Issuu on Google+

AUGUST 2013 EDITION

1

Pravaha

Re­defining the flow of operations

Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Big Data in Operations

Vilfred Pareto Intel

Amazon

Taiichi Ohno Same day delivery

3­D Printing

Doing it the McDonald’s Way

COVER STORY FROM CLICKING TO CARTING

IIM Shillong Bi-Annual Operations Magazine


Editorial

Pravaha | Edition 1

Sigma takes you through a simplified world of Six Sigma  practices and how they could help each one of you in your  Dear Readers, careers as well as day to day activities at your respective  organization.   Team Op­Era, Operations Club of IIM Shillong    We also take you through ʹThe Road less traveledʹ  brings  to  you  ‘Pravaha’,  the  bi­annual  operations  which  provides  you  dossiers  of  knowledge  in  its  every  magazine  of  IIM  Shillong.  Our  vision  to  inculcate  turn about unconventional upcoming practices which are  knowledge in this domain to all enthusiasts through our  set  to  revolutionize  businesses  and  supply  chains.  The  activities  reflects  in  the  cover  page  of  the  inaugural  pharmaceutical supply chain and the same day delivery  edition  and  we  encourage  all  of  you  to  maintain  the  techniques await at the end of this road to enlighten you.  knowledge ‘Pravaha’ ­ Redefining the flow of operations.    Pravaha  also  brings  you  face  to  face  with  the  Before  we  introduce  you  to  the  intriguing  world  of  ʹVirtuososʹ  and familiarizes the readers with the famous  operations  management  we  would  like  to  confess  that  contributors  in  the  development  of  Operations  there always prevails a sense of anticipation when such a  Management.  Not  to  forget,  the  cover  story  ʹFrom  magazine is conceived, more so if it is for the first time and  clicking to cartingʹ forays into the much talked about field  we take this opportunity to thank each and every one of  of e­commerce and captures the intricate and finer details  you for the overwhelming response. of the same.    In this first edition we bring to you six different    Do  keep  an  eye  on  the  ‘Rendezvous’  section  to  sections  dealing  with  varied  concepts  from  various  know about our initiatives that make the understanding  dimensions of this domain. We once again thank you for  of  the  concepts  easier  to  grasp  and  assimilate  and  also  the  ʹInsightsʹ  section,  where  the  canvas  was  quite  provide you a fun zone to tickle your grey cells . wonderfully painted by your ideas and would always be    So  get  set  to  enter  into  the  world  of  operations  open for all our readers. We acknowledge all your efforts  management where a plethora of ideas and concepts await  in this regard with a bow. The prize winning entries from   your perusal. Great Lakes, Chennai and NITIE, Mumbai will keep you  HAPPY READING! hooked on with the interesting concepts of Big Data and  3D  imaging  while  interesting  stories  on  rapid  prototyping, and the McDonald’s expertise await your  TEAM insights. OP-ERA   The  ‘Blaze­a­trail’  section  brings  forth  the  best  BHASKAR K practices  followed  in  the  industry  that  are  crucial  in  providing  a  competitive  edge  to  any  organization.  The  POULOMI PAL concepts have been brought to clarity through lucidity of  VM SAI MURALI language  and  exemplification  of  instances  this  time  ANISH AGARWAL through  the  retail  transformation  by  Amazon  and  the  NEELAV RATNAM customer delight strategy quite brilliantly used by Intel.   Through our ʹRobarooʹ with industry stalwarts  SAIPRASAD SHETYE we share their expertise and knowledge with you. This  DEVENDRA SINGH RAGHUWANSHI time  we  have  Mr.  S.  Ramani,  Founder­Director  of  Savourites  Hospitality  Pvt  Ltd  and  Head,  Project  and  Marketing  department  of  6  Ballygunge  Place,  the  flagship restaurant chain of the organization who helps  you  delve  deeper  in  the  business  of  restaurant  management and catering. Also Mr. Vishwadeep Khatri,  CEO and Lean Six Sigma Expert from Benchmark Six 

FROM TEAM OP-ERA


CONTENTS INSIGHT Big Data in Operations 3D Printing - A Radical Change in Manufacturing Doing it the McDonald’s Way Rapid Prototyping Its all about Improvements THE ROAD LESS TRAVELLED Adding Value to the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Same Day Delivery - Reviving the failed practice COVER STORY From Clicking to Carting VIRTUOSOS The TPS Patriarch - Taiichi Ohno The Pareto Analyst - Vilfredo Pareto BLAZE-A-TRAIL Transforming the online retail landscape Unveiling the customer delight ROOBAROO Mr. S. Ramani - What goes behind your favourite Bengali Cuisine? Mr. Vishwadeep Khatri - The Simple Idea Behind The ‘Six Sigma’ Jargon RENDEZVOUS Oper8 - Operations Week, IIM Shillong Opsopedia - The fun learning video series Optimus 3.0 - The most creative brain takes it all FunZone - Tickle your grey cells !

2 3 4 5 6 8 10 12 17 18 20 23 26 28 31 32 33 36


INSIGHT The strength of 'Pravaha' is multiplied by the inow of ideas from all avenues. Through this section, we share the insights of our fellow B-schoolers on the plethora of possibilities that Big Data could create in the ďŹ eld of operations, McDonald's supply chain integration story and the potential impact of 3D printing in revolutionizing manufacturing.


Pravaha | Edition 1

Insight

BIG DATA IN OPERATIONS ­ Bharat Ram, Jasdeep Kaur, G. Shivshankar

(Great Lakes Institute of Management, Chennai)

  Ever  changing consumer  needs  and  preferences  makes predicting demand a risky task and a big challenge  these  days.What  is  important  in  predicting  or  understanding these needs would be the relevance of the  Supply  Chain  Data.  The  relevance  is  only  made  more  complex  by  huge  availability  of  Structured  and  Unstructured data.The problems of using historical data  are Limited range, non­collinearity and bad correlation.  However, as we know almost all firms are facing a “Bull  Whip Effect”, decisions based on historical data would be  redundant. Organizations that can capture and analyze  data across Supply Chain can manage their inventory in  real time and capitalize on business opportunities.   Big data serves the goal of developing a scalable  platform for decision­making that is robust and nearly  real time to avoid the use of historical data. The financial  and  statistical  metrics  related  to  market  and  customer  focus when coupled with these decisioning inputs from  big data gives a real time analysis and discovery of trends  to bring in business agility, operational excellence, and  first mover advantage.   Big data is the warehouse of information available  on  Internet  and  other  computers.  Every  operational  transaction that takes place is recorded real time by using  RFID  taggers  and  bar­code  scanners  and  this  information is stored real time.  Real time monitoring of  this data and make decisions in improving product flow  in warehouse. Take the case of manufacturing industry  where big data is stored and analyzed to check product  quality, defect tracking, and supply planning and helps 

deal with supplier component parts defect tracking.   Net­flix  the  online  provider  of  movies  and  TV  programming has a big data system in place. With a $3.6  billion  revenue  from  subscription  for  movie  and  TV  programs and 33 million customers worldwide, they have  an  enormous  source  of  data  that  facilitates  product  development by anticipating what subscribers want. The  data sources being hours of video streamed per day, social  media data. The key characteristics of data which are the 4  Vs­ Volume, Velocity, Variability and Volatility are best  addressed with big data.   The  biggest  ROI  in  bringing  big  data  in  operations is expected in the logistics /distribution (78%)  and  consumer  service  (56%).  Data  transparency  and  usability  of  information,  boost  trend  analysis,  product  development  and  augmentation.  It  helps  regulate  inventories  from  happy­to­sick  days,  thus,  minimizing  operational losses and business vulnerability. Improved  forecasting by tying the loose ends of vendor and supplier  in  the  value  chain  in  real­time  is  possible.  Reduced  customer  dropouts  and  enhance  sustainability  by  analyzing customer behavior is yet another possibility. In  a  nutshell  big  data  increases  the  likelihood  of  revolutionizing operations through innovative designing  and  process  control  in  the  making  of  next  generation  products. ***** (Awarded as Winning article for inter­college article writing  competition conducted by Op­Era)

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

2


Pravaha | Edition 1

Insight

3D PRINTING - A RADICAL CHANGE IN MANUFACTURING ­ Vignesh Lakshminarayanan   The very idea of able to make anything by simply  printing it in 3­D is no myth. This technology is now  being  available  to  anyone  and  anybody  can  print  anything  at  home  from  practically  any  material.  This  technology has been used for “Bio­Printing” for making  human tissues or organs. The 3­D printing industry has  matured from prototyping to making functional objects.   The technology has evolved from a mere application for  making novelty items to a wide range of objects for critical  industrial  applications.  Examples  are  prototyping  of  parts for automotive and aerospace applications.  A 3­D  Printer requires a digital blue print which is sent as the  input to the 3­D printer. The 3­D Printer costs a very  affordable  $2200.  Digital  blueprints  and  3­D  printed  objects are available online. It is also an opportunity for  designers  to  advertise  their  creative  and  innovative  designs. However, these designs come at a premium.    Manufacturing  is  definitely  going  to  be  revolutionized.  The  technology  is  extremely  effective  intricate shapes or highly specialized complex products  which  are  very  difficult  to  produce  using  traditional  manufacturing  techniques  at  cu ing  edge  technology.  For  instance,  this  is  viable  for  aerospace  components  which are difficult to cast. This could reduce costs and  time. Another unique characteristic of this technology is  that it allows for customization of the product and design.  Traditionally manufacturing has been highly centralized  and has required huge set ups. With the advent of 3­D  Printing  Technology  in  Design  and  Manufacturing,  manufacturing  has  the  potential  to  evolve  from  a 

( NITIE, Mumbai)

? “Centralized”  to  a  “De­Centralized”  or  “Distributed  “model.   Though  3­D  Printing  Technology  holds  great  promise,  the  question  which  needs  to  be  addressed  is  whether  the  technology  is  powerful  enough  to  put  Manufacturing  giants  out  of  business  in  the  coming  decade or so. In spite of the effectiveness of the technology,  the 3­D printing process has very low productivity and it  takes several hours to even make a simple product. The  technology  is  therefore  not  scalable.  Hence  itʹs  very  debatable whether objects such as a car can be 3­D printed  in  a  tangible  amount  of  time.  Hence  for  at  least  some  period  of  time,  3­D  printing  canʹt  displace  traditional  manufacturing in terms of efficiencies and economies of  scale.  But  in  terms  of  a  making  complex  customizable  objects or objects having proprietary design and limited  demand, 3­D printing has been a phenomenon. However  with an increased access in the coming years, the concept  of manufacturing will definitely undergo a redefinition.  It will be fascinating to see how organizations respond,  given that 3­D Printing is emerging as a serious threat to  the viability of their businesses.  ***** (Awarded as Runner ­ Up Article for inter­college article writing  competition conducted by Op­Era)

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

3


Pravaha | Edition 1

Insight

DOING IT THE MCDONALD’S WAY

­ Aniruddha Jaju (IIM Ahmedabad)

`  We  o en  marvel  at  the  great  prices  offered  by  businesses  such  as  Amazon.com  and  flipkart.com,  wondering  what  it  is  that  makes  them  tick.  While  the  behemoth,  Amazon,  has  pioneered  the  e­commerce  domain  in  the  last  15  years,  Flipkart  is  still  nascent,  struggling to make a profit year­a er­year. So, then how  is it still able to sell at a discount?   Quite  contrary  to  popular  belief,  it  is  not  the  competition that forces such business to sell cheap; rather,  it is their operational efficiency that allows them to have a  low cost, which in turn enables them to sell at a low price.  There is a very subtle difference between the two – low  price entails lowering the profit margin, while low cost  ensures a higher profit margin.

  The  low­cost  model  was  championed  by  McDonalds,  way  back  in  the  early  1940s.  McDonalds  changed  the  quick­service  industry  with  its  quality  of  service and a plethora of food options – all at unbelievably  low prices. This enabled its growth from a small drive­in  outlet in the 1940s to the biggest fast­food chain in the  world by the 1960s.   McDonalds  was  the  first  organization  to  give  importance  to  its  supply  chain.  It  worked  with  the  suppliers  to  conduct  research  in  coming  up  with  cost­

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

saving  techniques  in  food  production  and  processing.  Ensuring  timely  orders  to  every  supplier,  McDonalds  gave  the  suppliers  enough  confidence  to  innovate  in  making  the  supply  chain  more  efficient.  As  a  result,  McDonalds was able to procure raw material at a very  low cost, which enabled them to provide their products  and services at a low price. Even their competitors in the  1960s  marveled  at  their  operational  efficiency,  and  in  changing the landscape of the quick­service industry. To put things into perspective, it was McDonalds who  perfected  the  cold­storage  technology,  to  transport  raw  materials  over  long  distances.  This  technology  is  used  even  today  by  almost  all  suppliers  of  perishable  food  products.  McDonalds  was  also  one  of  the  first  organizations  to  employ  the  just­in­time  (JIT)  procurement and delivery models, which is in widespread  use today.   Twenty years a er McDonalds first pioneered the  supply­chain integration and created a new benchmark  in  operational  efficiency,  many  organizations  started  realizing  the  importance  of  such  a  supply­chain  integration. Thus started an era of backward integration,  where the suppliers were given a larger share of the pie.  From here emerged organizations such as Amazon.com,  who  further  revolutionized  the  supply­chain,  by  completely eliminating the middle­men i.e. distributors  and wholesalers.   The  Amazon  model  is  unique  in  its  own  way.  Eliminating the middle­men reduced costs and allowed  them  to  sell  at  low  prices,  a  phenomenon  that  led  to  Amazon becoming one of the most visited website in the  US in the 2000s.   Organizations  like  McDonalds  and  Amazon  have, today, become the way of life for more than 50% of  Americans. Their operational excellence is marveled at  even today. The fact that no other organization has been  able  to  compete  with  them  for  the  last  several  decades  speaks  volumes  about  their  innovative  practices  and  supply­chain management. ***** (Awarded as Special Mention in Inter ­ college Article Writing  Competition conducted by Op­Era) 4


Pravaha | Edition 1

Insight

RAPID PROTOTYPING

­ Dwijendra Parashar, Achint Jain (NMIMS, Mumbai)

  “If  you  can  dream  it,  you  can  build  it”­Eric  Anderson. Such is the power of a digital manufacturing  technology called Rapid Prototyping (RP). It is a group of  techniques used to quickly fabricate a scale model of a part  or  assembly  using  three­dimensional  Computer  Aided  Design (CAD) data. The 3D printing machine reads the  data from the CAD drawing and lays down successive  layers of the material to build up the physical model. This  paves way for Rapid Manufacturing (RM).    Modern  products  like  aircra s  require  complex  development with huge upfront investments. This results  in  inflexible  systems  which  are  fraught  with  cost  overruns. Most machine shops have lead times of a couple  of weeks compared to less than 24 hours provided by RP. 

  RM has evolved from RP technologies that have  been successfully used to physically create designs and  concepts.  One  of  its  advantages  over  traditional  techniques  is  that  no  specific  tooling  is  required  for  manufacturing.    OEMs  have  to  warehouse  excess  inventory  to  ensure a fast delivery of spares while estimating future  demand. Infrequently sold parts have to be stored for a  long time, generating high inventory costs. RP helps cut  down  on  not  just  warehousing  but  also  rolling  inventories  resulting  in  be er  overall  supply  chain  efficiencies.      The key benefits of this technique involve cheaper  designing  and  testing,  faster  prototype  turn­around,  be er  visualization  of  products  with  a  physical,  tactile 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

item, prevent problems later in production, when changes  are costlier a varied range of working materials, flexible  product design and more importantly it is also suitable  for Nano­scale products    The production costs for RM made parts depends  primarily on part volumes. This is because of higher raw  material  price  compared  to  conventional  materials  and  the  process  of  building  up  the  part  layer  by  layer.  To  improve  capacity  utilization,  it  is  possible  to  produce  several non­identical components in a single job.   Increasing  pressure  on  quality,  costs  and  lead  times  is  forcing  companies  to  look  towards  backward  i n t e g r a t i o n .   R M   h a s   m a d e   t h i s   c e n t r a l i z e d  manufacturing a possibility because it incorporates JIT,  Inventory  control,  greater  scope  for  customization,  innovation and reverse engineering.   With  the  number  of  manufacturing  firms  increasing  their  presence  in  India,  demand  for  local  suppliers has also increased several folds. Vendors have to  deal with changing demands of the customer at a very  short  notice.  A  number  of  vendors  are  using  RP  for  flexible  manufacturing  to  keep  up  with  the  rapidly  changing  product  designs,  which  is  an  essential  for  survival in the market today.   Due to the success of RP, customers are shying  away  from  conventional  tooling  and  using  RM  throughout  the  manufacturing  cycle.  RM  is  helping  vendors  produce  be er  products  at  lower  costs  and  responding  to  market  demands  more  quickly  than  the  traditional manufacturing methods. ***** (Awarded a Special Mention in Inter­ College Article Writing  Competition conducted by Op­Era)

5


Pravaha | Edition 1

Insight

ITS ALL ABOUT IMPROVEMENTS

­ Tarun Shukla

(Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies, Pune)

  Operations management – area of management  which  ensures  that  business  operations  are  efficient  in  terms  of  using  few  resources  as  needed  &  effective  in  terms  of  meeting    customer  requirements.  The  role  of  operations management in a lot of industries has evolved   – now operations management is not only concerned with  processes (defining –designing –controlling) but also a  key  contributor  in  defining  the  future  .  With  fierce 

competition in virtually every market –companies have  the aim to give the customer extra which we call as value  for  the  product  /service  .A  company  may  use  different  strategies as per the market demand –be er price, be er  product/service  or  be er  delivery.  All  these  strategies  depend on companyʹs operational plan.   We  hear  about  Six  Sigma,  Kaizen,  Business  Process Re­engineering),TQM, Lean, JIT  & many other  concepts/philosophies.  The  main  aim  of  all  these  –“improvements” some way or the other. When we order  any  item  say  a  book  from  Flipkart  we  are  not  at  all  concerned with how many books the company is storing  with themselves, the customer is only concerned with fast  delivery of the item as per his/her requirements. But for  Flipkart to operate in an effective manner they need to  have  a  plan  about  the  overall  distribution  &  delivery  network.  The  real  value  addition  comes  when  the  company is offering the best prices with other value added  services – and for these services which can be termed as  “order winners” the only way is to keep other costs to a  bare  minimum.  An  effective  strategy  of  handling  the 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

physical distribution will ultimately lead to be er service  keeping  the  cost  low  which  will  ultimately  help  the  company to excel in providing some value added service.  We  may  take  any  field  of  operations,  a er  initial  designing & set up itʹs all about improving –the real role  of operation managers in the present scenario is to “how  to  make  processes  simpler”.  While  making  the  overall  processes efficient & delivering the general standardized  product mantra was effective in good old days, now with  varied  demands­  specific  features  the  concept  has  changed.  Now  standardization  and  customization  go  hand  in  hand  –  companies  are  able  to  deliver  desired  product/service  at  the  right  price,  on­time  with  value  added features.   The key problems which most of the companies are  facing  are  with  the  “Quality  improvement  type  programs”­ most of the employees take these programs to  suggest  solutions  which  are  either  very  difficult  to  implement  or  are  dependent  on  any  new  technology.  There needs to be complete shi  in the way these quality  improvement  programs  are  seen.  It  should  not  be  a  mandatory  exercise  but  must  be  ingrained  in  the  organization  philosophy  –  a  good  change  management  strategy  should also be adopted for any major change for  which the role of HR  department is also critical    Computers are just the opposite of what “kanban”  or “visual management system” tries to achieve – good  communication  of  any  new  method  /improvement  implemented will be usage of simple diagrams rather than  a formal e­mails whose impact would not be substantial.  Too  much  dependence  on  technology  will  lead  to  more  complexity  rather  than  simple,  clear  &  effective  implementation & communication.   The philosophy should be usage of best available  technique  in  the  simplest  way  with  clearly  defined  methods so that it would make organization more flexible  & quick to respond to changes. The  focus area  should be  simple  internal  operations  which  would  help  the  organization  to  change  faster  than  competitors  for  unforeseen external market factors.  ***** 6


The drive up ‘The Road Less Traveled’ explores the industry-wide new practices that are being adopted in the area of Supply Chain & Operations. This section also provides extensive analysis about the challenges faced by companies or industries in adopting these new practices, recommended frameworks for improvement & cross industrial learnings. This edition brings forth the developments in the pharmaceutical supply chain and the same day delivery technique that some corporate houses are fast developing.

T HE R OAD L ESS T RAVELLED


Pravaha | Edition 1

The Road Less Travelled

ADDING VALUE TO THE PHARMACEUTICALS SUPPLY CHAIN Gone are the days when stable demand, fewer products,  higher  margins  were  used  to  be  the  norm  of  Pharma  industry.  Todayʹs  pharmaceutical  business  is  more  complex  in  terms  of  varying  demands  of  different  business segments. To confront the shrinking margins in  prescription  drugs  segment,  companies  are  trying  to  diversify into new areas like generics, over – the – counter  (OTC) products, health services etc. Also, companies are  using  different  distribution  channels  like  direct  –  to  –  consumer, direct – to – pharmacy and they are relying on  external  partners  for  manufacturing,  selling  and  other  services. The business is rapidly becoming more global  with emerging markets are expected to contribute 50% of  industryʹs growth in the next few years. This results in  increase  of  plants,  suppliers,  products,  customers,  demand profiles, service requirements etc. in this complex  situation, Pharmaceutical companies still use  outdated  supply  chain  that  donʹt  meet  the  strategic  needs.  So,  Pharma companies need to have agile, cost effective and  service supported supply chain.

­ Bhaskar K.

Quality standards can never be sacrificed in the pursuit of cost savings Most pharmaceutical companies would err on the side of oversupply to avoid the risk of running out of life saving drugs

Eyeing the Benchmark ZARA Fashion Industry

APPLE Electronics Industry

P&G FMCG Industry

IKEA Furniture Industry

To   s t a y   a h e a d   o f   f a s t   ­  changing fashion trends, Zara  developed a very agile supply  chain with short lead times to  bring  new  styles  to  market  more quickly For its basic lines of clothing,  which  tend  to  change  less  frequently,  the  company  developed  a  more  cost  ­  effective  supply  chain  with  longer lead times

Apple has built a supply chain  that  ensures  high  service  levels & agility by developing  a closely integrated network of  supplier partners Apple  also  minimizes  the  c o m p l e x i t y   o f   p r o d u c t  components  and  finished  goods  so  it  can  manage  demand  volatility  across  markets & product cycles

P  &  G  has  adopted  an  agile,  cost  ­  effective  model  that  allows the company to respond  quickly to changes in demand.  It  gets  real  time  data  from  retail stores. Also, it has set up  d i ff e re n t   l e a d   t i m e s   f o r  different  customer  types,  depending on their needs

Ikea  has  built  a  low  ­  cost  supply chain to stock its stores  with  merchandise  at  prices  that are 30 to 50  %  below  the  competition  by  focusing  on  cost  effectiveness  at  each  step  of  supply  chain,  making  tradeoffs  on  product  c o m p l e x i t y   &   c l o s e l y  c o l l a b o r a t i n g   w i t h   k e y  suppliers

Following the Zaraʹs  example, pharmaceutical  companies should identify  needs of different business  segmentsʹ and design fit­for­ purpose supply chains into  the industry

Pharma companies  should aim to integrate more  closely with their suppliers  and strategically manage  complexity in order to gain  flexibility and access to new  skills

Pharmaceutical  companies could improve  their planning and customer  segmentation in order to  increase service levels and  respond quickly to changes in  customer demand

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Pharma companies can go  beyond narrow, functional  cost improvements by  rethinking and improving end  to end supply chain

8


Pravaha | Edition 1

The Road Less Travelled

Areas of Improvement for competitive advantage

The priorities that the pharmaceutical industry needs to  concentrate on as far as supply chain is considered are  service, cost effectiveness and agility. To meet the current  industry  challenges  and  remain  competitive,  pharmaceutical  companies  should  excel  in  these  three  dimensions.  Maximizing  all  three  dimensions  is  not  possible and tradeoffs are unavoidable 1)  Service When  service  is  the  critical  dimension,  Pharma  companies should focus on Product Availability 2)  Cost Effectiveness When  Cost  Effectiveness  is  the  critical  dimension,  companies  should  go  for  Standardized  processes,  lean  techniques,  faster  inventory  turnover,  higher  capacity  utilization   3)  Agility When Agility is the critical dimension, companies should  focus  on  effective  planning  &  scheduling,  rapid  c h a n g e o v e r   o f   p ro d u c t i o n   l i n e s ,   p ro d u c t i o n  postponement,  sourcing  from  multiple  suppliers,  and  external production facility for greater flexibility S E R V I C E

Flexible processes

Short lead times

Fast scale - up

Limited investments

     

Process Flexibility

   

Strategic  Flexibility

Highest quality of service Frequent deliveries

Short lead times

New business models

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

People  Flexibility

Tradeoffs among Service, Cost & Agility

Service  models  requires  investing  in  capacity  and  inventory to achieve higher service levels Lean – operations are critical for Cost Effective model.  The primary goals of maximizing capacity utilization &  minimizing costs limits the agility Availability  &  fast  response  times  are  critical  in  Agile  Service model. The primary goal is to create a flexible,  responsive manufacturing & distribution network Success  of  Agile,  Cost  –  Effective  model  (Mutually  Exclusive) lies in companies thoroughly understanding  their business needs. Companies should improve end – to  – end processes, keep operation clean & outsource non – 

Supplier  Flexibility

A G I L I T Y

Asset  Flexibility

C O S T

Flexible scheduling within the plants Balancing capacity Structural regulatory flexibility

Strategic sourcing plans Contracting for flexibility Integration for Lean processes Supplier development & renewal Multi ­ skilling and labor flexibility Global Innovation task force

Platforming & postponement Lean fulfillment & replenishment Fast time to market, supply issue resolution Event based forecasting Deep understanding of customer needs Demand driven segmentation

Cost effectiveness

Scale in direct channels and in product ows

Standardized processes

Lean techniques/ improved inventory turnover

core activities (Partnerships, Contract manufacturing &  logistics providers)  The Way Ahead: Pharmaceutical companies, in recent years, have focused  on reducing manufacturing costs and inventory levels.  Though  valuable,  these  improvements  will  be  less  differentiating in the future. Supply chain can be a true  differentiator  improving  the  bo om  line  performance.  Building  flexibility  into  multiple  facets  of  the  supply  chain  will  be  critical  to  maintaining  the  competitive  advantage. ***** 9


Pravaha | Edition 1

The Road Less Travelled

SAME DAY DELIVERY - REVIVING THE FAILED PRACTICE   Kozmo.com,  founded  in  1998,  was  an  online  company that promised free one – hour delivery of videos,  games, DVDs, music, books, food etc. This company is  o en  referred  to  as  an  example  of  ʹDot  –  com  boomʹ.  Kozomoʹs  business  model  was  severely  criticized  by  business analysts, pointing out that one – hour point – to  –  point  delivery  is  extremely  expensive  as  Kozomo  refused to charge for delivery. Eventually, the business  failed in 2001.   “Same Day Delivery” is back again in 2013 with  a new set of propulsive forces. Major retailers like Wal­ Mart, eBay and Amazon.com are all offering same day  delivery in a limited number of locations. FedEx, UPS are  partners in these pilots. The online retail market is now  much  larger.  Traditional  retailers  are  facing  pressure  from  online  shops  like  Amazon.com  to  offer  faster  deliveries.  Carriers  are  also  facing  competition  from  startups like Instacart, Postmates etc.  Consumer Behavior Most consumers care more about low – cost merchandise and free delivery and returns than same – day delivery. Consumers do not frequently feel the need to receive a product on the same day that they purchase it. So retailers and carriers should carefully segment the market by customer and product

Industry Scenario

­ Bhaskar K. slowly in providing Same Day Delivery services. Here  are  some  steps  for  retailers  &  carriers  to  take  as  they  consider same – day delivery. The most important decision for retailers is where to test  same day delivery. The retailers should choose suitable  demographics. Retailers should also choose test markets  based on the availability of nearby inventory, either in  warehouses or stores, for fulfilling anticipated demand.  Also, retailers should choose those products that can be  delivered profitably on the same day they are purchased.  These products will likely be high margin, small, and not  readily  available  in  neighborhood  stores  for  most  consumers. Carriers are the tail of the dog in same­day delivery. They  would not offer the service unless retailers wanted them  to.  But  carriers  should  not  follow  retailers  into  an  untested field without establishing their own criteria for  success.  Carriers  have  a  basic  choice  between  two  different  delivery  models.  They  are  either  extension  of  their  existing  delivery  network  or  creating  a  separate  network to support same – day delivery. The first model  would  be  most  effective  for  serving  retailers  with  distribution centers located near a carrierʹs local sorting  facility.  The  model  would  require  extra  operating  capacity, particularly labor, to support extended drop­off  hours  and  delivery  windows.  The  second  model  would  allow retailers to fulfill their customersʹ desire for instant  gratification, but it would only work in densely populated  areas  and  would  also  require  a  large  commitment  of 

The carrier industry in US is estimated to be generating  around $70 billion revenues. According to an estimate,  same day delivery could generate between $425 million  and $850 million in delivery fee income. This estimate  assumes that consumers are willing to pay shipping fees  of between $6 and $10 per purchase and this will leave  very limited margin for retailers and parcel carriers. So,  the  projected  revenue  through  delivery  fee  income  is  modest for the big companies.   Checklist for Retailers & Carriers in Same Day  Delivery model History  suggests  that  retailers  &  carriers  should  go 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

10


Pravaha | Edition 1

The Road Less Travelled

Checklist for Carriers Carriers should be able to execute basic parcel services reliably  and at lower cost before offering same­day delivery

Consider subsidizing delivery costs for retailers in exchange for  a larger share of wallet

resources. Vehicles would need to be on call to respond,  and  retailers  and  carriers  would  have  to  establish  a  technology  platform  that  would  enable  real­time  route  scheduling  and  parcel  pickup.  This  approach  is  more  costly,  but  carriers  might  be  able  to  avoid  some  investments  in  labor,  infrastructure,  and  technology  through  outsourcing.  Eg.  Deploying  local  couriers  to  handle final delivery Checklist for Retailers Retailers should analyze the expected costs and benefits of  same­day delivery and have a clear path to increased revenues  before jumping in

Consider alternative approaches, such as cutoff times as late as  11 p.m. for next­day delivery and click­and­collect services that  allow customers to order online and pick up goods in a store

Pilot same­day delivery offerings to understand demand; test  the effect of cutoff times, minimum purchase size, delivery fees,  and product categories on overall spending in different  consumer segments

Evaluate the investment return of same­day delivery based on  its potential to increase wallet share of retail parcel traffic, to  improve consumersʹ brand perception, and to mitigate threats  from national, regional, and local carriers

Invest in expanded capabilities to execute same­day   delivery, such as establishing strategic partnerships with high­ potential retailers, pushing the boundaries of network  flexibility through low cost labor and lean operations,  developing or acquiring enabling technologies, and  exploring  partnerships to support execution and share costs

The Way Ahead For the foreseeable future, same­day delivery will likely  remain a niche offering. Carriers & Retailers should be  actively trying to improve the customer experience and  their  own  competitive  position.  Carriers  may  want  to  focus more a ention on low­cost and convenient delivery  services. Regardless of how the delivery market develops,  carriers should be embedding themselves in the flow of e­ commerce  by  partnering  with  larger  retailers,  actively  supporting  purchase  returns,  and  improving  delivery  tracking. But it is way too soon to tell whether same­day  delivery is the right vehicle to achieve those goals. *****

Evaluate and select delivery partners based on their  willingness to share the risks and on the sophistication of their  fulfillment systems

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

11


Pravaha | Edition 1

Cover Story

FROM CLICKING TO CARTING : THE E - COMMERCE STORY ANISH AGARWAL IIM SHILLONG

EC

O M M E R C E

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

12


Pravaha | Edition 1

Cover Story

FROM CLICKING TO CARTING I just got a call from a friend of mine who is working in a  so ware  company  in  Bengaluru.  I  was  glad  that  her  cellphone was delivered on her birthday and she could use  it to click pictures of the party that night and send it over  to me on whatsapp! Now I didnʹt miss her much. Thanks  to e­commerce companies for making my task so simpler. I  just have to connect to internet, logon to an e­commerce  website,  browse  through  the  innumerable  products,  choose the one most suitable for me, make my payment  through  credit  card  and  get  it  delivered  to  a  location  I  desire.  But, is it really so simple and easy? This is one question  which  troubles  me  most  of  the  time  and  I  am  sure  somewhere at the back of your mind it bothers you as well.  It might seem to us that it is just another product which  gets delivered to us but have we ever wondered why it is  that the products are never shipped to a wrong address or  how the products reach us on a promised date when over  one lakh goods are shipped per day in India. There is a lot  of work that goes behind the scenes to make sure that the  product is correctly delivered. Before we delve deep into  the  process  of  ʹclicking  to  cartingʹ,  let  us  have  an  overview of e­commerce scenario in the country. E­commerce industry in India now stands at $1.2 billion.  According to IAMAI data it is set to grow at a healthy 

pace of 55% and is expected to reach around $1.8 billion  by  the  end  of  the  year  2013.  Today  there  are  about  69  million Indians who are visiting online sites. Though the  outlook is positive the major concern here is that only 14  million of them are actually transacting online. But, the  good  news  here  is  that  at  least  they  are  interested  and  check out prices and find out more about products. The  numbers look quite promising and we are certainly up for  e­tailing.  Players  like  Flipkart,  Jabong,  Myntra,  Snapdeal and many others have already started realizing  it  and  subsequently  started  investing  heavily  in  streamlining their supply chain which happens to be the  backbone of any player in this industry. The entire process  of supply chain starting right from building a supplier  base  to  outsource  goods  to  building  infrastructure  for  operations, using information systems to track goods and  delivering  value  to  consumer  requires  an  efficient  and  effective planning.  Let us have a look at this process for any typical company  in an e­commerce industry and understand how exactly  this  process  is  carried  out.  The  entire  process  can  be  broadly  divided  into  two  categories:  inbound  and  outbound. They are further broken as shown in the chart:

INBOUND

Segregation

Delivery

Receiving

Shipping

Packing

Picking

OUTBOUND

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

13


Pravaha | Edition 1

Cover Story SEGREGATION

RECEIVING

PICKING

PACKING

SHIPPING

DELIVERY

The entire procurement is generally handled by a central procurement team  (CPT). A purchase order (PO) is initiated and sent to the supplier. The goods are then  received in the warehouse by the team. They are then matched with the invoice and  any mismatch is reported to the supplier. Similar products are then placed in a box  and taken to a segregation table. The goods are segregated on the basis of their size,  color or any other a ribute relevant to the product and placed in separate boxes. A  unique ID, say warehouse ID (WID) may be assigned to a particular SKU.

A  good  warehouse  management  requires  successful  implementation  of  Enterprise  Resource  Planning  (ERP)  so ware.  When  the  products  have  been  segregated,  entry  for  each  WID  is  made  into  the  ERP  and  the  product  is  now  considered to have been received. Put list is printed for each box which contains the  shelf number where the box is to be kept. A new shelf number is assigned or retrieved  based on already existing product or not. Accordingly, the boxes are then placed on  their  respective  racks  by  the  workers  or  conveyor  belts  as  the  case  may  be.  The  warehouse is divided into zones, each zone comprising 4­5 racks. The orders are placed throughout the day and a pick list is generated for each  zone every 5 minutes to 30 minutes depending on the volume of order. The pick list  contains the details of the product to be picked, its zone, shelf and rack no. Then the  products are picked from their respective zones and brought to a common place. The  invoice for each product in the pick list is generated along with an address label to  where it has to be delivered. The goods are then sent for packing and the same is  confirmed in the ERP and is subtracted from the inventory.

Packing  is  one  of  the  most  important  step  as  it  directly  relates  to  customer  satisfaction. Various materials such as bubble wrap, tape and boxes of various sizes  are kept handy. The products are packed as and when they are received. The invoice is  kept inside the box and the address label is pasted on the top. The packed product is  then sent for shipping and an entry is made in the ERP to keep a record of products  shipped.

Shipping can be taken care of by the company itself or it can have a separate  logistics arm or it can be outsourced to any third party logistics provider. The entire  country is divided into regions and each region has several mother hubs. Each packed  product is assigned a unique tracking ID and then they are segregated on the basis of  regions to be delivered. At the end of the day or twice a day depending on the volume,  the goods are shipped to the respective mother hubs in the regions. Each mother hub  covers several areas around with delivery hubs in each one of them. From the mother  hubs, the goods are distributed to delivery hubs overnight. Each delivery hub covers 15­35 pin codes and employs 10­12 delivery boys who  are responsible for delivering the product to the customer. The goods in each delivery  hub are divided according to the pin code and each delivery boy is assigned 2­3 pin  codes. The delivery boy prints a sheet with the details of customers where products  are to be delivered. Since an order may consist of several items which might come  from different warehouses and be routed to mother hubs at different times, care is  taken that all of them are collected in delivery hub and are delivered in one visit.

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

14


Pravaha | Edition 1

Cover Story The entire process of ʹclicking to cartingʹ is a ma er of  efficient  management  of  supply  chain  to  reduce  the  delivery  time  to  consumer  as  well  as  to  reduce  the  operating  cost.  Companies  today  are  investing  heavily  and thriving to eliminate the unwanted steps from the  process and make their supply chain as lean as possible.  Even  one  of  the  worldʹs  largest  online  retailers,  Amazon.com,  which  ranks  third  in  Gartner  Supply  Chain Top 25 companies is not spared of rising operating  costs.         Amazon.com continues to grow at a handsome rate,  having $61 billion sales in 2012 and likely to reach $75  billion in 2013. In spite of its rapid growth, its net income  has  been  affected  negatively.  In  Q1,  for  example,  net  income decreased 37% to just $82 million, despite a rise  in sales of 22% to $16 billion. That means net income was  just 0.5% of revenue. The graph below shows reported  fulfillment  costs  as  a  percent  of  revenue  from  2010  to  2012, and then Q1 2013:

  If we consider Indian companies, the story is even  worse.  The  e­commerce  in  India  is  facing  massive  challenges  due  to  high  operating  costs.  Starting  from  leasing  a  fulfillment  center,  to  building  infrastructure  and the most severe of them all, logistics are some serious  hurdles. Though the leading companies have partnered  with  carrier  providers  to  deliver  their  products,  still  different couriers have to be used for different regions of  the country. This means that for orders sourced outside  the major cities, individual carriers have to be hired to  make  last  mile  deliveries  from  delivery  hubs  by  two  wheelers. The difficulties and unreliability of the carriers  has forced some of the largest and best funded players, like  Flipkart, to develop their own logistics arms to deliver  their  packages.    The  decision  however,  carries  massive  capital expenses in an industry that is still not standing 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

on its own feet.  It also means a huge increase in exposure,  and  a  business  that  is  now  seeking  success  in  two  industries instead of one.

In spite of all the challenges and high costs, the industry  continues to grow and is a racting foreign players. With  Amazon.com entering the Indian market, it has become  even more competitive. Amazon with its deep pockets has  the  ability  to  invest  heavily  on  fulfillment  centers  and  build a strong supplier base but even with huge inventory  and third part sellers, Amazon.com does not offer lowest  prices. On the other hand, Indian players are still in a  nascent stage and raising funds to build their operations.  Their  consistent  efforts  to  cut  costs  and  price  their  products effectively are on. With the industry set to grow,  it is for all of us to wait and watch, whether people still  ʹFlipkartʹ their products or are they simply ʹAmazonedʹ. *****  

15


VIRTUOSOS Virtuosos introduces the phenomenal changes brought by the work of famous stalwarts in the ďŹ eld of Operations management. This time around we bring forth, Taiichi Ohno, Father of Toyota production System & Vilfredo Pareto, famous for Pareto principle. Let us meet these experts!!


Pravaha | Edition 1

Virtuosos

THE TPS PATRIARCH - TAIICHI OHNO “Costs do not exist to be calculated. Costs exist to  be reduced.” 

­ Devendra Raghuwanshi

A life of Contribution   Taiichi  Ohno,  who  was  an  engineer  at  Toyota,  a er  World  War  II,  began  experimenting  with  the  assembly lines at the Japanese firmʹs automobile factories.  His main goal was to improve efficiency and catch up with  Americaʹs  Big  Three  (Ford,  General  Motors,  and  Chrysler). The result of Ohnoʹs tinkering revolutionized  the manufacturing industry forever.    Ohno  with  his  managers  devised  the  Toyota  Production  System,  more  broadly  known  as  ʺlean  manufacturing,ʺ  which  gave  Toyota  a  huge  edge  in  productivity  and  quality  control.  The  new  system  ensured Toyotaʹs position as an industry leader, and its  principles  were  adopted  within  organizations  across  sectors and countries.    He went to the U.S. to visit automobile plants, but  his most important U.S. discovery was the supermarket.  Ohno was marveled at the way customers chose exactly  what they wanted and in the quantities that they wanted.  He identified pull system in Supermarkets. It contrasted  with conventional push systems, which were driven by  the  output  of  preceding  lines.  This  visit  is  famously  known  as  the  foundation  step  of  Toyota  Production  System.    Several  elements  of  Toyota  Production  system  have become famous are muda (the elimination of waste),  jidoka (the injection of quality) and kanban (the tags used  as part of a system of just­in­time stock control). On a different note   Taiichi  Ohno  (in  1965  regarding  the  Toyota  Corolla):  “Produce  5000  engines  with  less  than  100  workers”  Manager reported back to Ohno a few months later and  said, “We are now able to produce 5000 engines with only  80 workers”. But  the  sale  of  the  Corolla  continued  to  rise  requiring  production to be increased.  Taiichi Ohno: “How many workers are needed to produce  10,000 engines?”

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Life Span - 29 Feb, 1912 – May 28, 1990 Country - Japan Known for/as - Father of the Toyota Production System Major works- Toyota Production System Workplace Management Manager  responded  quickly:  “160  workers  would  be  sufficient.” His answer infuriated Taiichi Ohno. “I learned how to  figure out 8 x 2 = 16 in elementary school. I had never  thought I would learn that again from you”   You are so accustomed to a notion that any form of  increase  in  sales,  labor,  and  equipment  is  considered  favorable. But, how do you ensure that our profit keeps on  increasing? That is the most critical factor.    Taiichi Ohno called the above logic “Management  by  Ninja  Art“,  in  other  words,  even  though  demand  increases, use your creativity to do more with much less  and not rely on basic management arithmetic to solve the  problem. “The key to the Toyota Way and what makes Toyota  stand out is not any of the individual elements…But  what is important is having all the elements together  as a system” 

***** 17


Pravaha | Edition 1

Virtuosos

THE PARETO ANALYST - VILFREDO PARETO “Give me the fruitful error any time, full of seeds,  bursting with its own corrections. You can keep  your sterile truth for yourself.” 

­ Devendra Raghuwanshi

A life of Contribution   The  major  contribution  of  Pareto  was  80:20  theory, which was first developed in 1906. He observed an  unequal distribution of wealth and power in a relatively  small proportion of the total population. This fact gave  rise to the Pareto effect or Paretoʹs law which says a small  proportion of causes produce a large proportion of results.  Thus  frequently  a  vital  few  causes  may  need  special  a ention while the trivial many may warrant very li le.  It is this phrase that is most commonly used in talking  about  the  Pareto  effect  –  ʹthe  vital  few  and  the  trivial  manyʹ.   The  importance  of  the  Pareto  Principle  for  a  manager is that it reminds to focus on the 20 percent that  ma ers.  Identify  &  focus  on  those  20  percent  which  produces 80 percent of our results. When the fire drills of  the day begin to sap our time, remind us of the 20 percent  we need to focus on. If something in the schedule has to  slip, make sure itʹs not part of that 20 percent. Pareto came up with several contributions which are as  follows:  Pareto  charts  are  a  key  improvement  tool  because  they help us identify pa erns and potential causes of a  problem.  The  Pareto  Chart  is  used  to  illustrate  occurrences  of  problems  in  a  descending  order.  It  is  used for making decisions at critical points in different  processes. It can be used both during the development  process  as  well  as  when  products  are  in  use,  e.g.  customer complaints  Pareto  Analysis  is  also  used  in  inventory  management  through  an  approach  called  “ABC  Classification“. The ABC classification system works  by grouping items by annual sales volume. This helps  identify the small number of items that will account  for  most  of  the  sales  volume  and  that  are  the  most  important  ones  to  control  for  effective  inventory  management.   Pareto efficiency, or Pareto optimality, is a state  of allocation of resources in which it is impossible to 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Life Span - 15 Jul, 1848 – 19 Aug, 1923 Country - Italy Known for/as - The Pareto Principle Major works - The Mind and Society Les Systèmes Socialistes

make any one individual be er off without making at  least one individual worse off. On a different note   Paretoʹs  best­known  student  was  Mussolini  while he was in Swiss exile as a Marxist agitator.  Pareto  was  such  an  influence  on  the  future  Il  Duce  that  Mussolini made him a Senator of Rome when he came to  power. Pareto, ever the independent­minded, denounced  Mussoliniʹs censorship of the university system anyway.  Many controversies are associated with Pareto due to his  association with Mussolini & much ink has been spent  defending Pareto from the charge of being a fascist.  “When it is useful to them, men can believe a theory of  which they know nothing more than its name.”

***** 18


Blaze-a-Trail

A mesmerizing odyssey to unearth the contemplations that have gone behind identifying subtle gaps and bridging them with unparalleled strokes to set the trail for us to follow. Unveiled, with a turn of this leaf , will be the unimaginable blend of actions and ideas that have gone into the making of the retail-giant Amazon and into the delight that Intel could bestow in something as stoic as a microprocessor.


Pravaha | Edition 1

Blaze-a-Trail

TRANSFORMING THE ONLINE RETAIL LANDSCAPE ­ Neelav Ratnam

Amazonʹs Success Story   Itʹs receptive, itʹs responsive and above all, itʹs  innovative. Beginning as an online retailer of books from  a 400 sq. feet garage of Jeff Bezos in Bellevue, Washington  to  selling  almost  everything  today,  Amazon  has  transformed itself to become the worldʹs biggest online  retailer and in the process it has changed the rules of the  game.  Amazon  now  offers  more  than  16  categories  of  products to its customers and gets them delivered within  a day, from its close to 50 fulfillment centers covering 26  million sq. feet. It makes its customers an offering they  find difficult to discount­ anything, anywhere, anytime  and  at  the  cheapest  price.  The  e­retail  giant  at  present  commands the loyalty of almost 200 million customers  spread across 178 countries.     Hidden  behind  these  baffling  numbers  is  Amazonʹs  strategy  that  transgresses  conventional  business  practices  and  seizes  opportunities  in  adjacent  verticals. From time to time Amazon simply created new  product categories; when it found competitors were well  established it made a buy­out and at other instances it  chose  to  partner  with  brands  to  create  a  massive  inventory of products. This helped Amazon reach out to 

new  audience  and  in  the  process  ensuring  accelerated  development.  Backed  by  its  agility,  Amazon  single  handedly hastened the speed and extent of change that, we  now take for granted, in retailing.   If we consider any successful business the focal  point  of  its  modus  operandi  is  its  customer.  With  its  customer  centric  innovations  and  frugal  means  of  operations, Amazon created a sustainable business model  that  drives  customer  loyalty  and  makes  it  the  online  retailer of choice.   They pioneered the concepts of customer reviews,  you­might­also­like,  people­who­bought­this­also­ bought,  fast  fulfillment  and  delivery  including  “same­ day  delivery”,  delivery  boxes  to  avoid  missed  carrier  appointments,  hassle­free  returns,  Amazon  prime  bundling two day shipping with host of other services like  media streaming and book­lending. Can such novelties in  the  front­end  alone  stream­line  the  aggressive  growth  mode,  that  Amazon  is  in?  Needless  to  say,  ample  bolstering  of  the  back­end  to  ensure  the  seamless  execution of the personalized algorithm­driven interface  that Amazon boasts of today.

More Customers Increased Convenience

More Distribution Channels

Lower Price

Larger Reach

Larger Selection More Sellers

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

20


Blaze-a-Trail

Pravaha | Edition 1

Logistics as the Driver   A  retail  enterprise,  in  general,  has  three  core  pillars  supporting  the  bandwagon  viz.  merchandising,  stores, and logistics. One of the prime focus as well as risk  area for a retailer is merchandising; deciding upon what  to  sell.  In  an  industry  where  making  decisions  on  markdown  is  a  constant  challenge  Amazon  has  constantly  persevered  to  optimize  the  retail  pricing  it  practices to minimize these markdowns. Enabling large  number  of  small  third  party  merchants  Amazon  has  managed  to  practically  sub­contract  the  biggest  retail  function and with it a large part of the risk associated with  the  unwanted  merchandise  stocks.  Stores  and  logistics  form  the  other  two  pillars.  Being  an  online  retailer,  Amazon  obviously  does  not  have  to  worry  about  the  stores (although now they are planning to venture into  the brick and mortar model). That leaves one of the most  critical enablers of retailing, Logistics­ Amazonʹs recipe  to success.   Though  Amazon  kept  on  adding  variety  of  products to its warehouse, profitability continued to be an  issue and it took todayʹs e­retail leader almost ten years to  post its first annual profit. How amazon managed to do  this is reflected in a series of improvements it employed in 

Amazon Fullfilment Centres

its inventory management and warehousing practices.  Best Practices and Innovation Warehousing Automation: Carrying anything­ anybody  wants­every time isnʹt easy and so Amazon has long used  automation  in  its  fulfillment  centers  (Amazon  doesnʹt  use  the  terms  ʺwarehouseʺ  or  ʺdistribution  centerʺ).  Amazon has 49 of these spread across 8 countries. Each of  these fulfillment centers of Amazon is approximately a  million sq. feet in area, equal to the size of around twelve 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

football fields, and items are shelved just based on where it  can get fit in. So, here we have a jungle of items that has to  be delivered to the right person, in the right quantity, at  the  right  time  and  in  the  most  cost  efficient  manner.    Amazon extensively relies on the use of bar­codes to sort  the items. The ordering system is completely automated.  It chooses the cheapest origin for the customerʹs order in  real­time and this process will re­optimize it based on the  other customersʹ orders. In 2012 Amazon acquired Kiva  Systems  in  its  second  biggest  acquisition,  for  $775  million.  Kiva  Systems  manufactures  robots  that  move  items  around  warehouses,  automating  much  of  the  fulfillment  process.  The  small  orange  robots  slide  underneath shelves, li  them, and bring them to workers  dramatically  reducing  the  effort  required  in  material  handling. Location  Postponement:  In  this  postponement  strategy  inventory  can  be  centralized  in  one  strategic  location  from  where  it  can  be  further  transported  to  possible destinations when demand is coming. Amazon  began reducing orders which were delivered from several  warehouses and stocking several items which were likely  bought, all together, by customer at one point and this  resulted  in  tremendous  reduction  in  the  safety  stock  levels. Inventory Outsourcing: There is a positive correlation  between  e­commerce  capability  and  increasing  the  inventory  turnover.  Had  Amazon  kept  increasing  its  product offering and storing them in its own warehouse it  would have meant huge amount of tied­up capital and  inevitably raised the fixed capital requirements. Hence,  since 2000, it has switched to outsourcing a part of its  inventory.  The  smart  way  Amazon  did  was  it  did  not  outsource inventory management of products which were 21


Pravaha | Edition 1

Blaze-a-Trail popular or frequently purchased by its customers. These  products  had  high  turnover  rate  and  were  managed  internally.  The  non­popular  products  were  stocked  by  distributors  who  delivered  the  products  on  request.  Amazon  outsourced  supplies  for  three  of  product  segments: cell phones, computers and books, excluding  those on best­seller lists. CellStar handled the cell phone  sales  and  wholesale  distributor  Ingram  Micro  handled  the computers and books. Amazon in essence pioneered  ʹdrop shippingʹ, the practice of using a third party seller  to fulfill demand. Inventory turnover for Amazon now  rests close to 9, ensuring lower holding and opportunity  cost and increased efficiency. Marketplace  Model:  In  addition  to  selling  its  own  products under its pure­play model Amazon introduced  the marketplace model in 2000, wherein it served as an  online platform which could be used by other retailers to  sell their products. The sellers in return got an assured  sales platform and Amazon got a share on each purchase.  But a subtle benefit that Amazon garnered by doing this  is  implicitly  ingraining  its  value  proposition  in  its 

Inc. and Best Buy Co., pick up sites.   However, due to  absence of indigenous stores, Amazon had to collaborate  with partners who would provide space for the lockers.  Customer who ship their item to a locker, usually in 7­ Elevens, grocery or chain drugsstores, are emailed a code  a er a package arrives that unlocks the door holding their  merchandise.  The  lockers  can  hold  only  smaller  items,  such  as  books,  DVDs  or  electronic  devices  like  tablets.  Users  have  several  days  to  retrieve  their  merchandise.  Users donʹt pay extra to use the service but the locker  program helps Amazon save on certain shipping costs.  For example, UPS and FedEx Corp. charge retailers as  much  as  20%  more  to  deliver  packages  to  residential  addresses  as  itʹs  more  efficient  to  deliver  multiple  packages to a business address.  Conclusion Rather  than  limiting  to  create  orthodox  logistics  infrastructure  of  an  archetypal  retailer,  Amazon  developed  a  logistics  services  platform  complete  with  technology  support,  hardware,  and  best­in­class  operations management that gives them the advantage of  scale as they manage receiving and fulfilling services for  thousands of merchants, as well as enables them to create  a  large  warehouse­network  to  enable  most  optimal  shipping for their own merchandise. Challenges loom at  large  in  the  arena  of  e­retailing,  nevertheless,  having  embedded  the  a itude  of  thinking  from  the  audienceʹs  psyche, Amazon way will never seize to amaze. *****

targetʹs  mind  –  low  price.  Customers  could  compare  between  Amazon  and  its  competitors  price  on  the  site  itself.  It  could  save  itself  the  trouble  of  handling  the  inventory  and  shipping  of  these  products.  Merely  by  processing orders it managed to reap benefits. Amazon Lockers: Failed package deliveries continued  to plague online retailers. They are also more expensive  for  online  retailers  because  those  consumers  are  more  likely to call customer service, switch to a competitor, or  get a replacement item. To mitigate this issue Amazon  started its locker service earlier this year. The concept was  borrowed from traditional retailers, like Wal­Mart Stores 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

22


Pravaha | Edition 1

Blaze-a-Trail

UNVEILING THE CUSTOMER DELIGHT INSIDE   We know Intel Corporation today for a multitude  of  reasons,  be  it  for  its  position  as  the  world  leader  in  advanced  semiconductor  chips,  or  the  company  behind  the  household  names  of  the  Pentium  microprocessor  range, the highly successful Advanced Product Phasing  (APP) tick­tock product development strategy and most  importantly,  for  the  iconic  “Intel  Inside”  branding  campaign.  The  basic  business  model  for  todayʹs  computing technology industry was laid out so aptly by  Intelʹs  co­founder,  Gordon  Moore  way  back  in  1965.  Since its inception, the company has strived to establish  an  innovation  heritage  that  expands  the  reach  and  promise of computing while advancing the ways people  work and live worldwide. In fact the Intel logo while on  the one hand representing its new branding and business  strategy,  also  emphasizes  the  embodiment  of  its  past  legacy, the present status and the future catalyst towards  positive  change  and  newer  technological  leaps.  The  famous HBR article, “Marketing Myopia” by Theodore  Levi   finds  perfect  cognizance  in  the  case  of  Intel,  a  company  that  managed  the  transition  from  a  memory  manufacturer  to  micro­processors  and  a  leading  knowledge base admirably, as opposed to, say a Kodak or  closer  home,  Hindustan  Motors.    This  multi­billion  dollar company envisages its responsibility to doing good  business  via  an  integrated  value  approach,  caring  for 

­ V M Sai Murali their people, caring for the planet and inspiring the next  generation.    Prior to the dot­com bubble burst in 2000, Intelʹs  supply  chain  was  designed  for  an  environment  where  semiconductor  demand  regularly  outpaced  supply.  However, once the situation reversed, Intel realized that it  had to establish a new culture that thrived on customer­ driven  processes  and  performance.  Starting  the  Customer  Excellence  Program  (CEP)  was  one  such  initiative that structured independent customer opinion  on Intelʹs products and services. However, even by 2005,  Intelʹs supply chain was designed to serve only the large  Original  Equipment  Manufacturers  (OEMs)  via  a  limited number of Stock Keeping Units (SKUs). Product  commitments were always backed up by physical supply  and  supply  quantities  were  fixed  much  in  advance  to  provide for supply chain predictability. But in all this,  Intel drew customersʹ ire due to long duration from order  placement to delivery. With the greater fragmentation of  customer base, more volatile demand, pricing pressures,  order changes became more frequent and Intelʹs supply  chain demoted it to “Worst in class” in order fulfillment. Central  to  Intelʹs  turnaround  effort  was  its  “Just  Say  Yes”  program  that  dramatically  improved  customer 

Strategic Corporate Responsibility Objective   Integrated Value Approach  14 Consecutive years of recognition of leadership in 

Corporate Responsibility   Caring for Our People  84% employees recommend Intel as a “great place to 

work”  Caring for the Planet  Largest  voluntary  purchaser  of  “Green”  power  in 

US since 2008   Inspiring the Next Generation  Intel Learn program has touched 1.9 million lives in 

under served communities

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Efforts Undertaken Cultivating an Ethical Culture Linking Compensation Commitment to Transparency Supply Chain Responsibility Career Development Advancing Diversity Health, Wellbeing, and Safety Promoting Volunteerism Renewable Energy Employee Engagement Energy­Efficient Products Technology for the Environment Education Transformation Inspiring Young Innovators Supporting Social Entrepreneurs Empowering Girls and Women

23


Pravaha | Edition 1

Blaze-a-Trail

responsiveness,  delivery  performance  while  optimizing  Automation for Responsiveness and Order Horizon  inventory. Reduction:  On  the  physical  end,  Intel  adopted  the    The  program  drew  its  origin  from  several  Vendor­Managed Inventory (VMI) strategy to improve  customer visits conducted by Intel executives in 2005.  responsiveness  and  reliability  with  reduced  inventory  Many customers indicated dissatisfaction with the order  levels. By utilizing IT­built automated solutions for real  fulfillment process that Intel was able to track down to  time order commitment, daily VMI hub replenishment  multiple approval levels and delays due to order changes.  and  necessary  supply  optimization,  Intel  was  able  to  Although  the  annual  customer  survey  through  the  reduce order fulfillment lead times by 23 days with 26%  Customer  Excellence  Program  (CEP)  was  started  in  improvement in responsiveness by the year 2010. In the  early  2000s,  the  results  from  these  executive­customer  case of non­VMI customers, Intel was able to shorten the  visits allowed Intel to be er structure the CEP program  order horizon to less than a month by avoiding manual  for obtaining and prioritizing customer feedback that had  order  handling  delays  and  errors  through  automated  a greater impact on customer commitment and retention.  processes. In its effort to address the order fulfillment process, Intel  Production  Planning  via  Accurate  Demand  made  sweeping  changes  to  its  existing  processes  by  Signaling:  Intel  re­aligned  its  production  and  supply  combining  customer  feedback  with  IT  data  analytics  planning process with the existing orders in the system  methods.  Keeping  in  mind  the  high  number  of  times  a  and  available  demand  forecast.  The  decision­making  given  order  changed  (average  of  6  times)  and  the  low  process  was  streamlined  and  key  IT  infrastructural  percentage of orders shipped without changes (a meagre  enablers  like  standardized  reporting  and  alert­based  1%), Intel was able to outline the primary goals for its  planning  developed  using  Intelʹs  IT  prowess.  In  2009,  supply chain organization. The “Just Say Yes” program  Intelʹs  “Just  Say  Yes”  program  received  the  Supply  thereby  set  a  company­wide  determination  to  inherit  a  Chain  Innovation  award  from  the  Council  of  Supply  new approach to customer relations through improving  Chain Professionals (CSCMP). ability  to  respond  quickly  to  change  order  requests,    As  on  today,  Intelʹs  IT­enabled  supply  chain  reducing  inventory  levels  and  errors  in  demand  solution has allowed it to meet market uncertainties by  forecasting. delivering  highly  efficient  information  systems  for    The initial success of the “Just Say Yes” program  various  aspects  of  supply  chain  management,  order  was  backed  up  by  further  initiatives  to  increasing  fulfillment,  production  planning,  demand  forecasting  customer responsiveness, productivity, and process cycle  and overall planning. time and inventory levels.   Today,  global  supply  chains  face  challenges  of  Standardized  Metrics  across  supply  chains:  Intel  newer  emerging  country  markets,  ever­increasing  enabled industry­standard Key Performance Indicators  portfolio of products and service offerings, customer reach  (KPIs) metrics like Order Fulfillment Lead Time (OLFT)  expansion,  social  media,  availability  of  infrastructure  to  measure  responsiveness.  Perfect  Order  metric  was  and  environmental  sustainability.  Thereby  Intel  will  instituted to measure the reliability of meeting customer  have to implement highly adaptable and agile IT solutions  expectations in full, on­time and without any damage.  to  support  market  environment  and  customer  More such KPI metrics were created to track and foresee  requirements.  early  trends  by  harnessing  Intelʹs  IT  Business  ***** Intelligence (BI) solutions. Intel’s Supply Chain Leadership Vision Internal Alignment Breakdown functional silos  Improve efficiency and  effectiveness

Just Say Yes Customer responsiveness and  delivery performance  Inventory optimization

2005

Cost Competitiveness &  Agility  Flexibility and lower complexity  Supply chain segmentation

2012

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

24


In our ‘Roobaroo’ with industry stalwarts we bring about a virtual interaction amongst our readers and corporate leaders via questions to exemplify their experiences which can benefit budding mangers and business leaders. In this edition we bring forth the back end of your favorite Bengali cuisine 6, Ballygunge Place through the words of Mr. S. Ramani himself. Further Mr. Khatri takes us through the supposedly complex world of Six Sigma in a simplified manner.

Roobaroo


Pravaha | Edition 1

Roobaroo

WHAT GOES BEHIND YOUR FAVORITE BENGALI CUISINE? Mr. S. Ramani is the founder director of Savourites Hospitality Pvt. Ltd and presently looks into Projects and Marketing of 6, Ballygunge Place. 6 Ballygunge Place is the flagship restaurant of Savourites Hospitality Pvt. Ltd. Started in 2003, today, 6 Ballygunge Place is known as one of the premier specialty eateries in Bangalore and Kolkata serving authentic Bengali cuisine after thorough research into cookbooks of the Tagore Era. After graduating from IHM Chennai Mr Ramani had a short stint at The Park Hotels post which he pioneered his venture Savourites which has turned out to be a big success story. In his interaction with Team Op-Era Mr. Ramani speaks about the best practices at Savourites and shares his advice to the budding entrepreneurs who want to make it big in the hospitality business. helps  us  have  a  series  of  dedicated  Vendors.  We  have  annual tenders which are reviewed every quarter as per  market information we receive and our internal controls.  We  have  installed  a  Shawman  Material  management  so ware  which  helps  us  in  auditing,  reviewing  and  reordering with work flow functionality.  Op­Era: Supply chains in the restaurant business is an  integral part of its success­ with regard to this, what are  the major difficulties that you face on the procurement  front? Mr. Ramani:   There is a huge amount of uncertainty  amongst smaller vendors, e.g. Mu on suppliers. During  inflationary trends, even Vegetable suppliers play spooky.  We command the largest base of consumption in Kolkata.  As  a  result,  our  Vendors  expect  huge  orders  and  our  difficulties are minimized. Op­Era:  What  motivated  you  to  enter  the  restaurant  business in a place like Kolkata where making a mark with  authentic Bengali cuisine is a tough challenge? Mr. Ramani:  Kolkata is the food capital of India, as the  Bengalis  are  most  known  to  be  extremely  passionate  about food. Bengal is a “Nation State” wherein there is  humongous variety in food and Bengalis travel quite a  lot, so there is varied amount of assimilation in cuisines  and recipes. This makes Bengal and Kolkata the best place  to start business. However, we face challenges in every  phase of life. Op­Era: Procurement in restaurants is a major task that  needs to be taken care of, what system does 6, Ballygunge  Place chain follow? Mr. Ramani:   Our belief in continuity and retainment 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Op­Era:  A  business  always  looks  towards  cost  optimization  –  you  as  a  restaurateur  would  have  your  own ways to go about it, can you elucidate some for us  (examples of cost optimization)? Mr. Ramani:  Yield Management is one area we focus on  wherein  we  have  a  standardized  output  matrix.  For  example, a kilo of mu on has to yield so many portions of  a prepared dish. In a month, if we have 100 kgs of mu on  ordered, we review the yield between input and output.  Procurement  of  key  raw  materials  before  the  season  begins based on our consumption pa ern helps us save  cost.  Eg  Cashew  &  Sugar  purchased  before  Diwali  because there is 30% price difference in the pre and post  Diwali phase. Op­Era: Given the uncertainties in government policies 

26


Pravaha | Edition 1

Roobaroo and economic fluctuations, how does cost escalation on  various fronts (rise in raw material cost, fuel cost, logistic  cost ) reflect on the pricing? Mr. Ramani:  We have a policy of reviewing prices every  18  months.  Inflationary  trends  are  taken  into  consideration before a price hike is formalized. In between  there is a crisis, eg, onion prices/ bird flu, we absorb it as a  business risk. Knee jerk price revisions have never been  our policy. Op­Era: 6 Ballygunge Place has made a mark for itself in  traditional Bengali Cuisine – how have you differentiated  yourself from other players like Oh Calcu a, Bijoli Grill,  Bhojohori Manna? Mr. Ramani:  6, Ballygunge place is specialized Bengali  Cuisine  which  incorporates  authentic  dishes  from  east  and  west  Bengal.  The  rest  have  completely  different  business model. Some follow the pot pourri concept while  others have smaller outlets and follow the military hotel  concept. Op­Era: We see a distinct change in the product offerings  during festive seasons with introduction of standardized  menus  and  buffets.  What  changes  do  you  have  to  inculcate  in  your  regular  operations  to  cater  to  such  occasions? 

cuisine to new frontiers. Op­Era:  As  a  successful  restaurateur  and  now,  a  premium caterer, can you mention a few synergies that  exist  between  the  two  and  also  the  operational  differences? Mr.  Ramani:    In  a  Restaurant,  everything  is  set,  the  menu, the processes, the price and the place. Whereas in  Catering,  it  is  entirely  dynamic.  Every  catering  has  a  diversified menu, one different from the other. Even the  management  needs  and  business  processes  are  diverse.  The only synergy we draw is added sales. A Restaurant  customer  recommends  us  for  Catering  and  vice  versa.  Our basic drive for Quality food is the only other synergy. Op­Era: As a seasoned entrepreneur in the field, what  would be your advice to budding restaurateurs/ caterers  who  want  to  make  it  big  in  the  restaurant­catering  business? Mr. Ramani:   Have passion, willing to take on failures  for  they  are  the  stepping  stones  to  success,  respect  the  people whom you work with because you are as good as  your team. Patience is a virtue as success never comes  easy. Last but not the least, you  must have the pulse of the  product. Never shy away from Systems. *****

Mr.  Ramani:    During  all  festivities  and  holidays,  we  have special buffet to cater to the extra rush of customers,  this helps us in adding variety and value to our consumer  base. For example, Puja, Bhai Dooj, Christmas, Holi &  Diwali.  New  products  are  our  differentiators.  Our  Seasonal  festivals  like  Aam  (Mango),  Hilsa  (Fish)  etc  helps us minimize the sway among our customers. Op­Era:  You  have  expanded  geographically  as  well  as  diversified into other specialty cuisines, what have been  the challenges involved and what have been the benefits? Mr.  Ramani:    To  expand  geographically,  the  first  challenge  is  manpower.  Second  is  availability  of  raw  materials,  third  is  sustaining  quality.  We  have  odd  comparisons, Your Kolkata outlet is be er than Bangalore  or vice versa. The benefits have been larger market share,  newer  customers,  the  introduction  of  this  specialty 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

27


Pravaha | Edition 1

Roobaroo

THE SIMPLE IDEA BEHIND THE ‘SIX SIGMA’ JARGON Mr. Vishwadeep Khatri is the CEO & Principal Consultant at Benchmark Six Sigma. Mr. Khatri has been into business improvement roles as a consultant, auditor and trainer for manufacturing and service industry for over 15 years. He has been driving consulting assignments with leading organizations like France Telecom, Airtel, Syngenta, NIIT, William Hare, Siemens, Schneider Electric, and American Express. Mr. Khatri is a B.Tech, M.B.A, Certified Lead Auditor (IRCA, UK), RLA (RABQSA, Australia), Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt (AMT, USA). Six Sigma Black Belt (Moresteam University USA), Senior Member of ASQ. Team Op-Era through its interaction with Mr. Khatri explores a simplified view of the six sigma practices and how they could be implemented into businesses as well as day to day activities in our respective organisations therefore use some statistical tools usage and data driven  decision  making.  Basically  for  the  senior  management  roles, you would like to use it for sense making followed by  decision making followed by policy making. So thatʹs how  it would work for any B­school graduate. Op­Era: Having handled consulting assignments both  in  India  and  abroad,  how  would  you  differentiate  the  nature of problems faced in these assignments?

Op­Era:  How  should  we  MBA  students  prepare  ourselves  by  being  well­versed  with  the  concept  of  six  sigma and its practices to suit the industry requirements  and move up the career ladder? Mr. Khatri: Focus on three things: problem solving, data  driven  decision  making  and  extra  ordinary  process  building. For example Google adwords is a very powerful  advertising tool where an advertiser may like to test many  hypotheses  and  he  would  like  to  know  which  excels,  if  controlled well, and would lead to more clicks and hence  for a marketer it makes sense. Even in HR, you would like  to check whether your psychometric testing is correlating  well with the on­the­job performance. So when you are  selecting  a  candidate  you  would  like  to  really  check  whether  that  testing  makes  sense  and  you  may  like  to 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

Mr. Khatri: They are very similar in certain industries  for example the knowledge industry like BPO, KPO and  IT,  you  will  see  challenges  like  everyone  has  to  be  the  lowest  cost  or  the  highest  speed  provider  or  both,  and  thatʹs for all the global companies. If we consider specific  sectors like for example textiles where India has a distinct  advantage of cheaper labor, but if along with cheaper labor  you donʹt create extraordinary processes then you will  have tougher times in future. There is a myth, that if you  are working with more amount of labor you canʹt use six  sigma, which is not true. In fact if you are working with  more  manual  processes  you  must  have  increasingly  extraordinary processes. Op­Era: Mumbai Dabbawala has been well known for  having error free processes even though they claim of not  having  implemented  lean  six  sigma  into  their  organization. So what do you think differentiates them  and how have they been able to achieve such results? Mr.  Khatri:  There  are  some  unique  things  happening  with the Dabbawalas. One is that they donʹt have any  serious  competition  because  they  are  unique  in  themselves and no one has been able to build the kind of  infrastructure they have. Also their processes do not have  that kind of complexity like the one that say Flipkart has.  There will be complexity in the processes in Flipkart, from  28


Pravaha | Edition 1

Roobaroo order  picking  to  delivery  to  meet  the  customer  expectations and requirements that if you try to do one  thing right the other thing tends to go bad. This is what is  called primary metric and secondary metric in six sigma.  So  the  idea  is  when  you  are  improving  your  primary  metric you donʹt want your secondary metric to go bad.  In addition the Mumbai Dabbawalaʹs are not a complete  entity in itself. They use an excellent transportation that  the  Mumbai  locals  are  renowned  for.  They  have  a  125  years  of  tried  and  tested  methodology  that  has  helped  them reach to this level. They are not the only one for that  ma er. If you take the example of the Indian Army they  are said to have the best pay­roll mechanisms in place.  And this has been the same even during the 1971 war. Op­Era: How can a start­up which hasnʹt established its  processes  that  well  use  lean  six  sigma  methods  to  transform its processes from the beginning? Mr.  Khatri:  Let  me  give  you  an  example  of  a  Father  Daughter company dealing in a product category called  Plasticizers. Plasticizers is a product which is used in a  tire for bonding of rubber with the metal mesh, so itʹs a  chemical. This specialty chemical was developed by them  using six sigma methods, and not by using DMAIC, but  by  using  DMADV,  which  is  a  product  development  approach (Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Validate) is  another  very  powerful  format  by  which  even  a  small  company or start­up can beat a well­established company  using latest technology and some wonderful designs. Op­Era: Which is the real thrust area today where lean  six sigma is contributing, or the area which is going to  revolutionize the way people work? Mr. Khatri: The DFSS or DMADV approach which is  about developing new products so that they perform in a  defect­free manner is the thrust area, in services as well as  manufacturing. It all started with DMAIC, but the way  change has become faster now, industries are changing  fast, for e.g. if a mobile phone is launched within fact days  you know whether it is a flop or a hit. Itʹs become like a  movie  now.  Things  are  so  fast  that  companies  have  to  focus more on be er designs rather than only improving  existing processes, which means their process change is  ge ing  faster  and  faster,  new  products  are  ge ing 

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

introduced. In service sector, this is even more dynamic.  Because you have the ability to change processes faster. In  manufacturing  you  get  stuck  with  your  plant  and  machinery for some time. In services, this is not the case  since most of the architecture of systems are open­ended.  You can connect with newer things, anytime. Op­Era: Speaking about change in the Indian context,  with employees resistant to change, how much of a role  does  HR  play  in  implementing  Six  Sigma  in  organizations? Mr. Khatri: The HR has got two things to contribute.  One is building the change culture in the organizations  and the other is modification of Performance Assessment  Systems  with  “Change”  as  one  of  the  important  parameters.  So  people  who  are  contributing  to  Improvements will get their own brownie points. If you  look  at  Google,  it  is  probably  the  only  large  company  where HR decisions are done with data. Data­driven HR.  Something that Google does very well. This is something  which will come up fast at other places as well. Op­Era: How are six sigma certifications important for  someone  who  aspires  to  pursue  a  career  in  the  field  of  operations?  Mr. Khatri: Basically a degree gives you a job while lean  six  sigma  helps  you  in  excelling  in  your  job  or  accelerating  in  the  career  ladder.  Everyone  knows  the  financial  or  marketing  or  operations  basics  when  they  join an organization, so what is the competitive edge you  have is the question. And how will you get close to the  senior management faster is by addressing challenging  problems, and this is true for any functional area whether  is  HR,  marketing  or  finance.  Because  following  the  routine business practices is not going to bring benefits to  the company over a longer period of time. You need to take  up  challenging  assignments  and  targets  and  address  them  using  the  six  sigma  approach  to  bring  improvements consistently in your organization. *****

29


RENDEZVOUS 'For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.' says Louis Sachar. Op-Era takes great pride in walking this talk, by creating fun experiences for budding operation enthusiasts which ultimately culminate in learning that is etched in their minds in the simulated environment. This section is an attempt to pen down them down into an enjoyable read and throw in some more fun learning challenges.


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

OPER8 - OPERATIONS WEEK, IIM SHILLONG (21  Feb ­ 24  Feb 2013) Operations Week, IIM Shillong Oper8 was launched at the end of academic year 2012-13 as a fun learning competitive initiative for the students of IIM Shillong through a week long event which brought out various aspects of operations and supply chain management through a series of events. A lot of enthusiasm was seen from both PGP and PGPEx batches. With a successful season 1 Oper8 looks to make it big with a more fun filled events and guests lectures in upcoming seasons of the Operations Week !!! Oper8  was  launched  through  a  series  of  teasers  which  finally  culminated into the detailed poster displayed alongside which  gave a brief of all the four major elimination rounds which the  teams  went  through  to  become  the  ultimate  champion.  The  evaluation stages were 8 in number which also reflects in the  logo. The first round was an online quiz ‘Optimus which saw  participation from around 45 teams, 35 of which qualified to the  next round. Optimus aimed at providing insights about simple  trivia and quick numericals in the field of operations. The top teams from Round 1  graduated to the next round ‘Opsview’  which featured a live video quiz. Three informative videos ­ Mumbai  dabbawallahs,  Store  retail  layout  and  the  Toyota  Production  Systems were shown to the participants post which questions were  posed to the participants on each video some direct from the video  and  some  indirect  which  could  connect  to  the  video.  The  teams  appreciated  the  learning  that  came  from  all  the  videos  and  were  eager to get to know the answers of the quiz which was played in a  very competitive spirit.  The top 16 teams made it to the next round of Oper8 while the  scoring for the ultimate champion had already begun. Optronix  was  a  realtime  simulation  of  a  corporate  house  to  ensure  profitability  through  winning  bids,  optimizing  production  and  inventory,  providing  appropriate  logistics  by  building  a  mathematical model with ongoing rounds of contract offerings.  The top 6 teams made it to the most exciting finale ‘The Amazing  Race’. The event started on a Saturday evening with a series of  clues  one  leading  to  the  another  inside  the  campus  and  intermingled games giving a feel of one or the other operations  concepts like Karakuri, Sorting, WIP inventory, etc. The finale  was to find the treasure a er a series of clues related to the domain  which was won by Ashok and Ernesto from PGP 12.

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

31


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

OPSOPEDIA - THE FUN LEARNING VIDEO SERIES (Monthly) Opsopedia was brought up as an initiative of Team Op-Era to involve all the management students in the process of learning simple operations and supply chain concepts through some fun interactions amongst characters created by Team Op-Era who can explain these concepts in an interesting and a very simple clarified manner. By now this video encyclopedia has covered concepts of different types of logistic providers, quality function deployment and Kaizen. Let us have a look. . .

GYAAN I - LOGISTIC PROVIDERS

GYAAN 2 - QUALITY FUNCTION DEVELOPMENT

Opsopedia began with Chintu­Guruji explaining this topic in a  light  hearted  manner.  Video  starts  with  the  curious  student  asking his teacher about the types of logistics providers & their  functions. The video goes on by explaining the concept of various  logistics providers & their significance in an interactive manner  which will make it easy to understand. In the field of Operations  management  various  terminologies  are  sometimes  taken  for  granted without understanding logic behind it & hence in the  first video an effort was put to draw a ention towards this aspect  of understanding the terminologies reflecting various concepts.  Video ends by creating a curious mind to search about these ideas  to  understand  the  intricacies  of  these  concepts  in  a  simple  manner.

In  its  second  video,  Opsopedia  covers  the  concept  of  Quality  Function Deployment which is depicted in a conversation with  the help of a presentation which makes it easily understandable as  the  concepts  like  House  of  quality  &  four  phases  of  Quality  function  deployment  are  depicted  pictorially.  This  video  discusses  the  applicability  of  QFD  as  a  good  product  development  tool  which  maps  customer  requirements  to  the  product  design  stage.  The  discussion  brings  into  notice  four  major  advantages  of  QFD  which  are  reduced  implementation  time, customer driven process, well documented process & the  process which promotes team work. Video ends with the real time  example of Ritz Carlton hotel and Mahindra & Mahindra which  uses QFD for the development of their products & services.  GYAAN 3 - KAIZEN In  Gyaan  3  Opsopedia  introduces  Boski  &  Chitra  madam  for  presenting  a  fun  and  quick  way  of  learning  concepts  of  Operations  management.  In  this  video  the  two  characters  explained the philosophy of continuous improvement i.e. Kaizen.  The  steps  of  continuous  movement  process  described  in  the  beginning marks the start of the video which culminates with the  simple & complete explanation of the process. Mentioning the  point that Kaizen does not only mean big improvements but it  also encompasses small changes done on a regular basis clearly  describes the foundation of Kaizen associated with its Japanese  roots i.e. incremental developmental processes. The example of  categorical arrangement of items on a shop floor is simple but  effective  in  understanding  the  basic  idea  behind  Kaizen.  This  edition  also  introduces  various  terminologies  under  Kaizen  which helps in creating a curious bent of mind.

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

32


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

OPTIMUS 3.0 - THE MOST CREATIVE BRAIN TAKES IT ALL

(9  Aug ­ 21  Aug 2013) Optimus 3.0 was launched as an Inter- College competition for motivating B-School students from all around the country to creatively bring forth important operations concepts like JIT, Cross Docking, Push-Pull Production Systems, Forecasting, etc. followed by propagating these entries on the social media platform to spread the word in their respective B-Schools and to all interested students alike.

Winning Entry : Team Konvicted from IIM Kozhikode Dipankar Biswas and Abhishek Nandan from IIM Kozhikode bagged a cash prize of Rs. 1000 with a  holistic explanation of the ‘Cross Docking’ concept critical to huge retailers

Runner­Up Entry : Team GIM Ops Guru from Goa Institute of Management, Goa Abhishek Sinha and Swayambhar Majumder from GIM, Goa used Goa’s very own JK Restaurant at  Sanquelim to interestingly explain ‘JIT’ and take home a cash prize of Rs. 500.

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

33


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

Special Mention for Design : Team Ultra Magnus from IIM Raipur Ruchi Sao and Trisha Gajbhiye from IIM Raipur were applauded  a ractive design which was  highlighted by the spiral with excellent use of colors which quite well symbolised the ‘Death Spiral’

Special Mention for Creativity : Team Lost Raven from VGSOM, IIT Kharagpur Anurag Dabas and Arpit Varshney entertained Team ­Opera with their hilarious yet powerful  explanation of ‘The Learning Curve’ via their friendly trolls

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

34


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

Special Mention for Conceptual Clarity : Team The Backbenchers from NITIE, Mumbai Sneha Lundia and Neeraj Nayak from NITIE, Mumbai received a special mention owing to the  excellent explanation of ‘Reverse Logistics’ via text as well as systematic infographics

Special Mention for Publicity : Team Transformers from IIM Udaipur Navdeep Thakur and Sushil Ramteke proved excellent marketers in publicizing their interesting  explanation on ‘JIT’ garnering over 1000 likes and 40 comments on Facebook

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

35


Pravaha | Edition 1

Rendezvous

Connect: 

1

2

3

4

Solve:  5. Match:   a) Agility               1) Adjust supply chainʹs design to meet structural shi s in markets   b) Adaptability      2) Create incentives for be er performance   c) Alignment         3) Respond to short­term changes in demand or supply quickly  6. Which of the following company was infamous for its lack of agility in 1990s?   a)  HP        b)  Zara       c)  H & M      d)  Mango  7. Which of the following is not the underlying premise of Theory of Constraints that organizations  can be measured and controlled by variation of ­­­­­­­­­­?   a)  Inventory         b)  Operational Expenses                                  c)  Throughput    d)  Cost of Goods Sold  8. US : Walmart :: Europe: ____________  9. Find the odd man out:   Airlines, Hospital, Automotive, Space industry 10. In a supply chain information, product and money are types of ____________ 

1. Continuous Replenishment (Search History) 2. Economic Ordered Quantity (Origin) 3. Top 10 Gartner Supply Chain Rankings-Asia Pacific 4. Bar Code (Evolution of Technique) 5. a-3 b-1 c-2 6. a (HP) 7. d (Cost of Goods Sold) 8. TESCO (Largest retailer in terms of revenue) 9. All industries except Automotive mentioned above strive to achieve 8 sigma level 10. How do you even dare to look at the key for this one. What does the name of the magazine literally mean ?

FUN ZONE - TICKLE YOUR GREY CELLS !!!

*****

Operations Club, IIM Shillong

36


Team Op-Era Operations Club Indian Institute of Management, Shilllong Please send in your comments/ feedback to  opera.iims@gmail.com


Pravaha - Edition 1 - Aug 2013