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Opera for Beginners


A Letter to the Teachers Dear Teachers,

Opera Colorado is pleased to provide engaging educational programs and performances for students across Colorado. What follows is a guide that we hope you and your students find useful, as we explore the basics of opera. In the spirit of exploration, we have included various lessons that connect opera with different subjects of learning. The lessons reference the new Colorado Department of Education’s Academic Standards: specifically, focusing on the fourth grade expectations. This does not mean, however, that these lessons should be limited to this age group. While we would be very pleased if you used these lessons in the exact format provided, we encourage you to expand, alter, and adapt these lessons so that they best fit your students’ abilities and development. After all, the teacher knows their student’s needs best. We would appreciate your feedback on our teacher evaluation form found at the end of this guide, and we hope that you enjoy all that Opera Colorado has to offer!

Ciao!

- Cherity Koepke Director of Education & Community Programs - Meghan Benedetto Manager of Education & Community Programs - Amelia ewport Education Intern

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Contact us to learn more! Opera Colorado’s Education & Community Programs department offers many more programs to assist your students as they continue to discover the world of opera. We have programs that take place at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House as well as programs that we can bring directly to your classroom. We even have opera education specialists that can teach lessons directly to your students.

Cherity Koepke, Director of Education & Community Programs ckoepke@operacolorado.org, 303.778.0371 Meghan Benedetto, Manager of Education & Community Programs mbenedetto@operacolorado.org, 303.778.7350 Amelia Newport, Education Intern intern@operacolorado.org, 303.778.0389 Opera Colorado 695 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 20 Denver, CO 80246

Opera Colorado makes every effort to ensure that the information provided in this guidebook is as accurate as possible. With the exception of materials used for educational purposes, none of the contents of this guidebook may be reprinted without the permission of Opera Colorado’s Education & Community Programs department. Dictionary definitions were taken from www.Merriam-Webster.com, and unless marked otherwise, educational information was gathered from www.Wikipedia.com . Unless otherwise noted, the materials in this guidebook were developed and compiled by Opera Colorado Intern, Amelia (ewport.

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Table of Contents Bel Canto & Opera Buffa ............................................................. 5 Glossary ....................................................................................... 6-10 Musical Terms .............................................................................. 11 Opera Comprehension Test – answer sheet ................................. 12 Opera Comprehension Test .......................................................... 13 On Stage ....................................................................................... 14 More stage activities..................................................................... 15 Character Wheel .......................................................................... 16 Character Frame .......................................................................... 17 Character Web .............................................................................. 18 Opera Career Activities ................................................................ 19-22 Classroom Writing Activities - Story Starters ............................. 23 Everyone’s A Critic ...................................................................... 24 Storyboarding ............................................................................... 25 Math Opera Activities for Elementary and Middle School ......... 26-27 More Opera Math – music notes .................................................. 28-30 Calculating the Cost ..................................................................... 31-32 You Design It! .............................................................................. 33 Opera Word Search ...................................................................... 34 Evaluation Form ........................................................................... 35 Tools for Educators ..................................................................... 36

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Bel Canto & Opera Buffa!

La Cenerentola (Cinderella) is an example of Bel Canto opera. Bel canto is Italian for “beautiful singing.” The term, in this case, also refers to a particular style of operatic singing that emphasizes beautiful tone and brilliant technique over dramatic expression. Bel canto is associated with the Italian opera of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, particularly the works of Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini. Audiences of this time wanted to hear as many “vocal fireworks” as possible (the more fast passages and high notes the better!), therefore the bel canto composers placed much more emphasis on singing than on plot development and story. Before Rossini, singers were expected to improvise their own ornamentations of simple vocal lines, adding the vocal fireworks that they felt were appropriate for the aria. Often, they could not remember what ornaments they had sung in a previous performance, resulting in a different show each night! Rossini, however, tried to put an end to this practice by writing in the specific ornamentations that he wanted the singers to perform in his arias. Many singers, however, still chose to add additional ornaments to those that Rossini composed. There is a story that Rossini happened to be at a party where the famous diva Adelina Patti sang the aria “Una voce poco fa” (Rosina’s opening aria in The Barber of Seville). Ms. Patti had added so many ornaments, however, that Rossini was prompted to remark “Very nice, my dear, and who wrote the piece that you have just sung?” Cinderella is also an example of Opera Buffa, an Italian term meaning “comic opera”. This term is mainly used for 18th century Italian comic operas. Opera buffa contrasts with opera seria (“serious opera”) in which the story was a tragedy. Like the opera seria, everything was sung – there was no spoken dialogue. This was different from comic opera in other countries. The story in opera buffa is told in recitative and there are arias for the characters to show their feelings and show off their voices. Opera buffa started in Naples and gradually spread to other parts of Italy. It was particularly popular at carnival time. Important composers of opera buffa include Goldoni, Mozart and Rossini. By the end of the 18th century it was not always possible to tell the difference between an opera buffa and an opera seria. Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni, for example, has a lot of comedy, but there is also a serious side. Opera buffa always includes a lot of caricature. The characters show human weaknesses such as stupidity, vanity, greed and affectation (people who were pretending to be wise and important). In opera buffa the acting is always very important. These are usually lively operas with a lot happening very quickly. At the end of each act all the main characters usually sing together; this is called an “ensemble” (the French word for “together”). Did you know that some operas could be BOTH bel canto and opera buffa? Cinderella is a great example – it is indeed sung in the bel canto style, but it is a comedy, so it is also opera buffa!

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Glossary: Important Words in Opera Act

a section of the opera tthat is then divided into scenes

Aria

a piece of music written for a one singer or soloist (means means “air” in Italian)

Aside

a secret comment from an actor to the audience that the other characters can’t hear

Baritone

the middle ssinging range of the male voice

Bass

the lowest singing range of the male voice

Basso buffo

a bass singer who specializes in comic characters (Italian term)

Basso profundo

the most serious bass voice (Italian term)

Baton

short stick that the conduc conductor uses to lead the orchestra

Bel Canto

A traditiona traditional Italian style of singing ing emphasizing tone, phrasing, coloratura loratura passages, and technique; also refers to the he operas written in this style (Italian, means “beautiful singing”)

Blocking

directions given to the pperformers for movement on stage

Bravo

a form of appreciation shouted by audience members at the end of a particularly pleas pleasing performance; technically, Bravo refers to a male performer, Brava refers to a female performer and Bravi refers to many performers (Italian means, “well done)

Cadenza

a passage of singing, often at the end of an aria, which shows off the singer's vocal ability

Choreographer

the person w who designs the steps of a dance

Chorus

a group of singers of all vocal ranges, singing toge together ther to support the vocal leads

Classical

the period in music which comes after the Baroque and before the Romantic, roughly from the birth of Mozart to short shortly ly after the death of Beethoven; it represents the greatest standardization in orchestral form and tonality

Coloratura

elaborate ornamentation of music written for a singer uusing sing many fast notes and trills

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Composer

the individual who writes all the music for both voice and instrument.

Comprimario

a nineteenth century term referring to secondary or supporting roles such as confidantes, messengers, and matchmakers

Contralto

the lowest female voice range, sometimes also referred to as alto

Conductor

the person responsible for the musical interpretation and coordination of the performance, the conductor controls the tempo, the dynamic level and the balance between singers and orchestra; you will see this person standing in the orchestra pit

Crescendo

a build in the volume or dynamic of the music

Cue

a signal to enter or exit from the stage, to move or to change lighting or scenery; or a signal given by the conductor to the musicians

Curtain Call

occurs at the end of the performance when all the cast members and the conductor take bows, this can occur in front of the curtain or on the open stage

Designer

a production can have many designers: a lighting designer, a costume designer, a set designer, or someone who is both costume and set designer, etc., they work closely with the stage director to give the production a distinctive look

Diva

An important female opera star, the masculine form is divo (Italian means, “goddess�)

Dress Rehearsal

the final rehearsal before opening night, includes costumes, lights, makeup, etc. sometimes it is necessary to stop for adjustments, but an attempt is made to make it as much like a regular performance as possible

Duet

music that is written for two people to sing together

Encore

a piece that is performed after the last scheduled piece of a concert, an encore is usually performed because the audience wants to hear more even though the concert is over

Ensemble

a part of the opera written for a group of two or more singers

Falsetto

the upper part of a voice in which the vocal cords do not vibrate completely, usually used by males to imitate a female voice

Finale

the last musical number of an opera or an act

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Grand Opera

spectacular opera lavishly staged, with a historically-based plot, a huge cast, an unusually-large orchestra, and ballet, it can also refer to opera without spoken dialogue

Helden

German prefix meaning “heroic” usually used in “heldentenor” but can apply to other voice types

House

the auditorium and front of the theatre excluding the stage and backstage areas

Interlude

a short piece of instrumental music played between scenes and acts

Intermission

a break between acts of an opera, the lights go on and the audience is free to move around

Librettist

the writer of the opera’s text (or words or lyrics)

Libretto

Italian for “little book,” it is the text or story of the opera (an opera’s script)

Lyric

used to describe a light to medium weight voice with an innocent quality, capable of both sustained, forceful singing and delicate effects.

Maestro

used as a courtesy title for the conductor (male or female means “master” in Italian)

Mark

to sing, but not at full voice; a full-length opera is very hard on a singer’s voice so most performers mark during rehearsals

Mezzo-soprano

the middle singing range for a female voice

Motif or Leitmotif

a recurring musical theme used to identify an emotion, person, place, or object

Opera

a dramatic presentation which is set to music, almost all of it is sung, and the orchestra is an equal partner with the singers (Opera is the plural form of the Latin word opus, which means “work”)

Opera buffa

an opera about ordinary people, usually comic, first developed in the eighteenth century (Italian term)

Opera seria

a serious opera (Italian term)

Operetta

lighthearted opera with some spoken dialogue, such as a musical

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Orchestra

an ensemble, led by a conductor, that is comprised of string, woodwind, brass and percussion instruments

Orchestra pit

sunken area in front of the stage where the orchestra sits

Overture

a musical introduction to the opera played before the curtain rises or the opera begins

Pitch

how high or low a note sounds

Prelude

a short introduction that leads into an act without a pause

Prima Donna

The leading woman in an opera; because of the way some of them behaved in the past, it often refers to someone who is acting in a superior and demanding fashion, the term for a leading man is primo uomo (Italian means, “first lady�)

Principal

a major singing role, or the singer who performs such a role

Production

the entire show; the combination of sets, costumes, props, and lights, etc.

Props

objects carried or used on stage by the performers

Proscenium

the front opening of the stage which frames the action

Quartet

four singers or the music that is written for four singers

Raked Stage

a stage that slants downwards towards the audience

Recitative

lines of dialogue that are sung, usually with no recognizable melody, it is used to advance the plot

Rehearsal

a working session in which the singers prepare for a performance

Score

the written music of an opera or other musical work

Serenade

a piece of music honoring someone or something

Soprano

the highest range of the female singing voice.

Soubrette

young female character with a light soprano (French term)

Spinto

a lyric voice that has the power and incisiveness for dramatic climaxes (Italian term)

Stage Areas

refers to the various sections of the stage as seen by those on stage

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Stage Director

thee person in charge of the action on stage, hee or she shows the singers, chorus and cast where and when to move and helps them create their characters; the he stage director develops a concept for how the entire performance rformance should look and feel, hhee or she works closely with the stage managers, lighting designer, set designers, costume designer and wig and make-up up artists to make the performance vision into reality

Stage Manager

the person who coordinates and manages elements of the performance.

Supernumeraries

appear on stage in costume in non non-singing and nd usually, non-speaking non roles (Also called Supers or Extras)

Surtitles

the visual translations of the opera’s language that are projected onto a screen during a performance to help the audience follow the story, much m like ike subtitles in a foreign film

Synopsis

a short sum summary of the story of the opera

Tableau

occurs at the end of a scene or act, when all cast members on stage freeze in position and remain that way until the curtain closes, itt looks as though that moment has been captured in a photograph

Tenor

the highest natural adult male voice

Trill

very quick alternation between two adjacent notes

Trio

an ensemble of three singers or the music th that at is written for three singers

Trouser role

the role of an adolescent boy or young man, w written ritten for and sung by a woman, oft often a mezzo-soprano, also known as a pants role

Vibrato

the fluctuation of pitch and intensity in the voice which characterizes a trained singer’s sound

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What are dynamics? The degrees of volume (loudness and softness) in music. Also the words, abbreviations, and symbols used to indicate degrees of volume. Piano (soft) and forte (loud) are most common. What is tempo? In music, tempo is the speed at which a composition is to be played played. Why are so many of these terms in Italian? Most important early composers were Italian and were writing the music when most musical terms were used for the first time. Italian is considered the international language of music.

DYAMICS

TEMPO

The range of sounds from soft to loud loud.

onductor indicates. Speed the conductor

Pianississimo Pianissimo Piano Mezzo Piano Mezzo Forte Forte Fortissimo Fortississimo

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Very, very soft Very soft Soft Medium soft Medium loud Loud Very loud Very, very loud

Presto Vivace Allegro Moderato Andante Adagio Lento Largo Grave

Very fast Vivacious Joyfully, quick, lively Moderate, not fast or slow Rather slow Slow and expressive Very slow Very ery slow and dignified Very, very slow


OPERA COMPREHESIO TEST How much do you and your students know about opera? Have your students take this test and find out. You can find the definitions to all of the vocabulary words in the glossary that we have provided for you on the previous pages in this guidebook. To study before taking the test, we recommend making flash cards with the vocabulary words on one side and the definitions on the other. Students can pair up and quiz each other. One student reads the definition and the other student names the vocabulary word that fits. The answers are listed below. The test is on the next page. Answers: #1 aria

#11 baritone

#2 bass

#12 director

#3 librettist

#13 orchestra

#4 pit

#14 tenor

#5 mezzo-soprano

#15 ensemble

#6 opera

#16 composer

#7 soprano

#17 overture

#8 duet

#18 operetta

#9 contralto

#19 chorus

#10 libretto

#20 Bel Canto

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Name: ___________________________

Opera Comprehension Test Vocabulary Words: baritone, duet, composer, libretto, mezzo-soprano, aria, intermission, opera, overture, bass, director, pit, librettist, contralto, tenor, chorus, operetta, ensemble, Bel Canto, orchestra 1. ___________________A song for solo voice in an opera. 2. ___________________The lowest male vocal range. 3. ___________________The person who writes the words or lyrics for an opera. 4. ___________________The area where the orchestra is seated. 5. ___________________The female vocal range lying between soprano and contralto. 6. ___________________A theatrical production incorporating both vocal and instrumental music, drama, and sometimes dance; considered the most collaborative art form. 7. ___________________The highest female vocal range. 8. ___________________A song for two voices. 9. ___________________The lowest female vocal range. 10. ___________________The Italian word meaning "little book." 11. ___________________The middle male vocal range. 12. ___________________The individual who has the artistic view for how the opera will be performed. 13. ___________________They play the music. 14. ___________________The highest male voice. 15. ___________________A piece of music written for a group of singers. 16. ___________________The person who writes the music for an opera. 17. ___________________The musical introduction to an opera. 18. ___________________A lighthearted opera, with some talking, similar to a musical. 19. ___________________A group of singers, from all voice types, that support the principal cast. 20. ___________________Means “beautiful singing. Your Score:____________________


Name: ___________________________

On Stage Opera singers have to be actors as well. This means that they need to know where to move on the stage and when. There are typically 9 areas of the stage. These are: Up Stage Right (UPR), Up Stage Center (USC), Up Stage Left (USL) Center Stage Right (CSR), Center Stage (CS), Center Stage Left (CSL) Down Stage Right (DSR), Down Stage Center (DSC), Down Stage Left (DSL)

Label the areas of the stage (9 areas):


More Stage Activities Long ago, stages used to be raked or slanted toward the audience. If you went away from the audience, or climbed up the incline, it became upstage. Down the incline was downstage. Remember, stage-left and stage-right right are from the actor actor’ss perspective when they are on stage, not the audience.

 Ask all of your students to face in the same direction. Facing you or a wall is good.  Have your studentss close their eyes and stand with their feet flat on the floor.  Now, ask them to slowly raise their heels off of the floor and keep them that way. way  This is how it would feel to stand on a raked (or slanted) stage.  Their heels are upstage, or on the hi higher part of the stage, near the back, and their toes are facing the audience. Have them imagine they are walking up and down, like they were actually going to points where the floor was higher and lower.  Have them try to move around a bit and see what it feels like.  Give them some stage directions to follow  Example: cross stage-left or walk downstage, etc.  Increase the complexity of the stage directions, making them two or more parts  Example: Walk to stage-right, right, then cross to up up-stage left.  Have students direct each other, giving simple stage directions  Students can create their own scene from the opera, block them and then perform them for the class.


The following pages in this guidebook are worksheets to use with your students to help them learn more about their characters and the stories of the opera you are studying. Please feel free to reproduce them for your use.

Character Wheel


Name: ___________________________


Name: ___________________________

Character Web


Name: ___________________________

Opera Career Activities So‌What do you want to be when you grow up? Did you know that there are many different types of careers in opera? You don’t have to be a singer, dancer, writer or musician. We have a few opera careers listed on the following pages. There is an activity for each career. Keep in mind, this is just small list. Do some research and see what other careers you can find!

Costume Designer Activity: Draw a costume for any character in the opera you are studying. The costume can be traditional, modern or abstract, but you must explain why you made the choices you did. Include as many details as possible.


Development What product or company do you think should sponsor the production? On a separate sheet of paper, write a proposal to the president of the company explaining why you think it would be beneficial for them to give funding to a production of this opera. Remember to tell the president what benefits there are for her or his company!

General Director If you were running a company, which aspect do you think would be more important to you: spending money on artistic expenses, or maintaining a balanced budget? Do you think one outweighs the other? Write a statement of what your company’s mission is and your vision for the company as if you were the General Director and had been asked to share this with the public.


Information Services If you were to design a website for the opera, what would it look like? Who would it reach? Who would be the “audience”? What kinds of things would be on the website? Draw your ideal website on a separate sheet of paper. If your school has a computer lab and if you have time, you could also design a website on the computer.

Marketing Create an advertisement for the opera. Decide whether you should put it on TV, radio, newspaper, a bus, etc. Include whatever you feel is the biggest “selling point” of the opera –what makes it exciting? Remember, you have a budget to stick to – you have to keep cost in mind. Why should people come to see it? First, write it as a presentation that you might make if you wanted Opera Colorado to use your ad. Second, rehearse the ad with others and present it as though you were actually acting in it. You classmates can take the role of the Marketing Staff who will decide if this ad represents Opera Colorado successfully enough to get aired.


Public Relations Think of an event that your class will have around the time you view the opera. What would draw attention and make people aware that your class lass is doing something special? Write a press release about the event, including the date, the time, the people involved, and why it would be exciting or fun to attend. It can be a fictional event or a real event –but but if it’s real, remember to send the principal or your school scho newspaper your press release. Opera Colorado would love to see it too! You can email it to us at education@operacolorado.org!

Education & Community Programs How would you share the world of opera with students and your community? How would you teach others o about opera? Imagine that you are going to teach a program about opera to a group of students in kindergarten. Make a lesson plan on what you would teach.


Classroom Writing Activity – Story Starters Below are some suggested story starters for your students. These can be adapted for different grade levels. La Cenerentola (Cinderella) In Rossini’s version of Cinderella, Angelina has a pair of matching bracelets. Write a story about those bracelets. Who gave them to her? Where did they come from? Why are they special? What do they look like? What is she going to do with them? Pretend that you are Dandini and you are masquerading as the prince. What would you do? What would you say? Where would you go? Who would be your servant? Would you make new laws? What would they be? There are over 1,500 version of the Cinderella story from all over the world. Why do you think this tale is so popular? What does this story tell us about our various cultures, our histories and our beliefs?

Carmen In Bizet’s Carmen, both Don Jose and Escamillo have really cool jobs – a detective and a bull fighter. If you could have any job in the world, what would it be? What would your average day look like? When Don Jose was in prison, he kept the rose that Carmen had given him. If you knew you were going to be away from home for a long time, what would you be sure to take with you? Choose three objects. Describe both what they are and why they are important to you. Carmen is set in Spain. What do you know about Spain? What are some aspects in the opera that would be considered to be “Spanish?” Do you think this is stereotypical? Why or why not?

Hansel and Gretel In Hansel and Gretel, Hansel and Gretel choose not to do what their father has told them to do, first by not doing their chores, and then by not picking berries quickly. Their choices end up causing quite a few problems. Have you ever done something you knew you weren’t supposed to? What happened? What were the consequences? Did you learn something from the experience? Imagine that you discovered a house made entirely of candy. Describe what your ideal candy house would look like. Then describe your reaction to seeing it. Would you eat the candy? Would you run and tell your friends? Would you try and see if anyone was home? Hansel and Gretel has a lot of colorful characters in it. Choose your favorite character from the opera. Imagine you are a journalist and that you have to interview that character for the newspaper. What kind of questions would you ask him or her? What do you think the character’s reaction would be? Is the character the same in real life as he or she seems in the opera, or was the character misrepresented?


Everyone’s a Critic Summary of Activity: Students write a review of a performing arts event, using observation and analysis of the performance and production elements. Time:

2--6 hours (incl. observation of performance)

Setting:

Performance venue/Classroom

Materials:

Pens and paper; revues from local newspapers

Objectives: Students will be able to write clear and well well-supported expository essays. Students will utilize observation and critical thinking skills based on real real-life, life, real-time real experience. Students will submit their writing for publication Procedure: Full class discussion of what they like and dislike in entertainment. Students’ feedback should be written on the board for key phrases and words. What is important to them in music? Movies? Other entertainment? What do they tell their friends if they want to recommend a show? If they want to discourage their friend from seeing something? Students find reviews of performing arts events in local papers and in the school paper (if available). In pairs, students read a review and answer these questions: FACTS: What was the performance? Type of performing art? Where did it take place? Who was performing? What was the story of the piece that was performed? ELEMENTS: What were the elements of the piece that the author talked about? Did he/she tell you clearly about the performances of the artists? About the sets, the lighting, the m music? OPINION: Was the author giving you only their own opinion (what they liked or disliked)? Did they tell you why they liked or disliked what they experienced? In pairs, students make a list of things they would want to know about a performance if they were going to decide whether or not to see it. Students review a live performance piece and share it with the class and/or submit it to the school paper for publication. Carol Weinstein, “Curricular Connections”. The Elixir of Love, a Teacher’s Guide and Resource Book. San Francisco Opera Guild. San Francisco, CA, 2002.


Storyboarding Summary of Activity:

Students will tell the story of the opera through drawing and will learn the basic skills of storyboarding as used in production design. Time: Setting: Materials: Subjects:

30-60 minutes Classroom paper, pencils, pens, and crayons Art, Literary Analysis

Objectives: Students will translate from verbal to visual storytelling Students will work with basic visual composition Students will begin to use visual vocabulary to communicate narrative Background Information Review the story of the opera with the students, using the synopsis and other materials. They should be able to tell the story in a very abbreviated form before wo working rking on the storyboard. The storyboard should tell a simple story based on action. Do not let the students get hung up on detail during their first draft. Procedure Working individually, each student will choose one moment from each of the two acts of the t opera. (Strung together these moments should tell the basic story of the opera.) The students draw each of the four moments that they have chosen (stick figures are fine). Each moment is depicted in its own story box. Students give a caption or titlee to each box. These titles, when read in order should also tell an extremely abbreviated version of the story i.e. boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back, girl dies.) Options for further development Students add more story boxes for fuller, more detail-specific specific story. Ask them to think about who these characters are, and where and how they live. What kind of clothes would they be wearing? Students design sets for the opera using the storyboard to design for each scene. In this exercise, students udents should be encouraged to think about when and where the story would take place, and to think about how that place would look and feel (weather, light, landscape, etc.). An example is provided below:

Adapted from: Carol Weinstein, “Curricular Connections”. The Elixir of Love, a Teacher’s Guide and Resource Book. San Francisco Opera Guild. San Francisco, CA, 2002


Name: ___________________________

Opera Math Activities Elementary Level Math Problems: 1. Mr. Smith wants to buy 2 tickets to see Carmen at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. The tickets are $8.00 apiece. How much will the tickets cost Mr. Smith? 2. If you wanted to buy 5 tickets to Hansel and Gretel and they are $3.00 each, how much will you spend? 3. You own $11.00 for two opera tickets. You give the ticket seller $20.00. How much change should you get back? 4. Your teacher has $100 to spend on tickets for Carmen. Tickets cost $5.00 for students and $10.00 for adults. How many student tickets could she buy? How many adult tickets could she buy? 5. Your class is going on a field trip to see a performance of Cinderella. There are 20 students going and 5 chaperones. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $12.00 for chaperones. 1 chaperone gets a free ticket. How much will the tickets cost for field trip?

Middle School Level Math Problems: 6. Mr. Smith wants to buy 75 tickets to see Hansel and Gretel at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. The tickets are $12.00 apiece. How much will the tickets cost Mr. Smith? 7. You want to buy a block of tickets to Carmen. Tickets are $59.00 each but there is a special package offering a 20% discount for group sales. You have 64 people in your group. How much will you spend? 8. You owe $111.00 for two opera tickets. You charge this on your credit card and there is a 2% fee. What is your total cost? 9. Your teacher has $250.00 to spend on tickets for Hansel and Gretel. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $10.00 for adults. She needs to buy tickets for 29 students and 4 adults. Does she have enough money? Explain your answer. 10. Your school is going on a field trip to see a student matinee of Cinderella. There are 452 students going and 22 chaperones. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $10.00 for chaperones. 1 chaperone per every 20 students gets a free ticket. How much will the tickets cost for field trip? How many free chaperone tickets will your group receive?


Opera Math Activities Elementary Level Math Problems: 1. Mr. Smith wants to buy 2 tickets to see Carmen at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. The tickets are $8.00 apiece. How much will the tickets cost Mr. Smith? (answer: 8+8=$16 or 8x2=$16) 2. If you wanted to buy 5 tickets to Hansel and Gretel and they are $3.00 each, how much will you spend? (answer: 3+3+3+3+3=$15 or 5x3=$15) 3. You own $11.00 for two opera tickets. You give the ticket seller $20.00. How much change should you get back? (answer: 20-11=$9.00) 4. Your teacher has $100 to spend on tickets for Carmen. Tickets cost $5.00 for students and $10.00 for adults. How many student tickets could she buy? How many adult tickets could she buy? (answer: 100รท5=20 students, 100รท10=10 adults) 5. Your class is going on a field trip to see a performance of Cinderella. There are 20 students going and 5 chaperones. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $12.00 for chaperones. 1 chaperone gets a free ticket. How much will the tickets cost for field trip? (answer: 20x7=$140 for students, 4x12=$48 for adults, 140+48=$188 total) Middle School Level Math Problems: 6. Mr. Smith wants to buy 75 tickets to see Hansel and Gretel at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. The tickets are $12.00 apiece. How much will the tickets cost Mr. Smith? (answer: 75x12=$900) 7. You want to buy a block of tickets to Carmen. Tickets are $59.00 each but there is a special package offering a 20% discount for group sales. You have 64 people in your group. How much will you spend? (answer: 59x64=$3,776.00 x 20%= $755.20 3,776.00-755.20=$3,020.80 total) 8. You owe $111.00 for two opera tickets. You charge this on your credit card and there is a 2% fee. What is your total cost? (answer: 111x2%=2.22 111+2.22=$113.22) 9. Your teacher has $250.00 to spend on tickets for Hansel and Gretel. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $10.00 for adults. She needs to buy tickets for 29 students and 4 adults. Does she have enough money? Explain your answer. (answer: Yes 29x7=$203 students, 10x4=$40 adults 203+40=$243) 10. Your school is going on a field trip to see a student matinee of Cinderella. There are 452 students going and 22 chaperones. Tickets cost $7.00 for students and $10.00 for chaperones. 1 chaperone per every 20 students gets a free ticket. How much will the tickets cost for field trip? How many free chaperone tickets will your group receive? (answer: 452x7=$3,164 for students, 18x10=$180 for adults, 3,164+180=$3,344.00 total) (4 free chaperones)


More Opera Math


Name: ___________________________

Worksheet directions Write your answers using numbers:


Answer Sheet


Name: ___________________________

Calculating the Cost 1 School Performance of Cinderella SETS AD COSTUMES Rental of costumes: 18 costumes @ $75.00 ea

$_________

Shipping for costumes

$

1 Costume Mistress, 5 Dressers and 4 Fitters 10 dressers @ $188.00 ea

$_________

Fee for Wig and Make-up Artists

$__1,292.00

Rental of 4 wigs and make-up $__________ ea

$__1,000.00

Shipping of wigs

$____150.00

Rental of scenery

$_11,668.00

Shipping of scenery

$__3,000.00

Loaders

$__1,500.00

Total Cost for sets and Costumes

$_________

284.00

Directions: Use the chart above to answer the following questions and then complete the chart. Show your work. If it costs $75.00 to rent 1 costume, what is the cost for 18 costumes?

$_________

If it costs $188.00 to pay 1 dresser, is the cost to pay 10 dressers?

$_________

If it costs $1,000.00 to rent the wig and make-up for 4 actors, what does it cost to rent these for 1 actor?

$_________

It costs twice as much to ship the scenery as it does to: a) rent or b) load the scenery.

__________

What is the total cost of sets and costumes for 1 school performance of Cinderella?

$_________


Calculating the Cost – Answer Sheet 1 School Performance of Cinderella SETS AD COSTUMES Rental of costumes: 18 costumes @ $75.00 ea

$ 1,350.00

Shipping for costumes

$___284.00

1 Costume Mistress, 5 Dressers and 4 Fitters 10 dressers @ $188.00 ea

$ 1, 880.00

Fee for Wig and Make-up Artists

$__1,292.00

Rental of 4 wigs and make-up $ 250.00 ea

$__1,000.00

Shipping of wigs

$____150.00

Rental of scenery

$_11,668.00

Shipping of scenery

$__3,000.00

Loaders

$__1,500.00

Total Cost for sets and Costumes

$ 22,124.00

Directions: Use the chart above to answer the following questions and then complete the chart. Show your work. If it costs $75.00 to rent 1 costume, what is the cost for 18 costumes?

$1,350.00

If it costs $188.00 to pay 1 dresser, is the cost to pay 10 dressers?

$1,880.00

If it costs $1,000.00 to rent the wig and make-up for 4 actors, what does it cost to rent these for 1 actor?

$ 250.00

It costs twice as much to ship the scenery as it does to: a) rent or b) load the scenery.

b)

What is the total cost of sets and costumes for 1 school performance of Cinderella?

$22,124.00

load


Name: ___________________________

You Design It! Choose an opera. A good idea is to choose the opera that you are studying or the one that you are going to see. Imagine that you are the designer for an opera. You are in charge of deciding what the opera looks like when it gets onto the stage. That means you need to design the set, the costumes, the makeup, the lighting and the props. We’ve provided a blank stage on this paper. Your audience is waiting for the performance to begin - What would your opera look like?


Opera Word Search

D A I J P W T H J F Y R P O Z J Y D E J

L I Z D I D N C B J E A W P V N W I L B

A A R F S I N E D G J R I Z Y A A G A Y

I D S E C V L D C L H T A O C E R Q N J

E R F R C C B X V A K S Y B O J H B I X

K W S M A T C K N T N E N S R F Z W F J

T R J N E E O A Q R N H N I H K F W H M

W Z T S A Z H R Z J V C I X E T T Z U R

V O C C X J Z E O P E R A B U F F A N L

A A O O N E M O R Y P O R H J H Z O R L

D O M R O N E T S M C O R O K R K O K H

D Q P E H A Z O G O N B A S S J T T O G

V F O S V K R B I A P C E F W C U K Z D

V D S E N O T I R A B R L X U V T A M T

U S E C O X T P A I J Y A D M G S S K P

I Q R Z S H O T I F R M N N O H E R D Q

G Z J W M S V Z R I Y O D J O I X S S C

R V B J F J E G C K C V B D Q U M D C N

G Z M Q U P P T X L I B R E T T O Q M K

J K P C V P E Q G F S I L G C C A O Q J

Words Hidden

ARIA

BARITONE

BASS

BELCANTO

BRAVO

COMPOSER

CONDUCTOR

DIRECTOR

FINALE

LIBRETTO

LYRIC

MEZZOSOPRANO

OPERA BUFFA

ORCHESTRA

REHEARSAL

SCORE

SOPRANO

TENOR


Opera Colorado strives to provide quality programs that meet the needs of students and teachers across the state. Please take a few minutes to complete this evaluation and give us feedback on your experience. Opera Colorado is also interested in your students' response to the programs. We would be happy to receive any letters or artwork from them! Program:

____Marriage of Figaro (Please circle one: dress rehearsal / matinee) ____Florencia en el Amazonas (dress rehearsal) ____ Il Trovatore (dress rehearsal) ____Backstage Workshops (Please circle one: 11/3, 11/10, 2/8, 2/16, 4/25, 4/29, 5/3) ____Touring Opera Performance (Please circle one: Carmen / Hansel & Gretel) ____Opera in a Trunk (Please name which trunk: __________________________________) ____In-School Workshop (Please specify: _________________________________________) ____Other (Please specify: _____________________________________________________)

Is this your first time participating in Opera Colorado’s Education programs? YES / NO If YES, what made you participate this year? If NO, how many years have you been a participant? Were you able to incorporate the field trip into your curriculum? YES / NO If YES, please share how. If NO, do you have suggestions? Please estimate the percentage of your students who had never been exposed to opera prior to this field trip:___________ How would you describe your students’ initial attitude toward exposure to opera? 1……...2……...3………4……….5……….6……….7 negative/unwilling neutral positive/excited Did their attitude change after learning more about opera and attending the fieldtrip? If so, please show on the scale: 1……...2……...3………4……….5……….6……….7 negative/unwilling neutral positive/excited Was the Opera Colorado Teacher Guidebook helpful in preparing your students to attend a dress rehearsal or matinee? 1……...2……...3………4……….5……….6……….7 not helpful very helpful On a scale of 1 to 7, how would you rate the priority of Arts Education in your school? 1……...2……...3………4……….5……….6……….7 not important very important Please share with us any additional comments you have. We especially love stories of how Opera impacted your students. _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Thank you for your time and comments! Name______________________________________________ School/Subject _____________________________________________ Teacher______ Administrator_______ Paraprofessional_______ Parent / Chaperone_______ Other_______ My students are: K-2

3-5

6-8

9-12

College

Opera Colorado • 695 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 20 • Denver, CO • 80246


Live Simulcasts! There’s nothing better than attending the opera and seeing it LIVE! But, what do you do if you can’t join us? Or if you have tickets but you just can’t get enough opera? We are pleased to be able to offer you an additional chance to hear this amazing art form right here in Denver, Colorado. Opera Colorado is excited to announce that, in partnership with Colorado Public Radio, a LIVE simulcast of Opera Colorado’s 2012 season will be broadcast. Tune in to 88.1 FM, or listen online at www.CPR.org, as the operas are presented in entirety. Listeners will also be invited backstage as interviews are conducted during intermission with artists, the production team and key members of the Opera Colorado staff. Please tune in and join us!

SIMULCAST SCHEDULE Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro February 19, 2012 Catán’s Florencia en el Amazonas March 24, 2012 Verdi’s Il Trovatore April 28, 2012

www.operacolorado.org


Opera for Beginners  

2011-2012 Opera for Beginners Teacher Guidebook

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