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September 27, 2013

Something to Chew On staffeditorial

Chewing tobacco is a major issue in Eaton High School and many of the users are uneducated about the addictive properties and health hazards that go along with the substance. But there is another issue as well. Simply put, teachers and other adults are turning a blind eye. First of all it’s illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to purchase the product, yet many underage students are chewing. Where are they getting it? In addition, Chewing tobacco is illegal on school grounds, pure and simple: it’s a law and the breaking of the law is punishable by at most $1,000 fine. That kind of cash could be used in so much better ways, like additions for a car, a TV, there are so many better alternatives than paying it as a fine. But the fact is, nobody is even worried about a fine. They have no reason to be when there is no threat of getting caught. Because many teachers continue to turn a blind eye to the use of

chewing tobacco in their classrooms, students will never kick the habit or gain knowledge about the hazards of chewing tobacco if this continues. Teachers have been role model for students for a long time and they should continue to be. Students spend hours with teachers and over time the teachers can, to some degree, shape opinions in students’ minds. The opinion that’s being shaped here is that disobeying the law and allowing harmful, addictive nicotine products on school grounds is no big deal. These factors all point to one outcome: students will continue to use tobacco products ignorantly because the teachers allow students to chew on school grounds. If character is such a big deal at Eaton like it is said so often, then instead of pounding it into our heads through assemblies and speeches, they need to show it, and enforce it, by preserving the safe and respectful environment that is Eaton High School.

Red Ink Staff Box Editor-in-Chief.............averyjones Sports Editor..............adamschott Opinion Editor.............tanneralm Feature Editor.............tiaramiller News Editor...................reecekothe Copy Editor...........................jakesell Tech. Support..........calebleonard Photo Editor......................haleycox Web Editor..........................haleycox Ad Manager...................lindydixon Staff Reporters ...........................................davisanders ..................................emilypennington ........................................................lexilapp ............................................. reedhodgson

Adviser........................deirdrejones

The Red Ink is a public forum, school-sponsored and student generated, which encourages the free exchange of ideas and information. All opinions made in the exercise of freedom of speech or press are the sole opinions of the writers and are in no way to be considered the opinions of Eaton High School, administration, Board of Education, or Eaton School District. The Red Ink strictly adheres to School Board Policy JCEA and Colorado Revised Statute 12-1-120. The Red Ink is a member of the Colorado High School Press Association, Journalism Education Association, and Quill and Scroll.

by Victor Batrez

Law open doors for Criminals

emilypennington staffreporter

The state of California recently passed a law that allows transgenders to enter the restrooms, locker rooms, and sports teams of their choice. Transgenders are people who are born as one sex, but have the appearance and behavior of the opposite sex. Some think of this law as the best thing to ever happen to the Californian society, others, however, view this law as an invasion of their human rights, an invitation to violence and an open door for perpetrators. When it comes to the California Gender Law, it does not only affect the transgender students, but every other student and faculty member in that school district. The gender law infringes on the rights of everyone else. First of all, it opens the door for violence. As Tia Jones(15) said, “Keeping and enforcing this law creates an invitation for violence and discrimination against transgender people...first we have to eliminate the prejudice against transgenders, then this law would be effective.” Individuality is an important part of American society, as well as having the freedom to have one’s voice heard; however, forcing students to just accept and be okay with the fact

that their privacy is being compromised is wishful thinking. Whether the students are homophobic or not, the law is just a recipe for disaster. Tom Ammiano, who wrote the bill, said in an interview with reporter James Nash, “We had children testify in the Assembly and Senate that this law will mean they no longer must hide who they are, nor be treated as someone other than who they are.” Transgenders should be treated equally and be able to be who they are; they should not have to feel invisible, but they could still stay true to themselves without this law. Participation in team sports is not as much of an issue as the bathroom and locker room part of the bill. Heterosexual students participate in sports meant for the opposite sex already. But changing in a locker room is another matter. When a teenage girl is undressing in the locker room and a boy walks in and changes right next to her, it is uncomfortable and unfair to the girl. Just because the boy considers himself to be female, that should not make it okay for him to be able to enter as he pleases. Teenagers are insecure with themselves enough as it is; adding this level of privacy invasion is ridiculous. This law could easily be taken ad-

vantage of by perpetrators who just want to be closer to the opposite sex. California State Senator Jim Nielsen said in an interview with reporter Eric Owens, “There are youthful sex offenders. I guarantee there would be those who use this opportunity.” Rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment are already difficult issues for high schools as it is. Passing this law does nothing but aggravate this already volatile issue. In addition, if this law goes further than just schools, it could become a larger public issue as well, opening the door to locker rooms, and other public facitlities for adults with harmful intents As Sylvia Renfroe(14) said, “Little girls or boys don’t need to be in the same facility of an adult while they are changing. It’s one thing if it’s their parents, but it’s completely different if it’s a random stranger.” This law has more cons than it does pros, and there is a huge possibility for problems to arise. All possible scenarios were not considered in the making of this bill. This bill helps the 2 percent of Californians that are affected; however, there is 98 percent of California’s population that it negatively affects. Simply stated, more bad comes from this law than good.


1 sep 2013 pg 11