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ABOUT US MISSION

Omaha Public Library (OPL) strengthens our communities by connecting people with ideas, information and innovative services.

VISION

Omaha is a vital and vibrant city, with OPL as an essential catalyst, collaborator and connector.

CORE VALUES

Service excellence Integrity Innovation Community engagement Equal & inclusive access Staff talent

CONTENTS

ABOUT OPL MESSAGE FROM THE BOARDS AUTHOR VISITS

BRANCH ANNIVERSARIES STORYBOOK LAND TOY LIBRARY KINGMAN MURAL

2 3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10-11 12

GIRLS WHO CODE CLUB 13

SUMMER READING PROGRAM OMAHA READS FINANCIALS / 2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

WHAT DOES THE LIBRARY MEAN TO YOU? FRIENDS OF OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION • FINANCIALS • HISTORIC $1 MILLION GIFT • TOBIAS WOLFF • DONORS

BOARD / ADMINISTRATION / MANAGERS

14-15 16-17 18-19 20 21 22-27

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Each year, OPL staff asks our library guests what the library means to them. Our mission guides what we strive to be for the communities we serve, but only by checking in with our patrons can we get a sense of how we have contributed to the betterment of our city and county. Time and again, we hear overwhelmingly positive feedback from the families and individuals who use OPL’s 12 branch locations. While no two people have the same library needs or experiences, OPL listens to what is happening in our neighborhoods, state and nation, and works to meet the needs of OPL cardholders through quality materials, services and programs. Whether your library is a home away from home, or simply an online destination for eBooks and digital resources, there’s something for everyone at OPL. Families with young children are frequent visitors at OPL storytimes, where pre-K children receive some of their first exposure to early literacy and social skills. Teens turn to OPL for homework help, coding and technology opportunities, as well as a network of like-minded peers with an interest in community involvement. For many adults, the library helps to foster a love for reading in an economical way, aids family and local history research, and creates social experiences through book clubs, craft programs, art openings and more. All of this is made possible through the support of City of Omaha and Douglas County taxpayers together with funds provided to OPL through the Friends of Omaha Public Library and the Omaha Public Library Foundation. Working with library volunteers, partners and advocates, OPL is able to extend its reach to more of the community for a greater impact, and provide opportunities to patrons that it could not achieve alone. Thank you for being a part of our story. We invite you to continue sharing your vision for the future of your libraries. We’re here because of you, and your voice matters.

Omaha Public Library Board of Trustees Omaha Public Library Foundation Board of Directors Friends of OPL Board of Directors

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OPL Staff, Cassandra Clare Tour Bus | Westside Middle School

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AUTHOR VISITS OPL provided many opportunities for book lovers of all ages to meet some of their favorite authors at locations throughout the community. In March, New York Times bestselling author Cassandra Clare introduced her new book in the Shadowhunters series, Lady Midnight, to a group of more than 500 (mostly teenage girls). Clare’s fans erupted into wild applause as the author, along with author friends Sarah Rees Brennan and Holly Black, entered the auditorium. The authors delighted the audience with a Q&A session devoted to revealing some of the decisions made surrounding their beloved book characters. In November, Chewish cookbook author Sandra Goldberg Wendel, and Sarah Baker Hansen, food reporter and columnist for the Omaha World-Herald and author of the Insiders’ Guide to Omaha & Lincoln, headlined the 2016 Culinary Conference. Wendel shared the difference between cheesecake and cheese pie, and how a mélange of religions and cultures steeped with a healthy portion of Jewish food from her paternal grandmother, Nama, shaped how she looks at food. Hansen revealed some of her favorite local comfort foods, and talked about her “food prowls” around Omaha.

Many other authors made appearances at OPL throughout the year including Brenda Baker, James Baldwin, Leo Begley, Marla Benjamin, Katrina Breier, Rebecca Crofoot, John D’Arcy, Robin Donovan, Cedric Fichepain, Marcia Calhoun Forecki, Eric Forrest, Rebecca Gomez, Mary Gonderinger, Donna Gunn, Marina Hardy, Jeanie Jacobson, Joy Johnson, Warren Jorgenson, Donald Joy, Daniel Kenney, Tonya Kuper, Preston Love Jr., Margie Lukas, Jean Lukesh, Abraham Mangar, Brion Martin, Jeff McArthur, Erin McIntyre, Christopher McLucas, Donna Miesbach, David Mike, Jeremy Morong, Frank O’Neal, Lisa Pelto, Tom Render, Matthew S. Rotundo, Rita Rae Roxx, Frances Ruh, Ron Schwab, N.L.Sharp, Jimmy Sheil, Steve Sieberson, Saria Smith, E.B. Tatby, Makayla Townsell, Lee Warren, Sara Wickwire, Brooke Williams, Joyce Winfield, Laura Madeline Wiseman, Tobias Wolff, and Tamara Zentic. Several of these authors took part in the annual Author Fair.

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A.V. SORENSEN LIBRARY AND COMMUNITY CENTER | AUGUST 1976

The building was designed by Bahr, Hanna, Vermeer & Haecker Architects as a split-level facility, featuring a recreation center on the first floor, and a library on the second. The building was named for former Mayor A.V. Sorensen in recognition of his generous personal donation of land, as well as his contributions to Omaha as a civic leader, philanthropist and humanitarian. Today, Sorensen Branch continues to serve as a neighborhood hub with educational and entertainment opportunities for residents in and outside of the Dundee area.

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W. CLARKE SWANSON BRANCH FEBRUARY 1966

As the sixth OPL location, Swanson Branch was considered a solution to the increased migration of families to west Omaha. It serves not only the neighborhoods surrounding its location, but also many Omaha commuters who find its location at 90th & Dodge convenient.

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The man for whom the library is named was a prominent civic and business leader who did much to advance the progress of the city. Omaha-based architecture firm Leo A. Daly designed Swanson Branch to serve a growing suburban area, and upon its completion, it immediately became the busiest branch in the system, breaking a single day lending record in its first week of business. Today, Swanson Branch continues to thrive and is treasured for its rare children’s collection and book sales by the Friends of OPL.

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MILESTONE BRANCH ANNIVERSARIES

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WILLA CATHER BRANCH DECEMBER 1956

The fourth branch in the OPL system was built to meet the growing population in southwest Omaha, and the site was selected for its proximity to the new Center Shopping Mall and Norris Middle School.

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At the time, Willa Cather Branch was considered an architectural experiment with a contemporary design. Wall-sized windows were installed facing Center Street not only to provide sufficient interior lighting, but also so passers-by could clearly see the book collection displayed inside, just as one might in a retail store. The facility also featured garage space to house the library’s Bookmobile. Named for one of Nebraska’s most celebrated authors, Willa Cather Branch serves a diverse community and offers a variety of programs including storytimes and book clubs. Several community groups also make use of the space for knitting club, Girl Scouts, language-speaking workshops and more. Sto

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“STORYBOOK LAND BRINGS CHARACTERS TO LIFE AND ENHANCES THE READING EXPERIENCE FOR PARTICIPATING CHILDREN.”

-OPL Youth Services Manager Julie Humphrey

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STORYBOOK LAND

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OPL successfully kicked off National Library Week by hosting its third annual Storybook Land event at Saddlebrook Branch. A record crowd of 750 people gathered on April 10 to meet eight of their favorite life-sized costume characters including Pete the Cat, Lyle Lyle Crocodile, Skippyjon Jones, the Snow Queen, Lilly the Mouse, Martha the Dog, Paddington Bear and Batman. OPL’s beloved mascot Scamper the Prairie Dog was also on site to help greet visitors as they arrived. Children of all ages gave high-fives and hugs to their storybook friends and left with a free book and many great memories. “Storybook characters visit storytimes at OPL throughout the year and families really enjoy the time to meet the characters and take photos,” said OPL Youth Services Manager Julie Humphrey.

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“TOYS ARE A TERRIFIC WAY TO TEACH CHILDREN AND DEVELOP LITERACY SKILLS.” -OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane

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LEARNING MADE FUN

Developing literacy and learning skills for OPL’s youngest patrons is a priority, and part of that learning experience for children includes toys. Yet, some families in our community may not have access to a variety of toys due to economic or special needs. On June 1, OPL introduced over 100 types of toys to OPL’s collection. Patrons peruse the toys in OPL’s online catalog or browse through a printed list available at each of OPL’s neighborhood branches. Toys in the collection are geared toward children ages 0-8 years. Available toys include dolls, musical instruments, building blocks, games and more! “Toys are a terrific way to teach children and develop literacy skills,” OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane said. “OPL’s staff worked to create a collection of toys that will inspire imagination, learning and fun.”

This collection is a valuable extension of educational packages curated by librarians such as Sensational Science Kits, Storybook Buddies Bags, and themed story boxes. These learning tools are among the many ways that OPL strives to provide materials and services that promote literacy and contribute to the wellbeing of our community’s youth. In the seven months that OPL’s Toy Library was active in 2016, toys were checked out 2,137 times. Funding for the Toy Library was made available through donations to the Omaha Public Library Foundation from The Sherwood Foundation and the Adah and Leon Millard Foundation.

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KINGMAN MURAL

The Eugene Kingman mural | Main Library

In 1946, Arthur Hayes Sulzberger, publisher of The New York Times, commissioned Eugene Kingman to paint an inspirational mural for the lobby of the Times headquarters in New York City. Kingman, a nationallyknown artist and muralist, was about to move to Omaha as the second director for Joslyn Art Museum. The mural was painted at Joslyn Art Museum and installed in the lobby of The New York Times in 1948. It remained there until the late 1980s when it was taken down during remodeling. In 2013, a group of Omaha art lovers led by Maureen McCann Waldron began working with the Kingman family and The New York Times to return the mural to Omaha. In 2014, the Times donated the mural to The Joslyn Castle Trust. The mural features a view of the world as it might have been seen from space, and also features a line of poetry by Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, “Every day is a fresh beginning ~ Every morn is the world made new.” The Kingman Mural was installed at W. Dale Clark Main Library in June. “OPL is thrilled to have the Kingman mural,” said OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane. “The location is ideal for making the mural accessible to our community and Omaha visitors alike. It is also truly representative of what the library is about—opening your world to new opportunities and experiences.” Kingman mural installation | June 13, 2016

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GIRLS WHO CODE CLUB In February 2016, OPL announced the launch of a new Girls Who Code club, a community-based affiliate of the national non-profit organization Girls Who Code, which seeks to inspire, educate, and equip girls with the computing skills to pursue 21st century opportunities. The first club session took place on March 5, at Milton R. Abrahams Branch. Each Saturday for 20 weeks, 24 girls met for four hours to connect, strategize, and virtually build solutions to problems they encounter in everyday life. The class concluded on July 30 with a reception and presentation of their project at the AIM Institute. The first class was such a success that a second class of girls started in the fall.

“IT WAS REALLY EXCITING TO BE A PART OF THIS IMPORTANT OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUNG GIRLS” -Branch Manager Marvel Maring

“Sometimes, there are social pressures and girls can feel that maybe this is a male-dominated area and that they don’t have a voice. By having girls’ clubs, it’s a much more comfortable environment for them.” Club partners included Interface Web School, Omaha Coding Women, and Omaha Public Schools (OPS). Club mentors included Sandi Barr, software engineer and founder of Omaha Coding Women; Shonna Dorsey, co-founder and managing director of Interface Web School; Eris Koleszar, senior developer at SkyVu Entertainment; Naomi See, programmer analyst at West Interactive & Java CEM at Interface Web School; and Lana Yager, OPS computer science instructor.

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OVERALL, 28,412 PARTICIPANTS LOGGED AN OUTSTANDING 251,320 HOURS OF READING TIME DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS. 1414


SUMMER READING PROGRAM

Readers of all ages raced to the finish line of the 2016 Summer Reading Program (SRP): On Your Mark, Get Set, READ! Kids, teens, and adults had the chance to exercise their minds Jeff Q uinn M and show off their reading agic | Washin gton B ranch strengths. Participants flexed their mental (and sometimes physical) muscles while experiencing a variety of programs like self-defense, ballet storytime, animal encounters, life-sized games, robotics, and much more at over 1,000 programs throughout the city. Reading is always the main focus of the Summer Reading Program. Overall, 28,412 participants logged an outstanding 251,320 hours of reading time during the summer months. Participants also had the opportunity to collect virtual badges, which encouraged additional learning and discovery through program attendance and by sharing experiences such as opinions about books, book recommendations, exploring book genres, and more. For each activity completed or event attended, participants redeemed a code online to receive a virtual badge to add to their collection. More than 60 badges were available to each age group to collect. Over 58,954 virtual badges were collected by library users over the summer. Summer Reading Program proved to be fun, physical and educational for all involved.

2016 Summer Reading Program sponsors included presenting sponsor Cox Communications; premier sponsors Richard Brooke Foundation and the Sokolof Foundation in memory of Richard Rosinsky; the Omaha Public Library Foundation and the Friends of Omaha Public Library; and in-kind sponsors City of Omaha Parks & Recreation, Family Fun Center XL, Fat Brain Toys, Film Streams, Gamers, Kids DIY Studio, NEST 529, O Comic Con, Omaha Children’s Museum, Omaha Public Schools, Omaha Storm Chasers, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, Papio Fun Park, Raising Cane’s, SkateDaze, SONIC Drive-In, That Pottery Place, The Bookworm, The Durham Museum, and The Rose Theater. 15


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ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE WAS CHECKED OUT MORE THAN 520 TIMES.

OPL celebrated its 12th annual Omaha Reads campaign in September with Anthony Doerr’s All The Light We Cannot See. Each fall, OPL encourages the community to join together in reading one book as part of the Omaha Reads campaign. Omaha Reads provides the city with a common theme to discuss and promotes literacy through book talks, author visits, and programming related to the chosen book. Preliminary titles are nominated and then voted upon by Omaha and Douglas County residents. Previous Omaha Reads selections include Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell, The Meaning of Names by Karen Gettert Shoemaker, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, and The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton.

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OMAHA READS

Set during World War II, the 2016 Omaha Reads selection, All The Light We Cannot See, followed the lives of various characters through Germany and France, revealing that there was nowhere to hide and there were no winners during this devastating period of history. “All the Light We Cannot See is an excellent choice of a book to spark conversation,” said OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane. “Not only does it humanize the war by introducing the reader to new perspectives through its characters, but it also recognizes how warfare evolves with changing technologies. The options for ann Bachm n re a discussion are endless.” K

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Programs were offered to explore some themes addressed in the book. Brian York, Curator of Exhibits and Collections for Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum, presented “The Importance of Radio in Nazi Germany and Occupied France.” Karen Bachmann, jewelry designer and instructor at Pratt Institute and the Fashion Institute of Technology, presented “Cursed Gemstones in History;” and author Joyce H. Winfield shared from her book, Forever Heroes: A Collection of World War II Stories from Nebraska Veterans. Joyce H. Winfield

Omaha Reads is supported through funding provided by the Omaha Public Library Foundation and Friends of Omaha Public Library.

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REVENUE City of Omaha (General Fund & Keno) $11,942,664 Douglas County $2,100,000 Omaha Public Library Foundation $288,865 Fines and fees collected $250,000 Friends of Omaha Public Library $165,937 State of Nebraska $164,177 Grants and other income $2,455 Total Revenue

$14,914,098

EXPENDITURES Personnel $10,004,717 Books, materials, databases $1,889,224 Facilities $1,772,869 Technology $463,536 Outreach and programming $229,230 Other operating expenses $180,039 Summer Reading Program $80,000 Total Expenditures

$14,619,615

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Current Library Members | 268,282 Items Borrowed | 3,039,413 Library Visits | 2,016,595 Website Visits | 1,594,094 Computer Sessions | 568,614 Wi-Fi Sessions | 197,014 Digital Downloads | 384,152 Freegal Songs Downloaded | 93,324

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kids, teens & adults participated in the Summer Reading Program

78,381

individuals attended a community, civic or business meeting in one of our meeting rooms

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WE ASKED: WHAT DOES THE LIBRARY MEAN TO YOU? OUR PATRONS SAID...

It means having an abundance of resources to help us home school! We appreciate being able to check out all of these great books!

• A place to be social, to learn—a place of community. •

It offers a wonderful array of great services for all ages.

Everything! I am an online student and do not have internet access at home. I have managed to maintain a GPA of 4.0 and will graduate in August. Couldn’t have done it without you!

I like the library very much because lots of books, and I’m coming to attend English program. It’s really very helpful for me.

It’s a place of learning and entertainment and good company. I think the library is one of the most important institutions ever allowing access of knowledge to all.

I couldn’t live without the library. It has allowed me to do my taxes, my homework, find a job, and even feed me with the seed program.

• A place where my kids can have a resource for expanding their minds through books. • A library to me means history. The smell of the books, the niceties of my neighborhood, and the sound of minds at work! The energy is beautiful here! •

I drive 3,000 miles a month, so I listen to a lot of audio books. Thanks to the library, I am able to do that.

• The library is central to my life - I have found wonderful art, literature, and people here!

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Friends of Omaha Public Library is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, grassroots organization dedicated to raising money for the library, providing volunteers, and promoting the library to the greater community. Volunteer members raise funds with book sales at W. Clarke Swanson Branch on the first Saturday of each month and every Thursday. They also raise funds through internet book sales, memberships, and donations to benefit OPL, its patrons, and the greater Omaha community. In 2016, the Friends provided OPL with 9,203 hours of volunteer service and more than $165,900. These funds helped support important programming such as author events, the Virginia Frank Memorial Writing Contest, and Omaha Reads. Learn more about becoming a Friend at friendsomahalibrary.org.

2016 BOARD Karen Hosier, President Cathy Hohman, Secretary Angie Wells, Treasurer Kay Bashus James DeMott Joe Goecke Polly Goecke Rose Hill Gwen Howard Michael O’Hara Euem Osmera Jeanne Spence

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REVENUE

$1,813,599*

EXPENDITURES

Direct library contributions $288,865 Development $156,346 Administration & office expenses $61,094 Total Expenditures $506,305

Some of the programs & services supported by OPLF: • • • • • • • •

Baby Reads Technology Books & materials Washington Branch summer lock-ins Summer Reading Program Designated branch support After-school programs Teen literacy programs

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2016 BOARD

Arun Agarwal, Vice President Jim Kineen, Treasurer Dan Kinsella, Advisor Bob Berger Anne Branigan Julie Cobb Traci Hancock Jo Giles Tina Lonergan Mark McMillan Kathy Roum EX OFFICIO MEMBERS Laura Marlane Carol Wang FOUNDATION STAFF Wendy Townley Development Director Sandra Lyden Development Associate

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THE MISSION OF THE OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION (OPLF) IS TO RAISE FUNDS AND ADVOCATE FOR OPL.

Wendy Townley, Matt Couch, Marty Davis & Laura Marlane

Citing a passion for education and literacy, the late Virginia C. Schmid of Omaha awarded a $1 million bequest to the Omaha Public Library Foundation. The check was presented by Schmid’s niece, Marty Davis of Bellevue, on January 6, 2016. An additional $171,519 was gifted from the estate in October 2016. Per Schmid’s wishes, the gift is designated exclusively to OPL’s A.V. Sorensen Branch – located in the heart of the Dundee neighborhood at 48th and Cass streets – in support of books, capital expenditures, and other branch improvements. Additionally, “in no event shall any of this gift be used for the ordinary operating expenses of Sorensen Branch,” according to paperwork accompanying the donation. This $1.17 million gift marks the largest single contribution the OPLF has received in its 32-year history. “We are truly humbled and even a bit speechless following the news of this extremely generous gift from the late Virginia Schmid,” said OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane. “Before moving to Omaha, I had heard this was a very philanthropic community. This is proof positive of such support. We are overwhelmed with gratitude.” Until OPL and its Trustees determine how to best use the gift at Sorensen Branch, the funds will remain in a trust. Virginia Schmid passed away in October 2015. She and her late husband, Marvin, met at the University of NebraskaLincoln in the late 1930s. They married in 1941. Throughout her life, she was a dedicated volunteer. According to Davis, Schmid loved travel, fine food, ballroom dancing, family, and friends.

Virginia Schmid, 2011


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A NOVEL AFFAIRE: TOBIAS WOLFF Award-winning author Tobias Wolff headlined A Novel Affaire, the Omaha Public Library Foundation’s (OPLF) third annual fundraiser, on April 2. Speaking to a crowd of approximately 150 OPLF supporters, Wolff shared stories of his life as a writer, delighting the crowd with humor one minute, and thought-provoking advice for writers (and the craft of writing) the next. He also answered questions from the audience about his many works, including two of his most popular, This Boy’s Life and In Pharaoh’s Army. Wolff is a lifelong lover and user of public libraries, and explained how they played a pivotal role in his passion for the printed word. OPL Executive Director Laura Marlane introduced Wolff at the fundraiser, adding how the support of private contributions makes library programs and services possible. “Your generosity allows us to expand our reach and touch more lives. OPL is reaching people through technology,” Marlane said. Even if you can’t get to a library, you can apply for a card, download eBooks, audiobooks, and even have access to resources and take classes online for free. Our programming reaches all ages, from the children who attend story times and coding clubs, to the adults who learn English and prepare for their GED.” A Novel Affaire 2016 was made possible by the generosity of the following event sponsors: Baxter Auto Group, Cline Williams, Deloitte, Fraser Stryker, Heritage Services, Jim Kineen, the family of the late Beverly McMillan, Nelnet, Streck, Tenaska, and Valmont.

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FINANCIAL GIFTS

Memorial & honorarium donors are recognized in our quarterly Connect newsletter throughout the year. $1,000,000+ Virginia Schmid Trust

Berger & O’Toole, CPAs (Bob & Shary Berger) Anne Branigan Cline Williams Wright Johnson & Oldfather Julie & Scott Cobb John & Terri Diesing Carol Ebdon Evonik Nancy Ford Fraser Stryker PC LLO Friedland Family Foundation Lance & Julie Fritz Carol Gendler Mike & Wanda Gottschalk Deryl & Ramona Hamann Peggy & John Heck Harold & Clara Hoover Edward Hotz & Trish Nipp Sandra Jenkins Richard & Helen Kelley Jack & Stephanie Koraleski Dan & Tina Lonergan Gary & Lucie Long Mary & Rodrigo Lopez Deborah Macdonald Laura Marlane Greg & Lori McMillan NelNet, Inc. Murray & Sharee Newman Phyllis & Bob Newman Peggy Payne Mary Anne & Bruce Ramge Nancy Rips Dave & Anne Rismiller Silvia Roffman Kathy & Chad Roum John & Ruth Sage D. David & Martha Slosburg Stephen & Karen Swartz Van Timberlake Union Pacific Corp. United Way of the Midlands Valmont Industries, Inc. Carol Wang & Jim Phillips Sarah Watson Webster Family Foundation Meredith & Drew Weitz Wells Fargo Bank Philip & Nancy Wolf

$50,000+ The Sherwood Foundation $25,000+ Anonymous Richard Brooke Foundation Hawks Foundation Lozier Foundation Omaha Community Foundation William & Ruth Scott Family Foundation Weitz Family Foundation $15,000+ Cox Communications Dr. C.C. & Mabel L. Criss Foundation Sokolof Foundation in Memory of Richard Rosinsky $10,000+ McGowan Family Foundation Omaha World-Herald $5,000+ Bluestem Prairie Foundation Holland Foundation Humanities Nebraska Steve Martin & Amy Haddad Pacific Life Foundation Amy L. Scott Family Foundation Fred & Eve Simon Charitable Foundation The Todd & Betiana Simon Foundation Tenaska, Inc.

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$2,000+ Baer Foundation Clifton B. & Anne Stuart Batchelder Foundation Benson Plant Rescue Barbara Bock-Mavis Stephen & Anne Bruckner Burlington Capital Foundation Deloitte & Touche LLP Sandy & Kate Dodge Devin Fox, M.D. Joan Gibson & Don Wurster James & Dawn Hammel Heritage Services Special Donor-Advised Fund of the Jewish Federation of Omaha Foundation Jim Kineen Dan & Kari Kinsella Mark & Dianne McMillan Mike & Dana Meyer Rochelle Mullen William R. Patrick Foundation Lewis & Winifred Pinch RBC Wealth Management Paul & Annette Smith Streck, Inc. $1,000+ Anonymous (2) Arun Agarwal Jean & Mohammad Amoura-Odeh Mary Joy Anderson Lynn & Thomas Ashby Baxter Auto Group Mogens & Cindy Bay Benson Neighborhood Association

$500+ Anonymous Abrahams Kaslow & Cassman ACCESSbank Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture, P.C. Lise Anderson Michael & Michelle Berlin Dick & Carole Burrows Sandor & Rhonda Chomos Lou & Ellie Clure Maurice & Cora Conner Mark & Teri D’Agostino Stewart & Lisa Dale Nancy Darst Hal & Mary Daub Joseph Drugmand John & Janis Haggstrom Traci Hancock Lynn Harland Dave & Vicki Krecek Russell & Mary Ann Manners Jim & Bobbie Montequin Harriet Otis Physicians Mutual Insurance Co Norma & Cliff Pountney Sandra Price John & Kathleen Ransom Ann Rinne Greg & Sue Rusie Saddlebrook Elementary School PTA nch ton Bra Washing ration | eb el C a Kwanza

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$250+ Anonymous (3) Doug & Cathy Aden Trent Allen AmazonSmile Foundation Jo Anne Amoura Aon George & Kathleen Bigelow Marjorie & Larry Brennan Richard & Carol Britten Bobbie Carlson Sydney Cate Robert & Jill Cochran Leilani & Ron Coe Tim Davlin & Ann O’Connor Thomas & Nancy Gallagher Jo Giles Lynn & Cindy Gray David Harding & Sarah Newman Terry & Linda Haubold Jamie Hsu Kyle & Lisa Hutchings Jim & Mary Jansen Theresa Jehlik Howard & Gloria Kaslow Katie & Justin Kemerling Emily & Philip Kemp Linda Lavely Marty Magee Maha Music Festival Roland & Jean Mariucci Stephanie McClellan Sharon L. McGrath John & Meg McNeal John & Merrilee Miller Ilka Oberst Stacey Otterson Peanut Butter Johnny’s Marcie Peterson Rotary Club of Omaha-North Rotary-Suburban Margaret Shearer Mary Ann & Gilbert Sherman The Soener Foundation Gloria Sorensen Pete & Mary Lou Stehr Elizabeth Summers Bill & Joan Truhlsen Eileen M. Wirth $100+ Anonymous (7) LaTisha Adams Aksarben Cinema Al Anon Tuesday Noon Library Clyde & Mary Anna Anderson Terry & Kris Atkins Lee Bachand Erin Bagwell Kim Bainbridge Barbara Bakhit Louise Bates Jean Battafarano Mary Baumstark Marcia Bechtel Colleen & Dale Bentley Bob & Shary Berger Karen Berry Verda Bialac Edward & Marion Bianchi Jim & Gail Binderup Lynn & Dave Blagg Rachel Bonnema Laura Bonnett-Murphy Dorothy & David Bowman Robert & Connie Bowne Jeffrey Boyum Kathleen Bradley Ann Burdette Julie & Charlie Burt Cecil Bykerk Margaret Cahill Jeanette Capps James & Anne Carroll Patrick Caulfield Susan & Bob Chenoweth Patricia Clow Tonya Conley John Connell

Library Bash | M ain Teen Poet ry

Shirley Siebler Sandra Squires Christine & Tony Swerczek Telugu Samiti of Nebraska Red & Jann Thomas Bruce & Susan Vosburg Jim & Maureen Waldron Molly Wickert

Shirley Crites Alistair Cullum Tony & Claudia Deeb Samantha Delagarza & Michael Luebbert Robyn Devore Carol & Dave Dickey Melinda Dillon Judith Douglas Linda & Charles Duckworth Dundee Bank Eclectic Book Club Carl Ekstrom Joanne Ferguson Cavanaugh Tom & Janet Ferlic Sarah Ferneding Ms. Mary Beth Flanagan Megan Flory Charles & Sherry Forrest Ivy Forrest Tom & Ruth Frank Jerry & Joanne Freeman Giger Foundation Joanne Gilmore Greater Omaha Genealogical Society Nancy Grant Martha Grenzeback Cheryl Griffin & Chuck Lenosky David Haas & Joan Lusienski Sarah Haddad Sarah Hanify Sarah Baker Hansen & Matthew Hansen Jesse Harding Roger & Jackie Harned Book Club Mary Jo Havlicek Dr. Kris & Mr. Gary Hoffman Marjorie Hood Barbara How Stephen Hug & Tom Elser Jack & Linda Huggins Donna & Edwin Hull IAWP, Nebraska Chapter Nisha Jafari Tony & Jan Jasnowski Eva & Burt Jay Marlene Jennum Jennifer & Chris Jerram George & Margaret Johnson Michelle Johnston Madeline Jones Barbara Karpf Lora Kaup Jim & Ruth Keene Lyle Kinley & Gwen Teeple Harry & Gail Koch Marc & Joan Kraft Terry & Jackie Kroeger Bob & Kathy Kunkle Richard J. Kutilek Joseph & Molly Lang Patrick Leahy Titus Lehman Steve Likes Patricia Lontor Rachel Lookadoo Quan Ly Bill MacKenzie Marilyn Marsh Amy Mather John & Deb McCollister Zulaika McEwen Gail McFayden Dr. & Mrs. Paul Meissner Metro Omaha Prime Timers George Morrissey

Geraldine Morrissey Ann Moshman Mandy Mowers Diana Nevins Daniel O’Keefe Omaha NE Parliamentary NAP Marian Paasch Beth & James Pakiz Frank Partsch Susan Petersen Jane Petersen Chuck & Char Peterson Denise & Hobson Powell Katherine Powers Don & Mary Lee Ranheim Robert & Patricia Ranney Neal & Deb Ratzlaff Liz Rea Amanda Reid Dick & Mary Lynn Reiser Gail & Curt Reiter Stephen Robinson Lloyd Rohrer Romance Authors of the Heartland James & Nancy Rosenthal Laura Rothe Deirdre Routt & Kevin Graham Max & Karen Rudolph Robert & Sheila Runyon Amy Sand Robert Schartz Daniel Schmidt Scriptown Brewing Company Richard & Carolyn Sieling Martin & Bonnie Simon Magan Smith Deborah Smith-Howell Pam & Neal Soderquist Mark Sorensen Becky & Dan Spencer Susan Stalnaker Matthew & Vera Stefan Rachel Steiner Kenneth & Ellen Stoll Mayor Jean Stothert & Dr. Joseph Stothert Ryan Strawhecker Nina Strickler Steve & Debra Styers Jesse Sullivan Gerry Sullivan & Bob Benzel Dan & Molli Surdell Vance Taylor Drs. Jon & Ann Taylor Mark Thalken & Katie Wadas-Thalken Austin & Dorothy Thompson Wallace Thoreson Anne & Charles Trimble Nichole & Kevin Turgeon Union Pacific Fund for Effective Government Vana Family Mary Wampler Nicole Wheeler Theodore Wheeler Judy & Gale Wickersham Jim Wilcynski Sarah Williams Michaela Willroth Michael Barwig & Jim Wolf Woodward Family Emily Young

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Omaha Public Library is governed by a ninemember board of trustees appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the city council to serve a three-year term. Monthly meetings are open to the public.

2016 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Caitlyn Davis Lenora Isom Mike Kennedy Kathleen McCallister Ervin Portis Adrian Suarez-Delgado Jesse Sullivan Beverly Thompson Carol Wang

ADMINISTRATION Laura Marlane, Executive Director Rachel Steiner, Assistant Director Deb Barelos, Borrower Services Manager Ben Brick, Collections Processing Manager Jody duRand, Community Engagement Manager Emily Getzschman, Marketing Manager Jason Goossen, Technology Manager Julie Humphrey, Youth Services Manager Theresa Jehlik, Strategy & Business Intelligence Manager Amy Mather, Adult Services Manager Judy Shannon, Collection Development Manager

BRANCH MANAGERS Matt Couch, W. Dale Clark Main Library Jennifer Jazynka, Milton R. Abrahams Branch Karen Pietsch, Benson Branch Sarah VanRaden, Bess Johnson Elkhorn Branch Micki Dietrich, Florence Branch Lois Imig, Millard Branch Lori Nelson, Saddlebrook Branch Deirdre Routt, A.V. Sorensen Branch Marvel Maring, South Omaha Library Casey Kralik, W. Clarke Swanson Branch Joanne Ferguson Cavanaugh, Charles B. Washington Branch Evonne Edgington, Willa Cather Branch y 2016

Staff Da

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OPL Annual report 2016  

Omaha Public Library Annual Report 2016

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