Page 1

V

on iew FLORIDA

NATHAN SAWAYA: REPLAY AT THE ART AND CULTUR E C E N T E R OF HOLLYWO O D

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 0


CONTENTS

J u n e /J u l y

2010

Vo l . 1 , N o . 2

THIS PAGE : Nathan Sawaya, COURTNEY, YELLOW, 2008, 30 x 45” ON THE COVER: Nathan Sawaya, Yellow, 2006, 35 x 13 x 28” images courtesy of brickartist.com

V

on iew FLORIDA

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 0

NATHAN SAWAYA: REPLAY AT T H E A R T A N D C U LT U R E C E N T E R O F H O L LY W O O D

2

OnV

i e w

Ma

Fe a t u r e s

36

NATHAN SAWAYA: REPLAY

Back by popular demand, Nathan Sawaya: Replay, at the Art and Cultural Center in Hollywood, is sure to ignite the imaginations of children and adults alike. Nathan Sawaya creates awe-inspiring works out of some of the most unlikely things. This exhibition features portraits and large-scale sculptures using only toy building blocks—LEGO® bricks to be exact.

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

42

AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM

Three current exhibitions, featuring renowned American Impressionists, offer tantalizing reflections of life and enchanting records of color and light.

50

56

64

( SUR ) REALIZING

THE POWER OF ART

BEHIND THE SCENES

A DREAM

From war to the workplace, art has been used to influence society’s perceptions and behaviors.

Paris has the Eiffel Tower, Sydney has the Opera House— St. Petersburg will have the new Dalí Museum!

As the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami prepared for the exhibition, Claire Fontaine: Economies, we chatted with MOCA’s Ruba Katrib about the process.

FROM TOP LEFT: william glackens, Cape Cod Pier, 1908, collection of the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University; USSR Strengthen Civil Aviation, 1933, collection of Cornell Fine Arts Museum; artist rendering of the new dalí museum; Claire Fontaine, CHANGE, 2006, courtesy Galerie Neu, Berlin; navy pier and the chicago skyline, © City of Chicago / GRC

On View Destination:

CHICAGO, IL

78 The Museums: An overview of Chicago’s outstanding art venues

88 A Gallery Tour: A fine art gallery listing OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

3


CONTENTS Ju n e /Ju l y

2010

Vo l u m e

1,

No.

2

Craft

70

ART ON A STRING

8

The Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida is hosting a summer exhibit of masterfully crafted kites from Asia.

A narrative

Fo c u s

10

72

Museum exhibitions

Shai’s photographs are hauntingly beautiful portrayals of the ominous imprint left by the military on the Israeli landscape.

6

COMMENTARY

MUSE

CALENDAR

SHAI KREMER

32

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists Spotlight

76

JAMES GURNEY

PICTURED: james gurney, Small Wonder, 1995, Illustration for Dinotopia: The World Beneath, courtesy of the Artist

4

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

James’ luminous paintings from the best-selling book series Dinotopia, invite viewers to enter a whimsical world in which dinosaurs and humans live side-by-side.

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

Profile

74

JOHN BISBEE

John’s large-scale sculptures transform everyday metal objects into elegant, intricate, and free-flowing works.


The photographs of Frederick W. Glasier

through September 6, 2010

View the most dynamic period of the American circus captured through the lens of a master photographer.

The John and Mable Ringling MuseuM of Art 5401 Bay Shore Road, Sarasota | 941.359.5700 | www.ringling.org Open daily 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., | wednesdays until 8:00 p.m. Drawn from the collections of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the exhibition was organized by the Eakins Press Foundation. Frederick W. Glasier | May Lillie, 1908 | The Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art


V

C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew

Thank you!

M A G A Z I N E

W e ’ v e b e e n s o e n c o u r a g e d by the enthusiastic response to our premiere issue and would like to take a moment to thank all who have wished us well and supported our efforts. It’s been a wonderful ride and we are thrilled to have you with us. Inside this issue is a stunning array of works. Our cover story, Nathan Sawaya: Replay, on pg. 36, spotlights the amazing talent of Nathan Sawaya, whose LEGO® sculptures and portraits are sure to ignite the imagination in us all. Also included are two feature stories, each incorporating multiple exhibitions and sharing common themes: American Impressionism, on pg. 42, showcases renowned American Impressionists and their unique interpretations of life, color and light; and The Power of Art, on pg. 50, which features compelling examples of how art has successfully been used to influence society’s perceptions and behaviors. With summer upon us, what better way to celebrate than to experience the wonder and beauty of the amazing art of kite-making in Art on a String, on pg. 70. We’ll also take you along for a tour of the exciting city of Chicago with its diverse range of fine art venues. These stories, and so much more, await—bon voyage!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

6

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010


ColleCtors’ ChoiCe WorkS of Art from JAckSonville collectionS t h r o u g h S eptember 12, 2010

829 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32204 904.356.6857 • www.cummer.org

Left: Meissen Porcelain Manufactory (German), Froehlich (The Court Jester), 19th Century, porcelain, 9 ½ in., The Benita and Jimmy Boyd Collection. MiddLe: Hans Hofmann (German, 1880–1966), The Chair, 1944, oil on panel, 13 ½ x 12 ¾ in., Collection of Preston H. Haskell. Right: Robert Reid (American, 1862–1929), In the Flower Garden, c. 1890, oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 30 in., The Collection of Mary Jane and Jack Uible.


MUSE

Click! B Y PA U L AT W O O D

I

and you can see the sheer outrage on Winston Churchill’s face, as captured in a single frame by renowned photographer, Yousuf Karsh. This is the magic of photography when in the hands of a master. Over the span of his career, Karsh immortalized world leaders, movie stars, and other luminaries on photographic paper. Each image capturing the essence of the subject in the instant of the portrait. It is no less wondrous to witness Ansel Adams’ portrayT IS 1941


MUSE

...it is the talent and skill of a master that enables us to see beyond the image and into the soul of the subject. als of the breathtaking beauty of Yosemite. He has documented this national treasure with images that leave me in awe of the greatness of the American landscape. Whether it is Yousuf, Ansel, or a contemporary master, there exists a common thread that defines this niche of the art world—the ability to capture the spirit of greatness with a click of the camera shutter. As I flip through one of my own photo albums, I see memories of wonderful moments in my life. There’s a photograph of my older brother enthusiastically biting into a candied apple. This is how I choose to remember him—the pain and suffering he lived with everyday is gone—this brief moment of happiness lives on. It is the camera that enables us to hold onto these moments, but it is the talent and skill of a master that enables us to see beyond the image and into the soul of the subject. I am grateful for the camera, in all its forms, and for the talents of the world’s great photographers that have left us with stunning moments, frozen in time—and although I may never possess command of this technology, I continue to be inspired by it. As I sit here now, with my digital friend at my side, I imagine the endless possibilities. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

PICTURED: Yousuf Karsh, Sir Winston Churchill, 1941, © Yousuf Karsh/ karsh.org

/J

u ly

2010

9


CALENDAR Current

06-07.10 Boca Raton Thru 06.13

Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

In 1956, a twentyone-year-old Elvis Presley was at the

Exhibitions

beginning of his remarkable career. This exhibition features 40 large-format photographs of Presley, taken by Alfred Wertheimer, capturing the unguarded moments in Elvis’s life during a year that took him from Tupelo, Mississippi to the silver screen, and to the verge of international stardom. Thru 06.13

Remembering Stanley Boxer: Retrospective (1946-2000) Boca Raton Museum of Art

C O M P I L E D

B Y

O N

V I E W

now held by major museums across the US. (See story in the April/May 2010 issue on pg. 66.) www.bocamuseum.org

Stanley Boxer (19262000) is best known for his large-scale abstract paintings which have a rich sculptural quality. This retrospective exhibition features 50 paintings and 13 sculptures dating from 1946 through 2000. Stanley became one of America’s most eminent mid-century abstract painters,with works

Coral Springs Thru 08.21

All sides of the Parthenon: Photography & Artifacts

1. Alfred Wertheimer (American, 1929- ), Elvis at 21, courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution and Govinda Gallery 2. Stanley Boxer (1926-2000), Lacedplumeinabam (detail), circa 1985, oil on canvas, Joel and Lila Harnet Museum of Art, University of Richmond Museums, The Alcoa-Reynolds Art Collection 3. Peter Yalanis, Parthenon and Greek Flag, ©Peter Yalanis

10

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 7 }

Coral Springs continued...

Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

This exhibition features large-scale photographs, by Peter Yalanis, depicting the reconstruction process of the Parthenon in Greece. Also on display are three replicas of Elgin friezes and artifacts from the New Acropolis Museum.

ated individual pieces as well as collaborated on large sculptures. Daytona Beach Thru 08.01

Thru 08.21

Collaborations in Clay and Wood by Jan Kolenda and Bob Bagley Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

The works of clay artist Jan Kolenda and woodworking artist Bob Bagley are featured in this exhibition. The artists have cre-

The Paintings of Tom Reis Museum of Arts & Sciences

peared in Time, Rolling Stone, the Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Sports Illustrated, BusinessWeek, Smart Money, and other prestigious publications. Reis has also worked as a fine artist, producing work with all the refinement of a classically trained painter. His paintings are represented in numerous permanent and private collections throughout the US.

This historically significant exhibition presents the art of Blanche Ames (1878-1969) and Marion Ruff Sheehan (1924-1998), two botanical illustrators whose work is the epitome, not only of scientific illustration, but also of the

www.moas.org

Tom Reis is a nationally known illustrator whose art has ap-

DeLand

creative perfection that makes the works great art. Included are original ink drawings, watercolors and lithographs of the numerous genera of orchids.

Thru 08.29

Illustrating Orchids Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

1. Bob Bagley, Wind Swept Vessel #1, maple, ceramic, collaboration with Jan Kolenda, courtesy of the artist. 2. Tom Reis, Autumn Nap, ŠTom Reis 3. Marion Ruff Sheehan (1924-1998), Cattleya Percivaliana, collection of the Botanical Libraries of Harvard University

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

11


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 7 }

Delray Beach

Dunedin

06.22-10.17

Thru 06.27

Kyoto: A Place in Art Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Perfectly Imperfect Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.morikami.org

Works by painters representing art movements closely associated with Kyoto, Kyoto textiles, photographs of Kyoto gardens, woodblock prints, ceramics, and more, are displayed in this exhibiton which explores why Kyoto remains the center of Japanese traditional culture.

07.16 – 08.14

www.dfac.org

Far-reaching works in photography, ceramics, glass, metals and mixed-media sculpture, by a diverse group of national and international artists, are on display. Each work represents a different view of the Japanese aesthetic of WABI SABI—the beauty of imperfection, impermanence and incompleteness.

Carolina Cleere Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Native Floridian, Carolina Cleere, has been recognized nationally and internationally for her art and photojournalism. This exhibition features her mixed-media narrative portraits of lost innocence. Ft. Lauderdale Thru 06.20

Glackens as Illustrator Ongoing

The Spectacle

of Life: The Art of William Glackens Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moaflnsu.org

William Glackens (1870-1938) was an Illustrator and an

American Impressionist who is considered to be one of the most influential artists in the history of American Art. He is best known for his paintings of street scenes and portrayals of daily life. (See story on pg. 42.)

1. Courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden 2. Kimberly Witham, courtesy of the artist 3. Carolina Cleere, The Muse, courtesy of the artist 4. William Glackens, Cape Cod Pier, 1908, oil on canvas, collection of the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, gift of an anonymous donor

12

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


PEARL & STANLEY GOODMAN C O L L E C T I O N

also on view RECENT ACQUISITIONS FROM THE MUSEUM’S LATIN AMERICAN COLLECTION

also on view RECENT ACQUISITIONS FROM THE MUSEUM’S LATIN AMERICAN COLLECTION

May 9 – December 5, 2010

One East Las Olas Boulevard | Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 | (954) 525-5500 | www.moafl.org

The Sansom Foundation Diego Rivera / Stone Worker / Oil on canvas mounted on mason, 1945 / Collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman, ©2009 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Matta / The Prophet / Oil on canvas, 1955, Collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman ©2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Frida Kahlo / Untitled (Self-portrait on Diary Page) Watercolor crayon, pen and ink on paper, double sided, 1945, Collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman ©2009 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Joaquin Torres Garcia / Gare II, 1931 / Oil on canvas, Collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman ©2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VEGAP, Madrid


C A L E N D A R

Gainesville 06.08-09.05

America at Work: Art and Propaganda in the Early20th Century Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

{ P g. 4 o f 1 7 }

The main focal point of this exhibition is a group of 30 work incentive posters with colorful designs, strong graphics and catchy phrases that were produced between 1924 and 1925 and were intended

to promote excellence in the American workplace. The graphic works tell a story about labor issues and demographics, popular culture, immigration trends and national identity in America during the first half of the 20th century. (See story on pg. 50.)

Hollywood 06.05-08.15

06.22-01.02.11

Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Jack Nichelson has been creating intricate and evocative “box environments” for more than 40 years. 

 Begun in 2000, Nichelson’s Sojourner Dream Reliquaries

represents the culmination of his longstanding fascination with the visual presence of religious reliquaries. Included are 22 sculptures replicating the basic forms of travel trailers from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. The compact size and shapes of the trailers lend themselves to the secular reliquary concept. The intricate, lighted interior of each work invites the viewer to look very carefully at the details, both inside and outside. Completed over a nine-year period, the series has never before been exhibited in its entirety.

Nathan Sawaya: Replay Art and Culture Center of Hollywood http://artandculturecenter.org

Back by popular demand, Nathan

Sawaya: Replay is sure to ignite the imaginations of children and adults alike. Nathan Sawaya creates awe-inspiring works out of some of the most unlikely

1. Mather & Company, 2 strikes, 3 balls and he knocks the last ball over the fence, 1925, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo 2. Jack Nichelson, A Trip to the Moon, 2007, hardwood veneer plywood construction with mixed media, collection of the artist, photography: John Knaub 3. Nathan Sawaya, Red, 2005, 24 x 49 x 26”, image courtesy of brickartist.com

14

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 7 }

Holly wood continued...

things. This exhibition features portraits and large-scale sculptures using only toy building blocks—LEGO ® bricks to be exact. (See story on pg. 36.) 06.05-08.15

Adaptation Art and Culture Center of Hollywood http://artandculturecenter.org

This exhibition presents a selection of contemporary artists whose practice incorporates discarded materials in order to make new forms of artistic expression. Materials include all

manner of refuse such as abandoned personal items and obsolete functional objects, which become reinvigorated when used as major components of newly fashioned works of art with varying contexts. Jacksonville Thru 08.29

Tradition Redefined: The Larry and Brenda Thompson Collection of African American Art Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Redefining the landscape of American art, this collection of 72 works, by recognized and emerging African American

Howard Finster became one of the most widely known and prolific self-taught artists. This exhibition provides an in-depth survey of Finster’s career, covering the variety of themes inherent in his work, much of it

artists, documents the social and aesthetic concerns of the African Diaspora through an intimate, inclusive and insightful perspective. Thru 08.29

Stranger in Paradise: The Works of Reverend Howard Finster Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

relating to his visionary experiences. Thru 08.08

Jazz ABZ: An A to Z Collection of Jazz Portraits by Paul Rogers The Cummer Museum of Art

www.mocajacksonville.org

An evangelistic preacher in paint and self-proclaimed “Man of Visions,” Reverend

1. Bradley Arthur, Calculator, 17 x 20 x 12”, metal, wood & bungee cord, ©Be-Art 2008 2. Frederick D. Jones, Female Figure at Shore, ca.1950, oil on masonite, 13 x 10”, ©Frederick D. Jones, photography: Greg R. Staley 3. Howard Finster, Emages of Visions of Other Worlds Beyond (3077), n.d., tractor enamel on plexiglas, courtesy of the Arient Family Collection

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

15


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 6 o f 1 7 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

were particularly inspired by jazz music.

are subjects which may evoke some sense of Florida such as Floridian social and cultural Lakeland landscapes. Among Thru 06.20 the artists represented Florida in the exhibition are Landscapes Eleanor Blair, John Polk Museum Briggs,Clyde Butcher, of Art Bradlee Shanks, and www.polkmuseumofart.org Margaret Tolbert.

& Gardens www.cummer.org

Artist Paul Rogers teamed with jazz musician Wynton Marsalis to create the book Jazz ABZ, which highlights jazz greats from A (Louis Armstrong) to Z (Dizzy Gillespie) through art and poetry. Each portrait and poem is evocative of the particular musician’s sound, and each work of art alludes to song titles, artifacts, and other markers of the time, including artistic references to wellknown artists who This exhibition is comprised of works from the permanent collection at the Polk Museum of Art which have been inspired by, and pay homage to, the Floridian landscape. Also included

Thru 08.08

Art & Design: Movement Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

How does movement affect the subject of an artwork? How might rhythm be used as part of the process of art production? Can motion be visually represented on a twodimensional plane? This exhibition incorporates works from the museum’s permanent

collection to explore the various ways in which fine art explores the concept of motion. Maitland 07.16-09.05

William Vincent Kirkpatrick: American Impressionist Maitland Art Center www.maitlandartcenter.org

William Kirkpatrick (1939-2004) was an Impressionist painter of landscapes, florals, figures, and portraits. Although most of his time was spent painting the Southwest, he traveled exten-

1. Paul Rogers, Charlie Parker, 2005, acrylic and ink on Strathmore illustration board, 12 1/2 x 12 1/2”, on loan from the artist, ©Paul Rogers 2. Margaret Ross Tolbert, Juniper Springs, 1993, oil on canvas, 72 x 48” 3. David Maxim, Untitled, 1999, pencil, charcoal and pastel wash on paper, 19 5/8 x 25 3/8”, gift of Robert & Patricia Maxim, Santa Barbara, CA

16

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 7 }

Maitland continued...

www.brevardartmuseum.org

sively and created his impressions of the world. His work is collected worldwide and can best be described as an explosion of color and light with an unrestrained use of dramatic patterns of brushwork. A collection of 32 paintings are included in this exhibition. (See story on pg. 42.) Melbourne Thru 08.01

Just Suppose: Maggie Taylor & Jerry Uelsmann Brevard Art Museum

This is a whimsical exhibition of the otherworldly art of Maggie Taylor that reflects her imaginative ventures into digital technology. Jerry Uelsmann’s photographs are produced using more conventional darkroom techniques. Uelsmann’s

composite, surreal photographs of nature, the human figure, exterior and interior environments, and human relationships evoke myth and magic, and are considered to be

masterpieces of 20th century photography.

habit, repetition and pattern in our lives— or they may leave the exhibition with the lines between religion,

Miami 06.25-10.03

Human Rites Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Human Rites examines ritual as a basic human activity, in terms of religious practices, but will also look at the place of ritual in the practice of contemporary artists, either as the subject of their work, or the mode of their work. Visitors to this exhibition may leave with a heightened sense of the resilience of ritual in everything from the religious to the mundane, the deep and timeless need we have as humans for ritual,

ritual, habit and pattern blurred, seeing no difference between artist and priest. Thru 06.20

Carlos Cruz-Díez: The Embodied Experience of Color Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Carlos Cruz-Díez creates interactive environments that invite visitors to become participants in his

1. William Vincent Kirkpatrick, Landscape 08, on loan from Baterbys Art Auction Gallery 2. Jerry Uelsmann, Untitled (hands holding water), 2003, silver gelatin print, 16 x 20”, ©Jerry Uelsmann 3. Thomas Hirschhorn, Necklace CNN, 2002, cardboard, foil, plastic, and gold wrapping paper, 98 x 31 x 4”, Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

17


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 7 }

Miami continued...

work, experiencing color through their own movement. Cromosaturación (Chromosaturation) consists of three color chambers infused with red, green and blue light. Three other works are also included: Duchas de inducción cromática (Showers of chromatic induction) where color is experienced via a

series of booths in the shape of showers made with strips of transparent colored plastic; Ambiente cromointerferente (Chromo-interferent Environment), a three-dimensional

chromatic projection environment activated by the physical movement of the spectator; and Experiencia cromática aleatoria interactiva (Aleatory Interactive Chromatic Experience) an interactive computer installation that allows spectators to create their own visual interpretations of Carlos’ work. (See story in the April/May 2010 issue on pg. 70.)

in Europe and the US, playing with that legacy. (See story on pg. 64.)

of school notebooks and declared herself a “readymade artist” in 2004. The exhibition will incorporate older works, including sculptures, light pieces, videos, text works and new interventions by Fontaine, in addition to a screening 06.03-08.22 area showing films Claire Fontaine: and videos that have Economies influenced Fontaine’s Museum of work. Managed by her Contemporary “assistants,” Fontaine’s Art, North Miami practice is deeply imwww.mocanomi.org bedded in collaborative This exhibition exmodes of working and plores the work of questioning possibiliParis-based artist ties for social change. Claire Fontaine. FonFontaine explores the taine took her name politics, theorists, and from a popular brand artists of the 1960s

Naples Thru 06.27

Princess Diana: Dresses of Inspiration Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Princess Diana traveled the world as a representative of the

British royal family, a post-divorce modern

1. Carlos Cruz Díez, Duchas de inducción cromática (Showers of chromatic induction), 1968/2010, wood and stripes of Plexiglas in red, green, blue,

yellow and orange, seven cylinders at 39” diameter by 83” each, installation view Miami Art Museum, courtesy Miami Art Museum, photograph: Oriol Tarridas 2. Claire Fontaine, CHANGE, 2006, 12 twenty-five cent coins, steel box-cutter blades, solder and rivets 90 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Pedestal), 32 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Plexiglass box), courtesy Galerie Neu, Berlin 3. Princess Diana joins Prince Charles on a Royal Tour of Portugal, February 1987, Rex USA

18

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


MIAMI ART MUSEUM BETWEEN HERE AND THERE: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION Ongoing, with periodic changes See how far MAM has come assembling a “Miami point of view” on art of the 20th and 21st centuries. BETWEEN HERE AND THERE is organized by Miami Art Museum and supported by MAM’s Annual Exhibition Fund.

CARLOS CRUZ-DIEZ: THE EMBODIED EXPERIENCE OF COLOR March 19 - June 20, 2010 Become a participant in the artwork of one of Latin America’s most important living masters. The Embodied Experience of Color is organized by Miami Art Museum and supported by SaludArte Foundation, Fundación Bancoro, Davos Financial Group and Fundación Mercantil.

NEW WORK MIAMI 2010 July 18 - October 17, 2010 Experience Miami’s art scene at this exact moment through this mixed-media gallery show, supplemented with public programs, art performances and screenings. New Work Miami 2010 is organized by Miami Art Museum and supported by MAM's Annual Exhibition Fund.

Miami Art Museum

101 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL (305) 375-3000 • miamiartmuseum.org Top: Tomás Saraceno, Galaxies Forming Along Filaments, Like Droplets Along the Strands of a Spider’s Web, 2008. Elastic rope, installation dimensions variable. Installation view Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, 2008. Collection Miami Art Museum, museum purchase with funds from the MAM Collectors Council. Photo: Fabian Birgfeld, PhotoTECTONICS. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York. Center: Carlos Cruz-Diez, Cromosaturación (Chromosaturation), 1965/2010. Wood, Plexiglas and fluorescent lights with color filters. Site-specific environment, variable dimensions. Installation view Miami Art Museum. Photo: Oriol Tarridas. Bottom: Don Lambert, Flatland, 2009. Motors, controller, aluminum and paper in wood cabinet. 103 x 120 x 26 inches overall. Photo: Courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum. Accredited by the American Association of Museums, Miami Art Museum is sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts; with the support of Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, the Cultural Affairs Council, the Mayor and the Board of County Commissioners.


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 7 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

woman, and an ambassador for charitable causes—and no matter where she was, or what the occasion, she was a fashion icon who is still known for her style, heart and impact on the world. This exciting exhibition, curated just for The von Liebig Art Center, features 20 of Diana’s dresses plus a collection of Diana and British Royals’ memorabilia. Many of the dresses and items have never been shown in the US. Thru 06.30

Associated American Artists, Art by Subscription Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

In 1933, at a time

Doris Lee, Reginald Marsh, Peggy Bacon and Grant Wood. Thru 06.30

when our nation was seized by an unprecedented economic depression, art dealer Reeves Lewenthal formed the Associated American Artists organization. His plan was to make fine art prints affordable to every American. This exhibition features over 70 etchings, wood engravings, aquatints and mezzotints by approximately 49 members of the AAA, including Thomas Hart Benton, Miguel Covarrubias, John Steuart Curry, Mabel Dwight,

Florida Contemporary 2010 Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

From realism to abstraction, and everything in between, this intriguing exhibition includes recognized photographers, painters and sculptors who have spent a lifetime at their craft, together with an exciting array of new artists that visitors can “discover”

for themselves. While not a definitive record of currently exhibiting Florida artists, Florida Contemporary serves as an overview of the innovative images, subject matter, techniques and mediums that characterize the work being created in the state today. Thru 06.30

French Twist: Masterworks of photography from Atget to Man Ray Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This groundbreaking exhibition features 87 rare vintage prints from the golden age of French photography, 1900-1940. From the lyrical architectural views of Eugène Atget to the Surrealist in-

1. Thomas Hart Benton, I Got a Gal on Sourwood Mountain, 1938, 12 1/2 x 9”, lithograph, collection of the Springfield Museum of Art 2. Rick Lang, Amanda’s Haircut Shop, Bellview, Florida, 1998, digital print, 12 x 12”,
courtesy of the artist

20

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 7 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Some of the world’s most remarkable miniatures will be on display this season as part of the Museum’s Masters of Miniature exhibition. Featured in this collection of miniature rooms are: the majestic Roman Triclinium, the Napole-

ventions of Man Ray and Dora Maar, from the boyish wonder of Jacques-Henri Lartigue to the twilight-inspired moodiness of Brassaï, all major facets of French photography are surveyed and celebrated. This is a rare opportunity to see these masterworks in onic Anteroom and the one exhibition. Louis XV Petit Salon. Other rooms include Thru 06.30 a delightful American Masters of Diner, ca.1941, Miniature: The Art Nouveau Shop, Kupjack Rooms Chinese Laundry and & Kaye Collection Artists’ Garret. Many Naples of these miniature Museum of Art environments were www.thephil.org created by the late

Eugene Kupjack, widely regarded as the pioneer in the field, and his son Henry.

the OMA presents Changing Landscapes, which includes this Clyde Butcher exhibit. Big Cypress Swamp features 40 stunning large-format black and white photographs depicting the beauty and fragility of the Western Everglades. (See story in the April/May 2010 issue on pg. 72.)

Orlando Thru 07.25

Clyde Butcher: Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 08.29

Knuffle Funny: The Art and Whimsy of Mo Willems Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

Recognizing the critical and formative role of landscape and the environment in the American experience,

www.omart.org

Author and illustrator, Mo Willems, has been hailed by The New York Times Book Review as “the biggest new talent to emerge thus far in the ’00s.” Winner of several

1. Man Ray, Erotique Voilée (Meret Oppenheim in Louis Marcoussis’ studio), 1933, silver gelatin print, 9 7/8 x 8 1/8”, French Twist: Masterworks of photography from Atget to Man Ray organized by art2art Circulating 2. Henry Kupjack, Roman Triclinium (detail), 1984, mixed media, 31 x 30 x 40”, collection of the NMA, gift of Carole & Barry Kaye 3. Clyde Butcher, Moonrise, 1986, silver gelatin fiber print, 46 x 60”, collection of the artist

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

21


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 7 }

Orlando continued...

cludes more than 40 paintings and sculptures from the nation’s early years through the 20th century. These works prestigious Caldecott reflect many important Honor awards, Wiltrends in American lems began his career art. Among the artists as a writer and anima- represented are: tor for television. He garnered six Emmy awards for his writing on Sesame Street, and created Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City. In 2003, Willems launched his picture book career with the bestselling Robert Henri, Herman Don’t Let the Pigeon Herzog, George InDrive the Bus! ness, Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, Thru 12.31 and Charles Sheeler. The American Collection Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

This exhibition in-

Works from the Bank of America Collection Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

As part of the OMA’s Changing Landscapes exhibition, Transcending Vision showcases 125 American Impressionist paintings from one of the largest and oldest corporate art collections in the world. Paintings by a diverse group of more than 75 American artists, trace not only the development of Impressionism in America, but also the

Thru 07.18

Transcending Vision: American Impressionism 1870-1940


emergence of a truly American style of painting. (See story on pg. 42.) Ormond Beach 06.11-08.01

American Icons Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

When one thinks of American icons, there emerges visions of symbols recognized all over the world— Coca Cola, Chevy, Aunt Jemima, and Wheaties, to name a few. This exhibition of works, by the Beaux Arts artists, explores the essence of these icons from each artist’s personal perspective. A range of media including paintings, sculptures, jewelry,

1. ©2004 Mo Willems, illustration for Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, 2003, published by Hyperion Books for Children, exhibition organized by the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, Abilene, Texas 2. Herman Herzog, The St. Johns River Entering the Atlantic Ocean, ca. 1888-1890, oil on canvas, 62 1/2 x 52 1/2”, on long-term loan from the Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc 3. Robert Spencer, Afternoon Bathers (detail), oil on canvas, 29.5 x 35.5”, Bank of America Collection

22

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


view

Transcending Vision: American Impressionism 1870–1940 Works from the Bank of America Collection 04•10•10–07•18•10 This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program.

Knuffle Funny: The Art and Whimsy of Mo Willems 05•22•10–08•29•10 Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey 08•13•10–10•31•10 Arthur Wesley Dow, Flowering Field, 1889, oil on canvas, 14 1/4 x 20 1/4 in. Bank of America Collection. This exhibition is provided by Bank of America Art in Our Communities Program.

Orlando Museum of Art 2416 North Mills Ave Orlando, FL 32803 407 896 4231 www.omart.org


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 7 }

Ormond Beach continued...

photography, pottery and mixed media are on display.

06.04-08.29

Art on a String Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

The Visual Arts

the prints he created for books as an extension of drawing. The same flowing lines that characterized so many of his paintings carried

Sarasota Thru 09.06

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Pensacola 06.04-08.29

Panama City

www.vac.org.cn

Center is hosting this vibrant and striking summer exhibit of more than 200 kites from around the world! Colorful and beautiful, these kites are true works of art. (See story on pg. 70.)

The Art Books of Henri Matisse From the Bank of America Collection Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

Best known for his boldly colored paintings, Matisse was in his sixties and a renowned artist when he began to make books. He regarded

over to the printmaking medium and related illustrations. This exhibition features original illustrations and text from 4 of Matisse’s most artistically significant books, each issued in a limited edition and signed by the artist.

HEYDAY offers a glimpse into the most dynamic period of the American circus through the rarely seen photographs of Frederick W. Glasier (18661950). The exhibition features more than 60 photographs and

1. Beau Wild, Coca-Cola Icon, courtesy of the artist 2. Image courtesy of the museum 3. Henri Matisse, Icare (Icarus), plate VII of XX from Jazz, 1947, pochoir (stencil) on Arches paper, 16 3/4 x 12 3/4”,
©2010 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York,
Bank of America Collection 4. Barnum & Bailey, The Four Sisters Deike, Strobridge Lithographing Company, 1909, 40 1/2 x 30 1/8”

24

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 7 }

Sarasota continued...

several lithographic posters that depict the circus coming to town, performances of spectacular feats, and the behind-thescenes life of circus members. (See story in the April/May 2010 issue on pg. 44.) Thru 01.30.11

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes of Central Asia John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Exquisite silver and gilt jewelry from the Turkomen tribes of Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan are presented in this exhibition. Included are more than 40 objects, hand crafted by the semi-

historical figures, and mythology. Theatrical and seductive, these unforgettable images explore the relationwww.fine-arts.org ship between viewer, Len Prince is celsubject, and artist by ebrated for glamorous examining personae portraits of Hollywood and their meaning, as stars and sleek adver- well as the very nature tisements for Cartier of the self. Photographs of Jessie Mann Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

nomadic Turkomen people, featuring headdress ornaments, bracelets, and clothing clasps with carnelian and lavish decorative elements of silver and gold. Decorated with gilding, chains and semi-precious stones, each piece is imbued with symmetrical yet organic designs drawn from the tribes’ mythological interpretations of the natural world. St. Petersburg 06.05-09.26

Changing Identities: The Len Prince

06.05-09.26

A Passion for Photography: Selections from the Carol A. Upham Donation Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

and Estée Lauder. In 2001 he met a selfpossessed young woman, Jessie Mann. What followed was a five-year collaboration making compelling images that reference paintings, famous photographs,

www.fine-arts.org

This select exhibition

1. Teke Tribe, Tumar (Amulet/Breastplate), dated first half of 20th century, gift of Mr. Stephen Va. C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 2. Len Prince, Untitled, Plate 140, 2006, gelatin silver print, 23 3/4 x 21 1/4”, gift of William K. Zewadski, © Len Prince 3. Arthur Tress, Hockey Player, N.Y. (1972), gelatin silver print, gift of Carol A. Upham, © Arthur Tress

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

25


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 7 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

features approximately 30 photographs by many of the 20th century’s leading figures. Edward Curtis, Walker Evans, Sally Mann, W. Eugene Smith, Joel Sternfeld and Arthur Tress are represented by telling works. Mrs. Upham’s love of the American landscape, especially of the West, is demonstrated by the photographs of Alan Ross, John Sexton and Don Worth. Striking images of Florida by Clyde Butcher and Woody Walters are also on view. Tampa Thru 07.17

Shai Kremer: Infected Landscape

lished 85 photographs Life Captured: of women caught in Garry Winoeveryday life, taken grand’s Women during the 1960s, in a are Beautiful volume titled Women Tampa are Beautiful. The Museum of Art museum is presenting www.tampamuseum.org its entire collection Garry Winogrand is of Winogrand prints known for a streetfrom the Women are style of photography Beautiful series to characterized by a let viewers revisit wide-angle lens, avail- this assessment of the able light, unposed photographer’s pursubjects and countless pose and place. exposures. The critically accepted view of Thru 08.01 Winogrand has been Taking Shape: that his “ambition Works from the was not to make good Bank of America pictures, but through Collection photography, to know Tampa life.” In 1975, he pub- Museum of Art

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

Thru 07.18

www.fmopa.org

Shai Kremer began photographing the ominous imprint of the military on the Israeli landscape in 1999. The result-

ing series of photographs, produced over a 7 year period, are hauntingly beautiful, formal and poetic compositions. They attract viewers, seduce them and then challenge them to reflect on their meaning and implications. (See story on pg. 72.)

www.tampamuseum.org

Works in this exhibition approach sculpture in a manner that made many in the 1960s and 1970s rather uncomfortable, as the lines

1. Shai Kremer, Soldiers’ viewing platform, Israel/Lebanon border, 2006, ©Shai Kremer 2.Garry Winogrand, Centennial Ball New York, 1969

26

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 5 o f 1 7 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

John Bisbee Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

between the purity of the canvas and the presence of the threedimensional started to blur. The works of artists Sam Francis, Helen Frankenthaler, Sam Gilliam, Ellsworth Kelly and Frank Stella provide a 30year view into one of the most persistent questions: how to reconcile the two-dimensional painted surface with reality of a threedimensional space.

John Bisbee creates large-scale sculptures by welding and forging everyday metal objects, such as nails and spikes, into organic forms. His sculptures

Sculpture in the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition, drawn from the Norton’s American, European and Contemporary collections, presents a grouping of over 20 abstract sculptures gathered and organized around such themes as “Lines,” “Assemblages” and “Vessels.” Artists Dale Chihuly, are both minimal and Nancy Graves, Sol Lecomplex—and evoke a witt, Louise Nevelson, dialogue between natu- Ursula Von Rydingsral forms and industrial vard, and Howard Ben materials. (See story Tré are represented. on pg. 74.)

Vero Beach W. Palm Beach

Thru 06.27

A Secret Language: Sculpture by

06.05-09.05

Beyond the Figure: Abstract

06.05-09.05

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Inspired by a deep and abiding interest in archaeology, lost civilizations and the art of illustration, James Gurney invites viewers to enter a whimsical world in which dinosaurs and humans live side-by-side. Recounted in words and pictures in the best-selling book series Dinotopia, the artist’s compelling tale has engaged and enchanted readers by

1. Frank Stella, Damascus Gate II, 1968, acrylic on canvas, collection of Bank of America, ©2009 Frank Stella/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 2. John Bisbee, Helio, 2006, 12” spikes, 84 x 84 x 9”, collection of the artist 3. Dale Chihuly, Macchia, 1994, blown glass, 24 1/4 x diam. 32” irregular, purchase, acquired through the generosity of Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Adler, Mr. & Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and Mr. & Mrs. Robert Sterling, ©Dale Chihuly 4. James Gurney, Birthday Pageant, 1995, Illustration for Dinotopia: The World Beneath, oil on canvas mounted to plywood

28

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 6 o f 1 7 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

inviting them to explore the far reaches of a mysterious destination. Gurney’s luminous paintings, beautifully crafted drawings and handmade models, which are featured in this exhibition, explore the wonders of the distant past through the lens of the imagination. (See story on pg. 76.) Winter Park Thru 08.01

Man and the Machine Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

CFAM is featuring this exhibition of rare, Stalinist-era propaganda posters. Following an extensive conservation process, this

ed to study art had few avenues open to them. Those belonging to an artistic family could learn from male family members. Those with means could attend the first art academies in the US, or travel to selection of Russian Europe. This exhibiposters from the 1930s tion examines the are shown along with a group of American and British propaganda posters from World War I. Each group represents the power of the image—and the artist—in social and political history. (See work of women story on pg. 50.) who chose each of these avenues, includThru 08.01 ing Martha Bare Out of the Shadow and members of the Cornell Fine Peale family, among Arts Museum at notable others.

Genesis of the Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

What began as a natural history museum filled with an odd assortment of ferns, shells and arrowheads, has grown and evolved into the richly diverse art collection of today’s Cornell Fine Arts Museum. In honor of the College’s 125th anniversary, this exhibition traces the genesis of the collection, from

Rollins College Thru 08.01

cfam.rollins.edu

In 19th century Ameri- Wonderful & ca, women who want- Curious: The

1. USSR Strengthen Civil Aviation, 1933, lithograph, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum 2. Martha Bare, Still Life with Roses and Vase, 1981, oil on canvas, 29 x 20 1/2”, private collection 3. Têng Chang (Deng Zhang), 16th century Chinese, Ming Dynasty, triad of Buddha with pair of Bodhisattvas, ca. 1500s, gilded bronze, 22 1/2 x 15 x 8” overall, gift of Carl H. Fowler, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

29


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 7 o f 1 7 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Native American artifacts to major paintings, decorative pieces, furnishings, sculptures, and objects from around the globe, many on view for the first time. Thru 07.04

Paintings by Louis Comfort Tiffany and His Circle The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

Although Louis Comfort Tiffany’s name is most often associated with his work in the medium of glass, he established himself first as a painter and continued to paint throughout his lifetime. Drawing from works in the

Morse collection, this new installation provides a view of Tiffany paintings in the context of artists who he believed in some way shared his commitment to beauty. The exhibit includes works by Tiffany alongside those of contemporaries such as Cecilia Beaux, Samuel Colman, Charles Hawthorne and Elihu Vedder.

Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

www.morsemuseum.org

www.morsemuseum.org

This summer, the Museum’s comprehensive Tiffany exhibition will be updated with objects that include a large leaded-glass hanging lamp and two major

windows, made for the exhibition, that have not been on view in five years.

Ongoing

Thru 08.08

Selected works of Louis Comfort Tiffany The Charles

The Japan Craze and Western Art: 1880-1920 The Charles

Morse Museum vignettes—a tradition established by Museum founder Jeannette Genius McKean— are themed interior scenes developed from objects in the collection. This new Morse vignette features a number of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany, John La Farge, Rookwood, and others that reflect the transforming influence of Japan on late 19thand early 20th-century Western art. O n V iew

1. Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933), Landscape with Figure, ca. 1870, oil on paper 2. Window, Plum Tree, ca. 1890–1900, Joseph Briggs House, Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, leaded glass 3. Katsushika Hokusai, The Bridge (detail), 19th century, colored woodblock print on paper

30

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010


The Wonderful, The Curious, The Rare on view through August 8 Wonderful & Curious Celebrating Rollins’ 125th Anniversary, fine paintings, sculptures and decorative objects that formed the genesis of the collection illustrate the expansive view of the world encouraged at Rollins from its earliest years.

Out of the Shadow This selection of works by 19th-century women focuses on the avenues of artistic education available to women of that time and the challenges they overcame to succeed in their endeavors.

Man and the Machine Rare early 20th-century Stalinist-era propaganda posters, along with American and British World War I posters, depict the power of the image—and the artist—in social and political history.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum • Rollins College Tues-Fri 10-4 • Sat-Sun 12-5 Admission $5 • Free to members, children, and all students with ID Free Parking at Museum and SunTrust Parking Garage Emile-Louis Picault (French, 1839-1915) Le Pensée, ca.1890 Gift of George H. Sullivan Collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum Kochergin, Without Lenin, Along Lenin’s Path Forward to New Victories, 1933, Collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum Mary Virginia Phillips (American, ca.1850-1923) The White Shawl, 1883, Private Collection


gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak Gallery www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: ALEXIS MARGUERITE TEPLIN CONCEPTUAL

painter, Alexis Marguerite Teplin, creates vibrant and engaging works in an impressionistic style, weaving art, historical data, modernist theories and pop culture into her work.

NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Artist: Marc Dennis

DRAMATIC AND PASSIONATE, gentle and elegant, a Marc Dennis

canvas captures it all. Imagine portraits of flowers saying so much—about nature, about life, about us. How ephemeral its beauty when a tiny insect, a change in weather, or an individual can destroy it in a flash. That moment of exquisite beauty is now!

From left: Alexis Marguerite Teplin, The Nape of Her Neck, 2003, oil on found poster, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak, Palm Beach ; Marc Dennis, Discovery of Existence, oil on canvas, 28 x 52”, courtesy of the artist

32

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

NAPLES

Gallery: Longstreth Goldberg Art www.plgart.com

Artist: Richard Currier

MIAMI

“ I N M Y P A I N T I N G S , I have

MIAMI

Gallery: always been drawn towards dra- Dot Fiftyone matic imagery, using contrasting Gallery elements of color, shape and space. www.dotfiftyone.com I paint until the objects become more than what they are.” Artist: ANDRES FERRANDIS nonconventional media and materials, and strategic placement, Andres Ferrandis accomplishes pieces that capture the spectator’s curiosity for truth and thought. Andres’ work depicts an evident influence from constructivist and architectural trends. USING COLOR,

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: Chris Reilly

NO MATTER WHAT FORM

in which he works­—sculpture, painting, or a mixture of painting and photography—Chris Reilly’s technical virtuosity is stunning. His work has both emotional and spiritual depth.

Clockwise from top left: Richard Currier, Resurrection series–Orchid, oil on canvas, 48 x 72”, courtesy of the artist; Andres Ferrandis, Gnidiub, mixed media, 34 x 34”, courtesy of Dot Fiftyone Gallery; Chris Reilly, Two Mayflies, encaustic on panel, 48 x 36”, courtesy of the artist

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

33


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

KEY WEST

Gallery: Harrison Gallery www.harrison-gallery.com

Artist: CINDY KULP CINDY HAS SPENT

the last seventeen years raising, studying and painting birds. She reveals the inner workings and what she calls the “narrative” of her subjects, as well as capturing their surface beauty.

SARASOTA

Gallery: Dabbert Gallery www.dabbertgallery.com

Artist: Eric Boyer

“I HAVE BEEN INVOLVED WITH CREATING, artistically and

otherwise, since my childhood. My work in wire mesh is a result of over twenty years of fascination with a material I discovered quite by accident, searching for a medium that I could best express myself with. Wire mesh itself is a material with no foreseeable limits as an artistic medium. My figurative work represents one narrow avenue of expression within a vast potential territory, which can include geometrical pieces, architectural installations, furnishings, two-dimensional work, and kinetic sculpture.” From left: Cindy Kulp, Three Toucans, courtesy of the artist; Eric Boyer, Three Graces III, mesh sculpture, 33 x 33 x 6”, courtesy of the artist

34

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: The Americas Collection

www.holdenluntz.com

www.americascollection.com

Artist: JO WHALEY

Artist: Enrique Campuzano EXTRAORDINARY in their execution, Enrique Campuzano’s hyper-realistic paintings seduce the viewer with rich colors and textural dimension.

WITH A BACKGROUND

in painting and the scenic arts, Jo Whaley’s detailed color photography combines the sensuality of painting with the veracity

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebakergallery.com

Artist: Nobu Fukui EXHIBITING since the 1960s, Nobu Fukui’s work still possesses impressive drive and energy. His dense and rhythmic paintings are animated with layers of newspaper clippings, patches of vivid, carnival-like colors, swatches of fabric, beads, colored circles and other embellishments.

of the camera, and creates elaborate photographic tableaux about the nature of the imagination.

Clockwise from top: Enrique Campuzano, Opus 708, oil on canvas, 39 x 32”, courtesy of the artist; Jo Whaley, Asterope, Chromogenic color photograph, 2008, 24 x 20”, signed and titled, courtesy of Holden Luntz Gallery; Nobu Fukui, Where Is This Ogre? (detail), 2007, mixed media on panel mounted canvas, 39 x 48”, courtesy of the artist

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

35


0 6.0 5 - 0 8.1 5

NATHAN SAWAYA: R E P LAY AT THE

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood 36

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


QUEEN, 2008, 14 x 32 x 14”; PAWN, 2008, 10 x 20 x 10”; BRICKARTIST.COM


RED, 2005, 24 x 49 x 26”


B

BACK BY popular demand, Nathan Sawaya: Replay is sure to ignite the imaginations of children and adults alike. Nathan Sawaya’s 2008 show drew the largest attendance in the Art and Culture Center’s 30+ year history! Nathan creates awe-inspiring works out of some of the most unlikely things. This exhibition features large-scale sculptures using only toy building blocks—LEGO® bricks to be exact.
It’s the only exhibition focusing exclusively on LEGO as an art medium. The creations, constructed from nearly one million pieces, were built from standard bricks. For Replay, the use of recycled LEGO bricks is emphasized in some of the works. Born in Colville, Washington, in 1973, and raised in Veneta, Oregon, Nathan’s childhood dreams were always fun. He

drew cartoons, wrote stories, perfected magic tricks and, apparently, mastered playing with LEGO. He later attended New York University where he earned a law degree and eventually practiced law at the firm Winston & Strawn. This would not last for long. Nathan maintained a passion for LEGO, but no longer as a toy, rather as a medium for creating art, and in 2001, decided to follow his dream and give up corporate law to, well—play with bricks. “New York corporate attorneys are known for working the long hours. I find myself working long hours now as well, but I’m doing something I love— The worst day in the art studio is still better than the best day in the law firm,” he explained. Nathan first gained national attention in 2004, when he won a nationwide search for a professional Lego Master Model Builder. After working for the LEGO company for six months, he branched off and opened his own art studio in New York, where he now has an inventory of more than 1.5 million LEGO bricks at his disposal. Nathan’s work is stunning, playful and painstakingly crafted. The pieces can take up to OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

BLUE FACE MASK, 2009, 48 x 40 x 18”; RED FACE MASK, 2009, 45 x 42 x 20”; YELLOW FACE MASK, 2009, 38 x 32 x 16” ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF BRICKARTIST.COM

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

39


ABOVE: SHOCKING SELF-PORTRAIT, 2008, 30 x 38” TOP: COURTNEY, YELLOW, 2008, 30 x 45” OPPOSITE: STAIRWAY, 40 x 38 x 15”

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF BRICKARTIST.COM

40

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

three weeks to build—each brick is glued in place. “These works are very personal to me, since they reflect my growth as an artist as I strove to discover my creative identity,” he said. “The museum exhibit is accessible because it engages the child in all of us while simultaneously illuminating sophisticated and complex concepts.” Nathan’s ability to transform LEGO bricks into something fresh and imaginative, his devotion to scale and dimension, as well as the sheer intricacy of the work enables him to elevate an ordinary toy to the status of fine art.



 He enjoys seeing people’s reactions to his artwork and aims to captivate. “I strive to create artwork that is interesting and that is unlike anything they have seen before.”

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

Nathan’s art form takes shape primarily in 3-dimensional sculptures and oversized portraits. With what amounts to an endless range of possibilities, he continues to create daily, and his unique, one-ofa-kind creations are commissioned by companies, charities, celebrities, museums and galleries from around the world. His work has been featured in numerous collections including:
Lancaster Museum of Art in Lancaster, PA; Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, NY; The Toy Museum in Bellaire, OH; Discovery Center Museum in Rockford, IL; and Stamford Museum in Stamford, CT. If you are like us, you’ll leave the exhibit and head straight for the nearest toy store to buy a new LEGO set! O n V iew


OnV

i e w •

M

ay

2010

00


American Impressionism produced a unique and optimistic manifestation of the American spirit.

Amer I M P R E IMPRESSIONISM, which began in France in the 1860s,

was a reaction to the conservative realism and restrictive rules of the French Academy. Major exhibitions of French Impressionist works in Boston and New York, in the 1870s, introduced the style to the American public. Some of the first American artists to paint in this genre did so after visiting France. Some stayed in Europe for prolonged periods or even settled there. The majority of them, however, returned to the US after several years of study and travel, full of new ideas about art, which they adaptAbove: Childe Hassam, Old House, East Hampton (detail), 1917, oil on canvas, 20 x 30�, Bank of America Collection, Exhibition: Transcending Vision: American Impressionism 1870-1940, Works from the Bank of America Collection, Orlando Museum of Art


CURRENT EX H I B I T I O N S . . .

TRANSCENDING VISION: AMERICAN

THE SPECTACLE OF LIFE:

WILLIAM V. KIRKPATRICK:

IMPRESSIONISM, 1870-1940, Works

THE ART OF WILLIAM GLACKENS

AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST

from the Bank of America Collection

Maitland Art Center

Orlando Museum of Art

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Pg. 44

Pg. 46

rican Pg. 48

S S I O N I S M ed to their paintings of the American landscape. Many flourished in art colonies, located mainly in the Northeast, where they lived and worked together, and shared a common aesthetic vision. The American style of Impressionism was similar to that of the French, although American Impressionists tended to retain more structure and realism in their work. Painting mostly en plein air, artists experimented with atmospheric effects and optical relationships between OnV

i e w

light and color and used vibrant palettes. They often painted landscapes and scenes of leisure, but the real subject they were rendering was an overall sense of light. Whether painting tranquil landscapes or busy city streets, their aim was to delight the senses and elevate the spirit. On the following pages, three current exhibitions, featuring renowned American Impressionists, offer tantalizing reflections of life and enchanting records of color and light. O n V iew Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

43


Exhibition

Transcending Vision: A M E R I C A N I M P R E S S I O N I S M , 1 8 7 0 - 1 9 4 0
 W orks from the Bank of America Collection On view through July 18th at the Orlando Museum of Art w ww.omart.org Paintings by a diverse group of more than 75 American artists, trace not only the development of Impressionism in America, but also the emergence of a truly American style of painting. Works by artists such as Arthur Wesley Dow, Herman Herzog, Childe Hassam, George Inness, John Sloan and Robert Spencer illustrate the full range of Impressionist qualities that captivated artists and audiences during a dynamic period in American history—and still do today. O n V iew

A S P A R T O F T H E O M A ’ s Changing Land-

scapes exhibition, Transcending Vision features 125 paintings, drawn from the Bank of America Collection, that demonstrate how American artists successfully transformed French Impressionism into their own artistic style. These artists redefined Impressionism as a means of depicting the American rural and urban landscape, expressing ideas about how the rapidly changing country saw itself.

Above: Arthur Wesley Dow, Flowering Field, 1889, oil on canvas, 14.25 x 20.25”, Bank of America Collection; Opposite: Robert Spencer, Afternoon Bathers (detail), oil on canvas, 29.5 x 35.5”, Bank of America Collection

44

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


OnV

i e w •

M

ay

2010

00


Exhibition

The Spectacle of Life: THE ART OF WILLIAM GLACKENS On view at the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University w w w.moaflnsu.org W I L L I A M G L A C K E N S (1870-1938) was an

ings of street scenes and daily life in urban neighborhoods. His work always emphasized the reality of life and also the happiness and humor. His later paintings showed the influence of Pierre-Auguste Renoir. During much of his career as a painter, William also worked as an illustrator for newspapers and magazines. A companion exhibition, Glackens as Illustrator, will be on view at the Museum through June 20th. O n V iew

American Impressionist who is considered to be one of the most influential artists in the history of American Art. He co-founded what came to be called the Ashcan School art movement. This group of artists, dubbed by the press “The Eight”, chose to exhibit their works without pre-approval by the juries of the existing art establishment. William became well known for his paint-

Above: Cape Cod Pier, 1908, oil on canvas, collection of the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, gift of an anonymous donor; Opposite: Dancer in Blue, ca. 1905, oil on canvas, collection of the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, bequest of Ira Glackens

46

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


OnV

i e w •

M

ay

2010

00


Exhibition

William V. Kirkpatrick: AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST On view July 16th through September 5th at the Maitland Art Center w w w. m aitlandartcenter.org WILLIAM KIRKPATRICK (1939-2004), who

Impressionism strengthened its hold on William’s art. He became an Impressionist painter of landscapes, florals, figures, and portraits. William traveled extensively and created his impressions of the world. His work can best be described as an explosion of color and light with an unrestrained use of dramatic patterns of brushwork. William’s florals expressed his love and spirituality of life. His work is collected worldwide. O n V iew

signed his canvases William Vincent, began painting at the age of ten and, soon after, won his first art contest, which was sponsored by the Lightner Museum of Art in St. Augustine. He later went on to study at the Maitland Art Center (formerly the Research Studio), then at Eastern New Mexico University. Having studied with the late writer and artist, Alfred Morang, in the mid 1950s, the influence of

Above: Landscape 08; Opposite: Country House (detail); Works are by William Vincent Kirkpatrick and are on loan from Baterbys Art Auction Gallery

48

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


OnV

i e w •

M

ay

2010

00


T H E P OWER OF

ART

From war to the workplace: Art has influenced society’s perceptions & behaviors

H

THE EARLY 20 t h CENTURY presented soci-

ety with a long list of difficulties—war, depression, racial tension and disease to name a few. Artistic representations of these phenomena often acted as a buffer between the horrors of reality and individuals’ interpretations of the world. Art helped to inform, explain, and educate society about controversial issues. It was also used to influence people’s perceptions, and modern propagandists realized the persuasive power of art and used this power in contemporary propaganda campaigns. Posters were a particularly successful form of propaganda because they incorporated bold and graphic images. These images helped to convey information to a wider audience, which included illiterate as well as foreign populations, and made

50

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

propagandistic messages clearer by adding detail and references. Perhaps most significant was their ability to draw emotional appeal. By associating the picture with a part of their life, the viewer would become more accepting of the message. Two distinctive exhibitions feature stunning examples of the power of art as propaganda. Man and the Machine, at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, offers a riveting display of Russian and wartime propaganda posters. America at Work: Art and Propaganda in the Early 20th Century, at the Harn Museum of Art, presents a selection of works from a popular campaign designed to promote excellence in the American workplace. Each represents the power of the image—and the artist—in social and political history. O n V iew

2010

USSR Strengthen Civil Aviation, 1933, lithograph, collection of Cornell Fine Arts Museum, from the exhibition Man and the Machine


OnV

i e w •

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

00


H EXHIBITION

MAN & THE MACHINE On view through August 1st at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park cfam.rollins.edu

From left: Kochergin, Without Lenin, Along Lenin’s Path Forward to New Victories, 1933, lithograph, Cornell Fine Arts Museum; Alferov and A.V. Sokolov, Success of collectivization are the Triumphs of Lenin’s and Stalin’s Teachings, 1933, lithograph, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

52

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


H

FOLLOWING AN EXTENSIVE conservation

process, Cornell Fine Arts Museum is premiering this exhibition of rare, Stalinist-era propaganda posters from the 1930s, which focus primarily on political discipline and the Five Year Plans, ambitious programs for the collectivization of agriculture and establishment of heavy industry. These posters give a powerful impression, using photomontage, dynamic composition, and strong contrasts in colors and shapes. Healthy, young workers and determined soldiers are the principal sub-

THE POWER OF ART

jects, as well as a friendly, smiling Joseph Stalin. The exhibition also features American and British posters from World War I. War posters were one of the most popular forms of propaganda art during the World Wars. Wartime art served to signify a nation’s identity, symbolize customs and cultural heritage and reinforce patriotism. Poster themes utilized cultural stereotypes to prod men into battle and inspire women to motivate their men. Iconic imagery and catchy slogans contributed to the success of these campaigns. O n V iew

From left: Howard Chandler Christy (American, 1873-1954), Join the Navy, 1917, lithograph; Richard Fayerweather Babcock (American, 1887-1945), Join the Navy, 1917, lithograph

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

53


H EXHIBITION

AMERICA AT WORK: Art & Propaganda in the Early 20th Century On view June 8th through September 5th at the Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville w w w. h a r n . u f l . e d u

From left: Mather & Company, 2 strikes, 3 balls and he knocks the last ball over the fence, 1925, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo; Mather & Company, Be a tight wad! Own something!, 1924, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo

54

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


H

A M E R I C A A T W O R K addresses the theme of

employment, a topic that is especially relevant today as the national economy struggles to recover from a serious recession. The main focal point of this exhibition is a group of 30 striking and unique American work incentive posters. These large posters with colorful designs, strong graphics and inspirational phrases were produced between 1924 and 1925 by Mather and Company, a Chicago-based lithographer, for the purpose of motivating workers, addressing workplace behavior, and ultimately maximizing profits. Artists were commissioned to employ famil-

THE POWER OF ART

iar images such as racing trains, baseball games and sports figures along with simple and direct headlines. Messages such as “Don’t make excuses, make good” and “Let’s play to win” were intended to mold the worker and influence his or her work patterns and loyalties. Overall, these messages promoted teamwork and solid American values. Many of the artists were heavily influenced by the “Plakatstil,” or Poster Style, made famous in Germany. The clean lines of the Mather posters, in turn, anticipated the streamlined and dynamic Art Deco designs that would dominate the next decade. O n V iew

From left: Mather & Company, Know your goal! Keep on keeping on!, 1924, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo; Mather & Company, Say it with snap! Get to the point, 1925, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

55


ad

{SUR}REALIZIN

56

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


Paris has the E I F F E L T O W E R , Sydney has the O P E R A H O U S E — St. Petersburg will have the new DA L � M U S E U M !

dream G


L OPPOSITE: the museum foyer will feature a grand helical staircase, resembling a strand of DNA, which Dalí recognized as the presence of the divine in nature. Renderings of the new Dalí courtesy HOK BELOW: the one and only salvador dalí

58

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

LIKE THE ARTIST HIMSELF,

the new Salvador Dalí Museum will be one of a kind. Unexpected and enigmatic in form, its design captures the classical and the fantastic. The Museum is being constructed in the heart of downtown St. Petersburg, just south of the Mahaffey Theater, within the Progress Energy Center for the Arts, overlooking Tampa Bay. Groundbreaking on the $35 million project took place on December 12, 2008. The highly anticipated Grand Opening is slated for January 11, 2011 at 11am! “The Board of Trustees of the Dalí Museum showed extraordinary confidence in art, in Dalí, in the St. Petersburg community, and in the American economy by giving this project the green light. They believe, as does the museum staff, that this community will support a project so vital to art and to our economy. It is an investment that will enrich this community far beyond its cost,” explained Museum Director, Hank Hine. The new Dalí is designed by internationally acclaimed architect Yann Weymouth, Director of Design for Hell-

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

muth, Obata and Kassabaum (HOK), Florida. Weymouth worked with I.M. Pei on the Grand Louvre in Paris and, with HOK, he has led the design of the Hazel Hough Wing at the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts, the Arthur F. and Ulla K. Searing Wing of the John and Mabel Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, and the new Frost Museum in Miami. HOK’s focus was to be true to Dalí and the great legacy of the Morse family—to create a unique environment of experiential spaces that move perceptually with the visitor, but remain as classic and surprising, as are Dalí’s works, without resorting to “melting clocks”. DIVINE DESIGN The building’s signature is the geodesic glass “Enigma”, a cascading river of glass spilling out from the center of the concrete geometric structure, which encloses the foyer and a grand spiral staircase that will soar heavenward from the ground floor to the museum’s main third level gallery. The helical staircase was derived from a series of mathematical equations and resembles


ABOVE: Two banks of galleries will allow display of dynamic exhibitions by other artists while, at the same time, maintaining the most complete exhibit of Dalí in the world.

60

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

a strand of DNA, which Dalí recognized as the presence of the divine in nature. Another exciting part of the new museum is the foundation stone, a gift from the city of Cadaqués, Spain, taken from the same area that inspired Dalí in so many of his paintings. The stone will be used to support the corner of the museum at its entry.

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

At 66,450 sq. ft., more than twice the size of the original museum, the new Dalí will give visitors an opportunity to see so much more. Two banks of galleries, one for visiting exhibitions and another for the priceless permanent collection, will allow display of dynamic exhibitions by other artists while maintaining the most complete exhibit of Dalí in the world.


basis, and be a place for visitors to begin their Dalí journey with an orientation film. The new Dalí will also feature a café, outdoor surreal gardens, an expanded store with a variety of new merchandise, a library, and community room for weddings, meetings and gatherings. TREASURE BOX The Salvador Dalí Museum is the permanent home of the most comprehensive collection of the renowned Spanish artist’s work, outside Spain. Compiled by A. Reynolds Morse and Eleanor Morse over a 45-year period, the collection includes 96 oil paintings spanning from 1917 through 1970, providing an excellent overview of Dalí’s major themes and symbols. Also included

BELOW: The theater will show Dalí’s films on a regular basis, and be a place for visitors to begin their Dalí journey with an orientation film.

The new museum will provide the space and opportunity to better connect with the community. A versatile theater and separate classrooms will allow expanded educational programs. Students will gather what they’ve learned in the galleries and continue to study and create art. The theater will show Dalí’s films, such as Un chien andalou, on a regular OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

61


LEFT TO RIGHT: Portrait of My Dead Brother, 1963, oil on canvas; The Hallucinogenic Toreador, 1969-70, oil on canvas; Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at Twenty Meters Becomes the Portrait of Abraham Lincoln— Homage to Rothko (Second Version), 1976

62

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

are the Impressionist and Cubist styles of his early period, abstract work from his transition to Surrealism, the famous surrealist canvases for which he is best known, and examples of his preoccupation with religion and science during his classic period. In addition, the collection

ing the waterfront building’s storm safety and its environmental elements, such as solar heating, water conservation and dehumidification—all to assure that the museum is as enduring as the artist’s body of work. Safety is of paramount importance. The current museum is a converted marine warehouse

includes over 100 watercolors and drawings, 1,300 graphics, photographs, sculptures and objets d’art, and an extensive archival library. Periodic rotations of the collection and special exhibitions allow museum goers to view new work on repeat visits.

built on the waterfront at sea level. Each storm threat requires the artwork be painstakingly moved to safety. This process alone puts the collection at great risk. In the new museum, artwork will be located above the floodplain on the third floor, protected from a Category Five storm surge. The walls will be poured with 18-inch thick concrete and steel designed to withstand 165 mph winds.

ENDURING The new museum comes with several practical extras, includ-

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


KEEPING THE FAITH All but $6 million has been raised from federal, state, city and private funding. Salvador Dalí Museum leaders have made a request to the Pinellas County Tourist Development Council to cover $5 million of the shortfall in hotel room taxes. By law, revenue from

um as their primary reason for coming to Pinellas County, and they spend 115,000 nights in the county’s hotels, a number that would double in the new museum’s first year, he adds. The museum also estimates it generates about $50 million for the local economy every year.

the 5 percent tax on commercial lodging is supposed to support advertising, events and, in some cases, facilities that stimulate more tourism. The Dalí is presently rated by the Michelin Guide as the highest ranked museum in the American South, attracting 200,000 visitors a year, nine out of 10 from outside Pinellas. According to Hine, 60 percent of visitors cite the muse-

Those numbers should resonate with the tourist council. If the TDC grants the Dalí’s request, museum backers believe they can raise the remaining $1 million from private donors. “We are convinced our community will rally and provide the remaining funding to complete the new Dalí,” says Marcia Crawley, Director of Development. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

ABOVE: Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus” (detail), 1933-1935 ALL IMAGES COPYRIGHT: In the USA: ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, Fl, 2010; Worldwide rights: ©Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2010 .

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

63


Interview

BEHIND THE SCENES As the MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, NORTH MIAMI

prepared for the exhibition, CLAIRE FONTAINE

:

ECONOMIES,

on view June 3rd-August 22nd, we chatted with MOCA’s RUBA KATRIB about the process.

Claire Fontaine, CHANGE, 2006, 12 twenty-five cent coins, steel

64

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


box-cutter blades, solder and rivets, 90 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Pedestal), 32 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Plexiglass box), courtesy Galerie Neu, Berlin


C

CLAIRE FONTAINE’S WORK is a passionate response to social and political issues facing the world today. Claire’s approach is often wry and witty, but at the core is a heartfelt cry for action. Claire’s thoughts and observations are presented in a series of powerful works on display in Claire Fontaine: Economies at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, from June 3rd through August 22nd. The exhibition features older works, as well as new interventions, in addition to films and videos that have influenced the artist. Claire Fontaine is actually a Paris-based artist collective. The name was lifted from a French notebook supplier—an iconic brand familiar to schoolchildren and office workers. The collaborators who form Claire Fontaine consider them-

1. My collar is clean, my underwear too..., 2008, stack of posters in English and German, 84 x 119 mm each, photo: Gunter Lepkowski, courtesy Galerie Neu, Berlin 2. You Pay, 2007, smoke on ceiling, 80 x 80 mm, courtesy the artist, Reena Spaulings Fine Art and Metro Pictures, NY

OV: What first attracted MOCA to Claire Fontaine and how did you arrive at the decision to feature the artist in a solo exhibition?

exhibition I curated at MOCA called The Possibility of an Island, which opened in December of 2008. I have always been interested in their work and was very excited about including them in the exhibition. MOCA acquired a work from that

RK: I first worked with Claire Fontaine in a group

66

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


Interview

selves her “assistants” and cooperatively produce neo-conceptual art employing a diverse range of media including neon, video, sculpture, painting and words. Written texts are also at the core of Claire’s work and accompany all exhibitions. A self-described “readymade artist”, Claire Fontaine experiments with the collective protocols of production and détournement, and creates works often described as an ongoing interrogation of political impotence and powerlessness. Claire has a soft spot for radical protest and is particularly motivated by the Paris student uprisings that took place in the late 60’s, often referencing art of that period. In this respect, she may be considered somewhat nostalgic, however her focus is on the culture and political realities of today’s world. Claire’s disposition is antiauthoritarian. She has the soul of a revolutionary and loves neon signs, especially those emblazoned with radical slogans. As MOCA prepared for Claire’s arrival, we chatted with Ruba Katrib, who is curating this exhibition, to get a feel for what goes on behind the scenes.

3. Untitled (Tennis Ball Sculpture), detail, 2010, one hundred used tennis balls enclosing various objects, dimensions variable 4. Instructions for the sharing of Private Property, 2006, digital video, Sony Trinitron box monitor on plinth, color and sound, 45’ 23”. Images courtesy of the artist, Reena Spaulings Fine Art and Metro Pictures, NY

exhibition and soon after, plans were in formation for their first comprehensive solo museum exhibition to take place this summer. Claire Fontaine has exhibited widely, but this is the first time they are able to fully articulate their practice in a large space. OnV

i e w

OV: You recently completed work on another solo show, “Cory Arcangel: The Sharper Image”. Did you find this experience helpful in preparing for the Claire Fontaine exhibition? Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

67


Interview

RK: Cory Arcangel and Claire Fontaine are very different artists, but working with Cory and Claire present similar opportunities—to show a large amount of artwork by artists who exhibit often, but have not had their work totally contextualized.

RK: Claire Fontaine and I have been in dialog for almost two years regarding this project, so a lot of ideas have bounced back and forth. We are in active dialog regarding every aspect of the exhibition.

OV: Installation art can test a lot of curatorial habits of mind and practice. What types of challenges can an exhibition of this type present?

OV: Can you give us an idea of how many works are included in this exhibition and how much help is needed to complete an installation of this size?

RK: Artists work in a variety of ways. It is the curator’s job to adapt to and understand these practices while translating them for the public. One thing that is exciting about Claire Fontaine is that they respond to the location of every exhibition, so there will be new works that relate directly to Miami.

RK: There are approximately 25 works in the exhibition ranging in date from 2006 to the present. We are producing a lot of new works as well, so there is a great deal of effort involved. We work collaboratively, and everyone in MOCA pitches in—the entire staff is an asset to every exhibition, from installation, to programs, to PR.

OV: Can you tell us a little about these new works?

RK: There are several new works. One example is a new video that was made in Miami featuring conversations that Claire Fontaine has with

OV: How collaborative is the relationship between curator and artist?

“I THINK CLAIRE FONTAINE ASKS US TO POSE QUESTIONS INTO DAILY FACETS OF LIFE THAT ARE OFTEN TAKEN FOR GRANTED. I HOPE VIEWERS TO THE EXHIBITION EXPERIENCE THIS RE-EXAMINATION.”

68

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010


Capitalism Kills Love (Red/White/Blue), 2008, three colored painted neon, framework, sequencer and transformers, dimensions variable; Opposite: 519 West 24th Street (03.01.10), 2010, moulded alloy, fishing cable and nail, courtesy the artist and Reena Spauling Fine Art, NY

taxi drivers. Another example is a large work that refers to the hotel advertisements so ubiquitous in this city.

OV: What has been the most enjoyable part of this process for you?

RK: Having the opportunity to dive into Claire Fontaine’s practice has been terrific. I really have enjoyed our conversations, as well as writing and researching for the catalog. In addition, it is always interesting to participate in the production of new artwork. OnV

i e w

OV: Given we all have different beliefs and desires, what do you hope viewers may take away from the exhibition?

RK: Claire Fontaine’s work asks us to reconsider our experiences as art viewers, as well as members of society. Some of their works seem very simple, but on closer examination they contain complex meanings. I think Claire Fontaine asks us to pose questions into daily facets of life that are often taken for granted. I hope viewers to the exhibition experience this re-examination. O n V iew Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

69


CRAFT

W E A L L H AV E fond memo-

{ K I T E S }

Exhibition

Art on a String On view June 4th-August 29th at the Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida www.vac.org.cn

70

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

ries of kite-flying. It is practically synonymous with Summer. Open park spaces, ocean beaches and lakeside shores made for ideal takeoffs. Countless hours were spent watching these colorful shapes dance across the sky. Art on a String is an uplifting, inspirational and educational exhibition consisting of more than 200 unusual and masterfully crafted kites collected in Asia—each created for a variety of uses. History indicates kites were flown in China and India as early as the seventh or eighth century. Priests used them as religious tokens. Military leaders deployed them to transport supplies, and soldiers, across rivers. Kites were also utilized by the Chinese military to distract and confound their enemies by flying explosives and fireworks over their heads, causing them to believe evil spirits were attacking. In Japan, kites were used to bring good luck in the production of grain. Merchants hung them as signs to advertise their wares. Japanese kites are also


C R A F T

well-known for their beautiful For centuries, kite masters artwork, which typically features have taken inspiration from characters from Japanese my- birds. Flight has always been a thology, folklore and religion. highly admired quality by man In Thailand, farmers sent mes- and kites represent our first sucsages to the gods on kites, plead- cesses in aviation. Kites coming for the safety of their crops. bine function with grace, color In Korea, families flew kites and beauty. Many countries have in honor of newborn baby boys developed individual kite styles to rid them of bad luck. based on masters of the past, and European explorthe images on moders brought knowlern kites are often edge of kites from centuries old. Asia to the westTraditional Chiern world. In 1295, nese kites resemble Marco Polo was the not only birds but first to document other natural obthis knowledge by jects, such as butKites combine sharing written ac- FUNCTION with terflies and flowers. counts of how to Most have complex grace, color construct and fly bamboo frames, and BEAUTY. kites that he had covered with fine seen in Asia. Descriptions of paper or silk and some have pakites were more widely publi- pier-mâchÊ features. Many are cized in the fifteenth and six- exquisitely painted with elaboteenth centuries, when books rate decorations more suitable outlined their construction and for display than flight, but all of use. Europeans considered them the designs are based on sound to be wonderful children’s toys aeronautical principles. during this time, and there are What better way to celebrate paintings depicting children fly- Summer than to experience the ing diamond-shaped kites dating wonder and beauty of this amazback to at least 1618. ing art form. O n V iew

Art on a String features more than 200 unusual and masterfully crafted kites collected in Asia.


FOCUS { S H A I

I N 1 9 9 9, Shai Kremer began a

K R E M E R }

Exhibition

Shai Kremer: Infected Landscape On view through July 17th at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa www.fmopa.org

72

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

seven year project photographing the ominous imprint of the military on the Israeli landscape. His goal was to reveal how every piece of land had become “infected” with the loaded sediments of an ongoing conflict. As he explains, “My images mirror the psychological trauma and resulting ambivalence of living in a world of friction, they also warn against the vestiges of warfare becoming a permanent fixture in people’s lives.” The images in this exhibition are aesthetic compositions. According to Shai, “this parallels the defense mechanisms developed by Israelis striving for normalcy and to protect themselves from the reality of the current political situation. The scars concealed in the landscape correspond to the wounds in the collective unconscious of the country. The photographs attract the viewer, seduce him closer, then challenge him to reflect on their meaning and implications.” 

Instead of confronting the subject of Israeli occupation


F O C U S

in the way the world has been Born in 1974, Shai grew up absorbing it through the news, on Kibbutz Ga’ash in Israel. Shai approaches it in a more He received a BA at Camera subtle way. He believes that the Obscura School of the Arts in media’s aggressive portrayal of Tel Aviv, and a MFA, in 2005, reality changes people’s sen- from the School of Visual Arts sibilities and makes them cal- in NY. He is currently based in lous to the suffering of others. NY and Tel Aviv. An emerging “One does not need to shock talent, Shai has received recogthe audience in order to make nition for his work as a nominee an impact. I would for the 2007 Santa rather challenge the Fe Prize and runviewer to think, usner-up for both the ing the landscape as Henri Cartier Bresa platform for disson Award in 2009 cussion.” and for the AperThe way Shai apture Portfolio Prize proaches a shoot in 2007. His work “One does NOT is intuitive. “I’m NEED TO SHOCK has been shown in constantly drivnumerous solo and the audience in ing all throughout order TO MAKE group exhibitions my country, taking throughout the US AN IMPACT.” roads never travand abroad. His elled and side ways. When I work is also included in the see a scene that, I feel, belongs collections of the Metropolitan to the project and my beliefs, I Museum of Art in NY, the Muoften come back several times seum of Contemporary Photo the site, at various hours, to tography in Chicago, the Muwork out a frame, a light and ev- seum of Fine Arts in Houston, erything that creates a picture.” the San Francisco Museum of The rigorous beauty of the im- Modern Art, the Israel Museum ages is haunting. Shai’s mes- in Jerusalem,
and the Tel Aviv sage, while subdued, is clear. Museum of Art. O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Burned olive trees and Katyusha crater, Lebanon War, 2006 2. the separation wall, Jerusalem, 2004 3. Military Ammunition Storage Ten Years After the Explosion, 2001 LEFT: Shai kremer, courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Trench “Chicago” Ground Force Training Zone, 2007 2. Soldiers’ viewing platform , Israel/Lebanon border, 2006 all images ©shai kremer


PROFILE { J O H N

B I S B E E }

Exhibition

A Secret Language: Sculpture by John Bisbee On view through June 27th at the Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

74

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

JOHN BISBEE is truly an iron

man. He has worked with metal for over 22 years and creates large-scale sculptures by welding and forging nails and spikes into organic forms. His sculptures are both minimal and complex—and evoke a dialogue between natural forms and industrial materials. He transforms heavy and ordinary hardware into elegant, intricate, and free-flowing works that nestle into symmetrical forms, cascade across walls, or cluster in corners. In a recent conversation about his work, John explained, “each piece is a new symbol in an infinite vocabulary. Because my material never changes, the work must. Each piece is abstract and unique, created entirely by my hand.” A Secret Language showcases 6 of John’s works and includes both wall installations and freestanding sculptures. John was born in 1965 and raised in Cambridge, MA. Creative, rebellious, athletic and dyslexic, he struggled for years to find his place in the world— until he decided to become a


P R O F I L E

sculptor. According to his moth- bucket. I sat on the rotted bed, er, Ann Porter, “art saved his mesmerized. That afternoon I life.” As an artist, he became went to the hardware store and focused, dedicated and driven. bought my first box of nails.” John is influenced by nature and The rest, as we say, is history. inspired by action. “If you do John also teaches at Bowanything long and hard enough, doin College in Maine. Those discovery is inevitable,” he says, who first encounter his color“and this action is an important ful personality might not guess part of my process.” at the seriousness with which John received he approaches his his B.F.A. from work. To his stuAlfred University dents, he is an inin NY, and attendspiration, but John ed the Skowhegan claims that it is the School of Paintstudents who ening and Sculpture rich him. “What in Maine. He bethey give to me “Each PIECE came inspired by is their youth and is a new metal during his setheir discovery and SYMBOL in nior year at Alfred surprise,” he says. an infinite University. At the John’s work is VOCABULARY.” time, he was makincluded in the coling sculpture out of found ob- lections of the Bowdoin College jects. While combing through Museum of Art, the DeCordova an abandoned house for brown Museum, The Albright-Knox and broken fragments, he found Gallery, the Portland Museum a bucket of nails on the floor at of Art, at Microsoft, and in prithe foot of a rusted bed. As he re- vate collections. His work has called, “I kicked over the buck- been reviewed in Art in Ameriet but the nails were so rusted ca, ARTnews, The New Yorker, that they tumbled out as a solid The New York Times and The chunk, still in the shape of the Boston Globe. O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Helio, from Ton series, 2006, 12” steel spikes, 84 x 84 x 9” 2. Blossom, 2008, Handforged, hammered nails, 51” diameter 3. Scale, 2007, Handforged, hammered nails, Dimensions variable LEFT: John at work on an installation OPPOSITE: Plode, 2002, 12” steel spikes, Each ball 2 1/2’ diameter, 10 ball assembly all works: Collection of the Artist


SPOTLIGHT { J A M E S

G U R N E Y }

Exhibition

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney On view June 5th-September 5th at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach www.norton.org

76

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

ACCLAIMED ARTIST and au-

thor James Gurney’s magical world of Dinotopia, a place where humans and dinosaurs live in harmony, comes to life in this enchanting exhibition with over 50 original oil paintings from the best-selling books, Dinotopia: A Land Apart From Time, 1992; Dinotopia: The World Beneath, 1995; and Dinotopia: Journey to Chandara, 2007, and presents fascinating examples of the illustrator’s creative process, including preliminary studies, reference photos, and handmade scale-models. Inspired by archaeology, lost civilizations, and the art of illustration, Dinotopia fuses fantasy with realism.“The thing I love about dinosaurs is that they are on that balance point between fantasy and reality,” says James. “It might be hard to believe that mermaids and dragons really existed, but we know that dinosaurs did—we can see their footprints and skeletons but we can’t photograph them or see them, except in our imagination.” Dinotopia chronicles the adventures of explorer Arthur


S P O T L I G H T

Denison, and his son Will, on ic magazine with a series of asa mysterious island inhabited signments working with scienby dinosaurs and shipwrecked tists and historians to recreate travelers. The land of Dinoto- ancient worlds. This inspired pia—the product of Gurney’s him to paint Waterfall City and fertile imagination—has its own Dinosaur Parade, which belanguage, festivals & parades, came the conceptual frameand a lively cast of characters. work for Dinotopia. As a young boy, James was James begins the process for captivated by the each painting with subject of dinothumbnail sketchsaurs and the dream es and, on occasion, of creating a fantaminiatures or masy world. This led quettes. In certain to an interest in arinstances he uses chaeology and lost models and concivilizations. He results with experts Inspired by calls excavating his to ensure scientifarchaeology and suburban backyard lost civilizations, ic or historical acfor arrowheads and curacy. After a line DINOTOPIA “even a lost temple.” drawing is made, fuses fantasy with James later mathe oil painting berealism. jored in anthropolgins. Most paintings ogy at the University of Cali- take from three days to a week, fornia at Berkeley, and studied but some can take up to a month. illustration at the Art Center James is the recipient of many College of Design in Pasadena. prestigious awards and his art Early in his career, he paint- appears in museum exhibitions ed jungle and volcano back- around the world. He lives in the drops for animator Ralph Bak- Hudson River Valley of New shi and became interested in York with his wife, two sons, the fantasy genre. His big break and a blue parakeet—a living came from National Geograph- descendant of dinosaurs. On View

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. The Excursion, 1995, Illustration for Dinotopia: Journey to Chandara, Oil on canvas mounted to plywood 2. Waterfall City: Afternoon Light, 2001, Illustration for Dinotopia: Journey to Chandara, Oil on canvas 3. archway scene: waterfall city, 1992. Illustration for Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time, Oil on board LEFT: james gurney OPPOSITE: Birthday Pageant, 1995, Illustration for Dinotopia: The World Beneath, Oil on canvas mounted to plywood images courtesy of the artist


V

on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Chicago

The museums. . .

CHICAGO HAS IT ALL —from cutting-edge architecture,

legendary blues, scrumptious dining and lavish shopping to world-class museums, lakeside views, glorious parks, majorleague baseball, and side-splitting improv…oh, and don’t forget the deep-dish pizza! Chicago’s great magic lies in its mix, and although a bustling city, it is also serene, sophisticated and friendly, and it offers a stunning year-round array of things to see and do that are unique in all the world. Among its many attractions, Chicago’s great diversity is apparent in its amazing museums. It is home to an impressive range of world-class art. On the following pages On View presents a brief overview of some of the city’s premier venues including the Chicago Cultural Center, Loyola University Museum of Art, Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the National Museum of Mexican Art, the Smart Museum of Art, and The Art Institute of Chicago. O n V iew

Osaka Gardens, © City of Chicago / GRC; postcards courtesy of www.ChicagoPostcardMuseum.org OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

79


Chicago Cultural Center

A

A “PEOPLE’S PALACE”, the

Chicago Cultural Center celebrates the arts, education, Chicago, and the world. People of all definitions, from near and far, come here to enjoy a multitude of exciting, and free, art exhibitions, music, dance, theatre, film and family events. The landmark building, constructed over 100 years ago as the Chicago Public Library and a Civil War memorial, features both Greek-inspired and Roman-inspired archiCHICAGO CULTURAL CENTER www.chicagocultural center.org

Info

hicagoChicagoChicag

80

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

78 E. Washington St.,
 Chicago, IL 312.744.6630

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

tectural elements and ornamentation. The building is most notably home to two magnificent stained-glass domes—the world’s largest Tiffany dome, measuring 38 feet in diameter with approximately 30,000 pieces of glass, as well as a Renaissance patterned dome, designed by Healy & Millet, measuring 40 feet in diameter with approximately 50,000 pieces of glass. The building’s beauty has been preserved through the years by meticulous restoration and is considered one of Chicago’s premier destinations. O n V iew u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. oculus of tiffany stained-glass dome (detail), Michael Beasley Images 2. preston bradley hall with tiffany dome, Hedrich Blessing Photographers 3. a view of the Chicago cultural center’s exterior, Hedrich Blessing Photographers images © City of Chicago / GRC


Loyola University Museum of Art

A

A B R I L L I A N T G E M of

Info

Chicago’s museum scene, Loyola University Museum of Art (LUMA), was founded in 2005 on the Water Tower Campus of Loyola University Chicago. LUMA is located on the Magnificent Mile at the Water Tower in Lewis Towers, a historic 1927 Gothic Revival building. The Museum contains eight main exhibition galleries, a lecture hall, library and museum store. LUMA is dedicated to the LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART www.luc.edu/luma 820 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 312.915.7600

exploration, promotion and understanding of art and artistic expression, and attempts to illuminate the enduring spiritual questions and concerns of all cultures and societies. The Museum displays rotating exhibitions and permanent collections, including the Martin D’Arcy Collection of medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art. Stunning ivories, enamels, painted sculpture and works by masters, such as Tintoretto and Bassano, are among the collection’s most important objects. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE WAY TO CALVARY, 16TH CENTURY,
FOLLOWER OF HIERONYMUS BOSCH (NETHERLANDISH, 14501516),
OIL ON PANEL,
 GIFT OF SPENCER SAMUELS 2. SCENES FROM THE LEGEND OF DAVID AND GOLIATH,
 FLORENTINE, CA. 1450,
 TEMPERA ON PANEL 3. ERA & DONALD FARNSWORTH, DHARMAKAYA, 2004, JACQUARD TAPESTRY, COTTON, 116 x 79” IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

ChicagoChicagoChicago

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

81


Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art

M

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. museum exterior 2. Marion Mahony Griffin, drawing of eucalyptus, ink-on-silk 3. Mary Cassatt, In the Omnibus, 1890–91, color aquatint, soft-ground, and drypoint on light cream laid paper, Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Gift of James and Anne DeNaut

MARY & LEIGH BLOCK

Museum of Art, Northwestern University, is the fine arts museum of Chicago’s North Shore. A permanent collection, consisting primarily of works on paper, distinguishes the Block as an important repository of original works of art. The museum currently has over 4,000 pieces in its collection which includes a remarkable sampling of old master to 19th century prints and drawings, modern and contempoMARY & LEIGH BLOCK MUSEUM OF ART www.blockmuseum. northwestern.edu

Info

Info

hicagoChicagoChicag

82

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

40 Arts Circle Drive Evanston, IL 847.491.4000

rary prints, photographs, and architectural drawings. Stuart Davis, Albrecht Dürer, Jasper Johns and Rembrandt are just a few of the artists represented. An integral part of the Museum’s indoor and outdoor environments is the sculpture collection. A tour of the sculpture garden includes works by Hans Arp, Barbara Hepworth, Joan Miró and Henry Moore. O n V iew

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

L

LOCATED IN THE HEART

Info

of downtown Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) has outstanding examples of visual art, from 1945 to the present, with a strong focus on surrealism, pop art, minimalism, conceptual art and contemporary painting, sculpture, photography, video, installation art, and related media. Its collection includes works by Alexander Calder, Jeff Koons, Rene Magritte, Claes Oldenburg and Andy Warhol. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, CHICAGO www.mcachicago.org 220 E. Chicago Ave. Chicago, IL 312.280.2660

The MCA was established in 1967 and moved to its present location in 1996. The fivestory limestone and aluminum structure was designed by Berlin architect, Josef Paul Kleihues, and contains 45,000 sq. ft. of gallery space, making it the largest institution devoted to contemporary art in the country. An architectural highlight is the Museum’s main stairway which combines clean lines and organic form. The museum has a shop featuring one-of-a-kind items and a café overlooking a sculpture garden. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JEFF KOONS, RABBIT, 1986, STAINLESS STEEL, 41 x 19 x 12”, PARTIAL GIFT OF STEFAN T. EDLIS AND H. GAEL NEESON 2. A VIEW OF THE MUSEUM’S MAIN STAIRWAY 3. RENÉ MAGRITTE (18981967), LES MERVEILLES DE LA NATURE (THE WONDERS OF NATURE), 1953, OIL ON CANVAS, 30 1/2 x 38 5/8”, GIFT OF JOSEPH AND JORY SHAPIRO IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

ChicagoChicagoChicago

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

83


Museum of Contemporary Photography

T

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MICHAEL WOLF, THE TRANSPARENT CITY 06, (DETAIL), 2008, CHROMOGENIC DEVELOPMENT PRINT, MUSEUM PURCHASE 2. JOHN OPERA, UNTITLED (FLAME IN WATERFALL), 2006, ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT, MUSEUM PURCHASE 3. DOROTHEA LANGE, MIGRANT MOTHER, NIPOMO, CALIFORNIA, 1936, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, GIFT OF SONIA BLOCH

T H E M U S E U M of Contem-

porary Photography is the only museum in the Midwest with a sole focus on contemporary photography. The Museum constantly seeks out local and international talent. By presenting projects and exhibitions that embrace a wide range of contemporary aesthetics and technologies, the museum promotes a greater understanding of and appreciation for the cultural, social and political implications of the image in our world today. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY www.mocp.org

Info

hicagoChicagoChicag

84

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

600 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 312.663.5554

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

The Museum’s collections uniquely illustrate the diversity of regional, national, and international photographic practice. The permanent collection is comprised of more than 9,000 photographs and related objects produced since 1936, including works by Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Julia Margaret Cameron, Walker Evans, Irving Penn, Aaron Siskind, and Victor Skrebneski. The Midwest Photographers Project is a rotating archive of contemporary works by artists living and working in the Midwest. O n V iew u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


National Museum of Mexican Art

T

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

Info

of Mexican Art (NMMA) carries the unique distinction of being the largest Latino cultural organization in the US, housing one of the largest collections of Mexican art, including textiles, folk art, paintings, sculptures, photography and more. The Museum is dedicated to stimulating and preserving knowledge and appreciation of Mexican culture from ancient times to the present, and showNATIONAL MUSEUM OF MEXICAN ART www.nationalmuseum ofmexicanart.org 1852 W. 19th St. Chicago, IL 312.738.1503

ing how it has manifested itself on both sides of the border. The current collection includes more than 6,500 objects, featuring prominent works by Mexican artists and artifacts from Mexican history. The permanent exhibit, Mexicanidad: Our Past is Present, explores the history of Mexico in five stages: PreCuauhtémoc Mexico, Colonial Mexico, Mexico from Independence to Revolution, Post-Mexican Revolution to Present-day Mexico and The Mexican Experience in the US. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

ChicagoChicagoChicago

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ALFREDO ARREGUIN, CORRIDOS DE MI TIERRA (DETAIL), 2004, OIL ON CANVAS 2. HEAD FRAGMENT WITH SMILING FACE, REMOJADAS, LATE CLASSIC (600–900 C.E.), EARTHENWARE, GIFT OF THE SNITE MUSEUM OF ART, UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME 3. ART DIRECTION BY SANTOS MOTOAOPOHUA DE LA TORRE DE SANTIAGO, EL NUEVO AMANECER (DETAIL), 2003, CHAQUIRA BEADS IN CAMPECHE WAX ON WOOD, 94 3/4 x 118 3/4”, PHOTO: MICHAEL TROPEA ALL WORKS FROM THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF MEXICAN ART PERMANENT COLLECTION

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

85


Smart Museum of Art/University of Chicago

F

F O U N D E D I N 1 9 7 4 with

a gift from the Smart Family Foundation and designed by the renowned architect Edward Larrabee Barnes, the Smart Museum of Art houses a permanent collection of over 10,000 objects, spanning five millennia of both Western and Eastern civilizations. Particular strengths of the collection include European and American modern and contemporary works, East Asian art, and works on paper SMART MUSEUM OF ART UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO www.smartmuseum. uchicago.edu

Info

hicagoChicagoChicag

86

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

5550 S. Greenwood Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 773.702.0200

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

from all periods. Highlights from the collection include ancient Greek vases, furniture, medieval sculpture, Old Master paintings, and Tiffany glass. Works by artists such as Ansel Adams, Degas, Matisse, Henry Moore, Diego Rivera, Rodin, Mark Rothko and Frank Lloyd Wright are represented. Stop off in the quaint Museum Café for a repast during your tour. In the summer, you can dine outdoors in the Eden Sculpture Garden. O n V iew u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1.FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT (1867-1959), DINING TABLE AND SIX SIDE CHAIRS, 55 5/8 x 96 1/4 x 53 1/2”, TABLE: OAK, LEADED COLORED AND OPAQUE GLASS, CERAMIC; CHAIRS: OAK WITH (REPLACEMENT) LEATHER SLIP SEAT, UNIVERSITY TRANSFER 2. BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903-1975), CURVED FORM (WAVE II), 1959, 15 3/4 x 18”, PAINTED CAST BRONZE WITH STEEL RODS, THE JOEL STARRELS, JR. MEMORIAL COLLECTION 3. HENRY MOORE (18981986), TWO FIGURES, 1939, 22 x 15”, PENCIL, CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK, AND PASTEL ON WOVE PAPER, THE JOEL STARRELS, JR. MEMORIAL COLLECTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


The Art Institute of Chicago

T

THE ART INSTITUTE OF

Info

Chicago ranks among the city’s most-visited museums and houses one of the finest art collections in the world, offering visitors a rich cultural experience that is not to be missed. The Institute was founded nearly 125 years ago, and has grown through adversity, having originally been built on the rubble of the 1871 Chicago fires. Today, the Institute houses a myriad of exhibits and permanent collections which include THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO www.artinstituteofchicago.org 111 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60603 312.443.3600

prints and drawings, an internationally acclaimed collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, sculptures, photographs, Asian, African and American arts, architectural drawings, textiles and more. Highlights from the collection include such masterpieces as Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks, Grant Wood’s American Gothic, Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, and Pablo Picasso’s The Old Guitarist to name a few. The museum also has an elegant restaurant and courtyard café (open June-Sept). O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

ChicagoChicagoChicago

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : CHICAGO

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. EDWARD HOPPER
(1882-1967), NIGHTHAWKS, 1942, OIL ON CANVAS,
33 1/8 x 60”,
S.L.R. EDWARD HOPPER,
FRIENDS OF AMERICAN ART COLLECTION 2. SALVADOR DALÍ
(1904–1989), VENUS DE MILO WITH DRAWERS, 1936, PAINTED PLASTER WITH METAL PULLS & MINK POMPOMS,
38 5/8 x 12 3/4 x 13 3/8”, THROUGH PRIOR GIFT OF MRS. GILBERT W. CHAPMAN, © 2008 SALVADOR DALI, GALASALVADOR DALI FOUNDATION / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY, NY 3. GRANT WOOD
(1891-1942), AMERICAN GOTHIC, 1930, OIL ON BEAVER BOARD,
 30 3/4 x 25 3/4”,
FRIENDS OF AMERICAN ART COLLECTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

c om

J

u n e

/J

u ly

2010

87


V

on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Chicago

A gallery tour. . .

BRING ON THE GAL L E R I E S ! Often called the “Second

City” to New York, Chicago has thriving gallery districts that prove this city to be anything but. From glass sculpture to black-and-white vintage photography to modern and contemporary painting and sculpture, Chicago’s art galleries feature a myriad of genres with an appeal to novice collectors, as well as to the more seasoned. This so-called “Second City” demonstrates that not only is it first class when it comes to the world of art, but it has a warmer, more inviting feel for visitors who appreciate art. Chicago’s galleries present the works of some of the most important and innovative artists. From the lesser known to the renowned Masters, collectors and enthusiasts of fine art can expect the best the art world has to offer. On the following pages, On View presents a listing of Chicago’s most distinctive galleries. O n V iew

Jay Pritzker Pavilion, © City of Chicago / GRC; postcard courtesy of www.ChicagoPostcardMuseum.org OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010 2010

89


hicagoChicagoChicag

90

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • C H I C A G O : A gallery tour

River North Area


BELLOC LOWNDES

HABATAT

FINE ART

GALLERIES

www.belloclowndes.com

www.habatatchicago.com

ADDINGTON GALLERY

226 West Superior St.

222 West Superior St.

www.addingtongallery.com

312.266.2222

312.440.0288

CATHERINE EDELMAN


JEAN ALBANO GALLERY


GALLERY

www.jeanalbano-artgallery.com

ALAN KOPPEL GALLERY

www.edelmangallery.com

215 West Superior St.

www.alankoppel.com

300 West Superior St.

312.440.0770

210 West Chicago Ave.

312.266.2350

Modern & contemporary art

704 North Wells St.

Contemporary art

312.664.3406

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

312.640.0730

Contemporary art

Contemporary art JOSEF GLIMER

DAVID WEINBERG

GALLERIES

ALDO CASTILLO

GALLERY

www.josefglimergallery.com

GALLERY

www.davidweinberggallery.com

207 West Superior St.

www.artaldo.com

300 West Superior St.

312.787.4640

675 North Franklin St.

312.529.5090

Contemporary art

Masters, modern & contemporary art

GALERY KH

KEN SAUNDERS GALLERY

ANDREW BAE GALLERY

http://gallerykh.com

www.marxsaunders.com

www.andrewbaegallery.com

311 West Superior St.

230 West Superior St.

300 West Superior St.

312.642.0202

312.573.1400

GRUEN

MELANEE COOPER

ANN NATHAN GALLERY

GALLERIES

GALLERY

www.annnathangallery.com

www.gruengalleries.com

www.melaneecoopergallery.com

212 West Superior St.

226 West Superior St.

740 North Franklin St.

312.664.6622

312.337.6262

312.202.9305

312.337.2536

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

312.335.8601

Contemporary Asian art

Contemporary art OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

Contemporary art .

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

Glass sculpture


Contemporary art


hicagoChicagoChicag

92

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • C H I C A G O : A gallery tour River North Area continued...

19th & 20th century impressionist & modern art

MONGERSON GALLERIES
 www.mongersongalleries.com

704 North Wells St.

ZG GALLERY www.zollaliebermangallery.com

300 West Superior St. 312.654.9900

312.943.2354

Contemporary art

ROY BOYD

19th & 20th century and contemporary art

GALLERY


NICOLE GALLERY


www.royboydgallery.com

ZOLLA / LIEBERMAN

739 North Wells St.

GALLERY

312.642.1606

www.zollaliebermangallery.com

Contemporary art

www.nicolegallery.com

230 West Huron St.

325 West Huron St. 312.944.1990

312.787.7716

Contemporary art

SCHNEIDER

Contemporary art

GALLERY schneidergallerychicago.com


ZYGMAN

PERIMETER

230 West Superior St.

VOSS GALLERY

GALLERY


312.988.4033

www.zygmanvossgallery.com

www.perimetergallery.com

Contemporary photography

210 West Superior St.

312.266.9473

STEPHEN DAITER

Contemporary art

312.787.3300

GALLERY www.stephendaitergallery.com

PORTALS

230 West Superior St.

GALLERY

312-787-3350

20th century American & European photography

www.portalsgallery.com

742 North Wells St. 312.642.1066

Contemporary art

222 West Superior St.

17th-20th century masters & contemporary art

South Loop Area, Michigan Avenue, & River East ATLAS

VALE CRAFT

GALLERIES

RICHARD NORTON

GALLERY

www.atlasgalleries.com

GALLERIES


www.valecraftgallery.com

535 North Michigan Ave.

www.richardnortongallery.com

230 West Superior St.

800.423.7635

612 Merchandise Mart Plaza

312.337.3525


Contemporary fine craft

312.644.8855 OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

Master prints & contemporary art


Konrad Winter:

Getarnte Landschaft / Riverastrand A

v

q

r A 33.5 x 59

h

Bill Durgin:

Still Life II -Pr

h

K

kE r 30 x 64

r h

,I

312-226-3444 | www.patrajdas.com by


hicagoChicagoChicag

94

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • C H I C A G O : A gallery tour South Loop Area, Michigan Avenue, & River East continued...

312.664.0090

COLLETTI GALLERY

Period & contemporary art

www.collettigallery.com

67 East Oak St. 312.664.6767


SPENCER WEISZ GALLERIES, LTD.
 www.spencerweisz.com

843 West Chicago Ave.

Antique posters & decorative arts

312.527.9420

OGILVIE / PERTL GALLERY www.opgallery.com

DONALD YOUNG

435 East Illinois St.

GALLERY


312.321.0750

Contemporary art

www.donaldyoung.com

224 South Michigan Ave.

Original European vintage posters VALERIE CARBERRY GALLERY

312.322.3600

Contemporary art

POSTER

www.valeriecarberry.com

PLUS


875 North Michigan Ave.

www.posterplus.com

312.397.9990

HILDT GALLERIES


200 South Michigan Ave.

www.hildtgalleries.com

312.461.9277

Original vintage & fine art posters

617 North State St. 312.255.0005

19th & 20th century British, European & American art

RICHARD

Contemporary art

West Loop, Pilsen Area & The Chicago Arts District


GRAY GALLERY
 www.richardgraygallery.com

4ART, INC.


HILLIGOSS

875 North Michigan Ave.

www.4artinc.com

GALLERIES


312.642.8877

1029 West 35th St.

Contemporary art

www.hilligossgalleries.com

520 North Michigan Ave. 312.755.0300

KAMP GALLERY

140 East Walton St. Ma

g a z i n e

FINE ART


CARRIE SECRIST

www.rosenthalfineart.com

GALLERY


3 East Huron St.

www.secristgallery.com

312.475.0700

835 West Washington Blvd.

20th century American & European art

www.kampgallery.com

i e w

Contemporary art

ROSENTHAL

Masters & contemporary art

OnV

773.254.5100

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

312.491.0917

Contemporary art


ART GALLERY / CUSTOM FRAMING / GRAPHIC & WEB DESIGN


hicagoChicagoChicag

96

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • C H I C A G O : A gallery tour West Loop, Pilsen Area & The Chicago Arts District continued...

DOUGLAS

www.lindawarrengallery.com

THOMAS ROBERTELLO

DAWSON

1052 West Fulton Market

GALLERY

GALLERY

312.432.9500

www.thomasrobertello.com

www.douglasdawson.com

Contemporary art

400 North Morgan St.

312.226.7975

MARS

Historic & contemporary art

939 West Randolph St. 312.421.1587

Contemporary art

GALLERY


Contemporary art

North, Bucktown, & Wicker Park Area

MCCORMICK

CHICAGO

GALLERY


ART SOURCE


www.thomasmccormick.com

www.chicagoartsource.com

835 West Washington Blvd.

1871 North Clybourn Ave.

312.226.6800

773.248.3100

www.kasiakaygallery.com

PETER MILLER

MADRON GALLERY OF

215 North Aberdeen St.

GALLERY

AMERICAN ART

312-944-0408

www.petermillergallery.com

www.madrongallery.com

118 North Peoria St.

1000 West North Ave.

312.951.1700

312.640.1302

www.kavigupta.com

RHONA

THOMAS MASTERS

835 West Washington Blvd.

HOFFMAN

GALLERY

312.432.0708

GALLERY

www.thomasmastersgallery.com

www.rhoffmangallery.com

245 West North Ave.

118 North Peoria St.

312.440 2322

www.marsgallery.com

1139 West Fulton Market 312.226.7808

FUNCTION + ART
 www.functionart.com

1046 West Fulton Market 312.243.2780

Contemporary objects, furniture & sculpture

Contemporary art

KASIA KAY

Contemporary art

ART PROJECTS

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

KAVI GUPTA

Contemporary art

GALLERY


Contemporary art

312.455.1990

LINDA WARREN

Contemporary art

GALLERY
 OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

u n e

/Ju

ly

2010

Contemporary art O n V iew


ADS ADVERTISE with us...

V

on iew M A G A Z I N E

...we’ve got the PERFECT SPOT for you. F O R I N F O R M AT I O N , C O N T A C T :

advertising@onviewmagazine.com

On View 06-07.2010  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you