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SOCIAL INNOVATION INCUBATOR SELF-SUFFICIENT BUILDINGS


A self sufficient building has to be a system of co-relationships that gather together an architectural object with answers in economic, technological and social subjects. The Social Innovation Incubator, grows within the actual situation and gives an optional solution over the social and economic issue that the unemployed professionals with capability to work are facing. The architectural program was developed by understanding a variety of innovative educational methods and giving the option to the users (in the case of our project, learners and participants) to develop new skills and prepare them to be ready for the change of matrix that the industry is facing.


Master in Advanced Architecture 2012-2013

SOCIAL INNOVATION INCUBATOR SELF-SUFFICIENT BUILDINGS Alejandra D铆az de Le贸n Lastras Robert Garita Garita Aldo Sollazzo Mauricio Valenzuela


Master in Advanced Architecture 2012-2013

SOCIAL INNOVATION INCUBATOR SELF-SUFFICIENT BUILDING STUDENTS Alejandra Díaz de León Lastras Robert Garita Garita Aldo Sollazzo Mauricio Valenzuela Lanzas

FACULTY Enric Ruiz-Geli Mireira Luzárraga Iker Mugarra Flores José Perelló Silvia Burés


INDEX

1

Introduction

11

2

Research The Site

14

The context Investment and the public space in Sant Andre de BĂŠsos La Mina

The Situation Euro - area Economy Crisis in Catalonia Crisis in Spain

Economics

Knowledge Economy Human Capital The Third Industrial Revolution

Innovation

The workforce Education Learning Strategies


3

Design Project

100

Learning methodology Project references

Lightness Aggregation Constructive systems Embeded technology

The Site Site analysis Landscape proporsal

The Program

Program and distribution Section plane Interior scenarios

Particles

Physics introduction Energy prototype Prototypes catalog

Modules

Modules typology Modules location

The Project Project perspectives 4

Open collective

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1

INTRODUCTION

Self - sufficience and responsiveness A self sufficient building has to be a system of co-relationships that gather together an architectural object with answers in economic, technological and social subjects. The Social Innovation Incubator grows within the actual situation and gives an optional solution over the social and economic issues that the unemployed professionals with capability to work are facing. The architectural program was developed by understanding a variety of innovative educational methods and giving the option to the users (in the case of our project, learners and participants) to develop new skills and prepare them to be ready for the change of matrix that the industry is facing. The Social Innovation Incubator, as an architecture proposal, is embedded within the context information by using the high salinity rate of the Mediterranean sea IaaC MAA_01

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and adapting the volume with the environmental characteristics. The shape its based on the mineral growth analysis understanding the aggregation as a the main concept, basing the volume with the halite (salt crystal) growths and how these mineral adapts over different configurations. Also, its use the Mediterranean sea salinity as a power tool to feed the sense of the building, using self sufficient sensor modules that release signals to improve the performance of the system and save energy by responding to the climate situation.

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Desk Crit with Enric

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RESEARCH

Introduction

The self sufficient building studio starts with the logic of understanding and embracing three main topics: Actual situation, architecture program and multi scalar design. Since the beginning, the research started driven by these topics in parallel with the objective of mixing in the project together and obtain by these an hybrid building powered conceptually. By the analysis of the actual situation, from the social to the economical matters, we discovered an space to intervene with the architectural program and the design, and give optional answers to the crisis situation. It was proposed through architecture, the possibility of change the state and the reality of the habitants that are around the site. With these distributed and particular interventions, that propose a systematic change, are the ones that would hack the actual system and twist the the reality to give opportunities to the people. IaaC MAA_01

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details to the building, the access to digital fabrication generate the possibility of going deeper the details of the product and the pieces. On the other hand, architectural design now its not just a matter of constructing and proposing buildings, with the digital tools and the accessibility to the information, our profession is facing a change of paradigm were the labor of the architect its to design from the smaller details to the building, the access to digital fabrication generate the possibility of going deeper the details of the product and the pieces. The research aims to understand a pallet of topics between physics, biology, technology and art and goes deeper to the particles of actual examples that would trigger technologic solutions to the final proposal.

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The Site

The project is developed in a site located in Sant Adriá de Bésos, the smalllest municipality of Barcelona. It is situated at the mouth of river Besòs and has close ties with the neighbouring cities of Barcelona, Badalona and Santa Coloma de Gramenet, forming a uniform urban area within Barcelona metropolitan area.

[ Sant Adriá del Bésos ] Population: 34.482 inhabitants Area: 3.8 km2 Density: 9.026,7 inhab/km2

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Sant Adriá del Bésos possess two main characteristics that define it. In one hand, during the years, it has experienced several massive migration flows attracted by the important industrialisation of the area during the last century. Therefore there is a high population density in neighborhood as La Mina that presents increasing social and economic issues. On the other hand, it has been subject of various major interventions in the urban public space such as the Unversal Forum of Cultures in 2004, and it has also been scenario of important projects and developments by prestigious companies and architects such as the Forum Building, Parc Diagonal Mar and the Telefónica Tower, among others. These massive developments represent the significant investment of the public and private sectors in this area which is not reflected in the use of the public space that reminds empty. The site is situated right in the middle of these opposite realities where housing, commerce, industry and services converge. It is also next to the new Campus of the Universidad Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC) that is under construction. Another important fact of the site is its proximity to the Mediterranean Sea, only 600 meters from the shore. The sourronding areas present evidence of the high salinity of the sea where interesting salinity formations can be found.

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Sant Adri谩 del Bes贸s in Barcelona

Salt formation found in Parc Forum

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[ Site ] Latitude 41°24’56.07”N Longitude 2°13’27.45”E

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Site Map 22

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Name of the project

1 - Introduction

[ Site ] 600 mts from the Mediterranean Sea

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Parc Forum - Empty Public Space

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Investment and the Public Space Economic, social and urban renovation strategy

In the urban morphology of the Barcelona City Plan, the structured grid of the Eixample de Cerd谩 allows the existence of programatic diversity. This characteristic is a key factor in the culmination of the transformation process of the most affected parts of the city and the integration of the 22@ project with the ret of the city. This plan points out the strategy of renovation of the Llevant of Barcelona where we nd the most important operations: *Sant Andreu-Sagrera Plan *Urban develpment of Plaza de las Gl贸ries *Infraestructures asociated to the renovation of Bes贸s. Including projects of neigborhood renovation, new commercial and cultural 12 projects such as new urban spaces.

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20

18

19

2 12

20

8 16 14 15 17

Location of buildings and developments that are part of the urban renovation strategy and represent considerable source: urce: http://densityatlas.org/measuring/ investmet 26

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6

50%

KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

5

11

22@

1

Smart City Campus Barcelona Biomedical Research Park Interface Building Media-TIC Agbar Tower INDRA Building

10 3

2 4

9

12 13 14 15 16 17

BESÓS

Knowledge Economy Yard 1 Torre Telefónica 2 Torre Espiral Zaha Hadid 3 Centro de Convenciones Fórum Herzog y de Meuron 4 TERSA Planta de Tratamiento y Selección de Residuos SA 5 Central Térmica de Besós (1970) 6 Centro Comercial Diagonal Mar 7 Parc Diagonal Mar 8 Parc del Forum 9 Nueva vivienda Llul Taulat 10 Regeneración del Barrio la Mina 11

LA SAGRERA Sagrera parque Lineal. 7600 nuevas viviendas Jordi Farrera 18 Estación Ave la Sagrera (9,000 nuevas viviendas) 19 Rascacielos La Novia Frank Ghery 20 2012-2013 MAA_01 IaaC IaaC MAA_01 27


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Parc Forum - Empty Public Space

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TOTAL INVESTMENT millons of euros

Knowledge Economy Yard UPC Campus Diagonal Besos Telef贸nica Building Espiral Building Forum Building Diagonal Mar Centre Diagonal Mar Parc Parc Forum La Mina Regeneration Llul Taulat

Unknown 250 86 65 117 272 36 2,100 174 9

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

TOTAL AREA square meters

Knowledge Economy Yard UPC Campus Diagonal Besos Telef贸nica Building Espiral Building Forum Building Diagonal Mar Centre Diagonal Mar Parc Parc Forum La Mina Regeneration Llul Taulat

84,000 174,000 34,000 20,650 45,000 100,500 140,000 167,000 387,000 22,470 0 50,000

100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000

COST PER SQUARE METER euros per square meter

Knowledge Economy Yard UPC Campus Diagonal Besos Telef贸nica Building Espiral Building Forum Building Diagonal Mar Centre Diagonal Mar Parc Parc Forum La Mina Regeneration Llul Taulat

Unknown 1,435 2,530 3,147 2,600 2,706 260 11,970 450 400

0

500

1000 1500

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La Mina Social Emergency

La Mina neighbourhood is situated in Sant Adrià de Besòs and was built in the 1970s to offer new housing opportunities for populations living in the different slum neighbourhoods of Barcelona. However, physical, economic, cultural and social disparities exist in La Mina. In the 1980s-1990s the first intervention plans to ameliorate the social situation were introduced but did not have enough capacity to respond to the long-term issues in the neighbourhood. In September 2000, a Consortium was established, introducing a Transformation Plan based on urban and social revitalisation. Currently, La Mina has over 500 inhabitants per hectare, much higher than the average of Sant Adriå (319) or Barcelona (221). The populations are mainly composed of immigrants from different countries that live together in a difficult environment for a harmonic social relationship. Besides this situation, La Mina presents damage to the environment due to the proximity to the industry, social exclusion, drug addiction, criminal record, insecurity and violence. Damage to the public space is due to vandalism.

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La Mina

La Mina

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inhabitants per km2

DENSITY

17.8 La Mina

9.07

Sant Adriá Besós

15.9 Barcelona

young

POPULATION

31%

- 19 years old

24%

- 16 years old

EDUCATION

18%

of the population can’t read or write

40%

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Density In 1970 over 15,000 people were occupying a total of 2,721 social houses and the population has decreased and increased irregularly in the last years always maintaining a high number of inhabitants per squared km. In the present, the density of La Mina overpasses the one of Sant Adriá de Besós and Barcelona with a 17.8%.

Population Nowadays, La Mina shelters 9,421 residents from which 31% are 25 to 45 years old and 24% is under 16. This talks about a young population growing in the same environment of scarcity. Also, the majority of the population of La Mina is foreign. Almost 10% comes from Pakistán, Morocco and China.

Education About 18% of the residents of this neighbourhood cannot read or write. This low level of instruction is correlated with a high rate of scholar failure and truancy. 40% of students drop off High School, while 10% to 15% give up at primary school. Only 0.3% has obtained an university degree. As a result, La Mina’s population grows unqualified and unprofessional and increases the high unemployment rate that already affects the area. 2012-2013

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Unemployment Although 74% of the population of La Mina is economically active, only 32% works. The occupancy rate is very low (29.1%) for reasons mainly related to incapacities associated to drug addiction and, on an opposite direction, many residents have become dependent on social programs developed by the governmental administrations. In spite of efforts to improve the area, La Mina has recently been devastated by the crisis, becoming one of the most precarious neighbourhood s of Catalonia.

DISOCCUPATION

4000 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

SECTORS OF DISOCCUPATION 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Agriculture Industry Construction Services unemployed

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Social Housing in La Mina 2012-2013

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The Situation The Euro - Area Economy

The euro is the currency of 17 of the EU’s 27 Member States. All the others are expected to adopt the euro once they meet the conditions for doing so – except for Denmark and the United Kingdom, which negotiated an opt-out from monetary union in the 1992 Treaty on European Union (the Maastricht Treaty). They may still join at a time of their choosing. The Maastricht Treaty enshrined the goal of a single currency and set out the conditions for joining. These are the ‘Maastricht criteria’ or ‘convergence criteria’, designed to ensure the smooth functioning of monetary union. In addition to some legal requirements, most notably an independent central bank, the Maastricht criteria are: • Price stability (inflation no more than 1.5 percentage points above the three best performing Member States) • Sound and sustainable public finances - Government deficit in principle no more than 3% of GDP - Government debt no more than 60% of GDP or approaching that level • Durability of convergence (long-term interest rates no more than 2 percentage points above the three best 36

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performers in terms of price stability) • Exchange rate stability (two years within ERM II without severe tensions). ERM II allows the exchange rates of participating EU currencies to fluctuate against the euro within fixed margins above and below a central rate. The Stability and Growth Pact (SGP) The SGP states that government deficits and debt should be less than 3% and less than 60% of GDP respectively. On this basis, the Commission monitors fiscal policy and public finances in Member States both inside and outside the euro area. This rule-based framework thus helps promote fiscal discipline in the EU.

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THE EURO-AREA ECONOMY THE EURO - A GLOBAL CURRENCY

The euro is the second largest reserve currency after the US dollar. Around 26% of the worldwide reserves are vow held in euro. I t is second m ost actively traded currency i n the world, used a round 20% o f daily t ransactions o n foreign exchange markets. KEY INDICATORS (2011)

Euro area (17)

EU (27)

United States

Japan

China

Population (millions)

332.2

502.9

312.7

127.3

1 359.1

7.8

11.1

10.6

3.1

7.9

Share of world GDP (% at PPP)

14.3

20.0

19.1

5.6

14.4

Exports (goods % as of GDCP)

12.5 (*)

12.2 (*)

9.8

13.2

26.8 (**)

Imports (goods as % of GDP)

13.5 (*)

13.5 (*)

15.1

13.0

23.8 (**)

GDP (in â‚Ź trillions calculated at purchasing power parity)

(*) Excluding intra-EU trade (**) 2010. Sources: European Commission AMECO, IMF WEO and DOTS.

SHARE OF INDIVIDUAL COUNTRIES IN TOTAL EU GDP Germany France Italy Spain Netherlands Belgium Austria Greece Finland Portugal Ireland Slovakia Luxembourg Slovenia Cyprus Estonia Malta Poland Sweden Czech Republic Romania Hungary Bulgaria Lithuania Latvia United Kingdom Denmark 38

Source: Eurostat, 2011.

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Euro Area: 14.3% European: Union 20%

SHARE OF GLOBAL GDP

United States: 19.1% China: 14.4% Japan: 5.6% Rest of the world: 40.9%

POLAND GULF OF BOTHNIA

NORWAY SWEDEN

DANMARK RUSSIA NORTH BISCAY

LATVIA DANMARK

BALTIC SEA

LITUHANIA

IRELAND UNITED KINGDOM

BELARUS

CELTIC BISCAY NEDERLAND

POLAND BELGIUM

DEUTSLAND

UKRAINE

CZECH REPUBLIC SLOVAKIA BAY OF BISCAY

MALDOVA

AUSTRIA

FRANCE

LUXEMBOURG ROMANIA

SLOVENIA

CROATIA BOSNA & HERZEGOVINA GULF OF LIONS

SERBIA

PORTUGAL

ITALY

SPAIN

ADRIATIC SEA

MONTENEGRO KOSOVO

BULGARIA

MACEDONIA

ALBANIA TYRRHENIAN SEA

GREECE

AEGEAN SEA

MEDITERRANEAN SEA IONIAN SEA

MALTA

Euro-area countries EU Member States that have yet to adopt the euro 2012-2013 MAA_01 EU Member States with an opt-out from the euro IaaC

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Europe's Leaders See Growth; Business Prepares for the Worst “...Europe’s l eaders are starting to t alk, cautiously, about economic recovery. “Growth is expected to pick up i n the second half of 2 012 and gather speed i n 2013,” O lli R ehn, t he European C ommissioner f or Economic and M onetary Affairs, wrote in a D ec. 1 0 column in the Financial Times. In t he l atest show o f pessimism, on D ec. 21, Luxembourg-based s teel g roup A rcelorMittal (MT) took a $4.3 billion writedown on its European units. Steel demand i n the region has a lready declined 29 percent since 2007, the company said in a statement. “This weaker demand environment, and expectations that it will persist over the near and medium term, led to a downward revision of cash flow expectations.” Spain’s official growth p rojections a re w idely dismissed as fantasy. A Bloomberg survey of 18 economists sees t he S panish economy contracting 1.5 percent next year, three times the government’s forecast 0.5 percent. If P rime Minister M ariano R ajoy has t o request a European bailout, the likely austerity measures that would be required would intensify the contraction...”

By Carol Matlack on December 21, 2012 |

h ttp://www . businessweek.com/articles/2012-12-21/europes leaders-see-growth-business-prepares-for-worst#r=lr-fs

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Euro-Area Unemployment Rate Rises to Record 11.8% Amid Recession “...The euro-area economy has shrunk for two successive quarters and economists foresee a further decline in gross domestic product in the final three months of last year, f orcing companies to c ut costs by s lashing jobs. The European C entral B ank estimates contractions o f 0.5 percent and 0.3 percent in 2012 a nd 2013. Today’s jobless report showed that 18.8 million people were unemployed in t he e uro area i n November, up 113,000 from the previous month. A t 26.6 percent, Spain had the highest j obless r ate in t he c urrency bloc. Germany’s jobless r ate was 5.4 percent and France’s stood at 10.5 percent. Austria had the lowest rate at 4.5 percent...”

By Marcus Bensasson - Jan 8, 2013 |

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-08/euro-area unemployment-trate-rises-to-record-118-amid-recession.html

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Europe Considers a Spanish Bank Rescue “...According t o people briefed on t he p lanned call, the discussion will focus on recapitalizing lenders hit hard by t he bursting of S pain’s real estate bubble. That’s sure to be costly: Fitch Ratings, which on June 6 cut S pain’s debt r ating by t hree g rades, t o two steps a bove j unk, said bailing out t he banks could cost as much as €100 billion ($125 billion). Banking analysts at JP Morgan Chase (JPM) put the figure at as much as €150 billion. Fears about S pain’s banking sector h ave intensified in r ecent d ays, a fter Bankia, the country’s t hird-dlargest l ender, said it needed a €19 b illion bailout. Standard & Poor’ s (MHP) said o n J une 6 t hat it expected Spanish banks t o suffer €80 b illion t o €112 b illion in l oan l osses t hrough 2013. “Once w e can r esolve this and get t he banks adequately capitalized, t he outlook f or S pain m ay b e a little b it b righter,” s ays James N ixon, chief European economist at S ociété Générale in London... ”

By Carol Matlack and Ben Sills on June 08, 2012 |

h ttp://www . businessweek.com/articles/2012-06-08/europeconsiders-a-spanish-bank-rescue#r=lr-fst

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Europe's Crisis Shifts to Spain

Spotlight

“...As the debate continues, S pain’s real estate problems are festering. For years the country relied on h ome and office building activity as a source of growth. At t he h eight of t he boom, construction accounted for more than 20 percent of Spanish gross domestic product. That’s the same level it reached in Ireland. While both countries experienced similar real estate booms and busts, t heir actions post-crash have been strikingly different. Ireland worked quickly to address t he solvency of its banks—nationalizing them a nd r emoving b illions o f euros worth o f toxic debt from their balance sheets by transferring it to a so-called bad bank...”

By Matthew Philips on May 31, 2012 |

h ttp://www .businessweek.com/articles/2012-05-31/europes crisis-spotlight-shifts-to-spain#r=lr-fst

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The Situation Global to Local Economy The crisis in Catalonia Catalonia’s economic activity has always depended on its ability to connect to the rest of the world. Catalonia is today an unbeatable meeting point for international business.

34%

exports of spain located in Catalonia

75% of exports and 60% of imports within the EU. Almost 60% of Catalan exports have a medium-high to high technological content.

60%

exports have a technological content

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A Bigger Depression The crisis in Spain During the bleakest days of the Great Depression, when Americans waited in bread lines and the nation’s future looked grim, the unemployment rate peaked at about 25%. In 2013, Spain’s unemployment rate tops 26%

26% unemployemnt rate

Young people have been especially affected, with 100,000 fewer people age 20-24 employed.

50% of the youth is unemployed

About 70% more people left Spain in 2012 than in 2011, statistics show. 850,000 jobs over the last year: 2335,16 each day.

70% inrease of

emigration in 2012 *numbers relative to Spain

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2,329

jobs lost everyday 2012-2013

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“Cataluña, leader in companies and families going bankrupt” http://www.elmundo.es/elmundo/2012/08/06/ barcelona/1344244621.html 48

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6 MILLION

unemployees in Spain in 2013 2012-2013

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EVERY HOUR

1 CITIZEN emigrates from Spain 2012-2013

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The Market Small and Medium Enterprises According to the Central Companies Directory (CCD), on January 1st, 2011, 3,246,986 companies in Spain, of which 3,243,185 (99.88%) are Small and Medium Entrerprises (SMEs) which means they have between 2 to 249 employees.

99.88% Companies in Spain are SMEs

Over half of the Spanish SMEs are concentrated in the region of Catalonia with 624,723 thas represents 18.3% of the national total and the community with the highest concentration of these type of entreprises.

18.3% of the total of SMEs in Spain are in Catalunia

The majority of the SMEs in Catalunia are related to the service, commerce, construction and industry sectors. being the constroction sector the most affected by the crisis .

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300

companies disappear everyday http://www.pymesyautonomos.com/ 2012-2013

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Distribution of the SMEs by sectors

Graphic 1. Evoluction of number of companies and annual variation (%).

number of companies annual variation

Distribution of Spanish companies by sectors and percentage of total 2010.

Economic Structure of the SMEs P < 2mln euros 2 < P< 10 mln P >10 mln

Retrato de las PYME 2012. (2012). Spain: Ministero de Industria, Energia y Turismo.

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KBE Knowledge-based Economy

Public policies for science, technology and innovation have always been aimed primarily at creating and diffusing knowledge. In recent years such policies have attracted increasing attention as a result of claims that knowledge-intensive industries are now at the core of growth, and that we are now entering a new type of knowledge-driven economy or even a completely new form of ‘knowledge society’. The knowledge economy. There are many who argue that we are moving towards a new ‘knowledge-based economy’ or ‘knowledge society’, in which the role and significance of knowledge as an input to economic processes has fundamentally changed. In some cases it is argued that this rests on advances in information technology that are leading to a ‘paradigm shift’. The idea here seems to be that there are basic changes in economic functioning, and changes in the

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economic rules of the game, for both business and policymakers. Proponents of such views can be found in business, where the ‘new paradigm’ has been held to justify previously high levels of stock prices in ICT and Internetrelated companies, as well as in policy-making, and in innovation analysis. But what does it mean to speak of the ’knowledge economy? At the outset, it must be said that there is no coherent definition, let alone theoretical concept, of this term: it is at best a widely-used metaphor, rather than a clear concept. The OECD has spoken of knowledge based economies in very general terms, as meaning “those which are directly based on the production, distribution and use of knowledge and information”.2 This definition is a good example of the problems of the term, for it seems to cover everything and nothing: all economies are in some way based on knowledge, but it is hard to think that any are directly based on knowledge, if that means the production and distribution of knowledge and information products. The Knowledge Economy Indicators Knowledge Based Economy (KBE) includes performance for innovation (capabilities and output) and globalization (impact of globalization on work and life).Both innovation and the drivers of a KBE require a broad set of

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skills and capabilities. The indicators for a KBE need to consider reading and writing as important as mathematics and science. The transition of work and life brought about by the KBE requires networking, problem solving and communication skills, from writing to marketing. •Production and diffusion of ICTs. ICT is the main technology underlying the KBE and increases in productivity. •Human resources, skills and creativity. These indicators represent the primary set of indicators needed to develop composite indicators on the human potential of a nation. These indicators reveal the creative and absorptive capacity of a work force. •Knowledge production and diffusion. This group includes many of the traditional indicators of R&D and knowledge production. They provide us with sound trend data and with indicators to develop composite measures of globalization and competitiveness. •Innovation, entrepreneurship and creative destruction. These indicators tell us about the churn and change brought about by ICTs and globalizing knowledge economies. They cover firm behavior and aspects of innovation including demand for innovative products, financing and market innovation. The share of the population in specific age cohorts can provide insights into the demand for innovative products.

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Human Capital The Lisbon Strategy

The Lisbon Strategy, aka the Lisbon Agenda or Lisbon Process, was an action and development plan devised in 2000, for the economy of the European Union between 2000 and 2010.. Its aim was to make the EU “the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion”, by 2010.It was set out by the European Council in Lisbon in March 2000. The role of ICT One of the groundbreaking aspects of the Lisbon agenda was the appeal by the heads of European governments to businesses’ new sense of corporate social responsibility as an asset for Europe’s competitiveness goals, particularly through lifelong learning, enabling opportunity and social inclusion. Microsoft’s Corporate Citizenship activities are built on

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four key areas which reflect the importance of this call: • Internet Safety and Policy Leadership to address key societal challenges in the ICT sector such as online child safety, privacy, security and spam; • Responsible Business Practices to ensure integrity and transparency in how we conduct our business and to provide a healthy workplace environment to our employees; • Economic Opportunity to strengthen local economic development, growth, competitiveness and innovation, a priority which is at the heart of the Lisbon Agenda; • Digital Inclusion and Education to enable people, communities and nations to access the benefits of technology tools, skills and solutions through lifelong learning and education. Member states are strongly urged for reforms. They are required to improve (and not only increase) their investment in knowledge and in human capital through the provision of better education and skills to their citizens in a lifelong learning perspective. The rapidly evolving knowledge economy imposes the continuous updating and renewal of skills, so as to adapt to changes. Lifelong learning perspective The objective of the session on Human Capital was to better identify appropriate strategies to improve the

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Six states were on target to meet the goals of the EUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lisbon strategy before the economic crisis (Photo: European Community, 2006)

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measurement of the contribution of human capital to growth. This is of immediate relevance to the revised Lisbon strategy strongly emphasizes the relationship between growth, competitiveness and human capital.

100 million europeans are registered in the education system

Member states are strongly urged for reforms. They are required to improve (and not only increase) their investment in knowledge and in human capital through the provision of better education and skills to their citizens in a lifelong learning perspective. The rapidly evolving knowledge economy imposes the continuous updating and renewal of skills, so as to adapt to changes. Workforce Competitiveness and growth The realization of knowledge economy, completion of the internal market and promotion of competition, the establishment of a favorable climate to businesses and an adaptable and inclusive labor market are identified among the key issues for increasing the economic growth and higher productivity. Sound macroeconomic conditions make the crucial framework for success. Europe must address the challenge of ageing populations and the need to increase labor productivity, as well as the EU economy to mounting competition from

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abroad. The range of economic activities exposed to external competition has widened, now including the production of both high-tech and labor intensive goods and services. To respond to these challenges, a renewed Lisbon strategy has been designed focusing the European Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts on two principal tasks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; delivering stronger, lasting growth and more and better jobs. Action plans both by the individual Member States and Commission have been drawn up.

US

EU

38%

22%

working age population with a tertiary graduation 2012-2013

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Talk to Gonzalo Delacamara The definition of KBE applied to our project

During the process of understanding the actual economic situation and how the project will be responsive to this in the Knowledge-based Economy, Gonzalo Delacamara helped the investigation to create the right scope addressed to improve the unemployed professionals actualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state. In his feedback, he made us realized that first of all, it is necessary to comprehend the limits of our project. We should be aware of the reaching a building could have in terms of economics and job gen66

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eration. The research and proposal should define boundaries in where it is impossible to go through. We also discussed Spain is facing a brain drain and by giving new skills to this professionals and introduce them in the knowledge economy, it would be possible to launch again, in terms of innovation, an economy based over SME (Small and medium enterprises).Gonzalo Delacamara economist, researcher and international consultant

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The Third Industrial Revolution by Jeremy Rifkin

The introduction of steam-powered technology into printing transformed the medium into the primary communication tool to manage the First Industrial Revolution. The steam printing machine increased the speed of printing and significantly reduced the cost. Print material proliferated in America and Europe, encouraging mass literacy for the first time in history. The advent of public schooling on both continents between the 1830s and 1890s created a print-literate workforce to organize the complex operations of a coal-powered, steamdriven rail and factory economy. In the 1900s, electrical communication converged with the oil-powered internal combustion engine, giving rise to the Second Industrial Revolution. The electrification of factories ushered in the era of mass-produced man-

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ufactured goods, the most important being the automobile, altering the spatial and temporal dynamic of society. The demand for fuel made the United States the leading oil producer in the world. Families began relocating in new suburban communities, recasting social life and creating a communication grid to manage and market the far-flung activities of the oil economy and auto age. The theory argues that conjoining Internet communication technology and renewable energies is giving rise to a Third Industrial Revolution. The creation of a renewable energy regime, loaded by buildings, partially stored in the form of hydrogen, distributed via an energy internet—a smart intergrid—and connected to plug in zero emission transport, opens the door to a Third Industrial Revolution. The entire system is interactive, integrated and seamless. This interconnectedness is creating whole new opportunities for cross-industry relationships. The Third Industrial Revolution brings with it a new era of “distributed capitalism” in which millions of existing and new businesses and homeowners become energy players. In the process, it will create millions of green jobs, jump start a new technology revolution, and dramatically increase productivity, as well as mitigate climate change.

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The five pillars of the Third industrial Revolution

Like every other communication and energy infrastructure in history, the various pillars of a Third Industrial Revolution must be laid down simultaneously or the foundation will not hold. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because each pillar can only function in relationship to the others. The five pillars are: (1) shifting to renewable energy (2) transforming the building stock of every continent into micro-power plants to collect renewable energies on-site (3) deploying hydrogen and other storage technologies in every building and throughout the infrastructure to store intermittent energies (4) using Internet technology to transform the power grid of every continent into an energy-sharing intergrid

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that acts just like the Internet (when millions of buildings are generating a small amount of energy locally, on-site, they can sell surplus back to the grid and share electricity with their continental neighbors) (5) transitioning the transport fleet to electric plugin and fuel cell vehicles that can buy and sell electricity on a smart, continental, interactive power grid. THE EUROPEAN UNION AND THE FIVE PILLARS

The UE would need

â&#x201A;Ź1 trillion

between 2010 - 2050 on updating its electricity grid to accommodate an influx of renewable energy The critical need to integrate and harmonize these five pillars at every level and stage of development became clear to the European Union in the fall of 2010. The European Union is expected to draw one-third of its electricity from green sources by 2020. This means that the power grid must be digitized and made intelligent to handle the intermittent renewable energies being fed to the grid from tens of thousands of local producers of energy.

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From Knowledge Economy to Knowledge Society The Evolution of Knowledge

The knowledge economy’s growth into the knowledge society hinges on the proliferation of knowledge-intensive communities. These communities are basically linked to scientific, technical and some business professions or projects. As has been said, they are characterized by their strong knowledge production and reproduction capabilities, a public or semi-public space for learning and exchange and, the intensive use of information technologies.

“Only when increasing numbers of communities displaying those very characteristics are formed across a wide array of cognitive fields will the knowledge so ciety become a reality rather than a vison of a possible future.” David & Foray (2002). Economic Fundamentals of the Knowledge Society.

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A Soft Discontinuity The Evolution of Knowledge

Not all of the competencies required for the knowledge economy are new – the soft-skills such as leadership, ability to work in teams, learning to learn, and communication and analytical skills have been a feature of the workforce for centuries.

“The knowledge economy represents a soft discontinuity from the past – it is not a “new” economy operating to a new set of economic laws.” Notes de Prensa. (2011). Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica.

It appear to be a number of set requirements: teamwork, communication and learning skills. But these sorts of “soft skills“ can hardly be described as new. Indeed, though sidelined during the age of Fordism, they have always, throughout history, been crucial to the development and well-being of individuals in the world of work. 2012-2013

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Innovation

Definition of innovation The process of translating an idea or invention into a good or service that creates value or for which customers will pay. To be called an innovation, an idea must be replicable at an economical cost and must satisfy a specific need. Innovation involves deliberate application of information, imagination and initiative in deriving greater or different values from resources, and includes all processes by which new ideas are generated and converted into useful products. In business, innovation often results when ideas are applied by the company in order to further satisfy the needs and expectations of the customers. In a social context, innovation helps create new methods for alliance creation, joint venturing, flexible work hours, and creation of buyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; purchasing power.* Definition of Innovation Activities Innovative activities are all kinds of scientific, technological, organizational, financial and trade, including investment in new knowledge, which actually or poten74

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tially lead to the implementation of innovations. From this definition we can distinguish two types of innovation: technological innovation and non-technological innovations. Definition of technology innovation Technological innovations include products (goods or services) and new technological processes and significant technological improvements thereof. An innovation is considered as such when it has entered the market (product innovation) or used in the production process of goods or services (process innovation). The impact of innovation on the SMEs 32.9% of Spanish companies with 10 or more employees were innovative in 2008-2010. and marketing). In this percentage are included technological innovation (product and process) and non-technological (organizational and marketing).

100%

32.9% *http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/innovation.

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How to do innovation The Evolution of Knowledge 41.9% of companies said that the priority of their innovative activities was to increase the quality of products or services. 36.5% identified as priority is the increase of production capacity or service provision. acquisition o f R&D (external R&D)

machinery, equipment, advanced hardware or software acquisition of other external knowledge for innovation training for innovation activities (Research and Development)

Introduction of market innovations

Design for production & distribution

Notes de Prensa. (2011). Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica. 76

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What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing innovation Main innovators Product innovation in 2008-2010 accounted 38.8% of sales in 2010 for innovative companies. This percentage drops to 17.7% if only considering products new to the market.

industry

62,7%

computer and electronic

71,1% pharmacy

services

51,6%

computer consultancy

73,3% companies

Notes de Prensa. (2011). Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica. 2012-2013

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Cost of innovation A company effort 16.171.000 € technological innovation spends. This amount of money represent a decrease of 8.3% over 2009. 2.1% impact on business. In 2010 reached 2.1% of the business of companies with 10 or more employees based on technological innovation expenditure.

madrid

catalonia

basque

37.0%

22.5%

9.0%

“The need to innovate is growing stronger as innovation comes closer to being the sole means to survive and prosper in highly competitive and globalized economies” Notes de Prensa. (2011). Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica .David & Foray (2002). Economic Fundamentals of the Knowledge Society.

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Source for innovation Different strategies 44.9% of internal resources. 44% of companies considered internal information sources (within the company or group) were the most important to carry out innovation projects. 43.5 % of market resources. Meanwhile, 43.5% of companies considered market sources (suppliers, customers, competitors) 49,4%

35,4% 28,2%

30,6%

27,3%

21,4%

20,1%

1

2

3

4

18,3%

5

6

8

7

1_other companies 2_suppliers of equipment 3_clients 4_competitors 5_consultants or private institutes 6_universities and other teaching centers 7_public research centers 8_technology centers

Notes de Prensa. (2011). Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadistica. 2012-2013

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The workforce and innovation Employment is now!

The unemployment registred a sharp drop of employees in the public and private sectors compensated by an increase in the number of self-employed. The labour market is rapidly, spurred by recent legislative iniciatives: more part-time jobs & lower percentage of employes with temporary contracts.

60% of employment is in the SMEs

The most notable feature of Spanish SMEs is their contribution to employment generation, occupying about 60% of the total workforce. And in particular, are the smaller companies that occupy a larger number of employees.

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Employment by workforce in Spain in 2011

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Training Innovation Stay Competitive

Training and development are important for all businesses and are particularly critical for small organizations. Experienced, competent people contribute to both the productivity and profitability of the company. Remaining competitive depends in large measure on ensuring that your workforce is trained and up to date with ever-changing skills and knowledge, especially in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global economy, in which keeping up with new methods is so important. While training and development can be expensive, it is still considered worthwhile in terms of achieving the long-term benefits of company and individual. it is still necessary to provide training; otherwise, companies discover how easy it is to fall behind both in terms of competence and meeting customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs.

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OLED The future of lighting. (an printing)

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Physics Introduction

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about particles [part I]

In parallel with the economic research, there was a focus on physics and particles as part of the multidisciplinary approach of this self-sufficient project. Starting from a general overview and understanding of particles, the initial focus was related to avant garde materials, processes and application of physics in architecture or generation of energy.

Lighting and Energy OLED The future of lighting. (an printing) OLEDs are brighter, thinner and more flexible than LEDs and consume less power than LCD. But most important, are printable. http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/oled1.htm

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Cromatopheres Lighting in nature “...Chromatophores are pigment-containing and light-reflecting organelles in cells found in amphibians, fish, reptiles, crustaceans, cephalopods, and bacteria. ” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatophore

Cold light Dinoflagellates bioluminescence At least two chemicals are required. The one which produces the light is generically called a “luciferin” and the one that drives or catalyzes the reaction is called a “luciferase.” http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/chem/

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Conductive ink Throught an interactive connection Electrically conductive ink made of polycrystalline silver nanopolyhedrons.It could be created interactive and responsive surfaces where the light and the human behaivors could work together. http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/chem/

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Halite Salt Chrystals behaviors Commonly known as rock salt, is the mineral form of sodium chloride (NaCl). Halite forms isometric crystals. The mineral is typically colorless or white, but may also be light blue, dark blue, purple, pink, red, orange, yellow or gray depending on the amount and type of impurities. It commonly occurs with other evaporite deposit minerals such as several of the sulfates, halides, and borates. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halite

Taking into account the proximity of our site to the coast of the Mediterranea Sea, the salt could have several advantages for the building: it could define the material to use [so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deteriorate or takes advantage of the salinity of the breeze], be the source of energy or even teach us from the crystalization processes and forms.

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building as a p INPUT 3: Wind salinity 1.

2.

4.

INPUT 4: Solar heat. 6.

5. 3.

5a.

5b

6a

on winter

INPUT 5: Cold dry wind.

[on winter]

INPUT 2: Humid hot wind.

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power plant INPUT 1: Waste water.

OUTPUT 1: Mechanical energy. OUTPUT 2: Electric energy. OUTPUT 3: Cold air. OUTPUT 4: Fresh water. OUTPUT 5: Humid hot air. [on winter]

ENERGY SYSTEM (SALINITY)

5c.

on winter

1. Fiber reinforced polymer (salt catcher). 2. Water cleaner- Living machine. 3. Salt+fresh water. 4. Salt battery. 5. Saltwater spray absorption refrigeration. 5a. Fresh water. 5b. Fresh wter sprinkler. 5c. Saltwater sprinkler. 6. Stirling engine. 6a. Mechanical Piston.

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The program

The hybrid agenda

In the search for models capable of economising resources, hybrid buildings, are chance samples that include the gene of mixed-use development in its code. This gene is necessary in order to adapt to the signs of the time. Personality Celebration of complexity: -Mixture of interdependent activities. -Opportunist building that take advantages of multiple skills. Sociability: -Meeting between private and public spaces. -The activity its constant and not controlled by public and private rhythm- Full time building. Form: -Attempts a undifferentiated habitat from the diversity of functions that are contained inside. -All the activities should provide life to the building.

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Social Innovation Incubator

Collaborate

86% 72%

Focus

83% 70% Learn

Socialize

82% 68%

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The Work Nodes There is four modes of working around an office. Actually, office design it’s just developing good FOCUS spaces, but it’s not going through the other three work modes. Productive workforce it’s also equal to socialize, collaborate, focus, relax and learn in healthy spaces. In the US companies there are expenses over the 80 millions of dollar for unhealthy and unproductive employees.

Top performing companies design their workplace to support all four modes. Employees at top-performing companies not only spend more time collaborating and learning, they consider that time more critical to job success than do their peers at average companies, who remain focus work-centered.

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Studying Alone Students prefer studying alone to group study by a factor of almost 3:1, and quiet is as much a prerequisite for effective studying as it is hard to come by. This time alone represents almost half of the time students spend on campus. Consider the provision of individual on-campus space in light of student preferences and needs.

Students prefer studying alone almost 3 to 1.

71% Study alone

01

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01

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(2011). CONNECTING CAMPUS DESIGN TO A NEW KIND OF STUDENT. Changing Course., 1, 10. Retrieved February 19, 2013, from http://www. gensler.com/uploads/documents/Changing_Course_Survey_10_08_2012.

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Activities and Space The first approach of defining a Social Innovation Incubator The extensive research in several subjects until now, allows us to define the temptative program of the building. The Social Innovation Incubator plans in short, medium and long term, combining strategies to move forward productive projects in different levels. It focuses on the reinsertion of the unemployeed workforce to the economic system of Barcelona but it also provides these and other users the technical and intellectual knowledge to develope skills that will allow them to adapt to the ever changing technologies and modifications of the performance of any job. On one hand, the Social Innovation Incubator provides the user (through workshops, laboratories, tutories, etc) with the necessary knowledge to face the new paradigms and processes of innovation. On the other hand, it promotes competitive workers and entrepreneurs that will contribute to the economic growth of Barcelona and the social cohesion of Sant Andreu de Bes贸s. The definition mentioned above as well as the program explained in the following pages, refer to an initial approach and it was later in the semester better developed and improved.

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to see diagram go to: http://prezi.com/j2f96uxiygg4/midterm-presentation/

PROGRAM

THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION IN BASED UPON 5 PILLARS:

1. Shifting to Renewable Energy. 2. Converting Buildings into Power Plants. 3. Hydrogen and Other Energy Storage Technology. 4. Smart Grid Technology (Internet). 5. Plug in, Electric, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell based Transportation. Jeremy Rifkin.

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to see video go to: Soc ciall In nno nov ovation on Inc ncub uba battor Social Innovation Incubator https://vimeo.com/62457632

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So S ociial ia al IIn nno no nov ov va ati at ttiio on n IIn Inc nc n cu uba ub b ba bator atto tor o or Social Innovation Incubator

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The space The medium for changes

After comprehending and analyzing the economical and social situation Spain, and thus Barcelona, is facing, comes the time to propose solutions through design. By designing an educational methodology, taking program choices, reading the morphology and site characteristics, the building and its components start to take shape and represent a vision that gathers all the subjects together. A proposal that shapes itself by all the embedded information and that will reshape the life style of the learners and participants. Taking Dali’s house as example, located in Cadaqués and visited on the research trip, it’s easy to understand how an architectural space could be enough to influence its’ users. It’s a reciprocal relation where the architecture shapes the human behavior and the man reshapes his space. That its precisely what the Social Innovation Incubator wants to reach by design, to give the opportunity to the learners and the participants to shape and be shaped by the space.

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Another important conclusion to notice from the research trip is to define how the salt cloud and the knowledge cloud get together and actually build the project and the main objective of it, that is to bring new opportunities of education and innovation to the unemployed professionals. That is why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s necessary to insist with the project in education through innovation, and make a fusion between the Mediterranean context and an innovative learning methodology.

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INNOVATION KNOWLEDGE

TE CON XT

LEARNING

SOCIAL INNOVATION INCUBATOR

SALT FACTORY

COMMUNITY

Knowledge Innovation Communities

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NEXT EDU Conversation with Andrea Graziano

Andrea is an architect, computational designer and digital explorer. Member and co founder of Co-de-iT and cofounder of FabLab Turin. He is also managing social media blogs related with innovations in education. By the time of the interview he transmitted that everything that is made by passion will be successful. The main points that he defined as important were: - New education models should not be defined allowance of evolution and flexibility. - Connectivity is as (or more than) important as learning networking. - It should be a mixture of activities where the learning, work and recreation are developed together.

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Learning and innovation from innovate to innovation

The human being in order to learn, through it different phases o growth, use and needs a variety of method that helps him to capture, keep and put in practice all the useful information. Actually, different sociologist and other specialist, are understanding that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroom model â&#x20AC;&#x153; its not the only way of learn and not the must efficient. In order to create an innovative paradigm in the education system of Spain, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s necessary to propose an education methodology that will take place inside of the building. One of the objective was to replace the logic of training and adapt inside these methodology the must advanced ways of learning that are being proved and applied in different spaces. In terms of efficiency, its necessary to put pressure over the system and make the learning phase a faster method in order to response actively to the actual situation.

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Brief of education models and theories 01 Open Education

Access and distribution of knowledge to regions of the world where higher education is not readily available / Recruitment and retention of students, as well as curriculum development and research collaboration among faculty / Sustainability of interest in and access to higher education. Examples: NYU Open Education on Facebook, MIT, PO\ olit茅cnica de Madrid, Tecnol贸gico de Monterrey

Online courses- http://www.ocwconsortium.org/ 2012-2013

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02 Social Learning Enviroments. (SLEs)

SLE is a place where individuals and groups can come together and co-create content, share knowledge and experiences, and learn from one another to improve their personal and professional productivity. It is a place that can be used to extend formal content-based e-learning for social interaction between learners and tutors. A SLE doesn’t manage, control and track users, but rather provides an open environment for working and learning collaboratively. Attention —Retention — Reproduction - Motivation

Elements for constructing social learning enviroments http://www.upsidelearning.com/

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03 Context based education.

All cognitive processes require constant practice and getting better thoughtout life is important. LEARNING IS IMPROVEMENT IN ONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COGNITIVE PROCESSES. Lifetime learning does not only mean the continual acquisition of knowledge, so much as the improvement in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to perform these cognitive processes, by the acquisition and alalysis of experience. What we should do is to teach employees how to think more clearly within the context of jobs. We should be providing worplace-based contexts, typicall ones that are beyond their day to dat tastks, contexts for exmployees to think within and about. Prediction - Modeling - Experimentation - Evaluation - Diagnosis - Planning - Causation

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04 BAUHAUS / The new man, the new technique.

The idealistic basis of Bauhaus was a socially orientated programme. An artist must be conscious of his social responsibility to the community. AND the community has to accept the artist and support him.Removing the limitations of professionalism. The Bauhaus system allowed for a work practice built on varied social, technical, and methodical basic knowledge.Specialization together with solid basic knowledge was not a risk when the students were employed by the production. They were able to follow the changes in technology and society in a flexible manner. Homogeneous professional roles started to dissolve in practice, or at least to change radically. At the same time it seemed necessary for the student to take personal responsible for his studies and the development of professional skill. THE THREE PILLARS. craft was the foremost pillar. drawing and painting was the second pillar. science and theory for the third pillar.

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05 Steiner education

is a humanistic approach to pedagogy based on the educational philosophy of the Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy. Works for all children irrespective of academic ability, class, ethnicity or religion / Takes account of the needs of the whole child â&#x20AC;&#x201C; academic, physical, emotional and spiritual / Is based on an understanding of the relevance of the different phases of child development / Develops a love of learning and an enthusiasm for school / Sees artistic ac-

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tivity and the development of the imagination as integral to learning / s tried and tested and is part of state funded, mainstream provision in most European countries; Is respected worldwide for its ability to produce very able young people who have a strong sense of self and diverse capacities that enable them to become socially and economically responsible citizens

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06 Social Development Theory

Many schools have tradionally held a transmissionist or instructionist model in which a teacher or lecturer â&#x20AC;&#x153;transmitsâ&#x20AC;?information to students. In contrast, Vygotskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theory promotes learning contexts in which students play an active role in learning. Roles of the teacher and student are therefore shifted, as teacher collaborates with his or her students in order to help facilitate meaning construction in students. Learning therefore becomes a reciprocal experience for the students and teacher.

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- Knowledge constructed by itself. - Development can not be separated from its social context. - Prior conceptions and new concepts are interwoven. - Language plays a central role in mental development.

07 Workforce innovation

Holistic approach Help businesses run better and help individuals become better employees. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that simple. Short-term training Training that can occur in less than a year. Follow up On site training (at work) for starting-up and developed companies On-line classes for starting-up and developed companies. Personal development Help people develop basic workplace skills, including teamwork, communication and overall professionalism. Social Support Transportation, resting places, open kitchenette and childcare that allows them to complete the coursework.

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3

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Introduction

A self sufficient building has to be a system of co relation matters that gather together an architectural object with answers in economic, technologic and social subjects. The social innovation incubator grows within the actual situation and gives an optional solution over the social and economic issues that the unemployed professionals with capability to work are facing. The architectural program was developed by understanding a variety of innovative educational methods and giving the option to the users (in the case of our project, learners and participants) to develop new skills and prepare them to be ready for the change of matrix that the industry is facing. As an architecture proposal, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embedded with context information by using the high salinity of the Mediterranean Sea and adapting the volume with the environIaaC MAA_01

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mental characteristics. The shape is based on the mineral growth analysis understanding the aggregation as a main concept, basing the volume with the halite (salt crystal) growths and how these mineral adapt over different configurations. Also, it uses the Mediterranean Sea salinity as a power tool to feed the sense of the building, using self sufficient sensor modules that release signals to improve the performance of the system and save energy by responding to the climate situation.

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Learning methodology from innovate to innovation

The transition towards an economy based on knowledge and innovation is creating unknown paradigms. We are living a revolution. We are part of it. The Learning Methodology for the SII, presents 5 principles and 6 pillars based on the analysis of revolutionary pedagogic and educational theories, that will set the hints to design the path for innovation through education of this new model. Principles

01 Short term education (1 to 3 months) 02 Holistic aproach 03 Lifelong learning capacity 04 Career and life-project oriented education: launching of skilled technicians, proffesionals and experts 05 Follow - up (both in bussiness and education)

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Pillars

Comprehensive Learning Improvement in cognitive process. Besides continual acquisition of knowledge, lifetime learning relies on the improvement in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to perform these cognitive processes, by the acquisition and capacity of analizing their experiences. Know/how Learning Straight forward education (instructor to learner) Active Learning Learners play an active role in educational process Horizontal education (learner to learner). Reciprocal education: Roles of the instructor and learner are shifted, as the instructor collaborates with the learners to help facilitate meaningful construction. Learning therefore becomes a reciprocal experience. Adaptive Learning Open Data (the knowledge cloud) Informal information sharing through existing platforms and networks. Formal information sharing of academic material, planning material, evaluation tools and thematic content.

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Self Learning Promotion of individual practice and updating for a lifelong education. Personal growth and motivation through artistic, cultural, recreational and creative activities. Development of basic workplace skills, including teamwork, communication and overall professionalism. Contextual Learning Provide the learning in an environment related to their workplace to teach them think more clearly within the context of jobs. Identify what people do on a work day and reflect on the cognitive processes they engage in when they do it. Social Support: transportation, resting places, open kitchenette and childcare that allows the learners to complete the coursework.

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contextual learning

comprehensive learning

active learning

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@ adaptive learning [e-learning]

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Learning Methodology Participants

Intermediate [low level] People with an academic grade (under or post) in search of jobs opportunities to collaborate with or start a business.

Advanced [high level] Entrepreneurs which business is in crisis or bankrupt in search of opportunities to innovate.

Beginner [low level] Semi-qualified or qualified person with work experience in a specific field who needs knowledge update for job opportunities.

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Learning Phase

Development of multidisciplinary project to apply the knowledge and techniques prevously learn. Immersion to innovative tools and techniques for expertise in a specific field. Mind set shift to introduce innovative work processes (Concept, economy and tools). Incubator Phase

To connect the learner to existent companies or businesses which profile match their preferences, knowledge and skills. At the same time the learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profiles are introduced to these companies. To promote a co-working space to share knowledge ideas among the three levels of learners with the intension of starting a project. Follow in Phase

Retrofitting - Follow in of the learners (entrepreneurs and workers) in order to reach reciprocal support.

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Project references Workâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sources.

Shigeru Ban (www. shigerubanarchitects.com) - Use of cardboard as principal construction material for medium structures. - Light architecture.

Frei Otto (www. freiotto.com) - Light structures. - Biomimicry based structures.

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Aranda Lasch (www. http://terraswarm.com/ comingsoon/)

- Aggregation based geometries. - Mineral volumes.

Cloud 9 (http://www.e-cloud9.com/) -

Multi scalar design. Light structures. Operative surfaces. Socialist design.

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The site Between local connection and the Mediterranean sea

The site its 600 m from the Mediterranean Sea, this is the reason for the salt aggregation structures that could be found near this place. The Mediterranean Sea salinity levels between 36% to 38%, this is also the perfect range to power our energy system.

RAMBLA 1.8

BESOS MAR Metro Station 875 m

FORUM 325 RAMBLA 735

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LA MINA Tram Station 340 m

BESOS MAR Metro Station 275 m

PORT FORUM Beach / Sea 500 m

MEDITERRANEAN 600 m CAM LIMA Tram Station 65 m PORT FORUM Port / Sea 150 m Area without shadow impact 14,300 m2 [ 7.1% ] Area with shadow impact 5,920 m2 m2 [ 29% ]

FORUM Tram Station 525 m

FORUM 325

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The landscape Operativeand agreggated

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The path Operating inside the building

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Its all about particles Understanding the physics of particles

“ In the physical sciences, a particle is a small localized object to which can be ascribed several physical properties such as volume or mass. The word is rather general in meaning, and is refined as needed by various scientific fields. Its possible to see the design through the particles point of view. “

“Particle”. AMS Glossary. American Meteorological Society.

By looking the design as a “smaller scale” operation, it’s possible to understand it as a multi scalar system. Architecture is looking again, thanks to the new fabrication methods and interdisciplinary science advances, to the design of particular operative products to improve the space experience and building performance. ----------With the logic of the “particles” concept, the design will be improved by using its physical and chemical behav154

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iours and responses, abstracting the nature’s logics, and using nature as an operative system within the project. Since the beginning of the investigation, there was a direct phenomenon that drove the main direction. The salinity accumulation existing near the site was showing an opportunity to go deeper into this subject, and the proximity to the ocean provided the opportunity to understand some logics related to what its happening there. With the help of Jopsep Perelló, a rooted research started, that drove a design solution inherent with the local situation.

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Cristalization phenomena Growing and aggregation Salt/Aggregation growth Nature crystal growing VENUS its a chair by Tokujin Yoshioka where he use a base structure of polyester elastomer where the water will attached the NaCl in order to create a crystal structure. SHIO is an skeleton made from fabrics and translucent plastics, but the main structure are made of salty water by controlling the enviroment parameters as: Humidity, temperature, water baume scale, and others. http://www.tokujin.com/ http://www.studioshio.com/studio

Self organized systems From chaos to order Architecturally, this system relates to aggregate construction scenarios and materials. Aggregates consist of loose-fill arrangements of materials that are contained with boundary conditions and auto-orient themselves based on size, external conditions and structural forces. 156

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This scenario proposes a large-scale application of aggregate materials, outside the scale of material properties and into the realm of construction methodologies...â&#x20AC;?

MIT/ http://phyllotax.is/self-assembly/

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Saltwater/Energy Electrolisis as an energy source.

“...Green House Co. Ltd., a Japanese electronics firm, has developed a new “power-generation LED lamp” called GH-LED10WBW that runs on salty water. Requiring no batteries, the lantern runs for eight hours for each fill of saline solution. The device doesn’t just light the way; it can also be used to power other USB-powered devices. When the saline water is put in the lantern, it functions as an electrolyte with a magnesium (Mg) rod (negative electrode) and a carbon rod (positive electrode) inside the lantern, the magnesium rod has to be replaced after about 120 hours of power generation...”

led

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http://www.green-house.co.jp/products/life/led/ledlight/gh-

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Saltwater/Energy 1st prototype The first prototype was developed through the understanding and testing of an electrolysis system. Besides other types of green sources, the electrolysis is the less explored one but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the less variable one. Solar and wind energy, for example, depend of variable elements, this system could be more stable because the range needed for energy generation is wide and sea salinity levels donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change a lot. Prototypes objectives: 1. Volts production. 2. Watts production. 3. Time of production. 4. Material uses.

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Conclussions: 1 2 1. 6 to 9 volts. 3 2. 18 mA. 3. 3 weeks working. 4. Water needs to recirculate in the 2nd week. 5. Level of mA are not enough for make an arduino works.

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Saltwater/Energy 2nd Prototype

Prototype objectives: 1. Water cycle. 2. Connect an Arduino Board. Conclussions: 1. The ram pump system works inside of the battery. 2. The mA levels are not enough. 3. The battery size could be optimized.

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Saltwater/Energy 3rd Prototype Prototype objectives: 1. Connect Arduino board and light sensors. 2. Optimized battery size. 3. Optimized battery position and use. Conclussions: 1. 80% size reduced from previus prototype. 2. Produce 12v of energy. 3. Arduino could be powered but still not stable.

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Electrolysis rac.

4 Waste water tank. This battery will be used as a self sufficient sensor that will translate the data received from the sun to a responsive facade system that is distributed in the building.

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Saltwater/Source From the Mediterranean Sea

- Distance: From 600 m to 2 km. - Salinity levels: 3.5%. - Transportation method: Gravity ram pump.

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Saltwater/Source From the Mediterranean Sea

- Distance: 13 km. - Salinity levels: 7.3%. - Transportation system: Land transportation.

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Constructive and structural system Learning from nature. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In nature, shape is cheaper than material. This has been shown a number of times and is manifested in the remarkably high performance, both absolute and specific, of biological materials which is achieved not by the us of high performance component but by the degree of detail and competence in their design and construction.â&#x20AC;?

Lightness: the inevitable renaissance of minimum energy structures. Julian Vincent (2005) , Smart by nature, Ed.

The hexagonal patterns occur when structures have to absorb two dimensional stresses in all directions. Matter apparently shapes itself into to sort of structure that is best fit to absorb stress because the forces need to move along the shortest distances.

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Base structure analysis Abstracting nature’s logic. A basic structure and its material utilization with the building’s logics was structurally tested and threw these results: 1. A polyhedron that contains hexagonal faces is structurally stable by itself. 2. it’s necessary to decrease the top section of the complete geometry in order to optimize the material utilization. If not, the structure on the top should be thicker and not viable. 3. There should be reinforcement in the bottom volumes to turn them in “foundations” and help in holding the structure.

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The proposed system Cardboard truncated hectahedra structure. The main structure is composed by cardboard tubes with fixed and pinned steel joins. The logic of the module is to follow the aggregation and lightness concept and help to reshape the project once that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finished. The aggregation works from the heavier system to the lightness module composition. Creating proper foundations, by adding to the system stress skin panels make a stronger structural solution. 1

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Its a relation between a triangular fixed joints frame and a pinned beam that could move in x and y but once that everything is set, it will be strong enough to translate the forces to the ground.

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The modular growth Constructing the ligthness.

The building is designed to be assembled on site; all the modules are prefabricated systems that can be transported as structural components. The aggregation logic allows building it as a numerical and three-dimensional puzzle that gets stable when the whole building will be finished. This characteristic also lets the building grow in the future by adding new modules if the program needs to change in order to solve new spatial needs. The project is principally composed by truncated tetrahedrons with three different shapes between each other.

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The proposed system Cardboard truncated hectahedra structure. One of the laws that rules the modulesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; distribution its the lightness that, by decreasing the weight of the surfaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s material, a shape that growth from a solid volume foundation to a wireframe structure. The materials used are: 1. Cardboard tubes as the main structure. 2. Stress skin panel that works in bending forces an reinforce the bottom bases. 3. ETFE surfaces that helps to cover volumes that should be lighter in the top of the building and are designed for being solar responsive.

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Stress skin panel

Wind responsive panel

Solar/ETFE responsive panel

Saltwater sensor module.

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The proposed system Cardboard truncated hectahedra structure. The batteries should be located in the most affected faces because of two reasons, to create a double layer that increases the thickness of the surface an helps to keep away the heat and more importantly, to keep the water warm because is optimizes the electrolysis reaction inside them. In other hand, the solar responsive ETFE modules are located in the transition zone between the most affected faces and the ones that stay in shadows. In this section the wind responsive modules itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also located. These help to get a stronger structure but also create a path for the wind to flow through the zones that are less warm.

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Stress skin panel

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Solar/ETFE responsive panel

Saltwater sensor module.

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to see video go to: https://vimeo.com/69261744

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3

OPEN COLLECTIVE

The team behind the project. Multidisciplinary group which conforms, promotes and proposes concepts of openness, connectivity and exchange of ideas in an interconnected and international environment. Alejandra D铆as de Le贸n Lastras Mexican MAA, collaborator with the Mexican firm Taller 13 in regenerative architecture projects and coordinator of the Architecture Cell of the multidisciplinary studio Ezequielfarca in Mexico City. Robert Garita Garita Costa Rican MAA co founder of MG Studio, member of The open innovation group (Holcim Costa Rica) and professor of design in Veritas University, School of design, Costa Rica. IaaC MAA_01

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Aldo Sollazzo Italian MAA, co founder of Noumena Architecture. Member of “Ordine Degli Architetti di Roma”. Worked for several international firms Embt-MirallesTagliabue , Nabito and Studio Transit. Mauricio Valenzuela Nicaraguan MAA co founder of Estudio Híbrido, project manager of several central american developments, and professor of design in Universidad Americana (UAM), Faculty of Architecture, Nicaragua.

Links // www.opencollective.com

Social Network // www.facebook.com/OpenCollective

Sources // www.noumenaarchitecture.com // www.estudiohibrido.com // www.bcnmainstreet.com

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valldaura S elf S ufficient Lab

www.iaac.net

Accredited by:

www.upc.edu

fablabbcn.org

www.valldaura.net


Social Innovation Incubator / IAAC