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Open UP Study Skills

The Ultimate Survival Guide for University Students Free eBook l How

to adjust to uni life l Exercises on dealing with stress and anxiety l Practical tips on finding part-time work l How to write the perfect essay and prepare for presentations l Handy keyboard shortcuts l Puzzles to beef up your brain


Table of Contents

01 Kick Start Studying How to Write Great Essays Internet Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism

11 12

13 14 Quicksteps to Microsoft Office 2010 15 Demystifying Statistics 16 Beef Up Your Brain Answers 17 Perfect Presentations

Exam Preparation and Performance

Student Life Top Tips for Adjusting to Life at University

2

Seeking Part-Time Work

3 4 5 6 8

Survival Tips from Other Students Dealing with Anxiety and Worry Take a Break – Recipes Beef Up Your Brain

02


Student Life

Top Tips for Adjusting to Life at University

2

Seeking Part-Time Work

3 4 5 6 8

Survival Tips from Other Students Dealing with Anxiety and Worry Take a Break – Recipes Beef Up Your Brain

1


Top Tips for Adjusting to Life at University It’s a whole new start. You’ve probably been planning it for ages. And now it’s actually happening. The beginning of your life at university. Feels a bit like a giant leap into the unknown? Don’t panic, keep your stress levels under control and follow some simple advice: Avoid information overload. There are some basic things you need to know when you start university, like what your schedule is, where your classes are, how much time you’ll have to spend studying. Take it slowly, focus on the important basics as you get your bearings, and all the other details will eventually fall into place.

Turn up. Woody Allen famously said that 80% of success is showing up. Remember that even now, when so much information is available on the internet and from so many sources, lecture and tutorial attendance is still very strongly linked to student success, so don’t miss out.

Get motivated and stay focused. Motivation is the spark that keeps you going even when

things get difficult. It keeps you curious in the face of tedium or complexity. Take things day by day but keep your eye on the goals you want to achieve, and remind yourself why engaging actively with university life will help you reach those goals.

Make contact. There are many places and people at college who can help you with all aspects of university life. Check out all the facilities and resources that can help you make the most of your time and maximise your chances of success. Look after your health and wellbeing. Make sure you develop habits that help you stay

relaxed and alert throughout your studies. Get plenty of exercise and rest. Eat healthily. Watch your alcohol intake. Take care of yourself.

The importance of friendship and supportive peers. Once you start to connect with

other students and establish good friendships, you’ll find that the early challenges of life as a student become much easier to tackle. Just as long as you learn to balance work and study with play and socialising, you’ll create the right ingredients for enjoyment and success.

Book Suggestion The Ultimate Study Skills Handbook Sarah Moore, Colin Neville, Maura Murphy, Cornelia Connolly 978-0-335-23442-4 240pp Apr-10

This is the handbook of techniques, tips and exercises for students! It will help improve your grades, save you time and develop the skills that will make you stand out to prospective employers.

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Seeking Part-Time Work Get your timing right. Apply early, and start thinking about who you can talk to well before term ends. Allow enough time for some face to face conversations with people who might be good connections.

Broaden your scope. Don’t rely on agencies, and certainly don’t rely on advertised positions. In a tough market you are more likely to find temporary work through word of mouth than any other method. Begin with personal contacts, not job ads. Start with people you know – find out about what organisations and sectors are doing, and what kind of skills they are looking for. Don’t follow the herd to the same old employers every student is approaching. Most jobs won’t be advertised, so ask around.

Offer a concise message. Learn how to present who you are and what you do in short, focused statements. Be ready to summarise your skills and know-how quickly, and say how you can help an organisation. How well does the first half page of your CV capture what you have to offer? Think about what employers really need. Most student CVs put a large emphasis on qualifications and academic learning, but what employers are looking for is very simple: skills, the right attitude to work, flexibility, and the ability to pick things up quickly. Make sense of your experience. Talk about skills you acquired through your studies and outside interests – organising projects, leading teams, communication skills. Talk about any skills you have picked up from any kind of employment or work experience. Do your homework. Even if it’s a temporary or holiday job, you will still come across as an

above-average candidate if you have found out something about the organisation. Use online tools to find out, but if possible also talk to people who have worked there before.

Keep on top of applications. Keep good records of contacts and applications close by at all times so you can respond confidently to phone calls out of the blue. Be ready to move fast if an interview or early start date comes up. Watch your online image. Maintaining a professional web presence matters, even when

looking for part-time work. Keep your social life and embarrassing photographs in a private space, and have separate public-facing pages for job seeking and work.

Sharpen up your interview look. Invest or dig out clothes that make you look sharp, but

still feel comfortable. Employers expect students to be scruffy, so buck the trend. At interview dress slightly smarter than the workplace dress code.

Book Suggestion How to Get a Job You’ll Love 2011-2012 Edition John Lees 978-0-077-12993-4 312pp Aug-10

This fully updated edition of John Lees’ bestselling book will help readers unlock their hidden potential, find their passion and apply it to their working lives. A must-have read for anyone looking for their ideal career. Visit www.johnleescareers.com for free career tools and tips.

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Survival Tips from Other Students C.A. Canton-Romein: “Learn to make mind maps! They are fast

for dictates, make it easy to connect and summarize information with the added benefit of everything being on one page.”

Katrina Walters: “Work out how many pages you need to read,

divide the total by five then read the resulting amount of pages per day and STICK to it. This leaves the weekend free.”

Katrina Walters: “Whilst reading, instead of just taking in information, write down what you under-

stand from the text in your own words. Research any remaining information you don’t understand from a different source then rewrite in your own words when you do.”

Emily Bunce: “Get a white board! All the important stuff can be written and re-written or made very obvious so you make sure you actually read your notes.” Yanan Li: “Keep track with the university website to ensure you are informed with every announcement.” Laura Cope: “Learn how to cook, home cooking is so much cheaper than buying ready meals and will make you a popular housemate.” Laura Taylor: “3kg Penne Pasta (approx £3). 60 servings, approxi-

mately 5p each. The perfect hunger solution.” NB. Add economy mixed herbs for a romantic meal or a dinner party.

Louise Banister: “Never ever go food shopping when you are hungry!” Laura Cope: “Personalise your room with photos and things from home. It will make your room seem more familiar and help with those homesickness pangs.” Catherine Willey: “To make sure you don’t feel too homesick plan visits home in advance (and

book train tickets) and remember home is never as far away as it appears at first. Plus everyone is in the same boat - scared and a bit lost!”

JOIN our Study Skills page for more discussion, articles, useful hints and tips www.tinyurl.com/openupstudyskills

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Dealing with Anxiety and Worry Adapted extract from Stop Worrying by Ad Kerkhof

Exercise 1: The vicious circle of worrying It’s natural to experience moments of anxiety or stress during university life when dealing with the pressures of assignments, exams, being homesick, juggling work or building new relationships. If you find yourself worrying, you may feel that you cannot stop. Worrying often makes us somewhat passive. You can get out of the vicious circle of worrying thoughts just by doing something to distract yourself. 1a l Look for contact with others. Have a chat with a roommate or telephone a friend. l Get active, or do some sports practise. For example, go for a bike ride or a walk, preferably with someone else.

l Take a nice shower, let all the worry be washed away.

l Read a good book, you will then be in another world.

1b l Make a list of distraction activities in your notebook.

Exercise 2: Positive worrying To avoid those feelings of unease and negativity it is important that we concentrate our positive qualities and skills. You will have more than enough of these.

l Close your eyes.

l Take a quality or skill which you are good at or in which you take a pride e.g. you stood up for yourself or someone else once, you are a good friend, you are a good cook, you can write or dance well, you are amusing, smart. l You then say to yourself: ‘I am good at . . .’ Perhaps you will doubt that you can hold onto this good feeling. So say it again: ‘I am good at . . .’ Now say it to yourself twenty times.

l Allow yourself to be proud for five minutes.

At night, are you unable to sleep due to all that worrying? If so, there are a number of things that could help you. Before going to sleep you could drink a glass of warm milk, read, listen to music. You could also put on something warm, for example, pyjamas or an extra T-shirt.

Book Suggestion Stop Worrying: Get your Life Back on Track with CBT Ad Kerkhof 978-0-335-24252-8 200pp Aug-10

We all worry about things - some of us even worry about the fact that we are worrying. This practical book will help you to put your fears into perspective and teach you to cope with stressful situations.

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Take a Break - Recipes Are you a cooking novice? Does the thought of losing your trusty microwave make you panic? If so, try these simple recipes to get you started and make you even more popular amongst your friends! Lalitha’s Butternut Squash Curry Ingredients: (serves 4)

2 tablespoon sunflower oil 2 red onions cut into wedges 2 garlic cloves 675g butternut squash, peeled, deseeded and cut into large chunks l 1 tbsp red curry paste l 400g can of coconut milk l 450ml vegetable stock l 1 tablespoon lemongrass l Juice of 1 lime l 225g baby spinach l Fresh coriander

l l l l

Method

1. Fry onion on a gentle heat for 7-8 minutes. 2. Add garlic and squash and fry for 3-4 minutes. 3. Stir in the curry paste, coconut milk and stock and bring to the boil. 4. Add lemongrass, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 25-30 minutes. 5. Take off the heat and stir in the lime juice, spinach and coriander.

Ceri’s sausages with cider, apple and mashed potato Ingredients: (serves 4)

6 large pork sausages (about 500g) 15 fluid ounces (425ml) strong dry cider 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 Bramley apple, 1 Cox’s apple – cored and sliced into rings, unpeeled l 2 dessert spoons olive oil l 8oz (225g) onions – peeled and sliced into rings l 1 large clove of garlic, peeled and chopped l 8oz lean smoked bacon, roughly chopped l 1 tablespoon plain flour l A few sprigs of fresh thyme l 2 bay leaves l Salt and freshly ground pepper

l l l l

Method

1. Heat oil in large heavy based pan. 2. Fry the sausages until nicely browned. 3. Add the onions, garlic and bacon, cook until brown. 4. Add apple rings, cook until soft. 5. Add flour to soak up juices. 6. Add cider and cider vinegar, a little at a time stirring after each addition. 7. Add thyme and bay leaves. Season with salt and pepper. 8. Put lid on and simmer gently for one hour on lowest possible heat.

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Mashed potato

Ingredients: (serves 4) l l l l l

2lb Desiree or King Edward potatoes 2oz (50g) butter 4 tablespoons of semi skimmed milk 2 tablespoons of half fat crème fraiche Salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

1. Peel and chop potatoes. 2. Put in a pan of boiling salted water and cook for 20 minutes. 3. Drain potatoes then mash, adding butter, milk and crème fraiche (a little at a time) until creamy and fluffy. 4. Taste and if necessary season.

Book Suggestion Understanding Your Eating: How to eat and not worry about it Julia Buckroyd 978-0-335-24197-2 264pp Aug-11

Understanding Your Eating will help you become more aware of your feelings towards food, understand your emotional eating, and explore the reasons behind your challenges, so that you can find other ways of managing your day-to-day experiences.

7


Beef Up Your Brain Extracts from Beef up your Brain by Michel Noir and Bernard Croisile (ŠThe McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc)

Answers on Page 17

8


Answers on Page 17

Book Suggestion Beef Up Your Brain: The Big Book of 301 Brain-Building Exercises, Puzzles and Games! Michel Noir and Bernard Croisile 978-0-071-70058-0 336pp Dec-09

A collection of 301 engaging, enjoyable, puzzles and exercises designed by experts which are guaranteed to help readers boost their skills of concentration, attention and focus.

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Kick Start Studying

How to Write Great Essays Internet Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism Perfect Presentations

11 12 13

Exam Preparation and Performance 14 Quicksteps to Microsoft Office 2010 15 Demystifying Statistics Beef Up Your Brain Answers

16 17

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How to Write Great Essays Adapted extract from How to Write Great Essays 2/e by Peter Levin

Be an active reader. Interrogate books, chapters and articles. Your task is not to ‘read’ the book in the traditional way; your task is to find what is relevant to your needs and to capture it. Teach yourself to be a detective. Learn to think for yourself. Be ‘original’, ‘thoughtful’, ‘intelligent’, ‘analytical’ and ‘imaginative’. Taking notes and translating ‘academic-speak’. Resist any urge you might feel to copy out word for word large chunks of a book. Capture the method, observations, conclusions and key learning points. And don’t forget to note where you found them so you can refer back to them later.

Read around the subject. Get into the habit of finding and reading books by more than one author on the same subject and exploring the disagreements to improve your critical reading.

Feedback. There are four crucial feedback questions you can ask yourself: What did I do well? What did I not do well? How could I have improved the essay? How can I do better next time? And don’t forget to ask your tutor for feedback. Create an essay plan. In order to write a decent essay you need to have a plan. A plan, which you rough out at the beginning and refine as you go along, provides you with a structure for your essay. An essay plan is basically a list of headings: main headings and subheadings. Conclusions. They should be clear and incorporate the briefest possible summary of your discussion. Never, ever introduce new material in your Conclusions.

The process of writing. Fit your notes into your essay plan. See which of them belong under particular headings or sub-headings. When you have a rough idea where everything goes, you can start writing a rough first draft. Keep an eye on your word count and check regularly that you’re ‘on track’. Monitor your alertness and allow yourself time. There will be times when your head swims and you feel it’s all becoming a terrible burden. When this happens, take a break! Save your work frequently. Get into the habit of saving it every time you pause to think. Save the essay not only in your personal folder but also on a flash drive or email it to yourself.

Book Suggestion How to Write Great Essays 2/e Peter Levin 978-0-335-23727-2 200pp Nov-09

Essential reading for students embarking on writing an essay or report for the first time, or returning to study after a break. This book is an invaluable tool for students of any discipline.

11


Internet Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism Adapted extract from The Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism 2/e by Colin Neville

How to avoid plagiarism (Chapter 4) Applying, analysing, criticizing or quoting other people’s work is perfectly reasonable and acceptable providing you always: l Attempt to summarise or restate another person’s work, theories or ideas and give acknowledgement to that person

l Cite your sources and present a list of references

l Always use quotation marks (or indent lengthy quotations in your text) to distinguish between the actual words of the writer and your own words l There are four situations when you do not need to reference sources a) When presenting historical overviews b) When presenting your own experiences c) In conclusions, when you are repeating ideas previously referenced d) When summarizing what is regarded as ‘common knowledge’.

Internet referencing tips (Chapter 9) There are four main principles or guidelines to referencing electronic sources.

l First, and this is common for all referencing styles, the citation should link with the full reference:

Citation: (Friends of the Earth 2005) This would then link to the full list of references (in Harvard style):

Reference: FRIENDS OF THE EARTH (2005). Corporates: corporate power. Available at http:// www.foe.co.uk/campaigns/corporates/issues/corporate_power/ [Accessed 13/12/2005]. l Tutors should be directed as closely as possible to the online information being cited and

reference, giving the complete URL addresses or digital object identifier (DOI) tags. l Ensure you show website addresses that work! Make sure you have copied them or pasted them in correctly. l Because sites do disappear without warning, it is wise to print out copies of sources used for citation purposes to show a tutor, if required.

Book Suggestion The Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism 2/e Colin Neville 978-0-335-24103-3 288pp Feb-10

This excellent new edition demystifies the referencing process and provides essential guidance to make sure you are not committing plagiarism. Tackling all the main forms of referencing in an accessible and comprehensive manner, you’ll want to dip into this book time and again.

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Making the Perfect Presentation For most people, the prospect of having to speak to an audience is an intimidating one. However you can learn to control your nerves, and develop the communications skills and confidence you need to be a more effective presenter. Adapted extract from Perfect Presentations by Peter Levin and Graham Topping

Make sure that you really know what your brief is. If your teacher hasn’t made it clear to you what you are expected to do, you must ask. You also need to know how much time you are allowed for your presentation. Clarify your goals and objectives. How will you be assessed? In general, the criteria for assessing your presentation fall into two categories: Academic criteria, such as use of literature, understanding of subject, organization of material, and ‘Quality of communication’ criteria, such as audibility, visual aids and keeping to time.

Make your message memorable. It’s a good idea to grab your audience’s attention at the outset and grab it again each time you want to reinforce a point. Here are some suggestions:

l Begin by saying something arresting l Tell a story l Repeat important points

l Communicate your interest with the topic l Give your audience an agenda (‘route map’) l Have a neat, punchy ending

Consider using visual aids. For maximum audience-friendliness, it should be clear what each visual is showing, without any commentary from you. Your job will be to point out the significance of what the visuals show. Handouts. Decide what purpose(s) your handout is to fulfil and design it accordingly. Make your handout look good. It should be neat and tidy. Make friends with your audience. The more energy you are putting in to your presentation,

the more positive the body language and eye contact that you generate and elicit. Use confident body language and make eye contact confidently, and you will feel confident. That’s how it works!

Speaking with authority.

As a student, you are unlikely to be an authority on the subject on which you are presenting. However you can speak with authority and acquire respect by following these rules: Show that you have done your homework; Be organised; Cite your sources; Exercise care in making judgements; Tell your story.

The benefits of rehearsing. To give a really good presentation you must rehearse it. This will help you to give your presentation without having to think self-consciously about what you’re doing and to also get your timing right.

Book Suggestion Perfect Presentations Peter Levin and Graham Topping 978-0-335-21905-6 152pp May-06

An invaluable tool for anyone with a presentation to do in a class, seminar or in the workplace. This lively, concise and to-the-point guide offers practical advice and tips, not only on how to plan and prepare, but also on how to deliver the perfect presentation.

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Exam Preparation and Performance Adapted extract from How to Get a Good Degree 2/e by Phil Race

Good revision is about writing and talking rather than reading.

So which revision processes have high learning pay-off? l l l l l l l

Making summaries of your source materials as you read them Making essay plans for essay question possibilities Practising writing out answers to old exam questions Practising speaking the answers to past questions, and to short questions written for yourself Practising thinking through how you would answer questions Practising solving problems. In subjects like science, maths, and engineering! Getting fellow students to quiz you and quizzing them

How to prepare a revision timetable

l l l l l l l l l

Make your timetable early Include elements of a near-normal life - such as friends, hobbies, relaxation, and resting Plan to do some revision on most days, but have no days of solid revision Make your timetable humane and realistic Plan out your syllabus, approximately, and with ‘repeats’ Plan variety into your revision content Plan to work in spurts, not slogs Plan in a variety of revision activities Build in eating and sleeping!

Exams – dealing with your day of reckoning

l Keep to time (within reason) l Decide whether to spend up to five minutes ‘mapping’ your answer l Read the question, again and again l Don’t panic when solving problems l Show all your working when doing anything with numbers l Keep addressing the question l Leave margins uncluttered l Use diagrams or illustrations whenever you can justify them

Book Suggestion How to Get a Good Degree 2/e Phil Race 978-0-335-22265-0 288pp Dec-07

Are you motivated to succeed at university but unsure how to achieve your full potential? This book will help to unlock the secrets to getting a good degree and all the benefits that can come from it.

14


Quicksteps to Succeeding with Microsoft Office 2010 Mastering the Ribbon:

Microsoft’s solution to the increased number of feature enhancements is the ribbon. To see the shortcut keyboard commands for accessing the ribbon, press either ALT or F10 to toggle the commands on or off. Small squares showing letters and numbers will then appear. When you press ALT (or F10) and press the appropriate letter or number key, you will be executing the command.

PowerPoint Tips and Tricks:

Adapted extract from Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2010 QuickSteps 2/e by Carole Matthews (©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc) l Use the Design tab rather than the Masters tab if you want to change the font, colour or effects for all selected slides. l Use the Masters tab for more fundamental reasons such as to customise the layout for one or all slides, to place a logo on all slides, to control page numbering, etc.

Word Tips and Tricks:

Adapted extract from Microsoft Office Word 2010 QuickSteps 2/e by Marty Matthews (©The McGrawHill Companies, Inc) l To quickly find a folder that you have used previously, click the Recent Pages down arrow to the left of the folder name. l You can reset all paragraph formatting, including indents, hanging indents, alignment, and paragraph spacing to their default settings by pressing CNTRL+Q. l Press SHIFT+F3 to toggle between uppercase, lowercase, and sentence case options or capitalise each word on selected text.

Excel Tips and Tricks:

Adapted extract from Microsoft Office Excel 2010 QuickSteps 2/e by John Cronan (©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc) l You can fill data into the active cell from the cell above it or to its left by clicking CNTRL+D or CNTRL+R, respectively. l To view formulas instead of cell values in the Formulas tab Formula Auditing group, click Show Formulas. Click the button a second time to return to a value display. l You can convert a number to scientific notation from the Home tab Number group on the ribbon. Click the Number Format down arrow, and click Scientific near the bottom of the list. Use the Increase / Decimal buttons to then set the number of decimal places.

Book Suggestions Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2010 QuickSteps Carole Matthews - 978-0-07163491-5 240pp Jun-10

Microsoft Office Word 2010 QuickSteps Marty Matthews - 978-0-07163487-8 272pp Jun-10

Microsoft Office Excel 2010 QuickSteps John Cronan - 978-0-07163489-2 288pp Jun-10

Start using Office 2010 right away - the QuickSteps way. Quickly learn how to create Word documents; build Excel spreadsheets; manage Outlook email, contacts, and schedules; design PowerPoint presentations; and use Office Web Apps.

15


Demystifying Statistics Adapted extract from Statistics Demystified 2/e by Stan Gibilisco (©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc) When you want to know what you’re reading, writing, or talking about in statistics, you must have some familiarity with basic mathematics, including set theory, number theory, relations, functions, equations, and graphs. Table 1-1 lists common symbols used in mathematics. You’ll encounter many of these symbols in statistics as well.

Here’s a Riddle: Can any set ever constitute an element of itself? At first you, might say “No, that’s impossible. That would be like saying that the Pingoville Ping-Pong Club is one of its own members. The elements are the Ping-Pong players themselves, not the club as a whole”. But wait! What about the set of all abstract ideas? That’s an abstract idea, so in some situations a set can behave as a member itself.

Book Suggestion Statistics DeMYSTiFieD 2/e Stan Gibilisco 978-0-07175133-9 398pp May-11

Trying to understand statistics but feeling a bit uncertain? Here’s the solution to help you master this fundamental topic with ease. Includes new quizzes and test questions, clearer explanations of the material, and a completely refreshed layout.

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Beef Up Your Brain Answers

17


References Buckroyd, J. (2011) Understanding Your Eating: How to Eat and Not Worry About it. Maidenhead: Open University Press Cronan, J. (2010) Microsoft Office Excel 2010 QuickSteps. New York: McGraw-Hill Osborne Gibilisco, S. (2011) Statistics DeMYSTiFieD 2/e. New York: McGraw-Hill Professional Lees, J. (2010) How to Get a Job You’ll Love 2011-2012. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Professional Levin, P. (2006) Perfect Presentations! Maidenhead: Open University Press Levin, P. (2009) Write Great Essays 2/e. Maidenhead: Open University Press Kerkhof, A. (2010) Stop Worrying: Get Your Life Back on Track with CBT. Maidenhead: Open University Press Matthews, C.B. (2010) Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2010 QuickSteps. New York: McGraw-Hill Osborne Matthews, M. (2010) Microsoft Office Word 2010 QuickSteps. New York: McGraw-Hill Osborne Moore, S., Neville, C., Murphy, M. and Connolly, C. (2010) The Ultimate Study Skills Handbook. Maidenhead: Open University Press Neville, C. (2010) The Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism, 2/e. Maidenhead: Open University Press Noir, M. (2009) Beef Up Your Brain: The Big Book of 301 Brain-Building Exercises, Puzzles and Games! New York: McGraw-Hill Professional Race, P. (2008) How to Get a Good Degree: Making the Most of Your Time at University 2/e. Maidenhead: Open University Press


The Ultimate Study Skills Handbook

Sarah Moore, Colin Neville, Maura Murphy, Cornelia Connolly 978-0-335-23442-4 240pp Apr-10

The Complete Guide to Referencing and Avoiding Plagiarism 2/e Colin Neville 978-0-335-24103-3 288pp Feb-10

How to Get a Job You’ll Love 2011-2012 Edition

Perfect Presentations

Stop Worrying: Get your Life Back on Track with CBT

How to Get a Good Degree 2/e

Beef Up Your Brain: The Big Book of 301 Brain-Building Exercises, Puzzles and Games!

Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2010 QuickSteps

John Lees 978-0-077-12993-4 312pp Aug-10

Ad Kerkhof 978-0-335-24252-8 200pp Aug-10

Michel Noir, Ph.D and Bernard Croisile, M.D, Ph.D 978-0-071-70058-0 336pp Dec-09

Understanding Your Eating: How to eat and not worry about it

Julia Buckroyd 978-0-335-24197-2 264pp Aug-11

Peter Levin and Graham Topping 978-0-335-21905-6 152pp May-06

Phil Race 978-0-335-22265-0 288pp Dec-07

Carole Matthews 978-0-07163491-5 240pp Jun-10

Microsoft Office Word 2010 QuickSteps

Marty Matthews 978-0-07163487-8 272pp Jun-10

Microsoft Office Excel 2010 QuickSteps

John Cronan 978-0-07163489-2 288pp Jun-10

How to Write Great Essays 2/e

Peter Levin 978-0-335-23727-2 200pp Nov-09

Statistics DeMYSTiFieD 2/e

Stan Gibilisco 978-0-07175133-9 398pp May-11


The Ultimate Survival Guide for University Students  

- How to adjust to uni life - Exercises on dealing with stress and anxiety - Practical tips on finding part-time work - How to write the per...

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