............................ 020 000 001

Span cf JCarrll ss Mauer c Wlngh lf Mornea dh Parmel 1b Brrghs 3b CThms rf

New Orleans 3, Memphis 1 Round Rock 4, Omaha 2 Oklahoma City at Nashville, ppd., rain Albuquerque 13, Iowa 6 Salt Lake 3, Las Vegas 2 Fresno 4, Reno 2 Sacramento 5, Tacoma 1

ab r h bi

Aviles ss Pedroia 2b AdGnzl 1b C.Ross rf Ortiz dh Youkils 3b Shppch c Sweny ph DMcDn lf Sltmch ph Repko cf Punto ph Spears lf

2 1

HBP—by Marquis (Martin).

BOSTON

MINNESOTA

REDHAWKS NOTEBOOK

Logan R.Soriano

Latos L,0-2 LeCure Simon Bray St. Louis

J.Garcia W,2-0 V.Marte McClellan

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

52⁄3 1 ⁄3 1 1

9 1 0 4

8 0 0 3

8 0 0 3

3 0 0 0

6 0 1 1

7 1 1

7 1 1

1 0 0

1 0 0

3 0 0

3 2 0

HBP—by V.Marte (Stubbs). Umpires—Home, Todd Tichenor;First, Brian Gorman;Second, Larry Vanover;Third, Tony Randazzo.


SPORTS/SCOREBOARD

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM BASKETBALL

Wednesday’s Games Oklahoma State 8, Tulsa 3 Baylor 5, Texas 4 Oklahoma 9, North Texas 4 Texas Tech 8, Texas A&M 6 Iowa State 4, Iowa 3 Missouri 8, Western Illinois 0 Friday’s Games Iowa State at Kansas, 5 p.m. Oklahoma State at Texas, 5 p.m. Baylor at Texas Tech, 6 p.m. Missouri at Oklahoma, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Results Texas Tech 2, Missouri 0

NBA Draft Early Entries

Harrison Barnes, f, North Carolina Bradley Beal, g, Florida J’Covan Brown, g, Texas Dominic Cheek, g, Villanova Jared Cunningham, g, Oregon State Anthony Davis, f, Kentucky Andre Drummond, c, UConn Justin Hamilton, c, LSU Moe Harkless, g-f, St. John’s John Henson, f, North Carolina John Jenkins, g, Vanderbilt Terrence Jones, f, Kentucky Perry Jones III, f, Baylor Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, f, Kentucky Doron Lamb, g, Kentucky Jeremy Lamb, g, UConn Meyers Leonard, c, Illinois Damian Lillard, g, Weber St. Kendall Marshall, g, North Carolina Fab Melo, c, Syracuse Khris Middleton, g-f, Texas A&M Arnett Moultrie, f, Mississippi St. Austin Rivers, g, Duke Thomas Robinson, f, Kansas Terrence Ross, g, Washington Renardo Sidney, f, Mississippi St. Jared Sullinger, f, Ohio State Marquis Teague, g, Kentucky Hollis Thompson, f, Georgetown Dion Waiters, g, Syracuse Maalik Wayns, g, Villanova Royce White, f, Iowa State Tony Wroten, g, Washington BJ Young, g, Arkansas

Wednesday’s Games State OKLAHOMA STATE 8 TULSA 3

Tulsa.................................. 001 020 0 — 3 8 2 Oklahoma State.................002 105 x — 8 8 0 Middlebrooks, Schrock (6), and Bowen. Freeman, Espinosa (6), and Ettinger. W — Espinosa (13-8). L — Middlebrooks (13-4).

CENTRAL OKLAHOMA 8-8 MIDWESTERN STATE 6-4

Midwestern State........... 010 300 2 — 6 12 1 Central Oklahoma............000 004 4 — 8 10 1 Hennan and Ford. McClelland, Steverson (4), and Timmermans. W — Steverson (19-2). L — Hennan (5-10). HR — Mooney (2), Roosmalen (5), Edwards (15), Weaver (5). Second Game Midwestern State........... 000 012 1 — 4 8 0 Central Oklahoma ...........410 210 x — 8 13 1 Glenn, Hennan (2), and Ford. McClelland, Steverson (7), and Timmermans. W — McClelland (17-1). L — Glenn (18-12). HR — Roosmalen (6), Edwards (16), Whitmire (9), Noles (2).

BASEBALL

High School

Wednesday’s Results City Area

College Big 12 Standings

Little Axe 16, Newcastle 6

Overall Conference W L Pct W L Pct. Baylor......................15 0 1.000 32 7 .821 Texas A&M..............9 3 .750 28 9 .757 Texas.......................9 3 .750 21 13 .618 Oklahoma...............7 8 .467 23 14 .622 Oklahoma St. ........5 7 .417 19 17 .528 Texas Tech ..............3 9 .250 22 17 .564 Missouri..................3 9 .250 18 17 .514 Kansas St................3 9 .250 19 18 .514 Kansas ....................3 9 .250 15 23 .395 Wednesday’s Games Kansas 6, Saint Mary, Kan. 0 Oklahoma State 6, Northeastern State 3 Baylor 11, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 1 Kansas State 7, Northern Colorado 5 New Mexico 6, Texas Tech 4 Friday’s Games Kansas State at Missouri, 6 p.m. Alabama State at Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m. Texas Tech at Oklahoma State, 6:30 p.m. Baylor at Texas A&M, 6:30 p.m. Kansas at Texas, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s Results Kansas 7, Baker 3 New Mexico 20, Texas Tech 3 Texas 2, Texas State 0 Kansas State 4, Northern Colorado 3 Baylor 15, Texas A&M Corpus Christi 2 Wichita State 2, Oklahoma State 1 Oklahoma 6, Oral Roberts 3 Rice 5, Texas A&M 4

District

CLASS 4A At Haskell Konawa 9, Hulbert 5 Hulbert 1, Haskell 0 Haskell 13, Konawa 6 Hulbert 3, Konawa 2 Hulbert 4, Haskell 2 CLASS 2A At Binger-Oney Calumet 14, Geary 3 Binger-Oney 14, Geary 1 Binger-Oney 11, Calumet 0 Binger-Oney 16, Calumet 0 At Pond Creek-Hunter Drummond 10, Ringwood 5 Pond Creek-Hunter 18, Buffalo 1 Ringwood 15, Buffalo 14 Pond Creek-Hunter 12, Drummond 2 Drummond 18, Ringwood 16 Pond Creek-Hunter 17, Drummond 2, champ CLASS A At McCurtain McCurtain 10, Braggs 3 McCurtain 10, Braggs 0

GOLF

PGA Tour Schedule and Winners

Wednesday’s Game OKLAHOMA STATE 6 NORTHEASTERN STATE 4 NEOSU (20-20)

OSU (19-17)

ab r h bi

Jackson cf Davidson 2b Knight ss Gallegos 1b Wilkins lf Cash rf Skelly c Espinal dh Stone 3b

Totals

4 4 5 4 3 4 4 2 4

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

3 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 1

ab r h bi

1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

Higgisn cf 5 Womack c 4 Rea 2b 2 Ginther 3b 3 Fish rf 4 Saxon pr 0 Whaley lf 4 Mings dh 1 Bass ph 1 Barnes p 0 Wes 1b 4 Bailey ss 4 34 4 10 4 Totals 32

0 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 2 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1

6 9 5

Northeastern St.................... 003 000 001 — 4 Oklahoma St.......................... 110 000 22x — 6 E — Cash (2), Ginther (4). LOB — NEOSU 8; OSU 7. DP — NEOSU 1; OSU 2. 2B — Gallegos (12), Wilkins (9), Whaley (4). CS — Wilkins (2). HR — Rea (5), Whaley (1).

IP H R ER BB SO Northeastern State George 2.0 2 2 1 0 2 Williams 1.0 0 0 0 3 2 Ochoa, L 0-4 4.0 4 2 2 0 3 Sprick 0.1 2 2 2 0 0 Morillo 0.2 1 0 0 0 0 Walch 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 Oklahoma State Perrin 2.2 5 3 3 1 2 Abbott 4.0 3 0 0 1 6 Bevacqua, W 1-0 1.0 1 0 0 0 1 Rea 1.0 1 1 0 1 1 Barnes, S (2) 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP — by George (Rea), by Abbott (Wilkins). PB — Womack (9). T — 2:35. A — 268.

High School

Wednesday’s Results State

Henryetta 7, Haskell 2 Holdenville 18, Wewoka 3

District

CLASS B At McCurtain Bokoshe 22, Arkoma 12 McCurtain 23, Arkoma 5 McCurtain 27, Bokoshe 1 At Thackerville Bennington 9, Ryan 8 Bennington 8, Thackerville 4 Bennington 4, Thackerville 2

Tournament/Festivals

Deer Creek Classic Norman North 10, El Reno 2 Westmoore 5, Guthrie 4 Edmond North 6, Edmond Memorial 4 Edmond North 9, Deer Creek 1 Deer Creek 11, Edmond Memorial 7 Southmoore 9, Bishop McGuinness 1 Northwest Optimist Tournament 5A Shootout At McAlester Chickasha 13, McAlester 9 At Putnam City Choctaw 9, Norman 1 OKC Broncos 10, Putnam North 9 At Dolese Park Lawton Eisenhower 12, U.S. Grant 1 Lawton Eisenhower 9, Putnam West 4

Wednesday’s Game OKC BRONCOS 10 PUTNAM NORTH 9

Putnam North....................120 006 — 9 12 4 OKC Broncos...................... 160 021 — 10 13 2 W — Jones. L — Gibbs. LH — PCN: Riess 3-4. OKC Broncos: Sundbye 3-4, 3B, 2B.

SOFTBALL

College Big 12 Standings

Conference W L Pct. Oklahoma .................11 3 .786 Texas..........................9 4 .692 Missouri.....................10 5 .667 Texas A&M ................11 6 .647 Texas Tech .................8 7 .533 Oklahoma State .......5 6 .455 Baylor ........................4 8 .333 Kansas .......................3 12 .200 Iowa State.................1 11 .083

Overall W L Pct. 36 6 .857 35 6 .854 33 8 .805 31 14 .689 35 12 .745 22 16 .579 27 14 .659 26 15 .634 13 28 317

Jan. 6-9 — Hyundai Tournament of Champions (Steve Stricker) Jan. 12-15 — Sony Open (Johnson Wagner) Jan. 19-22 — Humana Challenge (Mark Wilson) Jan. 22-29 — Farmers Insurance Open (Brant Snedeker) Feb. 2-5 — Waste Management Phoenix Open (Kyle Stanley) Feb. 9-12 — AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am (Phil Mickelson) Feb. 16-19 — Northern Trust Open (Bill Haas) Feb. 22-26 — WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship (Hunter Mahan) Feb. 23-26 — Mayakoba Golf Classic (John Huh) March 1-4 — Honda Classic (Rory McIlroy) March 8-11 — WGC-Cadillac Championship (Justin Rose) March 8-11 — Puerto Rico Open (George McNeill) (Luke Donald) March 15-18 — Transitions Championship, Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead Course), Palm Harbor, Fla. (Luke Donald) March 22-25 — Arnold Palmer Invitational, Bay Hill Club & Lodge, Orlando, Fla. (Tiger Woods) March 29-April 1 — Shell Houston Open, Redstone GC (Tournament Course), Houston. (Hunter Mahan) April 5-8 — Masters Tournament, Augusta National GC, Augusta, Ga. (Bubba Watson) April 12-15 — RBC Heritage, Harbourtown GL, Hilton Head Island, S.C. (Carl Pettersson) April 19-22 — Valero Texas Open, TPC San Antonio (AT&T Oaks Course), San Antonio April 26-29 — Zurich Classic, TPC Louisiana, New Orleans May 3-6 — Wells Fargo Championship, Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, N.C.

Champions Tour Schedule and Winners

Feb. 10-12 — Allianz Championship (Corey Pavin) Feb. 17-19 — The ACE Group Classic (Kenny Perry) March 16-18 — Toshiba Classic, Newport Beach (Calif.) CC. (Loren Roberts) March 23-25 — Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, Fallen Oak, Biloxi, Miss. (Fred Couples) April 13-15 — Tampa Bay Pro-Am, TPC Tampa Bay, Lutz, Fla. (Michael Allen) April 20-22 — Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf, Savannah (Ga.) Harbor Golf Resort. May 4-6 — Insperity Championship, The Woodlands (Texas) CC. May 24-27 — Men’s golf, Senior PGA Championship, The Golf Club at Harbor Shores, Benton Harbor, Mich. June 1-3 — Principal Charity Classic, Glen Oaks CC, West Des Moines, Iowa.

HOCKEY

AHL Playoffs

AUTO RACING

NASCAR Sprint Cup Leaders

Through April 15 Points 1, Greg Biffle, 273. 2, Matt Kenseth, 254. 3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 254. 4, Martin Truex Jr., 253. 5, Kevin Harvick, 249. 6, Denny Hamlin, 242. 7, Tony Stewart, 234. 8, Jimmie Johnson, 233. 9, Ryan Newman, 225. 10, Clint Bowyer, 219. 11, Carl Edwards, 215. 12, Paul Menard, 192. 13, Joey Logano, 192. 14, Kyle Busch, 184. 15, Brad Keselowski, 183. 16, Jeff Burton, 179. 17, Jeff Gordon, 177. 18, Juan Pablo Montoya, 174. 19, A J Allmendinger, 172. 20, Mark Martin, 170. Money 1, Matt Kenseth, $2,562,848. 2, Greg Biffle, $2,060,238. 3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $1,847,165. 4, Tony Stewart, $1,775,850. 5, Denny Hamlin, $1,712,222. 6, Jimmie Johnson, $1,562,940. 7, Kyle Busch, $1,495,914. 8, Kevin Harvick, $1,434,482. 9, Martin Truex Jr., $1,398,191. 10, Jeff Burton, $1,368,060. 11, Carl Edwards, $1,339,342. 12, Ryan Newman, $1,322,664. 13, Jeff Gordon, $1,277,885. 14, Brad Keselowski, $1,190,290. 15, A J Allmendinger, $1,189,810. 16, Clint Bowyer, $1,141,506. 17, Marcos Ambrose, $1,108,741. 18, Jamie McMurray, $1,103,856. 19, Juan Pablo Montoya, $1,085,997. 20, Aric Almirola, $1,084,837.

Sprint Cup Schedule-Winners

Through April 14 Feb. 27 — Daytona 500 (Matt Kenseth) March 4 — Subway Fresh Fit 500 (Denny Hamlin) March 11 — Kobalt Tools 400 (Tony Stewart) March 18 — Food City 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 25 — Auto Club 400 (Tony Stewart) April 1 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500 (Ryan Newman) April 14 — Samsung Mobile 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Greg Biffle) April 22 — STP 400, Kansas City, Kan. April 28 — Richmond 400, Richmond, Va. May 6 — Aaron’s 499, Talladega, Ala. May 12 — Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. May 19 — x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. May 19 — x-Sprint Showdown, Concord, N.C. May 27 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. June 3 — FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks, Dover, Del. June 10 — Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa.

HORSE RACING Thursday’s Morning Line First Race

Purse $9,800, Maiden Claiming $5,000, 3, 4, & 5 yo’s, 350 Yards 1 Rootn Tootn Cowgirl-126 Muntz K 6-1 2 Okey Gambler-126 Bennett T 8-1 3 Remember the Alibi-126 Smith C 5-1 4 Dreamsmasher-124 Flores J 20-1 5 Jess Gold-124 Garcia J 15-1 6 Glow Like a Star-126 Vazquez J 10-1 7 Friday Mornin-124 Carter, Jr. G 4-1 8 Flyin First Rocket-126 Smith S 15-1 9 Atonement-126 Hadley R 3-1 10 Barbs First Down-126 Wilson R 8-1

Second Race

Purse $12,200, Claiming $10,000, 3 yo’s & up, 330 Yards 1 Eyesa Specialbeduino-126 Garcia-Luna F 8-1 2 Bestogne-124 Wilson R 15-1 3 Rock Zar-124 Brown D 12-1 4 Likes His Ponies-126 Smith C 20-1 5 This Hearts On Fire-126 Frederick M 10-1 6 Serenghetti-124 Smith S 6-1 7 Zoomin Streak-124 Carter, Jr. G 5-1 8 Surprise Me First-124 Candanosa A 3-1 9 Jess Damoney Honey-126 Salazar J 20-1 10Rusty Wave-126 Bennett T 4-1

Third Race

Purse $12,200, Maiden Claiming $10,000, 2 yo, 330 Yards 1 First Movie Star-122 Nieto P 12-1 2 Purr Country-122 Muntz K 15-1 3 Azyouseeirap-122 Flores J 20-1 4 Jrs Fast Dynasty-122 Carter, Jr. G 3-1 5 Splash of Timber-122 Garcia-Luna F 20-1 6 Scouts Diva-122 Vazquez J 4-1 7 I Hear Voices-122 Packer B 6-1 8 High On Jon-122 Garcia J 5-1 9 Let It B Me-122 Salazar J 8-1 10 Hotrods N Heels-122 Baca B 10-1

Fourth Race

Purse $14,500, Claiming $15,000, 3 yo, 330 Yards 1 Shazoomin Mary-124 Baca B 20-1 2 Howdedoit-124 Smith S 8-1 3 All About Respect-124 Candanosa A 4-1 4 Justaflyingmachine-124 Carter, Jr. G 3-1 5 Jw Dancer-124 Wilson R 15-1 6 Wr Chiseled in Vegas-124 Frederick M 12-1 7 Coronas Flyer-124 Baldillez, Jr. A 10-1 8 Lets Go Home Now-124 Smith C 20-1 9 Jess a Special Star-124 Packer B 6-1 10Dashing Teller-124 Garcia J 5-1

Fifth Race

First Round (Best-of-5) (*-if necessary)

Eastern Conference

(1) NORFOLK vs. (8) MANCHESTER Friday, April 20: Manchester at Norfolk, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Manchester at Norfolk, 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 25: Norfolk at Manchester, 6 p.m. (2) ST. JOHN’S vs. (7) SYRACUSE Friday, April 20: St. John’s at Syracuse, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 21: St. John’s at Syracuse, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 25: Syracuse at St. John’s, 5 p.m. (3) BRIDGEPORT vs. (6) CONNECTICUT Thursday, April 19: Connecticut at Bridgeport, 6 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Connecticut at Bridgeport, 6 p.m. Sunday, April 22: Bridgeport at Connecticut, 4 p.m. *Wednesday, April 25: Bridgeport at Connecticut, 6 p.m. (4) WB/SCRANTON vs. (5) HERSHEY Friday, April 20: Hershey at WB/Scranton, 6:05 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Hershey at WB/ Scranton, 6:05 p.m. Wednesday, April 25: WB/Scranton at Hershey, 6 p.m.

Western Conference

City, 7 p.m. (2) TORONTO vs. (7) ROCHESTER Thursday, April 19: Rochester at Toronto, 6 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Rochester at Toronto, 2 p.m. Monday, April 23: Toronto at Rochester, 6:05 p.m. *Wednesday, April 25: Toronto at Rochester, 6:05 p.m. (3) CHICAGO vs. (6) SAN ANTONIO Thursday, April 19: Chicago at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 21: Chicago at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 24: San Antonio at Chicago, 7 p.m. *Wednesday, April 25: San Antonio at Chicago, 7 p.m. (4) ABBOTSFORD vs. (5) MILWAUKEE Friday, April 20: Abbotsford at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 22: Abbotsford at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Wednesday, April 25: Milwaukee at Abbotsford, 9 p.m.

(1) OKLAHOMA CITY vs. (8) Houston Thursday, April 19: Oklahoma City at Houston, 7:05 p.m. Friday, April 20: Oklahoma City at Houston, 7:35 p.m. Sunday, April 22: Houston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. *Tuesday, April 24: Houston at Oklahoma

Purse $17,600, MAIDEN, 2 yo, 300 Yards 1 Valiant Lil Lady-122 Garcia J 8-1 2 Heart of a Lion-122 Garcia-Luna F 12-1 3 Ok Chatita-122 Baca B 20-1 4 Maximum Turnpike-122 Wilson R 10-1 5 Teller Im Scootan-122 Carter, Jr. G 4-1 6 Beat This Chick-122 Brooks J 3-1 7 West Coast Shaker-122 Payne L 15-1 8 Esperance-122 Wainscott C 20-1 9 Heza Valiant Warrior-122 Packer B 5-1 10Wicked Courage-122 Jensen C 6-1

Sixth Race

Purse $10,800, Claiming $7,500, 3 yo’s & up, 400 Yards 1 Ruby Sonnet-126 Carter, Jr. G 4-1 2 Sir Comp Alot-126 Martinez P 15-1 3 Streaking Invictus-126 Candanosa A 5-1 4 Okey Dokey Hero-124 Garcia J 3-1 5 Imonawinningstreak-126 Smith C 12-1 6 Dashing Strut-126 Macedo D 8-1 7 Splash of Nash-126 Packer B 6-1 8 Blushing Romance-126 Pinon D 12-1 9 Tj Get Er Done-126 Nieto P 20-1 10Cd Dashing Bug-126 Bennett T 10-1

Seventh Race

Purse $11,000, STA $15,000, Paints & Appaloosas, 3 yo’s & up, 330 Yards 1 Awesome Fling-126 Smith S 3-1 2 Take Your Fortune-126 Martinez P 15-1 3 Bailout-126 Jensen C 15-1 4 San Mateo Chick-126 Nieto P 10-1 5 Onlytreasureofmine-126 Candanosa A 15-1 6 Eye Chek You-126 Ernst B 12-1 7 Stormy Celebration-126 Baldillez, Jr. A 6-1 8 Texas Royal Snow-126 Smith C 4-1 9 Ww Granite Treasure-126 Carter, Jr. G 5-1 10Jacis Flashy Girl-126 Salazar J 8-1

Eighth Race

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Purse $17,600, MAIDEN, 2 yo, 300 Yards 1 Slew of Success-122 Brooks J 5-1 2 Feature Mr Bb-122 Packer B 20-1 3 Three Kysses-122 Candanosa A 20-1 4 Cartels Choice-122 Garcia J 10-1 5 Coronas Investment-122 Wainscott C 12-1 6 Panamera-122 Vazquez J 6-1 7 Royal Bellarina-122 Carter, Jr. G 3-1 8 Furrst-122 Jensen C 8-1 9 Eye Kelly-122 Bennett T 4-1 10Beccas Teller-122 Pinon D 10-1

Ninth Race

Purse $19,600, Allowance, 2 yo, 350 Yards 1 McM Tres Episode-122 Bennett T 6-1 2 Jess Call Me Valiant-122 Carter, Jr. G 3-1 3 Valiant Dreamgirl-122 Vazquez J 8-1 4 Icu Holy Messenger-122 Wilson R 12-1 5 Ja Joanies Fly Boy-122 Packer B 4-1 6 Grc Paint Me Quick-122 Brooks J 9-2 7 Fly Or Dash-122 Baldillez, Jr. A 5-1 8 Club Royal-122 Salazar J 10-1

Tenth Race

Purse $17,300, STA $10,000, 3 yo’s & up, 870 Yards 1Heza Chico-126 Smith C 3-1 2Dm Shaman-126 Carter, Jr. G 7-2 3Jess Another Reb-126 Packer B 8-1 4Ice On the Lake-126 Salazar J 8-1 5Rb Twenty Four Seven-126 Candanosa A 12-1 6Caitlyn Rose-126 Brown D 5-1 7Street Meter-126 Brooks J 6-1 8Apollo Rocks-126 Landeros B 10-1

Eleventh Race

Purse $21,000, Allowance, 3 yo’s & up, 550 Yards 1 Dean Price-126 Smith C 4-1 2 Runaway Fees-126 Hadley R 3-1 3 Callme Cash-126 Payne L 20-1 4 My Boy Corona-126 Salazar J 6-1 5 Bv Eyesa Shazoom-126 Muntz K 8-1 6 Come in Houston-126 Baca B 20-1 7 Sure Thing Bob-126 Montoya J 15-1 8 Jim Bean-126 Ernst B 10-1 9 Chicks Gold Medal-126 Smith S 12-1 10 Zoomin for Time-124 Carter, Jr. G 5-1

Twelfth Race

Purse $16,600, Maiden Claiming $15,000, 3 yo, 300 Yards 1 Gone to the Hague-124 Smith S 4-1 2 Bully Penny Sue-124 Baca B 8-1 3 Championlook-124 Ernst B 5-1 4 Okey Begone-124 Smith C 3-1 5 A P Hero-124 Payne L 20-1 6 Quik Fire-124 Garcia J 6-1 7 Pita Chick-124 Garcia-Luna F 12-1 8 Eyeyinmycorona-124 Wainscott C 15-1 9 Willie Mosconi-124 Jensen C 20-1 10Great Regard-124 Wilson R 10-1 POST TIME: 6:00PM

TRANSACTIONS Wednesday’s Deals

BASEBALL MLB MLB—Suspended Cleveland RHP Jeanmar Gomez five games and fined him an undisclosed amount for intentionally throwing at and hitting Kansas City’s Mike Moustakas in an April 14 game. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Recalled RHP Junichi Tazawa from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Mark Melancon to Pawtucket. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled RHP Jason Marquis from New Britain (EL). Released 1B Luke Hughes. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Selected the contract of INF Cody Ransom and OF A.J. Pollock from Reno (PCL). Placed INF Geoff Blum on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 17 and OF Chris Young and on the 15-day DL. American Association KANSAS CITY T-BONES—Signed Dan Kickham and RHP Josh Rainwater. LAREDO LEMURS—Signed INF Brad Emaus. Released RHP Jose Velasquez. SIOUX FALLS PHEASANTS—Released RHP Adam Cowart. WICHITA WINGNUTS—Released LHP Shawn Joy and RHP Anthony Ortega. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES—Signed OF Jon Weber. Traded OF Cristian Guerrero to Sioux Falls for a player to be named. Atlantic League SUGAR LAND SKEETERS—Announced RHP Lance Pendelton was signed by Tampa Bay (AL). Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS—Traded 1B Joe Agreste to Evansville (FL) for future considerations. QUEBEC CAPITALES—Signed INF-C Josue Peley. WORCESTER TORNADOES—Signed INF John Welch. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS—Signed RHP Cory Trudell to a contract extension. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES—Signed SS Vladimir Frias. LONDON RIPPERS—Signed INF Stephen Cardullo. Released INF Rafael Ortega. WASHINGTON WILD THINGS—Traded C Justin McDavid to Alpine (Pecos) for a player to be named. Traded LHP Matt Kretchmer, C David Peters and OF Rashad Taylor to Roswell (Pecos) for players to be named. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS—Signed RHP Michael Click to a contract extension. BASKETBALL NBA NBA—Fined Dallas G Delonte West $25,000 for a physical taunt by poking Utah’s Gordon Hayward in the ear during an April 16 game. CLEVELAND CAVALIERS—Recalled F Luke Harangody from Canton (NBADL). NEW ORLEANS HORNETS—Signed C Darryl Watkins to a 10-day contract. Waived C Chris Johnson. FOOTBALL Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORS—Signed QB Nate Davis. SAN JOSE SABERCATS—Announced the addition of DL Derek Simmons. United Indoor Football League FLORIDA TARPONS—Acquired DE Joshua Long from Lakeland for DB Aaron Hodges, WR Chuck Walker and an undisclosed cash payment. HOCKEY NHL NHL—Suspended Phoenix F Raffi Torres indefinitely for a hit that knocked Chicago F Marian Hossa out of an April 17 game. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed LW Josh Shalla to a three-year contract and assigned him to Milwaukee (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Recalled F Matt Watkins from Portland (AHL). ECHL ECHL—Suspended Las Vegas’ Ryan Weston two games and fined him an undisclosed amount after he was assessed a game misconduct in an April 17 game against Idaho. COLLEGE GEORGE WASHINGTON—Named Megan Duffy women’s assistant basketball coach. PROVIDENCE—Named Dan Durkin and Kristeena Alexander women’s assistant basketball coaches. TENNESSEE—Announced women’s basketball coach Pat Summitt will take the title of “head coach emeritus” and promoted assistant coach Holly Warlick to head coach. TEXAS SOUTHERN—Named Cynthia Cooper-Dyke women’s basketball coach. TOLEDO—Announced the NCAA denied its appeal on next year’s postseason ban for the men’s basketball team because of belowstandard Academic Performance Rate scores. The team will be forced to give up three regular-season games and cut its practice time.

ODDS NBA

Favorite INDIANA DETROIT Houston MIAMI PHOENIX

Thursday’s Games Pts. Underdog 5 Indiana 1 Minnesota 5 ⁄2 3 NEW ORLEANS Chicago 41⁄2 2 LA Clippers Home team in CAPS

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

...

7C

NHL PLAYOFF ROUNDUP

Senators even up series with Rangers FROM WIRE REPORTS

OTTAWA — Kyle Turris scored at 2:42 of overtime to give the Ottawa Senators a 3-2 victory over the New York Rangers on Wednesday night, tying the Eastern Conference playoff series at two games apiece. Milan Michalek and Sergei Gonchar scored in the second period for the Senators to erase a 2-0 deficit, and Craig Anderson stopped 31 shots. Anton Stralman and Ryan Callahan had powerplays goals early in the first period for the Rangers. Henrik Lundqvist made 28 saves.

Penguins 10, Flyers 3 PHILADELPHIA — Pushed to the brink of a sweep, Pittsburgh’s Sidney Cros-

NHL Playoffs

by, Evgeni Malkin and Jordan Staal pushed back with a vengeance, helping the Penguins score nine goals in the first two periods in a win over the Philadelphia Flyers in their opening-round playoff series. Staal had a hat trick, Malkin scored his first two goals of the series and Crosby added one to help the Penguins cut the series deficit to 3-1. Game 5 is Friday in Pittsburgh. Penguins goalie MarcAndre Fleury settled down after a shaky first period and had his best game of the series, easily outplaying counterpart Ilya Bryzgalov. The Flyers led 3-2 when the Penguins reeled off seven straight goals to win the most lopsided game of the series. 4

Wednesday, April 18: Pittsburgh 10-3, Philadelphia leads series 3-1 Friday, April 20: at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m.

First Round (Best-of-7)

Western Conference

Eastern Conference

N.Y. RANGERS VS. OTTAWA Wednesday, April 18: Ottawa 3-2, OT, series tied 2-2 Saturday, April 21: at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Monday, April 23: at Ottawa, TBD BOSTON VS. WASHINGTON Saturday, April 14: Washington 2, Boston 1, 2OT Monday, April 16: Boston 4-3, Boston lead series 2-1 Thursday, April 19: at Washington, 6:30 p.m. FLORIDA VS. NEW JERSEY Sunday, April 15: Florida 4, New Jersey 2 Tuesday, April 17: Florida 4-3, Florida leads series 2-1 Thursday, April 19: at New Jersey, 6 p.m. PITTSBURGH VS. PHILADELPHIA Sunday, April 15: Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh

VANCOUVER VS. LOS ANGELES Sunday, April 15: Los Angeles 1-0, Los Angeles leads series 2-1 Wednesday, April 18: at Los Angeles Sunday, April 22: at Vancouver, TBD ST. LOUIS VS. SAN JOSE Saturday, April 14: St. Louis 3, San Jose 0 Monday, April 16: St. Louis 4-3, St. Louis leads series 2-1 Thursday, April 19: at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. PHOENIX VS. CHICAGO Saturday, April 14: Chicago 4, Phoenix 3, OT Tuesday, April 17: Phoenix 3-2, OT, Phoenix leads series tied 2-1 Thursday, April 19: at Chicago, 7 p.m. NASHVILLE VS. DETROIT Sunday, April 15: Nashville 3, Detroit 2 Tuesday, April 17: Nashville 3-1, Nashville leads series 3-1 Friday, April 20: at Nashville, 7 p.m.

BEST OF NEWSOK

Gundy: Lunt more advanced than expected Gina Mizell gmizell@ opubco.com

OSU FOOTBALL

In Wednesday’s Oklahoman, I looked back at Mike Gundy’s experience as a true freshman starting quarterback in 1986 and what that means now that he could name true freshman Wes Lunt as the Cowboys’ starter for 2012. Gundy was asked about that very subject after Wednesday’s scrimmage. The biggest difference between Gundy’s situation and Lunt’s is, obviously, that Lunt arrived on campus for spring practice, and Gundy didn’t come until he had to report for fall camp. “I walked off the baseball field (in Texas) in the morning and came up here that night,” Gundy said. Which means he didn’t have any sort of grasp of Pat Jones’ offense when he arrived at OSU. “I had no clue,” Gundy said. “I was playing 75 Legion baseball games and worrying more about trying to hit an off-speed pitch than I was anything else. I didn’t think I was going to play (as a freshman) anyway, so I wasn’t really worried about it.” But he did play, getting inserted at halftime of the Cowboys’ third game against Houston, and was successful as a true freshman starter. He finished the season with 1,525 pass-

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ing yards and was named the best freshman quarterback in the country by The Sporting News. After that, he helped lead OSU to a pair of 10-win seasons and became the Big Eight’s all-time leading passer. Lunt, conversely, will have a clue about OSU’s offense when fall camp begins and has prepared this spring like he’s going to be the starter. So that presents this question: is Gundy more likely to play Lunt because of his personal success as a true freshman starting quarterback? “I would guess, if I thought about it, I would say maybe yes,” Gundy said. “But if a freshman’s the best player, then we’re going to play him. I think that we have an obligation to the team, to the seniors, to do that.” Gundy said that Lunt is more developed than he expected, both physically and mentally. He even said he’s the freshman passer he’s been around. But Lunt still has a long way to go to being a bigtime college football quarterback, in Gundy’s eyes. “I don’t even think he’s halfway there,” Gundy said. “The fairest way to put it is, for where he is at in his career, in his age, in his life, he’s further along than what I thought he would have been at this point. I don’t know any other way to say it.” “He’s done really well out here of not being flustered, and that’s part of it. He’s got to learn things happen and don’t get flustered.”

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8C

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SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

THE OKLAHOMAN | NEWSOK.COM

GIRLS ATHLETE OF THE WEEK: ALEXIS SADEGHY

Harrah athlete dies after being in car accident

Two wins in three days Scott Wright swright@ opubco.com

HIGH SCHOOLS

Two victories in three days equals a good week for any golfer. But for a sophomore competing against some of the best high school players in the state, that’s a pretty resounding statement. Bishop McGuinness sophomore Alexis Sadeghy has hardly been under the radar after a standout freshman season that

ended with a victory at the Oklahoma All-Star Challenge last May. And she’s back on track this spring, including her two wins this week to earn The Oklahoman’s Girls Golfer of the Week honor. Sadeghy started off with a 2-under-par 69 for a two-shot win over teammate Caitlin Farris in McGuinness’ Irish Easter Classic Monday at River Oaks Golf Club in Edmond. On Wednesday at Lake Hefner North, Sadeghy carded a 72 for a victory in the Putnam City North Invitational. In both tournaments, Sadeghy defeated Altus’ Megan Blonien, an Okla-

homa State signee who has won three consecutive state titles and will be going for No. 4 at Lincoln Park’s East Course on May 2-3. With Farris finding her groove as well, McGuinness is hoping for its third straight state championship. The Irish won Class 4A in 2010 and Class 5A by 26 strokes last year. Farris spent her offseason as a U.S. Senate page and didn’t play golf for most of the fall and winter. But since returning in February, she has quickly regained the stroke that helped her win 4A as a freshman and finish third in 5A last year. Coach Todd Farris calls

Alexis Sadeghy

this a close-knit team, and a third straight title could very well be in its future. As for Sadeghy, who has been competing on a national level for several years, there’s no telling what the future could hold. “She is a fine young lady, and she has played outstanding this year,” Farris said. “And I don’t think she has played her best golf yet.”

HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES OF THE WEEK BASEBALL

GIRLS TRACK

BOYS TENNIS

AUSTIN CRANFORD, NORMAN NORTH

DIETRA REECE, NORMAN NORTH

BLAKE CRAWFORD, MOUNT ST. MARY

Cranford came on with the bases loaded and no outs in the seventh inning of Tuesday’s game against Edmond Memorial and quickly worked out of the jam, forcing a groundout, making a play for the second out on a squeeze play and then striking out the third batter to keep the game scoreless in an eventual 1-0 Timberwolves win in 10 innings. Cranford eventually earned the win.

Reece took three gold medals at the John Jacobs Invitational, annually one of the top meets in the state. The senior won the 100 meters (12.92 seconds), 200 meters (26.05) and long jump (17 feet, 7 inches).

SOFTBALL

DESTINIE LOOKOUT, WESTMOORE Lookout was 3 for 4 with a pair of home runs in the Jaguars’ 18-9 win over rival Southmoore earlier this week.

BOYS TRACK

COLE SWAYZE, PURCELL

BOYS SOCCER

SAM BROWN, EDMOND NORTH Brown’s goal in the closing minutes of the first half Tuesday ended up being the game-winner in North’s 2-1 win over rival Edmond Santa Fe, ensuring the Huskies the city soccer championship for 2012.

GIRLS SOCCER

RYAN MARONEY, BISHOP MCGUINNESS

Crawford, a freshman, topped Piedmont’s Hayden Cook to win at No. 1 singles in the Harrah tournament earlier this week.

GIRLS TENNIS

ANN PEPPER, EDMOND NORTH

Maroney, a sophomore, scored both goals in the Irish’s 2-0 home win over Westmoore on Tuesday. For the season, Maroney has scored four goals.

HARRAH — Sara Rogers kept her five goals posted on her bedroom wall. Her basketball coach recited the first two — start next season for Harrah and win a state championship — before pausing, regaining his composure and finishing the list with her goals of being valedictorian, playing college hoops and working for the FBI. “She was really goaloriented,” said Harrah girls basketball coach Curt Knox. “That’s just the type of kid she was.” Rogers, 16, was involved in a car accident Tuesday afternoon and died a few hours later of the injuries she sustained. Rogers was the Panthers’ backup point guard as a sophomore and the “heir apparent” to the starting position, Knox said. She played a key role off the bench this season for Harrah, which went 16-11 and advanced to a Class 4A area tournament. “She had a lot of leadership capability,” Knox said. “She’s the type of kid you want to have in your program.” Knox said he and Rogers had been talking a lot recently about how to improve her game and pre-

Sara Rogers

pare for the starting role, which she likely would have assumed as a junior. Jim Miller, Harrah’s tennis coach who had Rogers in his speech class, said she was all about hard work and that there were “no frills with her.” “She was among a very large and close-knit group of friends,” Miller said. “To me, it’s what you might call the biggest clique you’ve ever seen, but a good kind of clique.” The loss was particularly devastating for the Harrah community, which has now dealt with three deaths of students or former students during this school year. Senior football player Matt Grace died in a car accident in October, and one day later, former football player Jonathan Adams died of a sudden illness. Adams was a freshman football player at Northeastern State in Tahlequah. “It’s a tragic loss for the entire community,” Knox said of Rogers’ death. “There’s no question about it.”

BOYS GOLF

DREW POSADA, CHOCTAW

The senior went up against some impressive competition from bigger schools and still came away with golds in the 200 and 400 meters. He ran 22.54 seconds in the 200 and 49.26 in the 400.

Posada fired a 67 to win the Moore Lion Tournament at Moore Golf and Athletic Club on Monday, five strokes ahead of his nearest competitor. Choctaw finished second as a team, seven shots behind Edmond Santa Fe.

Pepper was part of the winning No. 1 doubles teams in both the Ponca City tournament late last week and the Edmond tournament Wednesday. BY RYAN ABER, JASON KERSEY AND SCOTT WRIGHT

OU FOOTBALL

TE Harlow’s football career is over Ryan Aber raber@ opubco.com

HIGH SCHOOLS

It was expected on signing day that Laith Harlow would receive a medical hardship and never suit up for Oklahoma. Wednesday, though, it became official, when Sooners coaches told Har-

low that his scholarship would be honored but the medical hardship would end his OU career before it began, ESPN.com reported. Harlow, a 6-foot-5, 240-pound tight end from Tallahassee, Fla., told the site he had talked to Sooners coach Bob Stoops and assistant Bruce Kittle. “There is no nice way of saying that your dream is being taken away,” he told the site. Harlow suffered a back injury midway through his

Laith Harlow

senior season that led to surgery. Harlow had hoped to return to playing, but nerve damage made that

impossible. More surgeries are possible for Harlow. The Sooners signed three other tight ends in February, including Ohio product Sam Grant, whose late addition to the class signaled that their might be troubles with Harlow’s health. Junior college transfer Brannon Green and Taylor McNamara, who enrolled early, also signed with OU and recently completed spring practice with the team.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Colts decide on No. 1 pick, but aren’t telling The Colts have decided on their No.1 pick, but they aren’t going to reveal it publicly until draft night. Colts general manager Ryan Grigson met with the local media on Wednesday and said the team feels good about its decision. The Colts will select either Stanford’s Andrew Luck or Baylor’s Robert Griffin III with the first pick of the NFL Draft on April 26 in New York City. “We’ve known for a little while,” Grigson said. “We’ve done all our due diligence.” Most analysts believe the Colts will select Luck.

TENTATIVE DEAL IN MCALLISTER LAWSUIT A tentative agreement has been reached to settle a federal lawsuit between former New Orleans Saints running back Deuce McAllister and Nissan Motor

Acceptance Corp. over his failed car dealership in Mississippi, court records said. U.S. Magistrate Judge Linda Anderson said Tuesday in a filing in U.S. District Court in Jackson that the parties have seven days to finalize the deal. The dealership in Jackson closed in 2009 and filed for Chapter 7 liquidation under federal bankruptcy law.

JAGS’ ROSS GOING TO OLYMPICS Cornerback Aaron Ross didn’t want to miss the Olympics again. Training camp prevented him from traveling to Beijing to see his then-girlfriend, U.S. runner Sanya Richards, compete four years ago. Now that they are married and with the London Games quickly approaching, Ross started setting up his trip even before he signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Jaguars obliged, granting Ross permission to skip part of camp to see his wife run.

BEARS ADD VETERAN GUARD Guard Chilo Rachal, a second-round pick of the 49ers in 2008, agreed to terms on a one-year con-

tract Wednesday and will enter what is now a crowded mix. He made 38 starts for the 49ers but lost his job at right guard after three games last season. FROM WIRE REPORTS

Rev. Jesse Jackson, center, laughs at the end of his talk with Douglass basketball players as he puts his arm around the shoulders of DeAngelo Smith, right, Wednesday. Jackson held a brief, informal session with players from the Trojans’ state championship basketball team before addressing a general assembly of students in the auditorium. His comments were of an inspirational nature, encouraging the youth to stay in school and focus on their academics so they can have more access to opportunities for success and advancement after graduation. PHOTO BY JIM BECKEL, THE OKLAHOMAN


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'07 Jeep Wrangler X 5M/T Like New $16,995 294-4115 co.

'06 LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER 4x4, only 64K miles, $24,988 294-4115 co.

'08 Jeep Liberty Sport $15,990. 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 4x4, 5.7L V-8, only 50K miles, sunroof, heated seats, $15,988. 405-294-4117 co.

'06 Civic EX/sdn auto snrf $11,981 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'05 Cherokee Rocky Mtn 4x4 lthr rf $12988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2008 LEXUS ES-350, maroon, leather, super clean, only 11K miles, $27,988. 405-294-4117 co.

2009 MERCEDES BENZ CLK-350 COUPE, sunroof, alloys, heated leather seats, $31,988. 405-294-4117 co.

'02 Wrangler X 4x4, Red, 6cyl, 5spd, 85K mi, New whls & tires, Hard top, Int & Ext in Great Cond. ¡¡ $12,500 obo ¡¡ 359-0476, 570-2221

2007 LEXUS ES-350, heated/cooled seats, navigation, sunroof, 50K miles, NICE!!!! $20,988. 405-294-4117 co.

'08 MERCEDES 280 SLK, 49K miles, red, blk leather, auto, immaculate $23,988. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'07 Lexus IS350 all opts pwr snrf $23,982 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

2003 MERCEDES E-320 SEDAN, sunroof, black/ black, heated seats, 60K miles, $15,988. 405-294-4117 co.

2005 Jeep Liberty, right hand drive conv., rural mail ready, 4x4, auto, $7500 obo 580-450-9055

1986 CJ-7, Extra tub, Lots of extra parts, 6 cyl w/ hard top, Disassembled w/ rolling chassis. $3500 580-320-8890

'11 KIA SORENTO, V6, 3rd row seating, gorgeous, $22,988, Stk #67256P. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'06 Accord EXL Cpe lthr snrf auto $15,663 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'11 KIA RIO, 2 to choose, special purchase at $13,988, Stk #848861P or 954663P. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 '11 Kia Soul s/roof lthr auto loaded $18,990 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com '10 Kia Soul + auto pw pl lo mi $15,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'08 HUMMER, hard to find Alpha 3, V8, blaack, black leather, lots of chrome $27,988 BOB MOORE KI.A 405-294-4179 '08 HUMMER H-3 ALPHA, 5.3 V-8, loaded, 22K mi, $28,400 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '08 HUMMER H-3 4x4, roof, lo mi, loaded, $23,900. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '07 H3 Luxury hard loaded victory red$21,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '07 H3 luxury roof lthr nice $17,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2005 HUMMER SUV, luxury and chrome packages! $20,900. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354

'11 Hyundai Tuscon Ltd lthr $23981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com '06 HYUNDAI SONATA, auto, AC, V6, power sunroof, CD, $10,988. 405-217-4464 co.

2010 Kia Souls x-cln 1 owner $14,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2012 Jeep Wrangler 4dr Unltd 4x4 $30988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '11 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT, only 15K miles, $25,988. 294-4115 co. 2011 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA 4WD, 1 owner, low miles, $26,900. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354 '11 JeepPatriot 4WD Sport auto $16,488 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '11 Jeep Grand Cherokee 7k mi $39,981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com '10 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED 4x4, leather, roof, chromes, extra low miles, $24,988, Stk #61136A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 2010 JEEP PATRIOT, roof, 16K mi, non-smoker, $17,300. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '10 Jeep Patriot one owner $12,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'10 CIVIC EX CPE, auto, rf, lo mi, $17,988. SMICKLAS 943-5721

'11 Infiniti G37 cpe lthr snrf 5k $38,981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'10 Wrangler 4WD Sport auto A/C $20,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'10 Accord LXP Sdn auto pwr warr $17,994 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'11 Infiniti EX Prem Pkg lthr s-rf warr $24,990 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

2010 Commander, blk, 34K, NAV, lthr, 3rd seat, fac warr 100K, $22,500. 405-664-2100

2009 MERCEDES ML350, black mid-size luxury crossover, navigation! $32,988. 405-294-4117 co. 2009 MERCEDES S-550, silver, super luxury Sedan, navigation, loaded, $48,988. 405-294-4117 co.

'11 KIA SPORTAGE, LX Package, 22K miles, power windows and locks, alloys, $20,988, Stk #49035P. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

2006 Honda Civic manual 6 speed, Blue ext, 103,000 mi, SI model $8900. 405-642-3025

2009 Mercedes-Benz CClass WHITE ext, 71000 mi, SPORT, AMG PACKAGE $25,500. 405-641-5878

'09 LEXUS ES350, pear white, tan leather, PW, PL, 6 disc, tinted glass, $27,900. 405-217-4464 co.

'12 KIA SPORTAGE, all wheel drive, 5K miles, auto, air, power W/L, $23,988, Stk #243527P. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'07 Accord SE sdn 63k mi pwr $12,964 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'02 HONDA ACCORD EX, roof, leather, auto, power W/L, $8388, Stk #61090A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'93 Ford Escort, body rough, runs good, $950 924-1430/885-2572

1991 Isuzu Amigo Runs/drives good. Call Don (580) 234-2197 $2,000.

'07 Honda Accord LT sdn cold ac $12,964 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'02 FOCUS LX, auto, A/C, great mpg, $5600. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com

94 Ford Taurus 4D, V6, auto $1,100 405-912-4985

'06 ISUZU ASCENDER, great looks, great value, $11,388, Stk #65297A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'08 Accord EX-L lthr snrf 1 owner $16,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'03 Honda CRV EX 4wd snrf auto $8891 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'95 FORD CONTOUR GL, PW, PL, cruise, only 73K mi, $3995. 294-4115 co.

'04 Infiniti G35 CPE lthr snrf 37k $16,981 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'08 Accord EXL Sdn auti lthr snrf $16,764 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

2003 Ford Crown Vic $5,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'00 Taurus SES, 138K mi loaded, cold ac, new tires /brakes, $2450. 201-3831

2010 G-37 SEDAN, this car has it all, with only 23K miles, $24,988. 405-217-4464 co. '08 G37 COUPE, leather, auto, loaded, pearl white, PW, PL, one of a kind, $28,900. 405-217-4464 co.

'09 Ford Fusion SEL-V6 lthr snrf $14,983 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'08 Ford Mustang GT Shelby $22,992 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

2010 EX35, beautiful black metallic with tan leather, nav and everything else, only 27K miles, $29,988. 405-217-4464 co.

'06 Lexus IS250 1owner 36K mi Really! 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com 2004 LEXUS LS-430, navigation, sunroof, wood trim, heated seats, super nice!!! $13,988. 405-294-4117 co. 2004 LEXUS ES-330, 1 owner, navigation, sunroof, wood trim, alloys, super clean!!! $13,988. 405-294-4117 co.

2011 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid loaded, 2660 miles, as new, $31,000. 285-6494 2008 LINCOLN MKX AWD, wood trim, navigation, sunroof, rear seat entertainment, $17,988. 405-294-4117 co. '07 Lincoln MKX AWD lthr lo mi $22,981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com '04 LINCOLN LS, V8, leather, climate control, $9988. 294-4115 co. '98 Lincoln Town Car drives great $4862 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'02 E320 red, mint condition, leather 118 K $6995 209-5297 co 1991 Mercedes 300TE Wagon 2 owners 97k nice Gargage Kept $5,500 Ricky Stapleton 405 615 2777

'04 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS GS, 61K miles, auto, $8788. 294-4115 co. '00 Grand Marquis black, leather, loaded $2950 209-5297co

2010 MINI COOPER S, 1 owner, low miles, $20,594. 888-457-5765 www.fowlerhonda.com '09 MINI COOPER, roof, lthr, 18K mi, extra clean, $18,000. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '06 BMW MINI COOPER, auto, PW, PL, low mi, $13,995. 294-4115 co.

'08 KIA SORENTO, V6, auto, air, power W/L, $14,988, Stk #848641P. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 '08 Kia Spectra EX Sdn auto pwr $8864 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com '08 Spectra EX auto 36mpg pw pl crs $10,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2002 Rio, only 68K miles, gold, runs great, $2300 obo, 405-361-1241.

'12 LAND ROVER LR4 Only 5k miles $45,988. 294-4115 co. '11 LAND ROVER LR4 HSE LUX, only 5K miles, $54,165. 294-4115 co. '11 LAND ROVER LR4 HSE, Nav, 7 pass, 10k Miles $49,988 294-4115 co.

'11 Sentra SL auto pwr low mi $16,862 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

97 Bonneville 111K, lthr sunroof, loaded, extra nice $3500 209-5297 co

'11 370Z Convt auto lth nav Touring $39,990 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'95 Grand Prix, 126K, 2 door, AC, CD, Alloy rims, nice, $1700. 905-3379

2010 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S loaded with low miles $17,550. 405-217-4464 co. '10 Altima Cpe red S auto sexy Cert! $19,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com '10 Nissan Versa Great on Gas, cruise $12,995. 294-4115 co. '10 Nissan Sentra auto ac 1 owner $13,488 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2010 Nissan Sentra Auto SE $14,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '10 300 Touring lthr nice must see $17,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S COUPE w/leather and sunroof, gorgeous pearl white! $18,998. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354 '09 Nissan 370Z Cpe 6 sp Sexy! $27,891 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'11 CX7 Tour 8K mi showroom $23,962 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com 2010 MAZDA 3, extra clean, 4 door, $14,900. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '09 CX9 Tour AWD lthr blk beauty $23,982 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com 2009 Mazda RX8 $17,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '08 MAZDA RX8, pearl white paint, auto with paddle shift trans, PW, PL, custom alloys, one of a kind, $14,900. 405-217-4464 co. 07 Mazda 3 loaded 91K gas saver, runs great $6995 209-5297co '07 Miata Touring lthr htd sts Bose $16,462 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'10 RANGE ROVER S/C Lux Pkg, 20k miles $74,988. 294-4115 co.

2006 Mazda 6 Sedan New tires, PW, PL, alloys, 89K miles, $8800 Ricky Stapleton 405 615 2777

'08 RANGE ROVER SPORT S/C Loaded $30,988. 294-4115 co.

2005 MAZDA 6 SPORT, clean Carfax, $7881. 888-457-5765 www.fowlerhonda.com

'05 MITSUBISHI GALANT, Platinum Pak, leather, auto, power sunroof, 6 disc CD changer, very low miles, $9950. 405-217-4464 co.

2011 NISSAN ALTIMA COUPE, red, auto, like new, pw/pl/tilt/cruise/cd $21,544 405-294-4117 co. '11 Nissan Versa S auto fact warr $14891 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com '11 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5S, PL, PW, $25,995. 294-4115 co. '11 Altima S loaded warranty $18,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'08 SAAB 9-3 AERO, leather, loaded, PW, PL, power sunroof, low miles, $15,900. 405-217-4464 co.

'08 SATURN SKY CONVERTIBLE, beauty. Loaded, fun in the sun!!! $17,988, Stk #65224A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 '08 ASTRA XR COUPE, auto leather, PW, PL, CD low miles $13,900. 405-217-4464 co. '08 SATURN VUE, 1 owner, great mpg, $11,800. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '07 Saturn Sky Convertible 1 owner, very nice $11,900. 918-650-5998 '02 Saturn LW2 Wagon auto pwr $3993 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'09 Altima SL 2.5 auto lthr snrf $18,981 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com '09 Niss Maxima Prem Pkg lthr s-roof $26,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com '09 Nissan Sentra auto PW PL $13,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

2008 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible, manual 6 speed, Silver ext, Titanium int, 43000 mi, Bra and extra set of wheels $37,000. avnald@yahoo.com 405-376-4834

'08 Altima Coupe 2.5S low miles $13,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '07 Sentra SE-R S/R PW PL CC alloys $13,990 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com '06 MAXIMA SE, auto, rf, loaded, $9988. SMICKLAS 943-5721 '04 NISSAN SENTRA S, auto, air, pwr windows and locks, just $6,988. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179

'12 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i LIM, roof, leather, $27,995. 294-4115 co. '11 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i, Prem, PW, PL, Cert, $24,995. 294-4115 co. '11 SUBARU IMPREZA 4DR, auto, cruise, alloys, $17,988. 294-4115 co.

2001 Nissan Pathfinder 5Dr, 4WD, 6 cyl 3.5, auto, cloth, excel. cond, 213815 mi,cold A/C, runs, drives & feels like new, salvage title 70% of tires, clean body $3800obo. 501-5846

'11 Subaru Outback AWD auto pwr $23,983 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'98 Nissan Altima, 4dr, A/C, Sunroof, Very Nice $1650 ¡ 427-4564

'09 IMPREZA WRX awd pw pl alloys loaded won't last $25,900. 405-217-4464 co.

1995 Nissan 300ZX excellent cond, 67K ORIGINAL mi, always garage kept. $10,500 or best offer, 405-808-0166

'93 Subaru Legacy L auto very reliable $2495310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'95 Nissan Altima 4dr, auto, ac, 4cyl, runs great, 95K, $2900 obo 361-2278

'10 Kia Forte auto ac 1 ownr x-clean $13,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

NEWSOK.COM

'10 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5i AWD Prem roof, $21,995. 294-4115 co.

'03 Aero SX 107 K dazzling red, great mpg $3995 209-5297 co

2000 ALERO, 4 dr, Olds Luxury small car. Loaded. Exc Condition. $2,495 CASH, 759-3886/630-7091

'11 Matrix PW PL cruise 35 mpg 1own $15,788936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'95 Aurora, 96K mi. exc cond, loaded, cold ac, $3950. 201-3831

2011 Toyota Matrix $15,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'08 PONT G8, red, auto, lthr, excellent cond, $18,995. 294-4115 co. '06 PONTIAC G6, auto, air, power W/L, chromes, $9988, Stk #61131A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 ''05 Pont Grand Prix SE custm whls $8981 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com '04 GRAND PRIX GT, roof & more, $8800. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '04 AZTEK, don't miss it, only $6400. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '02 Firebird 165K loaded, Hwy mls, mint condition, $4950 209-5297

2010 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE with leather and sunroof! Do not miss it @ $21,900. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354 2010 Toyota Corolla $12,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '09 TOYOTA VENZA, lthr, loaded, lo lo mi, $24,500. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '08 TOYOTA CAMRY LE, auto, power W/L, $12,988, Stk #65240A. BOB MOORE KIA 405-294-4179 '08 PRIUS HYBRID, auto, extra clean, $15,000. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '07 CAMRY LE, auto, air, alloys, $10,988. SMICKLAS 943-5721 '07 Toy. Camry LE too nice to miss! $12,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com


THE OKLAHOMAN

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

NEWSOK.COM Computer/IT

'93 Celica GT 5spd cold air drives grt $2481 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'11 VW Jetta SE auto warr elegant $17,991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

2007 Dodge D3500 Diesel 4x4 $21,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com 2011 FORD F150 FX4 4WD SUPERCREW with leather, nav, and sunroof, $34,900. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354

'10 VW CC Luxury Sdn auto lthr snrf $28,982 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

2011 F-150 SUPER CREW XLT, 22K miles, $26,900. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com

2008 TOUAREG 2, AWD, PW/PL, power sunroof, leather, loaded, like new, very low miles, $25,900. 405-217-4464 co.

2011 FORD F250 FX4 4x4 SUPERCREW, 1 owner, only $31,900. HEITZ CHEVY866-365-1354

'05 VW BEETLE CONV. GLS, blk w/blk top, auto, leather, heated seats, CD/MP3, 1 owner, garaged $7500 obo. 405-413-5189 '05 Jetta GLS TDI auto lthr snrf $6992 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com '04 VW BUG convertible, leather, auto, pw, pl, heated seats, $9,995. 405-217-4464 co. '04 VW Beetle auto s-roof only 57K mi $8991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com '03 Passat GLX V6 auto lthr snrf $7862 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'00 VOLVO S-80, roof, great car $5800 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com '95 Volvo 8/G, runs good, new tires, needs ignition switch,$850. 405-650-0326

$ ~Most~ $ Junk Auto's *SAME DAY SERVICE* $200 & UP No Title Ok, Call Becca 405-408-4835

CA$H 4 CAR$ WE PAY MORE!

$200 ß$10,000

2003 Trailblazer 4x4 79k mi $8,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com '96 Chevy Suburban 141K loaded ,leather, runs great $2950 209-5297 co '05 PACIFICA FWD, lo mi, loaded, $9488. SMICKLAS 943-5721 '04 CHRYSLER PACIFICA LIM, nav, DVD, leather, $8995. 294-4115 co.

2010 Ford Ranger XL 36k automatic 4cyl Bedliner $11,250 Ricky Stapleton 405 615 2777

'11 Dodge Durango 3rd st 1 owner $25,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

2010 FORD F-250 4x4 CREW CAB, turbo diesel, leather, lift kit, $43,988. 405-294-4117 co.

'03 Dodge Durango SLT lthr loaded! $7991 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'08 F-350 Lariat diesel 36k Crew-Cab$35,962 753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'03 Dodge Durango SLT too nice! $6990 310-8112 bobhowardnissan.com

'08 F-350 Lariat diesel 36k Crew-Cab$35,962753-8792 BobHowardHonda.com

'01 DURANGO SLT PLUS, lthr, lo mi, $6988. SMICKLAS 943-5721

'07 Ford F150 Crew Cab 4x4 Lariat 6'' lift sunroof nav $21,988 936-8857 BobHowardDodge.com

'01 DURANGO SLT PLUS lthr, low miles, $5988. SMICKLAS 943-5721 '05 Escape XLT 4WD auto lthr snrf $9862 753-8793 BobHowardHonda.com

'07 F-150 SUPER CREW XLT, extra clean, $18,500. 748-7700 bobhowardchevy.com

'09 ESCAPE XLT 4WD, 39K mi, loaded, $17,988. SMICKLAS 943-5721

'06 F-2