Page 1

V

on iew FLORIDA

APRIL/ JUNE 2016

INSIDE...

Will

COTTON

& Steve

AT

LOTZ

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

+ Art

SPACES

REDEFINING

F L O R I D A’ S V I S U A L A R T EXPERIENCE


CONTENTS A p r i l /Ju n e

2016

Vo l . 7, N o . 1

RIGHT : WILL COTTON, ICING, 2014, OIL ON LINEN, 72 x 80”. PRIVATE COLLECTION. BELOW: WILL COTTON, ELLE WITH CUPCAKES, 2014, OIL ON LINEN, 36 x 24”. COLLECTION OF RITA AND JEFFREY ADLER, WINTER PARK. Images © Will Cotton, courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery,

V

New York.

on iew FLORIDA

APRIL/ JUNE 2016

INSIDE...

Will

COTTON

& Steve

AT

LOTZ

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

Art

+

SPACES

REDEFINING

F L O R I D A’ S V I S U A L A R T EXPERIENCE

34 Orlando

WILL COTTON + STEVE LOTZ

Orlando Museum of Art simultaneously presents The InFlux Series: Will Cotton and The Sources: Paintings and Drawings by Steve Lotz, featuring Cotton’s seductive imagery composed of sugary delights and Lotz’s dream-like visions of transcendent metaphysical realms. 2

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50

68 Ocala

80 Orlando

92 Bradenton

REDEFINING

IN TRANSITION

Pop Art comes to The Mennello Museum of American Art in a blockbuster exhibition featuring dazzling prints on loan from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s permanent collection.

THE HUMAN IMPACT

ART SPACES:

DIGNITY: TRIBES

FLORIDA’S VISUAL ART EXPERIENCE

Many fine art institutions in Florida are growing to meet new demand, and we have chosen to showcase three that have dynamic new plans for architecture and stimulating ideas for the 21st century.

POP ART PRINTS

The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida presents an exquisite photography exhibition by Dana Gluckstein honoring Indigenous Peoples worldwide.

CHANGING WATERS: ON FLORIDA’S

AQUATIC SYSTEMS

Lynne Buchanan’s breathtaking photographs on view at the South Florida Museum brings to light new perspectives on the use and conservation of Florida’s aquatic ecosystems.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ARTIST RENDERING OF THE PROPOSED NORTON MUSEUM OF ART, DESIGNED BY FOSTER + PARTNERS, COURTESY OF FOSTER + PARTNERS; DANA GLUCKSTEIN, SAMBURU GIRL,KENYA, 1985;

102 Coral Springs

ROBERT INDIANA, LOVE, 1967. SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM,

ABOUT FACE: THE ART OF JOTA RIGHT: JOTA LEAL PHOTOGRAPHED WITH HIS MONUMENTAL WORK, THE PERSISTENCE OF DALÍ.

GIFT OF LOUIS AND LINDA KAPLAN,

Coral Springs Museum of Art hosts the first major solo exhibition of whimsical and incisive portraits by Venezuela-born painter, Jota Leal. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

© 2016 MORGAN ART FOUNDATION/ ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY; LYNNE BUCHANAN, GLOWING VINES, LOXAHATCHEE RIVER.

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

3


CONTENTS A p r i l /Ju n e

2016

Vo l u m e

7,

No.

6

COMMENTARY

1

112

FOCUS

Charles McGill: Front Line, Back Nine at Boca Raton Museum of Art.

114

16

FORM

Carole Feuerman: Still Life at Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida.

CALENDAR

Special exhibitions.

32

116

GALLERY

A selection of gallery exhibitions and artists.

PROFILE

Kenton Parker: Everything Counts in Small Amounts at Art MUSE and Culture Center / SHAWN HALL: RECENT WORKS Hollywood.

8

PICTURED: shawn hall, untitled (floater), image detail, acrylic on clayboard, 30 x 30”.

4

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

Armory Art Center in Palm Beach will be hosting an exhibition featuring Shawn Hall, whose paintings embrace the ebb and flow of the natural world. Hall will also create a site-specific installation, Species Act, with collaboration from the artists enrolled in her unique master artist workshop. .

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

118

SPOTLIGHT

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings at Pensacola Museum of Art.


Spring graduating artiStS Exhibition M U S E U M o f F I N E A RT S

April 8-28, 2016 Reception: April 8, 6-8pm

Once again as the semester draws to a close, the Museum provides the forum for young artists taking their first opportunities to display the achievements of their academic course of study in studio art. The BFA and MFA students exhibit a range of media and styles for their joyous exit show.

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

For more information on the Studio Art Program at FSU visit: www.art.fsu.edu

Jon Nalon, Excess Extended, lamp.

May 20-July 1, 2016 Reception: May 20, 6-8pm

The Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts Artists’ League was formed over two decades ago as an informal group of local artists. The purpose was to share information and to assist each other in locating galleries and / or exhibitions where League members could promote their work. For more information or to become a member visit: www.artistsleaguefsu.org

MUSEUM HOURS Monday-Friday 9-4, Saturday & Sunday, 1-4 Weekend hours may vary in May and June so please check our website for updates.

TOURS For tours and school or community groups please call (850)-645-4681 530 West Call Street 250 Fine Arts Building www.MoFA.fsu.edu • 850-644-6836

William Morris, Little Big Mountain, 2014 Best of Show.

ADMISSION IS ALWAYS FREE May 20-July 1, 2016 Reception: May 20, 6-8pm

The Tallahassee Watercolor Society provides members with workshops, meetings, and also sponsors a regional water media juried exhibition each Spring. Members who reside in the tristate area of Florida, Alabama, and Georgia are eligible to enter and participate in the exhibition. For more information or to become a member visit: tallahasseewatercolorsociety.com


V

C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew M A G A Z I N E

S pring allergies aside , it ’ s a wonderful time of year here in Florida as our landscapes brighten with color and the air fills with delightful scents from seasonal blooms. Our cover story is simply bursting with color and seductive imagery composed of “sugary delights” and “dreamlike visions of transcendent metaphysical realms”—The InFlux Series: Will Cotton Will & Steve and The Sources: Paintings + Art and Drawings by Steve Lotz (starting on pg. 34) transport viewers far from the pedestrian realities of everyday life. As Spring typically signifies a time of growth, we thought it fitting to highlight the ambitious expansion projects taking place at three of Florida’s premier fine art venues. Contributing writer, Richard Reep, reports on these exciting new developments in Art Spaces (on pg. 50). As Richard notes in the article, “It’s a good time for museums in Florida, and the future holds even greater promise for visual arts venues.” We wholeheartedly agree—and hope you will too as we introduce this season’s vibrant new shows!

V

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

on iew FLORIDA

Paul Atwood

APRIL/ JUNE 2016

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s

INSIDE...

COTTON

LOTZ

AT

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

Adver tising

SPACES

Advertising Account Representative

REDEFINING

F L O R I D A’ S V I S U A L A R T EXPERIENCE

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com Advertising

advertising.onviewmagazine@gmail.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com

6

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


MUSE On view

04.23.16-05.14.16

Shawn

HALL +

RECENT WORKS

S P E C I E S A C T: Installation by Shawn Hall & Workshop Participants a t ARMORY ART CENTER, Palm Beach w w w. a r m o r y a r t . o r g

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

9


S MUSE

SHAWN HALL IS A NEW ORLEANS-BASED

interdisciplinary visual artist/painter who views her practice as an act of participation in the biological world through intuition and action. As a visual artist, she observes and imagines the natural world in its various facets, often from an up-close and even microscopic point of view. Working from the premise that everything is an event in nature—her field work, her painting, her walking, her breathing—everything connects her to the larger world. To Shawn, what exists in this world within and without us is teaming with biological drama that we are just a small part of. To a large extent, her work is a kind of homage to this fact. Previous spread: Untitled (Floater), acrylic on clayboard, 30

x

30”.

Opposite: Untitled (Spring Pop), acrylic on clayboard, 30 x 30”.

10

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


“Shawn Hall’s abstract paintings are fixed animations—freeze frames of nonstatic blobs, shafts, bubbles, coils, cells, and transparent cavities floating, pulsing, dripping, stabbing, and emanating from their own spaces to construct new worlds. These objects or subjects live somewhere between the realm of fantasy and pseudoscience and leave us wondering if we are looking with a microscopic or macroscopic lens.” curator , art

—R honda L ane C oleman , director , and arts entrepreneur

Armory Art Center in Palm Beach will be hosting the exhibition, Shawn Hall: Recent Works, showcasing a selection of the artist’s most recent 2D works. Coinciding with this exhibition, Hall will create a site-specific installation, Species Act, with collaboration from the artists enrolled in her unique, four-day visiting master Above: Untitled (Bloom Occasion), acrylic on clayboard, 30 x 30”. Opposite: Untitled (Euphoric Seed Event), acrylic on clayboard, 30 x 30”.

12

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


MUSE

artist workshop, Site Specific Installation: Visual Art and Environmental Awareness. Visitors will be able to view both the exhibition and installation, which will be on view from April, 23 through May 14, 2016. “Shawn Hall’s painting is a reminder of the continuous unfolding of creation and loss that surrounds us daily,” wrote David Houston, executive director, The Bo Bartlett Center, College of the Arts, Columbus State University, in an essay about the artist. “Her seductive, organic fields of color embrace the slow but steady flux that is often overlooked in the gloss of everyday life. In embracing the ephemeral, Hall’s paintings are parallel representations of the ebb and flow of the natural world…Shawn Hall’s lyrical paintings remind us that words, concepts, and images are but sophisticated points of reference to an intangible, everchanging world that may be briefly captured in thought and image, but ultimately


Shawn Hall works within a studio practice that encompasses drawing, video, performance, and interdisciplinary and site-specific installations such as Pastoral Universe (pictured above). Photo: Shawn Hall.

14

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


MUSE

represent an ongoing process of continuity and change that is at the very center of the mystery of life itself.” Born in Ann Arbor, MI, Shawn Hall has lived and worked in New Orleans since 1997. She holds an MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art where she was a Patricia Harris Fellow, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and an AS in Science from Delta College in MI. She has been in residence at School 33 in Baltimore, LMCC in NYC, 18th Street Art Center in LA, the Santa Fe Art Institute, and Isidore Newman School in New Orleans. Exhibitions include the Contemporary Art Center and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans; Wolfson Gallery at Miami Dade, FL; N.A.M.E. in Chicago; The Hewitt Gallery and Bronx River Art Center in NYC; Van Brunt Gallery in Beacon, NY; G.U.M+D Gallery in Dallas, TX; Williams Tower Gallery in Houston, TX; The Red Arrow in Nashville, TN; and Chateau de La Napoule in Mandelieu, France. Her work has been reviewed nationally in Art Papers, New Art Examiner, dialogue, Hyperallergic and Pelican Bomb. She is a part of the permanent collection of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans, Linklaters Corporate collection in NYC, and numerous private collections throughout the United States and Europe. Shawn Hall is represented by Cole Pratt Gallery in New Orleans, and The Red Arrow in Nashville, TN. On View Top: Shawn Hall, self portrait. Bottom: Installation in progress—Shawn Hall’s workshops provide students with a collaborative, hands-on experience building site-specific installations. Photo: Bear Hebert.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

15


{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

of Florida Art

Warhol Prints from the Collection of Marc Bell

and Culture

(See both stories

www.mofac.org

in the January/

Thru 04.28.16

March 2016 issue

Visions of Florida: The Photographic Art of Clyde Butcher

on pg. 130.)

AVON PARK SFSC Museum

05.17.16–07.03.16

Jane Benson: Finding Baghdad

BOCA RATON Boca Raton

BRADENTON

Museum of Art

www.bocamuseum.org

South Florida

04.21.16–07.03.16

Museum

Arnold Newman: Master Class

www.southfloridamuseum.org Thru 06.05.16

+

Charles McGill: Front Line, Back Nine (See story on pg. 112.)

Thru 04.24.16

Thru 05.01.16

Figurative Landscapes: Photographs from the Collection

Bob Colacello: In and Out with Andy

+

Lynne Buchanan: Changing Waters (See story on pg. 92.)

Image from Charles McGill: Front Line, Back Nine at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Charles McGill, Arthur Negro II, 2007-10, mixed media, 7 x 5 x 5 ft., courtesy of Bill and Pamela Royall, Try-Me Collection, Richmond, Va.

16

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

CORAL GABLES Fairchild Tropical

{ P g. 2 o f 1 6 }

Yuroz: Symbiosis

CORALS SPRINGS

DAYTONA

Botanic Garden

Coral Springs

www.fairchildgarden.org

Museum of Art

Thru 04.30.16

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Museum of Arts

Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden

Thru 05.27.16

& Sciences

Angie Jordan

www.moas.org

Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Africa: Up Close and Personal Thru 04.24.16

BEACH

+

Jim Jinkins: The World According to Jim

Midway: Portrait of a Daytona Beach Neighborhood

Thru Spring 2016

Thru 05.31.16

Forms of Fancy: Sculptures from the MOAS Collection

Coast Guard Paintings

www.lowemuseum.org

+

Thru 07.17.16

Jota Leal: About Face

Dürer to Rubens: Northern European Art from the Bass Museum of Art

(See story on pg. 102.)

Thru 04.17.16

+

Dr. Harry Moulis­—

Thru 06.12.16

Pacific Exotics: The Woodblock Prints of Paul Jacoulet

Thru 07.02.16

Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World Thru 07.31.16

David Hayes: Small Sculpture and Gouache Studies

+

The Noblest Feature: The Eye Paintings of J. McGuinness Myers Image from Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables: Clyde Butcher, Shell Key 1, Florida Keys.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

17


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 6 }

Daytona Beach continued...

Southeast Museum

www.oldschoolsquare.org

of Photography

Thru 04.17.16

www.smponline.org

WILD: A Group Art Exhibit

Thru 04.16.16

Richard Sexton— Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast

(See story in the January/ March 2016 issue on pg. 124.)

+

04.28.16–07.31.16

The Civil Rights Movement Revisited: Three Portfolios from the Permanent Collection

LIT Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Thru 05.15.16

www.morikami.org

Fred Stein—In Exile: Paris and New York

Thru 05.08.16

Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World

+

Gary Metz— Quaking Aspen

+

D e LAND

Concealed and Revealed

Frank Rampolla: The Figure

Museum of Art– DeLand, Florida

+

www.moartdeland.org

Jack Levine & Hyman Bloom: Against the Grain

04.08.16–07.03.16

DELRAY

06.10.16–09.18.16

Shadows of the Floating Worlds: Paper Cuts by Hiromi Moneyhun

BEACH

+

Old School

Transcending Forms: Japanese Bamboo Baskets

Carole Feuerman: Body of Work

04.29.16–07.10.16

Square /Cornell

(See story on pg. 114.)

Syd Solomon:

Art Museum

Image from LIT at Old School Square/Cornell Art Museum, Delray Beach: Mark Khaisman, The Lady with the Bag.

18

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

DUNEDIN

{ P g. 4 o f 1 6 }

Italy and High Fashion 1945-1968

Dunedin Fine Art Center

Thru 07.03.16

www.dfac.org

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

Thru 04.17.16

Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society

Thru 08.07. 16

06.28.16–11.27.16

William J. Glackens: A Modernist in the Making

Mirror, Mirror... Portraits of Frida Kahlo Thru 07.17.16

Framing Nature: The Living World in Art

GAINESVILLE Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

Thru 09.18.16

Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection

Thru 05.15.16

Thru 10.02.16

Thru 06.05.16

DFAC Faculty and Member Exhibitions

Chuck Close Photographs

Michael Kenna: Haiku

06.03.16–08.21.16

Ingenius/Indigenous

+

HOLLYWOOD

Le Papier

+

Art and

Pulp Fiction

Culture Center

+

of Hollywood

On Your Mark

www.artandculturecenter.org 04.09.16–05.29.16

Nereida Garcia-Ferraz: As Close As You Want

FORT LAUDERDALE

+

Ruben Millares: Mother Pages

NSU Art Museum / Fort Lauderdale

www.nsuartmuseum.org

+

Thru 06.05.16

Sara Stites: New Work

+

Bellissima:

Image from Bellissima: Italy and High Fashion 1945-1968 at NSU Art Museum /Fort Lauderdale: Sorelle Fontana model alongside the hand of the colossal statue of Constantine in the courtyard of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, 1952. Photograph by Regina Relang, courtesy Archiv Relang, Sammlung Photographs, Munchner Stadmuseum. This image was part of a feature published in La Donna, June 1952.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

19


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 6 }

Holly wood continued...

www.mocajacksonville.unf.edu 04.04.16–07.31.16

Rock Paper Scissors: The Printmaking Process Thru 05.15.16

In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

+

Time Zones: James Rosenquist and Printmaking at the Millennium Grisel Ors: Out of the Woods

continued... Art and

Carmen Tiffany: The Teeth Beneath My Feet

+

Culture Center of Hollywood

06.11.16–08.21.16

www.artandculturecenter.org

Kenton Parker: Everything Counts in Small Amounts

04.09.16–05.29.16

Jean-Paul Mallozzi: Familiars

+

Aurora Molina: Selfie

JACKSONVILLE

(See story on pg. 116.)

MOCA

+

Jacksonville

06.04.16–09.04.16

Confronting the Canvas: Women of Abstraction Thru 06.26.16

Project Atrium: Shinique Smith

Image from In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation at MOCA Jacksonville: Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Flowers, 1970. Screenprint, 38 1/8 x 38 1/8”, 2006.161. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

20

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 6 o f 1 6 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

The Cummer

Opening 06.14.16

www.polkmuseumofart.org

05.07.16–05.08.16

Museum of Art

Lift: Contemporary Responses to Jacksonville’s African American Heritage

04.09.16–07.03.16

Mayfaire by-the-Lake Art Festival

& Gardens

www.cummer.org Thru 04.17.16

Archipenko: A Modern Legacy

Thru 10.02.16

Thru 05.01.16

David Hayes: The Sentinel Series

Julien De Casabianca: The Outings Project

LAKELAND

Thru 05.15.16

Polk Museum

Rockwell Kent

of Art

Rebels with a Cause Thru 04.16.16

Some Things Contemporary

MAITLAND Art & History Museums,

Thru 04.23.16

Maitland

Another America: Contemporary Latin American Art from the Permanent Collection

www.artandhistory.org Thru 05.01.16

ART31-Material World: Glass Rubber & Paper


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 6 }

Maitland continued... Thru 05.31.16

Sylvie Fleury 06.07.16–07.10.16

John Salvest ICA Miami

www.icamiami.org 06.03.16–10.30.16

Laura Lima Thru 06.12.16

John Miller 07.08.16–10.30.16

Renaud Jerez continued...

Thru 05.15.16

Art & History

Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers

Museums, Maitland

www.artandhistory.org

05.21.16–08.06.16

05.11.16–07.03.16

Ray Turner: Population

Interacting with the Permanent Collection

+

05.28.16–08.27.16

Ida Applebroog

Radical Elements (by Studio Art Quilt Associates)

MDC Museum of

MIAMI

Textile Arts

http://textiles.fit.edu

Bass Museum of Art

Foosaner

Thru 05.07.16

www.bassmuseum.org

Art Museum

Reimagined: Innovations in Fiber

04.26.16–05.29.16

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Susan Te Kahurangi King

+

Art + Design

www.mdcmoad.org

The Ruth Funk Center for

MELBOURNE

by Alex Trimino and Carrie Sieh

Emmett Moore

Thru 07.17.16

Implied Interaction: Selected works from the CINTAS Foundation Fellows Collection

Image from Laura Lima at ICA Miami: Laura Lima, The Naked Magician, 2008/10/13, exhibition view, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, photo: FBM studio, courtesy of the artist and A Gentile Carioca, Rio de Janeiro.

22

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued... Thru 07.31.16

Thru 05.29.16

Pérez Art

Thru 04.24.16

A Patch of Blue: Illustrations of Oscar Wilde’s The Ballad of Reading Gaol

Acta Non Verba: The Art of Marielle Plaisir

Museum Miami 04.22.16–07.17.16

Carlos Alfonzo: Clay Works and Painted Ceramics

Doris Salcedo

Thru 05.29.16

06.16.16–09.04.16

Intersectionality

www.pamm.org

Project Gallery: León & Cociña

Thru 08.21.16

Recent Acquisitions + Highlights from the MDC Permanent Art Collection

Thru 06.26.16

Project Gallery: Romare Bearden

Thru 08.28.16

Childhood Memories from the Other Side of the Water: Photographs by Eduardo Del Valle

Thru 08.21.16

Project Gallery: Sheela Gowda Thru 09.11.16

+

Michele Oka Doner: How I Caught a Swallow in Mid-Air

75 Years of EFE Images: Wars, Triumphs, Disasters, People and Politics

+

Thru 11.13.16

The Exile Experience: A Journey to Freedom

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: A Universe of Fragile Mirrors

Museum of Contemporary Art,

Thru 01.15.17

North Miami

Project Gallery: Matthew Ronay

www.mocanomi.org

Image from Project Gallery: Matthew Ronay at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Matthew Ronay, Janus, 2015, Basswood, plastic, steel, dye, and gouache, 52 x 25 x 18”, courtesy the artist; Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; and Nils Stærk, Copenhagen.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

23


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued...

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu 04.04.16–05.01.16

Aesthetics and Values: The Honors College Thru 04.17.16

The Art of Video Games: Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum The Wolfsonian–FIU

www.wolfsonian.org Thru 05.06.16–08.21.16

Promising Paradise: Cuban Allure, American Seduction A Visual Jazz Affair

06.20.16–08.05.16

www.artisnaples.org Thru 04.20.16

Members’ Gallery— World Piece (Fill in the Blank)

The von Liebig

+

Pictures in Process: Photography by Naples Art Association Members

Art Center

Best of All Worlds

www.naplesart.org

+

Your Choice 2016

Ewa Tarsia: PaintingForest and ForestDot

04.29.16–06.03.16

Journeys: Real or Imagined

The Baker Museum,

Thru 06.19.16

Artis—Naples

Naples Collects

+

NAPLES Naples Art Association at

Ignacio Alperin:

+

Florida Contemporary

+

Image from Florida Contemporary at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: Gay Germain, Sculpture Garden Conversation #14, acrylic, oil, and graphite on canvas wrapped panel, 30 x 30”, courtesy of the artist.

24

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 6 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . . Thru 07.24.16

Dawn’s Forest: The Sculpture of Louise Nevelson Thru 07.31.16

New Acquisitions: In Context— From the Collection of Paul and Charlotte Corddry

Photographs by Bruce Mozert and others

Thru 05.01.16

ORLANDO

Patrick Dougherty: Stickwork

Orange County Regional History Ctr.

04.30.16–07.31.16

(See story in

www.thehistorycenter.org

Norman Rockwell: The Man Behind the Canvas

the January/

Thru 05.29.16

March 2016

Art Legends of Orange County: Albin Polasek

issue on pg. 64.)

+

Photographer Sans Frontières: A Retrospective of Harry De Zitter

OCALA Appleton Museum of Art

www.appletonmuseum.org 04.22.16–06.19.16

Dignity: Tribes in Transition (See story on pg. 68.) Thru 04.24.16

Paradise Park Remembered: Image from Norman Rockwell: The Man Behind the Canvas at Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida in Ocala: Norman Rockwell in his studio, sitting in a study for Triple Self Portrait in 1960. Louis Lamone, Black and White Photo.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

25


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 6 }

Orlando continued...

Forged Works

Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

06.10.16–09.11.16

Thru 04.24.16

Pop Art Prints

Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment

(See story on pg. 80.)

05.14.16–08.07.16

Ormond

2016 Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art

Memorial

ORMOND BEACH

Art Museum & Gardens

www.ormondartmuseum.org Thru 06.05.16

Thru 04.16.16

The InFlux Series: Will Cotton

Sci-Fi Jumbo

(See story on pg.34.)

06.03.16–09.18.16

+

Garten Celebration

The Sources: Paintings and Drawings By Steve Lotz

PALM BEACH

(See story on pg. 46.)

The Henry Morrison Flagler

The Mennello

Museum

Museum of

www.flaglermuseum.us

American Art

Thru 04.17.16

www.mennellomuseum.com

Beauty’s Legacy: Gilded Age Portraits in America

Thru 05.15.16

Albert Paley:

Image from The Sources: Paintings and Drawings By Steve Lotz at Orlando Museum of Art: Steve Lotz,Two Male Deities Totem, 1970, wax pencil and spray paint on paper mounted onto foam core, 90.5 x 46.25”. Collection of the artist, © Steve Lotz, image courtesy of the artist. This exhibition has been organized by the Orlando Museum of Art in conjunction with the community-wide celebration, Art Legends of Orange County.

26

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 6 }

Pa l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Juried Exhibition

06.10.16–09.17.16

Thru 04.08.16

www.fourarts.org

04.22.16–07.16.16

Thru 04.17.16

The Artist Revealed: Artist Portraits and Self-Portraits

Highlights from the Permanent Collection

John Bunker & Brian Frus: Natural Currents

The Society of the Four Arts

Power & Piety: Spanish Colonial Art

PENSACOLA

04.22.16–08.27.16

Pensacola

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings

Museum of Art

(See story on pg. 118.)

www.pensacolamuseum.org

07.22.16–10.08.16

Mary Petty: The Life and Art of Mary Petty

04.15.16–05.27.16

PONTE VEDRA

+

BEACH

Thru 04.15.16

Thru 06.04.16

The Cultural Center

Annual Members

Tschacbasov: Inner Visions

www.ccpvb.org

Sharon Booma: Collection of Impulses Unmasked: Art with a Heart in Healthcare


C A L E N D A R

SARASOTA

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 6 }

the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Circus Posters Across Europe

The John and Mable Ringling

05.20.16–09.25.16

Thru 10.06.16

Museum of Art

Exposure: Naked before the Lens

Walker Guest House Replica

www.ringling.org

www.fine-arts.org 04.20.16–07.10.16

Vanessa Diaz: Beginning at the Cornice, Not the Foundation

Thru 04.17.16

Samurai: The Way of the Warrior

06.17.16–09.25.16

Phantom Bodies: The Human Aura in Art

ST. PETERSBURG

05.07.16–07.31.16

Harold Edgerton: What the Eye Can’t See

Museum of

Thru 05.01.16

Ink, Silk and Gold: Islamic Art from

Thru 06.20.16

Fine Arts,

Thru 05.29.16

Cirque/Cyrk/Cirkus:

St. Petersburg

Contemplating

Image from Vanessa Diaz:Beginning at the Cornice, Not the Foundation at Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Vanessa Diaz, Here is Enticement is Not Always Difficult (installation view), 2014, fabric, wood, salt, glass, iron, Orlando Museum of Art.

28

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 6 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Character: Drawings and Oil Sketches from Jacques-Louis David to Lucian Freud

Candid Moments from the Artist’s Life

Competition 2016

TAMPA Florida Museum of

Tampa Museum

Photographic Arts

of Art

www.fmopa.org

www.tampamuseum.org

+

TALLAHASSEE

The Art of the Classical Guitar

Florida State

04.01.16–06.30.16

Thru 05.15.16

University Museum

Danny Lyon: People

Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape

of Fine Arts Thru 05.01.16

www.mofa.fsu.edu

Thru 06.01.16

Christian Marclay: Telephones and Sound Holes

05.20.16–07.01.16

Gohar Dashti: Iran Untitled and Stateless

06.18.16–10.09.16

Shana Moulton: Journeys Out of the Body

The Artists’ League Annual Summer Salon

+

06.10.16–06.30.16

The Tallahassee Watercolor Society

International Photography

Thru 05.30.16

Public and Private— The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation

The Dalí Museum

www.thedali.org Thru 06.12.16

Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination (See story in the January/March 2016 issue on pg. 76.) Thru Fall 2016

Dalí Revealed: Image from Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape at Tampa Museum of Art: Jaume Plensa, See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil, 2010. Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, 2015. Photo: Dean Dixon, © Jaume Plensa. Courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

29


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 5 o f 1 6 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

continued... Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org 06.10.16–09.11.16

Peter Max: 50 Years of Cosmic Dreaming 06.20.16–09.25.16

Norma Kamali: New City— Fashion+Art+Culture Landscapes and Still Lifes by Heade and his Contemporaries

University

Thru 05.15.16

www.verobeachmuseum.org

of South Florida

Florida Inspired 2016-2017

Thru 05.15.16

Art Museum

+

www.ira.usf.edu

Vernacular Art from the Gadsden Arts Center

(See story in the

06.25.16–09.25.16

January/March 2016

Out of this World: The Art and Artists of NASA

Contemporary

Thru 04.17.16

The Music Box: Tampa Bay

John Baeder’s American Roadside

issue on pg. 40.) 05.29.16–08.28.16

Into the Third Dimension: Sculpture from the Collection

TARPON SPRINGS Leepa-Rattner

VERO BEACH

Museum

Thru 05.22.16

Oscar Bluemner: Selections from the Vera Bluemner Kouba Collection

W. PALM BEACH Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

www.ansg.org

of Art

Vero Beach

Thru 06.05.16

Thru 05.15.16

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Museum of Art

Nature Illuminated:

Art in the Family Tree

Image from John Baeder’s American Roadside at Vero Beach Museum of Art: John Baeder, Trailer, Arizona Route 66, 1975, C Print on Kodak Endura Paper, 20 x 30”. Courtesy of the artist and Thomas Paul Gallery.

30

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 6 o f 1 6 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Armory Art Center

(See story in the January/

www.armoryart.org

March 2016 issue on pg. 52.)

Thru 04.15.16

+

PARK

Still/Moving: Photographs and Video Art from the DeWoody Collection

Cornell Fine Arts

Armory Faculty Show

+

Artists-In-Residence Exhibition

04.16.16–05.15.16

WINTER

2016 Rollins Faculty Exhibition

Museum at

05.21.16–09.04.16

Rollins College

Displacement: Symbols and Journeys

cfam.rollins.edu

04.23.16–05.14.16

The Albin

Shawn Hall: Recent Works / Species Act

Polasek Museum

(See story on pg. 8.)

Gardens

& Sculpture

www.polasek.org Norton

Thru 04.17.16

Museum of Art

Sight Unseen: Touch­able Sculp­ture

www.norton.org Thru 04.24.16

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: I Refuse to be Invisible

04.24.16–04.30.16

Thru 05.15.16

The Charles

Majestic Mountain Retreats: 17th- and 18th-Century Monumental Chinese Landscape

Hosmer Morse

Winter Park Paint Out

Museum of | American Art

www.morsemuseum.org Thru 09.25.16

+

Lifelines: Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau

O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York

O n V iew

Image from O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach : Georgia O’Keeffe, City Night, 1926, oil on canvas, 48 x 30”. Minneapolis Institute of Arts, lent by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, gift of funds from the Regis Corporation, Mr. and Mrs. W. John Driscoll, the Beim Foundation, the Larsen Fund, and by public subscription, West Palm Beach only. Photo: Bridgeman Images / © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

31


MIAMI

Gallery: ArtBastion Gallery www.artbastion.com

Exhibition: SENSE OF PLACE ON VIEW THRU 04.16.16

A group of artists all working within a geographical region that reaches North of London will be showing for the first time in Miami. Each of these works carries a particular resonance that has the potential to transform the new environment in which it is placed.

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

TALLAHASSEE

Gallery: City Hall Gallery www.TallahasseeArts.org

Exhibition: Creative Tallahassee 2016 ON VIEW THRU 04.18.16

Highlighted in this annual multi-media juried exhibition is the work of well-known and emerging local artists. The City Hall Gallery is located at 300 South Adams Street in Tallahassee. Creative Tallahassee 2016 is curated by the Council on Culture & Arts (COCA) and is part of the City of Tallahassee’s Art in Public Places program. Above (left to right): Emma Levine, Miami Hawthorn 5 (detail), Somerset paper, silk, pins, 23 x 23”, courtesy of the artist and ArtBastion Gallery; Steve Coleman, Afternoon Suspension, digital photograph, courtesy of the artist and the Council on Culture & Arts (COCA).

32

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


G A L L E R Y

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery www.jjohnsongallery.com

Exhibition: Carlos Betancourt ON VIEW 04.01.16–05.19.16

J. Johnson Gallery closes its fifteen year run presenting internationally and nationally recognized artists to the north Florida region with an exhibition of work by Miami artist, Carlos Betancourt, one of the first artists to show with the gallery. Both Betancourt’s recently released book with Skira | Rizzoli, Imperfect Utopia, and his retrospective at San Juan’s

LAKE WORTH

Gallery: Cultural Council of Palm Beach County www.palmbeachculture.com

Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico have recently received much acclaim from publications like Interview Magazine and Artforum. For this final exhibition at J. Johnson Gallery, the artist will be presenting a series of his newest photographs as well as some larger wall works and two installation pieces.

Exhibition: SOMETHING OUT OF NOTHING ON VIEW THRU 05.21.16

This show reflects creation and innovation through artwork that moves the viewer to explore ideas, challenge opinions, and see new perspectives.

Above left (top to bottom): Carlos Betancourt, Amulet for Light I (gold), 2012, 72 x 110”, edition of 2; and Re-Collections X (X-ray), 2011, print on fine art paper, 49.5 x 49.5”, edition 3/3, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery. Above right: Rod Faulds, Orange Mesh Fence Trees I, courtesy of the artist and Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

33


Will COTTON

On view thru

06.05.16

at

ORLAND

Giverny Flanpond, 2014, oil on linen, 48 x 72 in. Š Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.


N

+ Steve

LOTZ

O MUSEUM o f ART w w w . o m a r t . o r g OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

35


Orlando Museum of Art simultaneously presents The InFlux Series: Will Cotton and The Sources: Paintings and Drawings by Steve Lotz, featuring Cotton’s seductive imagery composed of sugary delights and Lotz’s dream-like visions of transcendent metaphysical realms.

W WILL COTTON’S PAINTINGS DEPICT

astonishing worlds in which beautiful women are sur-

Candy Heart, 2015, oil on linen, 48 x 36 in. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.

36

OnV

i e w

rounded by and adorned with an abundance of sug-

ary desserts. These appear to be utopian realms where

all desires are indulged without guilt or consequence. The vivid and flawless naturalism of Cotton’s painting makes these imaginary worlds all the more remote from the pedestrian realities of everyday life.

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


The InFlux Series: WILL COTTON

The Orlando Museum of Art’s The InFlux Series: Will Cotton, currently on view through June 5, 2016, includes oil paintings, preparatory drawings, and sculptures that reveal aspects of Will Cotton’s creative process. Also highlighted in this exhibition is the artist’s passion for the printmaking process of stone lithography. In 2015, he was invited to work at Flying Horse Editions, the fine arts press of the University of Central Florida, where he produced several lithographs in the exhibition. Elegantly created, strategically composed, and masterfully executed, Cotton’s works are layered with cultural references from European 18th century masters to American mid-century pinup painting. He makes paintings about the pure, the fragrant, the land of plenty, the desirable, and the dream of perfection and complete indulgence. He introduces cake decoration as a form of adornment and architectural ornamentation, a symbolic

indication of reverence for an object that exists only for pleasure. Through a range of media, which includes paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, and performance art, Cotton uses food as an allegory for the human condition; sweets become a substitute for everything desirable. Cotton described his early works in a 2008 interview: “My initial impulse to make these paintings really came out of an awareness of the commercial consumer landscape that we live in. Every day we’re bombarded with hundreds, if not thousands of messages designed speOnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Above: Icing, 2014, oil on linen, 72 x 80 in., Private Collection. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York. Opposite: Frosting Basket Dress, 2013, acrylic polymer, paper and ribbon, 24.5 x 19 x 17 in., Collection of the artist. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

39


The InFlux Series: WILL COTTON

Above: Domino, 2015, oil on linen, 58 x 38 in., Private Collection. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York. Opposite: Elle with Cupcakes, 2014, oil on linen, 36 x 24 in. Collection of Rita and Jeffrey Adler, Winter Park. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.

40

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

cifically to incite desire within us.” Cotton’s projects have included, the Will Cotton Bakery (2009), a pop-up French bakery/art installation at Partners & Spade in New York City. Over a period of three weekends, the artist baked and sold confections and baked goods that often serve as visual

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

reference for his paintings and sculptures. Will Cotton Bakery staff, comprised of friends of the artist, wore cupcake and frosting tiaras, and aprons, made by Cotton. His idea was to create a space where the public could experience the painting process as he does, surrounded by the aroma of freshly baked sweets, adding a layer of sensation to the experience of viewing his work. Cotton became well known in the pop music world when his work, Cotton Candy Katy (2010), a painting of Katy Perry reclining amid cotton candy clouds, was used for the cover of Perry’s album, Teenage Dream. Cotton also art directed Perry’s acclaimed music video, California Gurls. This collaboration with Perry brought Cotton’s vision of confectionary paradise to a new audience. In his debut work of performance art, Cockaigne for Performa 11 (2011), Cotton employed the forms of both ballet and burlesque to cre-


The InFlux Series: WILL COTTON

ate a celebration of whipped cream and cotton candy. Cockaigne was an exploration of the peculiar nature of two ephemeral confections, incorporating music and dance, in addition to scent. For the Spring 2013 Fashion Issue of New York Magazine, Cotton photographed actress, Elle Fanning, within sets he designed, in which she is often wearing clothing and accessories he created, inspired by the Spring 2013 collections. When presented online, Cotton’s work appears to have an airbrushed quality. As the artist explained, “If you saw it in person, you’d see the paint—and that’s important to me. It does make me sad; I know that they look like photographs when you see them on a computer screen. There is really a lot of paint on the canvas, and they feel ‘very painterly.’” Cotton also stated that his work is not realism, “In fact, it should be idealism” he added. “That’s really the

idea—that it’s ideal.” Yet within Cotton’s utopian landscapes one can sense undertones of a more ominous nature. In his highly structured and dense landscape paintings, the ‘sublime’ is confectionary and the ‘threat’ is complete immersion in an atmosphere of one’s own desires. Inspired by formal portraiture, Cotton’s portrayals of women adorned in headdresses made of Ladurée macarons or embellished OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Above: Candy Crown (Cover For Art News, Summer 2015 Issue), 2015, 3-color lithograph, edition of 100, 10.5 x 8.75 in., Courtesy of Flying Horse Editions, Orlando. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York. Opposite: Deferred Promise, 2015, 16 color lithograph, edition 20 of 25, 37.5 x 28 in., Courtesy of Flying Horse Editions, Orlando. © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

43


The InFlux Series: WILL COTTON

with cupcakes speak to the desire for self-decoration and alimentary longing conflated into an inherently absurd gesture and the impossibility of actual satiation. Cotton starts his process by building maquettes to paint from in his New York studio. These can range from table-top scenery to life-sized sets occupied by models dressed in confectionary costumes that Cotton has created. Constructing these sets allows the artist to see surprising and often unexpected details, enabling him to recreate textures and details in such a way that viewing the works becomes a tactile experience. The artist has taken cooking classes to better fabricate these painstaking miniature worlds— he even went to Paris to learn about macaron baking directly from Philippe Andrieu, Ladurée’s pastry chef, for a landscape he was creating featuring macaron trees. Will Cotton received his

44

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

BFA from Cooper Union in New York City, where he currently resides. He also studied at the Beaux Arts in Rouen, France, and the New York Academy of Art, also in New York City. His work has been exhibited through-

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

out the US and Europe, including the San Francisco Museum of Art, CA; the Seattle Art Museum, WA; the Kunsthalle Bielefeld, Germany; the Hudson River Museum, NY; the Triennale di Milano, Italy; and the


Musee Marmottan Monet, Paris. His work is in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, both in Washington, DC; Seattle Art Museum, WA; Columbus Museum

of Art, OH; as well as many prominent private collections. Cotton’s work is the subject of a recent monograph, Will Cotton (Rizzoli, 2011). Cotton is represented by Mary Boone Gallery in New York City. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Above: Modern Times, 2015, oil on linen, 60 x 96 in., © Will Cotton. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

45


46

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


THE SOURCES: Paintings and Drawings by Steve Lotz

COINCIDING WITH THE ORLANDO

Museum of Art’s InFlux Series featuring Will Cotton is a solo exhibition of work by internationally recognized artist, Steve Lotz. The Sources: Paintings and Drawings by Steve Lotz is on view through June 5, 2016 and includes large-scale drawings, paintings, and collages selected from his 57 year career. Lotz, who is one of the most significant artists living in Central Florida, has created a rich visual vocabulary of organic and figurative forms, symbols, and “Sources” from his inner life. His works are expressions of his spiritual connections to the world, to nature, and to the cosmos. Lotz came to Central Florida in 1968 to create the Art Department at the University of Central Florida (UCF) where he was chairman of the department for its first ten years. He stayed at UCF until he retired as a professor emeritus in 2003. During this period, he established a successful career as a widely recognized

Source #4, 2015, acrylic and wax pencil on canvas, 48 x 48 in.,

artist. Perhaps his best known local work is his monu-

Collection of

mental triptych, Florida Dream, in the main terminal of

© Steve Lotz.

the Orlando International Airport where it has greeted visitors to Orlando since 1980. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

a n u a ry

/M

a r c h

the artist. Image courtesy of the artist.

2016

47


THE SOURCES: Paintings and Drawings by Steve Lotz

In his recent paintings, Lotz introduces vistas comprised of cloud-filled skies and wide, dark seas with soft and misty atmospheres. The foreground contains elements silhouetted in shadow against the sky, with occasional bright highlights causing a leaf, ribbon, flower or bird to glow with ethereal light. These are dreamlike visions of transcendent metaphysical realms, related to, but apart from common earthbound reality. Lotz does not follow a religious practice, he does believe in a spiritual force within us that connects us to all things in the universe. He developed this belief based on his life-long appreciation of Eastern philosophy, the writings of Carl Jung and others, and his own personal experiences. This exhibition was organized by the Orlando Museum of Art in conjunction with the community-wide celebration, Art Legends of Orange County. O n V iew Source #3, 2015, acrylic, wax pencil and India ink on canvas, 68 x 93.5 in., Collection of the artist. Š Steve Lotz. Image courtesy of the artist.


OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

49


ART SPAC

R E D E F I N I N G F L O R I D A’ S V I

50

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


CES

ISUAL ART EXPERIENCE


ART SPACES

By Richard T. Reep ANYONE WHO HAS WITNESSED THE SKYLINE-

busting towers and construction cranes in Florida’s bus-

tling cities can tell you that our population is growing. While new people are always arriving, our cultural ven-

ues historically felt only a faint effect from each boom cycle. This time around, however, it’s different. Prestigious institutions such as the Norton Museum of Art

Previous spread: Artist rendering of the proposed Norton Museum of Art, southern view of The Heyman Plaza.

in West Palm Beach, ICA Miami, Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, and others, are reacting quickly with

new programming and vigorous construction projects

to meet the audience at the door with stimulating ideas for the 21st century.

Several trends are changing the scene in Florida,

the sun-and-fun capital of the world. While Florida’s in-migration still includes the vast service industry, we are no longer a low-cost, do-over option for most who 52

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


seek the good life. A large component of new arrivals remains retirees, but with today’s taste for cosmopolitan cultural facilities, these new arrivals expect more than just beach bars and t-shirt shops.

And with Florida’s new medical high-technolo-

gy economy, places like the Max Planck Institute and

Scripps are bringing in a component of highly educat-

ed, highly skilled professionals. All of this adds up to a demand for cultural facilities that needs to be met if we are to raise ourselves to the next level. The new face of

Florida is more than just tourism­—it is smarter and more sophisticated than ever before.

Fortunately, many facilities in the state are building

Above (left to right): Artist renderings—the proposed Norton Museum of Art’s West Façade on South Dixie Highway; the new ICA Miami building’s South Façade–daytime view; Expansion view of Bass Museum of Art’s Exterior Façade.

or have announced fundraising campaigns to expand and re-program. Museums need more space. Resident

collectors, as well as new arrivals, have some of the OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

53


ART SPACES

most interesting and exciting art, and it deserves to be

seen by a wider audience, not locked away in storage or kept in homes.

Ultimately, museums need no longer be forbidding

institutions stewarding art for the few. Today, museum

directors see themselves as vibrant ambassadors of the arts, with education and outreach programs, involving

their local communities in art events, conducting classes outside their walls, and inspiring young and old with creativity that crosses class and ethnic lines.

Many institutions in Florida are growing to meet

new demand, and we have chosen to showcase three that indicate a hunger for fine art is starting to be satiated.

Norton Museum of Art, Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) Miami, and Bass Museum of Art are different venues with different missions. What they all have in com54

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


mon is a sense of the importance of outreach, bringing art to a greater community than ever before. They also

have dynamic new plans for architecture that sizzles and

creates a sense of excitement about art that cities need. The so-called “Bilbao effect,” where the architecture itself becomes the art, with the city as gallery­—takes the audience to a new level of thinking about art’s place.

It’s a good time for museums in Florida, and the

future holds even greater promise for visual arts venues. As our population swells, and we resonate with more

and more of the wonderful diversity of America, these art museums document a time when art and ideas are stronger than ever in this country. Norton Museum of

Art, ICA Miami, and Bass Museum of Art each have something to offer, and all enrich the art scene of Florida

Above (far left and far right): View of the original 1941 South Olive Avenue entrance of the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach and Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach. Above (center): ICA Miami’s temporary space in the landmark Moore Building. The Museum is building its new, permanent home in Miami’s Design District.

in many ways—some that only the future will tell. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

55


ART SPACES

Right (top to bottom): Artist renderings—the new Norton Museum of Art West Façade on South Dixie Highway (daytime and evening views). Below right: Southern view of The Heyman Plaza­. All designed by Foster + Partners. Images courtesy of Foster + Partners. Below left: Norton Museum of Art’s current West Façade on South Dixie Highway.

WEST PALM BEACH

NORTON MUSEUM OF ART Completion in 2018


West Palm Beach’s venerable Norton Museum of Art is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, and what better way to celebrate than to re-emphasize the importance of the arts in the 21st century? With an expansion and a radical interior reconfiguration, The New Norton project will broaden its embrace of the Palm Beach County community and beyond, while organizing exhibitions of significance to the art world when the project

is completed in 2018. The original Norton was designed in 1941 by architect Marion Sims Wyeth, facing the Intracoastal Waterway and Palm Beach. Acknowledging its greater visibility along US Highway 1, which borders the Museum’s west side, architect Lord Norman Foster of Foster + Partners has created a serene, welcoming entry with a monumentally scaled canopy. The canopy’s form encircles a magOnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

nificent banyan tree, creating a unique interplay between nature and architecture at the Museum’s new entrance. Executive director and CEO, Hope Alswang, has two fundamental missions for The New Norton project. “We want to create a new social focus for the community,” she stated. Its comprehensive collection is exceptional, ranging from the Renaissance to Contemporary work, and from Asia to Europe

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

57


ART SPACES

Right: Artist rendering— the Pamela and Robert B. Goergen Sculpture Garden. Below (top to bottom): Artist renderings— the Ruth and Carl Shapiro Great Hall (evening view); Northern view of The Heyman Plaza. All designed by Foster + Partners. Images courtesy of Foster + Partners.

to America. Exhibitions have strengthened, bringing the Norton into the league of Florida’s best cultural centers, and with the Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers, Recognition of Art by Women (RAW), and similar programming, the Museum has raised the level of discussion about fine art. “We are looking towards the future with a remarkable transformation,” adds Alswang. Education is the parallel, and very serious component of the Museum’s mission, and drives a great deal of the expansion work. No longer an elite experience, art viewing is accessible to everybody. The Museum’s director and education staff see outreach as a vital part of its future, and with Florida’s population growth, reaching this new audience becomes critical in the Museum’s mission. The New Norton will include a 210-seat auditorium, a special event room, and a new dining pavilion with a garden terrace. A Great Hall, conceived as the Museum’s “living room,” will welcome visitors with a 43-foot-tall space capable of hosting special events and exhi-


bitions. By liberating existing spaces and infilling areas, Foster + Partners will create more than 12,000 square feet of new galleries, and an expanded education center. “Museum in a Garden” is one of The New Norton’s design motifs, and is realized by interlacing an event lawn, a sculpture garden, and a shade garden into the programming on the six-acre Museum campus. In addition, six historic homes owned by the Norton are being restored for use as an artist-in-residence program and the director’s residence, bring-

ing the Norton a sense of activity and working-studio energy that few museums have. Reinvigorated programming has begun to transform the Norton into a center of art and ideas. With its facility expansion and renovation, the Museum’s platform for cultural outreach will be broader and deeper than ever before. The Norton’s leadership, in an unabashed quest to be one of the leading cultural institutions in the southeast, is set to achieve a level of influence that will impact the state’s quality of life and future trends for years to come. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Above (top to bottom): Artist renderings— the new Leonard and Evelyn Lauder Dining Pavilion; The J. Ira and Nicki Harris Family Gallery. All designed by Foster + Partners. Images courtesy of Foster + Partners.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

59


ART SPACES

Above and opposite: Renderings of the new ICA Miami, South Façade, designed by Aranguren & Gallegos. Images courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos.

MIAMI Above: ICA Miami’s temporary space in the landmark Moore Building. Image courtesy of ICA Miami.

ICA MIAMI Completion in 2017


The Institute of Contemporary Art Miami began construction last November on a new facility in the Miami Design District, scheduled to open in 2017. This crisp, clean structure addresses NE 41st Street with a three-story mosaic of triangular panels that will glow at night. At the street level, the facility will flow directly out to a sculpture garden, and above, exhibition galleries will be sunlit on both north and south sides,

allowing the Museum a wide range of lighting for exhibitions. The design supports its mission to bring contemporary art to visitors in this bustling tropical metropolis. Museums whose mission is dedicated solely to contemporary art are few and far between. ICA Miami has been operating out of an existing structure on Northeast 2nd Avenue, and this will be the first new construction of its kind. Other ICA museums are already established in gateway cities such as Boston and London. Aranguen & Gallegos Arquitectos, a talented Madridbased architecture firm, is noted for museums in Europe, and their new design will feature state-of-the-art sound and light

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

technology available to the artists in its galleries. ICA Miami is responding to the increasingly dynamic contemporary art scene, where multisensory installations are kinetic and flexible, the galleries and viewers themselves have become canvases, and artistic experimentation requires an open presentation platform. The ICA will feature moveable gallery walls and interior spaces capable of performance art, acoustic, and visual presentations in a wide range of sizes. In this new museum, the room can shrink or grow, no longer a static cavity into which the artist must mold and adapt his work. Miami, noted Director Ellen Salpeter recently, “has one

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

61


ART SPACES

This page and opposite: Renderings of the new ICA Miami, designed by Aranguren & Gallegos. Images courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos.

of the most supportive and engaged cultural communities in the country.” With a growing taste for contemporary art, Miami’s public feasts on shows in the Wynwood District, the Design District, and elsewhere. And, of course, the annual art fair, Art Basel Miami, attracts visitors worldwide. Miami’s balmy weather and sunshine will be a second environment for viewing art, with the outdoor sculpture garden. Surrounded by the Design District’s architecture, and framed by lush, tropical foliage, contemporary art will be cast in a

new light in this outdoor space. Miami is known as an experimentation ground for environmental artists going back to Christo, so expect the sculpture garden to yield a new generation of outdoor contemporary art. As a leading cultural resource


in Miami, the Museum’s mission is enabled by this facility and its location in the Design District. Irma Braman is cochair of the Board of Trustees, and funded the construction of the new Museum with her husband, Norman Braman. “The

New ICA Miami,” she stated at the groundbreaking, “will be a dynamic and open forum for visitors of all ages to engage with the art of our time.” A high mission indeed for this institution, one which it appears prepared to fulfill with this new facility. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

63


ART SPACES

This page and opposite (clockwise from top): Renderings of the new Bass Museum of Art Expansion Project in Miami Beach. Architectural rendering Š David Gauld.

MIAMI BEACH

BASS MUSEUM OF ART Completion in late 2016


Miami Beach’s Bass Museum of Art is evolving. By the end of 2016, when it reopens in its current location in Collins Park, the Bass will be almost half again as large, with over 26,000 square feet of programmable exhibit space. In the meantime, the Bass will be active with a pop-up gallery at the Miami Beach Regional Library, and exhibitions ranging from the University of Miami to New York. This

expansion will allow the Bass Museum to fulfill its mission of mounting major contemporary art exhibitions, offering a strong educational program, and hosting special events and public programs in its facility. The Bass is housed in an iconic 1930s Art Deco library designed by architect, Russell Pancoast, who led the Deco design movement in Miami Beach. In 2001, Tokyo architect, Arata Isozaki, and New OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

York architect, David Gauld, completed a new addition, echoing the massing of the original structure and adding larger, more flexible exhibition space. Now, fifteen years later, the Bass Museum’s mission has grown, and so has its need for exhibit, event, and classroom space—so they called back Isozaki and Gauld. The team performed delicate surgery to enhance the entry experience by adding a Living

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

65


ART SPACES

Room and a Grand Staircase, increasing flow of visitors up and down the Museum’s two levels. Four new galleries will house contemporary exhibitions with select works from the permanent collection on view in “Open Storage,” a dedicated gallery space that will house a rotating selection of the permanent collection. Education, increasingly in demand for the population of Miami Beach, drove the addition of over 4,000 square feet of classroom space, named the “Creativity Center.” And finally, the architects have added a new entry off 22nd Avenue into an enclosed courtyard, enabling special events. Altogether, the new additional space is 8,000 square feet. On the building’s main level, two new galleries will house permanent collection exhibits from the Museum’s Art History Lab. Upstairs, the Muss Gallery

and the Alan and Diane Lieberman Gallery will expand and become linked with moveable walls, maximizing flexibility for exhibits in these monumental spaces. The Creativity Center will take the second half of the expansion area, with specialized classrooms and programming for preteens, teenagers, and adults, rounding out the education mission of the Bass.

The formal gardens of Collins Park, the setting for the Bass Museum, is a treasure of the city, and considered the heart of the cultural neighborhood of Miami Beach. Executive director and curator, Silvia Karman Cubiñá, observed that museums have evolved into “crucial centers for education, exchange, and socializing.” Much of this new expansion work recogAbove and left: Renderings of the new Bass Museum of Art Expansion Project in Miami Beach, Staircase and Waterview Classroom spaces. Architectural rendering © David Gauld.


Florida. He began his design career with architects from the Sarasota School in Tampa, and his practice is focused on art and hospitality. As an artist, he has exhibited worldwide, with a body of work in concrete. He is a Duval County Language Arts award winner and has been cited in The Economist magazine, the Wall Street Journal, and Florida Trend magazine. Below (top to bottom): Renderings of the new Bass Museum of Art expansion project in Miami Beach, interior and gallery spaces. Architectural rendering © David Gauld.

nizes this shifting role of the Museum, and helps anchor its place in Miami Beach. With Miami Beach’s premier art event, Art Basel, held nearby at the Miami Beach Convention Center, the Museum will better capture the external exhibits, events, and fairs that surround the Museum. During other times of the year, the institution’s dynamic programming will have more impact on the community by providing more space for classes and spontaneous gatherings as well. O n V iew Richard Reep is an artist and architect based in Winter Park, OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

67


DIGNITY ...........................................................................

TRIBES IN TRANSITION Photography by DANA GLUCKSTEIN

ON VIEW 04.22.16 – 06.19.16

APPLETON MUSEUM of ART College of Central Florida www.appletonmuseum.org

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

69


T

DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition

HE APPLETON MUSEUM OF ART,

College of Central Florida in Ocala presents DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition, an exquisite photography exhibition by Dana Gluckstein, honoring Indigenous Peoples worldwide. The exhibition, which will be on view from April 22 through June 19, 2016, captures the fleeting period of world history where traditional and contemporary cultures collide. Gluckstein’s powerful B/W portraits pay homage to these imperiled cultures, signaling our collective interdependence and fragility. Spanning three decades, these images distill the universality of experience that links us all without diminishing the dignity of the individual. Whether photographing a Haitian healer or a San Bushmen chief, Gluckstein infuses each portrait with an essential human grace.

Previous spread: Samburu Girl, Kenya, 1985. Opposite: Samburu Women, Kenya, 1985.

70

OnV

Photography by DANA GLUCKSTEIN

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition

As noted by former Los Angeles County Museum of Art photography curator and prolific scholar, Robert A. Sobieszek, “The dispassionate remove common to most modern portraits is all but absent in these images; in its stead is a passionate complicity between artist and sitter that allows each subject to be memorialized with both beauty and grace.” In a field in which indigenous cultures are often exploited and objectified for their “exoticism,” Gluckstein’s images reinvest their portraiture with soul. “The Indigenous Peoples have a gift to give that the world needs desperately, this

reminder that we are made for harmony, for interdependence,” stated Nobel Laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in DIGNITY. “If we are ever to prosper, it will only be together...The work of Dana Gluckstein helps us to truly see, not just appearances, but essences, to see as God sees us, not just the physical form, but also the luminous soul that shines through us.” Gluckstein has traveled across the world, often at her own expense, to record the lives of the Goba in Zambia, the Maasai in Kenya, the Quechua in Peru, and peoples in Bhutan, Botswana, Bali, and Mexico, as well as native

Above: Dana Gluckstein. Photograph by Gold Wong Photography. Opposite: Woman with Pipe, Haiti, 1983.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

73


DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition

Hawaiians, members of the Navajo tribe in Arizona, and the Campbell River Indian Band in Canada. “For over three decades, I followed an inner calling to track the ‘Ancient Ones,’” said Gluckstein.  “I photographed Indigenous Peoples fighting for their lands, traditions, languages, and their very lives. They tell us where we have come from and where we must go as a world community. Humanity’s survival depends on how carefully we listen. As an artist, I want my work to truly make a difference. I am deeply honored that these images inspire the hearts and minds of people

all around the world.” DIGNITY is intended to give a fuller awareness of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples—who comprise six percent of the global population and are amongst its most impoverished and oppressed inhabitants. The declaration was adopted by 144 countries in 2007 even though the US, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand voted against the declaration. In December 2010, the US adopted the declaration following the other three countries. The declaration is the most comprehensive global statement of the measures every

Above: Masai Warrior Initiate, Kenya, 1985. Opposite: Chanter, Hawaii, 1996.

74

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


00

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

J

a n u a ry

/M

a r c h

2016


DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition

government should enact to ensure the survival, dignity, and well-being of Indigenous Peoples around the world. DIGNITY was exhibited at the United Nations in Geneva in 2011 sponsored by the US. Gluckstein spoke at the World Economic Forum, in 2013, in Davos, Switzerland, on how art can impact the state of the world. By sharing these exquisite portraits, Gluckstein hopes to raise awareness around Amnesty International’s campaign to ensure Indigenous women can access post-rape care. She hopes her audience will join her in urging President Obama

to enforce the Indian Health Services to implement Standardized Sexual Assault Protocols, which were adopted in The Tribal Law and Order Act, passed in 2010 (click HERE to sign Amnesty’s letter to President Obama). The protocols include full and equal access to emergency contraception, rape kits, including prophylactic medications against sexually transmitted infections and immunizations, when appropriate. The lack of implementation of standardized sexual assault protocols is leaving Indigenous women at risk and contributes to violations of their human right to health

Above: Young Boy at Religious Festival, Bhutan, 2010. Opposite: Dancer, Bali, 1988.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

77


DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition

and non-discrimination. Dana Gluckstein graduated from Stanford University, where she studied psychology, painting and photography, and realized the power of images to shape consciousness. From photographing political icons and celebrities to award-winning advertising projects, Gluckstein is a museum-collected photographer, with fine artworks in the permanent collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. She has photographed iconic figures such as Nelson Mandela, Mikhail Gorbachev, Desmond Tutu,

and Muhammad Ali, as well as award-winning advertising campaigns for clients like Apple and Toyota. Her book, DIGNITY : In Honor of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the associated international museum exhibition, DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition have received international acclaim and awards. Dana Gluckstein lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children. On View

The Appleton will host an opening celebration on April 21st, 6-8 pm, with a presentation by Dana Gluckstein, who will discuss her work.

Above: Aboriginal Artist, Australia, 1989. Opposite: Lamu Woman, Kenya, 1985.

78

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


The

MENNELLO MUSEUM

of

AME

PO

AR

ON VIEW

06.10.16-09.11.16 www.mennellomuseum.com

P


ERICAN ART, ORLANDO

OP

presents...

RT

PRINTS OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

81


POP ART Prints

POP ART

is coming to Orlando! The Mennello Museum of American Art will host a blockbuster exhibition of 37 prints, one of only three museum engagements on loan from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s permanent collection. The installation includes works from primarily the 1960s by Allan D’Arcangelo, Jim Dine, Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Mel Ramos, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Andy Warhol and Tom ROY LICHTENSTEIN Wesselmann. The installation is part Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997) became a of a series that highlights objects leading figure of the Pop Art movement. Inspired from the Smithsonian’s collection by advertisements and comic strips, Lichtenstein’s bright, graphic works parodied American popular culture that are rarely on public view—all and the art world itself. Lichtenstein became known for his of the featured works were selectdeadpan humor and his slyly subversive way of building a ed by Joann Moser, the Smithsonsignature body of work from mass-reproduced images. His ian’s deputy chief curator. Pop Art art became increasingly popular with both collectors and Prints will be on display from June influential art dealers like Leo Castelli. Like much Pop 10 through September 11, 2016. Art, his work provoked debate over ideas of originality, consumerism and the fine line between fine art and entertainment.

Roy Lichtenstein, Sweet Dreams, Baby!, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume III, 1965. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Philip Morris Incorporated, © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein.

82

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


POP ART Prints

“Pop Art brings many known images to mind, but also poignantly addresses accessibility and commodity in the art market through the print media,” said The Mennello’s executive director, Shannon Fitzgerald. “I am thrilled to present select images from the icons of Pop as understood through multiples, editions, and mass distribution that was of great, first-time interest to this group of artists. It is a delight to see color, pattern, repetition, assemblage, collage, and narrative―largely culled from everyday culture, the media, and advertising―coalesce formally and conceptually on paper. With humor and punch, Pop Art Prints provides a graphic glimpse into a changing, often volatile­, societal landscape

ROBERT INDIANA Robert Indiana (b. 1928) has played a central role in the development of assemblage art, hardedge painting, and Pop Art. A self proclaimed “American painter of signs,” Indiana has created a highly original body of work that explores American identity, personal history, and the power of abstraction and language, establishing an important legacy that resonates in the work of many contemporary artists who make the written word a central element of their oeuvre. Few Pop images are more widely

Robert Indiana, Love, 1967,

recognized than Indiana’s LOVE, originally designed as a Christmas card commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art in 1965.

screenprint on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Louis and Linda Kaplan. © 2016 Morgan Art Foundation/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

84

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


JASPER JOHNS By representing common objects and images in the realm of fine art, Jasper Johns (b. 1930) broke down the boundaries traditionally separating fine art and everyday life. He effectively laid the foundation for the Pop Art movement’s aesthetic embrace of commodity culture with his playfully subversive appropriation of common signs and products. The American flag subject is typical of Johns’ use of quotidian imagery in the mid- to late 1950s. As he explained, the imagery derives from “things the mind already knows,” utterly familiar icons such as flags, targets, stenciled numbers, ale cans, and, slightly later, maps of the US.

by these artists so prevalent in America during the 1960s and ’70s.” Pop Art took the American art scene by storm approximately 50 years ago, when New York art dealer, Leo Castelli, first showed Pop Art in his gallery in 1962. The movement was eagerly embraced by an audience who responded to the familiar subjects—flat forms, bright colors, and sly commentaries made on the mass culture of the era. “Pop artists were commenting on consumer society, while attempting to understand it themselves,” said Moser. “Pop Art is much more layered and complex than people think.

Jasper Johns, Gray Alphabets (detail), 1968, color lithograph on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Transfer from the National Endowment for the Arts, © Jasper Johns and Gemini G.E.L./ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Published by Gemini G.E.L.


POP ART Prints

It serves as the mirror that exaggerates...reflecting the culture we live in back to us in a different way.” Pop Art offered a stark contrast to Abstract Expressionism, then the dominant movement in American art. The distinction between high art and popular culture was assumed until this new generation of artists challenged a whole range of assumptions about what fine art should be. For Pop artists, social and

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG Robert Rauschenberg (1925 –2008) was an American painter and graphic artist whose early works anticipated the Pop Art movement. Rauschenberg is well known for his “Combines” of the 1950s, in which non-traditional materials and objects were employed in innovative combinations. Rauschenberg was both a painter and a sculptor and the Combines are a combination of both, but he also worked with photography, printmaking, papermaking, and performance.

political turbulence coupled with unprecedented consumerism meant that art was no longer about the persona of the heroic individual artist, as it had been in the years immediately following World War II. They sought to eradicate the notion of the “genius artist” and downplay the role of originality in art, adopting mechanical means of generating images such as screen


printing, which theoretically allowed for an endless production of images. As interest in Pop Art increased, many of the artists became celebrities, and demand for their work skyrocketed. The commercial techniques of screen printing and lithography were well suited to reproducing the magazine, newspaper, and comic-strip images favored by many Pop artists. From the commercial viewpoint of the galleries,

Above: Jim Dine, Untitled, from the

JIM DINE

portfolio A Tool Box, 1966,

Over the past five decades, Jim Dine (b. 1935) has created a wide breadth of work: drawings, works on paper, paintings, assemblages, and sculpture. Dine’s debut on the New York art scene came via several “happenings” performances in the early 1960s. Since then, Dine’s name has been inextricably linked with the Pop Art movement, but his diverse body of work defies such easy categorization. His subjects have included plants, animals, figures, puppets, and self-portraits, and his iconic depictions of hearts, tools, and robes have become the hallmark of his oeuvre.

photo-serigraph and collage on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase. © 2014 Jim Dine /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Opposite: Robert Rauschenberg, Front Roll, 1964, color lithograph on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and ULAE/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Published by Universal Limited Art Editions.

O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

April/June 2016

87


POP ART Prints

print editions made this imagery more affordable to a large audience that wanted to buy the art. Roy Lichtenstein was one of the first American Pop artists to achieve widespread renown, and he became a lightning rod for criticism of the movement. His early work ranged widely in style and subject matter, and displayed considerable understanding of modernist painting. Lichtenstein would often main-

MEL RAMOS Mel Ramos (b. 1935) is famous for his provocative, humorous paintings of idealized nude women and the imagery of popular culture. His style references the sensuality and glossy flatness of pinups and Playboy spreads and has drawn the ire of feminists and art critics alike, despite Ramos’s assertion that his works are “apolitical”. Though clearly aligned with Pop Art in his appropriation of imagery from mass media and consumer products, Ramos calls his practice rooted in Surrealism and its emphasis on “absurd conjunctions,” for example, a beautiful nude woman emerging from a Snickers wrapper or lounging seductively in a banana split.


TOM WESSELMANN

tain that he was as interested in the abstract qualities of his images as he was in their subject matter. However, the mature Pop style he arrived at in 1961, which was inspired by comic strips, was greeted by accusations of banality, lack of originality, and later, copying. His high-impact, iconic images have since become synonymous with Pop Art, and his method of creating images, which blended aspects of mechanical reproduction

Tom Wesselman (1931-2004) started experimenting with small, abstract collages and then adopted advertising images to make bold amusing still lifes and interiors, collages, and assemblages using commonplace household items, and often, a highly stylized female nude. Wesselman began The Great American Nude Series in 1961—a series of large and small works distinguished by number only. Some of the works include real rather than depicted objects, household objects such as a bathtub, radiator, and toaster. He has continued to feature the female nude in every major series of paintings and sculpture throughout his career.

Opposite: Mel Ramos, Chic, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume I, 1965, screenprint. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Philip Morris Incorporated Art, © Mel Ramos/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Left: Tom Wesselmann, Cut out Nude, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume I, 1965, color screenprint on plastic: vinyl mounted on paperboard. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Philip Morris Incorporated Art, © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

89


POP ART Prints

and drawing by hand, has become central to critics’ understanding of the significance of the movement. Andy Warhol, whose work is also featured in the exhibition, was the most successful and highly paid commercial illustrator in New York even before he began to make art destined for galleries. Nevertheless, his screenprinted images of Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy, soup cans, and sensational newspaper stories, quickly became syn-

ALLAN D’ARCANGELO Painter and printmaker, Allan D’Arcangelo (1930–1998), is best known for his abstract paintings of highways and road signs. Often depicted from the driver’s perspective, D’Arcangelo’s paintings incorporate simplified, flat color planes and fragmented geometric forms, superimposing cropped road signs, forms resembling broken glass, and vague highway imagery over two-dimensional, endlessly rolling landscapes. D’Arcangelo always maintained a strong fascination with industrial imagery and scenery, and is considered one of the earliest American Pop artists.

onymous with Pop Art. He emerged from the poverty and obscurity of an Eastern European immigrant family in Pittsburgh, to become a charismatic magnet for bohemian New York, and to ultimately find a place in the circles of High Society. For many, his ascent echoes one of Pop Art’s ambitions, to bring popular styles and subjects into the exclusive salons of high art. His eleva-


tion to the status of a popular icon represented a new kind of fame and celebrity for a fine artist. Perhaps owing to the incorporation of commercial images, Pop Art has become one of the most recognizable styles of modern art. And it is clear, from collectors and museums and immense public interest, that Pop Art is here to stay. As Warhol once stated: “Everything is beautiful. Pop Art is everything.” O n V iew

CLAES OLDENBURG

Above: Claes Oldenburg, Tea Bag, from

American sculptor, Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929), makes multimedia performances and artistic projects rooted in popular culture that have mirrored the human experience in surprising and sometimes unsettling ways. Oldenburg uncovers the mystery and power of commonplace objects by morphing their scale, shape, and texture, embracing what he calls “the poetry of everywhere.” He is best known for his public art installations typically featuring very large replicas of everyday objects. Another theme in his work is soft sculpture versions of everyday objects. Many of his works were made in collaboration with his wife, Coosje van Bruggen.

the portfolio Four on Plexiglas, 1965-1966 (published 1966), screenprint on plexiglas and felt, with rope and vacuum-formed plexiglas mounted on paperboard. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase. Opposite: Allan D’Arcangelo, Landscape III, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume III, 1965, screenprint on paper. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Philip Morris Incorporated Art. © D’Arcangelo Family Partnership/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

April/June 2016

91


CHANGING T H E H U M A N I M PA C T O N F L

On view thru

06.05.16

Creek Off The Loxahatchee River.

@

SOUTH FLORIDA


G WATERS O R I D A’ S A Q U AT I C S Y S T E M S Featuring the Photography of

LY N N E B U C H A N A N

A MUSEUM, Bradenton OnV

i e w

www.SouthFloridaMuseum.org Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

93


Drama On Tuscawilla Lake. All images Š Lynne Buchanan.


CHANGING WATERS

W E MUST BEGIN THINKING LIKE A

RIVER IF WE ARE TO LEAVE A LEGACY OF

BEAUTY AND LIFE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.” — David Brower

When most people think of Florida and its waters, they’re probably thinking of its 1,197 miles of coastline and beautiful views of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean. But Florida is home to more than 11,000 miles of rivers, streams and waterways, and its most storied lake—Lake Okeechobee—is the second-largest lake in the United States. Changing Waters: The Human Impact on Florida’s Aquatic Systems, a new exhibition on view at the South Florida Museum in Bradenton, through June 5, 2016, documents the conditions of Florida’s aquatic ecosystems through approximately 40 of Lynne Buchanan’s photographs OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

95


CHANGING WATERS

Opposite (top to bottom): Serge Kayaking Through The Salvinia. Tapestry Of Muck, Wakulla River. Caloosahatchee Decomposition. Below: Withlacoochee Maze

featuring our rivers, estuaries, lakes and bays. The exhibition provides narrative interpretations of the photos along with maps and interpretive graphics, which shed light on the state of Florida’s waterways. The featured photographs, most of which were taken over a period of a year and a half, show both the beautiful waterways we are at risk of losing and the troubled waters that already reflect the effects of human action. “Buchanan’s work compliments the direction of the Muse-

um, as it captures the beauty of the natural world in a creative way that breaks boundaries and invites Museum visitors to become actively engaged in their viewing experience,” said Matthew Woodside, director of exhibitions and chief curator, South Florida Museum. For much of its geologic history, Florida was submerged in the ocean. When the waters finally receded, they left behind a porous, peninsular landmass where human habitation began some 12,000 to 14,000 years ago. Since those first inhabit-


ants arrived, humans have been impacting the state’s waters. “We know from the archaeological record that humans have been impacting Florida’s natural environment going back to the Calusa and Tequesta peoples, who dug canals through islands and mangrove forests to create more efficient routes for canoe travel,” Woodside explained. “In the latter part of the 19th century, our technology was at a scale where we could really cause major changes by diverting water through extensive canal sys-

tems, draining wetlands, and removing vast tracts of coastal mangrove forests. The growing demands for economic growth, energy production, and other industrial-based economies all have had their impact on Florida’s springs, rivers, lakes, and coastal estuaries.” The centerpiece of Changing Waters is the photographic journey taken by one photographer as she learned more about the issues affecting our waterways. “Sharing new perspectives on the use and conservation of water was inspirational OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

97


CHANGING WATERS

Above: Lynne Buchanan. Below: Mangrove Maze, Holding Things Together.

to me,” said Buchanan. “This photographic project invites viewers to examine the changes to the water in Florida and to consider their personal relationship to this vital resource.” Buchanan elaborated on the inspiration behind Changing Waters in her introduction to the exhibition: “In 2013, I drove alone cross-country in search of myself and for something to which I could dedicate my life. While I was traveling, I met riverkeepers and indigenous people who were protecting the ever dwindling waterways of the Southwest. When I returned home, I decided to focus on water issues in my own state of Florida. I had previously created an exhibition of river meditation photographs, so this time, I decided to focus on what we are at risk of losing and what has already been lost due to human actions. One of my biggest inspirations was the Nile Project, which included 14 musicians from 7 of the 11 countries the Nile River touches. The objective was to teach each other their musical traditions in order to overcome


conflict and find a way to work harmoniously in preserving this life-sustaining waterway. One goal of my project became to work with many water advocates around the state and to connect their efforts in a single body of work. The dialogs we had were equally as important as my photographs. I learned

water does not stop at borders and what happens to water upstream impacts people and ecosystems downstream. Place is critically important; rivers with protected watersheds and wild riparian banks are much healthier than waterways in developed areas. The preservation of water should not be OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Above: Glowing Vines, Loxahatchee River.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

99


CHANGING WATERS

Opposite (top to bottom): Porous Limestone Foundation, Apalachicola River. Root Reflections, Blue Springs, High Springs. Below: Midges Ascending, Santa Fe River.

a partisan issue. It is a basic human right we all need to work together to preserve.” Lynne Buchanan’s awardwinning photographs have been featured in exhibitions in Florida, including the Mattie Kelly Arts Center Galleries of Northwest Florida State College in Niceville; Fogartyville Arts and

Media Center, Selby Gardens, White Heron Wellness Center in Sarasota; and the Venice Art Center. She is also a Flash Powder Projects photographer (www.flashpowderprojects. com). Buchanan received master’s degrees in creative writing from the University of


South Florida in Tampa, and in art history/museums studies from George Washington University in Washington, DC. She also received a bachelor’s degree from New College in Sarasota, Florida. For additional information, visit: www.lynnebuchanan.com. O n V iew

“WATER HAS BEEN IMPORTANT TO ME FOR MY ENTIRE LIFE, AND AS OUR RIVERS AND WATERWAYS HAVE BECOME INCREASINGLY ENDANGERED, IT HAS BECOME EVEN MORE OF A CALLING TO DOCUMENT THEM THROUGH MY PHOTOGRAPHY.” — L y n n e B u c h a n a n

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

10 1


On view thru 1 02

OnV

i e w

Ma

05.27.16

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

@

/J

CORAL SPRINGS MUS

u n e

2016


ABOUT FACE

.................................................

T H E

A R T

O F

JOTA EUM of ART

www.coralspringsmuseum.org


ABOUT FACE: The Art of JOTA

STEP INSIDE the surreal world of Jota Leal. Coral Springs Museum of Art presents the first major solo exhibition of artistic works by the Venezuela-born painter, currently on view through May 27, 2016. This remarkable compilation brings together the best of Leal’s whimsical and incisive portraits of rock stars, movie stars, sports icons, and historical and cultural figures. There’s something for anyone who is captivated by the famous and iconic figures around us. Jota’s wildly expressive paintings of Salvador Dalí, The Beatles, Marilyn Monroe, Jimi Hendrix, Keith Richards, Michael Jordan, Freddie Mercury, Ali, and others, are at the pinnacle of contemporary portraiture. The icing on the cake is the remarkable twist that he imparts to each and every subject. His ability to transform the subject’s face into something more elemental and evocative is a gift few have possessed. Previous spread: The Persistence Of Dalí, acrylic on canvas, 70 x 60”; Above: Jota Leal photographed with his monumental work, The Persistence Of Dalí. Opposite: The artist at work on Mr. Frankenstein’s Monster Close-Up, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36”.

1 04

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


ABOUT FACE: The Art of JOTA

“In the hands of a lesser artist, celebrity caricatures can appear garish and even grotesque — irreverent and offensive to both the star and their fans. Jota Leal, however, has a passion and affinity for his subjects that allows him to capture their essence in a manner that is both playful and insightful.” T he

— B rett M aly , art appraiser and H istory C hannel ’ s Pawn S tars art expert

Jota Leal’s superb sense of humor and his curiosity and perceptiveness of the human condition are critical elements of his ability to create the works he does. He paints the inner soul of his subjects, and manifests this as their outer persona. The paintings are magically captivating. He is, in a sense, an interpreter of the subconscious, translating with his pencils and brushes. “I try to paint people that I admire, or fascinate me,” said the artist. “It’s often my way to share what I perceive about their character, or inner soul. It’s almost a way for me to communicate with them and get to know them in some manner. This is the most chal-

lenging part of the entire painting process, working up to the point where I feel ready to begin, with the layout and the sensibility poised, after much thought and consideration.” Born in a humble little town in eastern Venezuela in the mid-’80s, Jota (pronounced: Hota) began drawing and painting at a very young age. As stated in his biography, he never studied fine art. He attempted to sit in art class as a child, but ran away after being forced to paint plastic fruit and empty bottles. Since the age of six, he knew what he wanted to do. He wanted to paint people. He wanted to paint their faces. Leal was the second of OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

Above (top to bottom): Clark Gable, pencil drawing, 11 x 15”. Elvis Presley, pencil drawing, 12 x 16”. Opposite: Scarface, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 26”

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

10 7


ABOUT FACE: The Art of JOTA

Below: Ali Close-up, acrylic on canvas, 47 x 39”. Opposite: Rubber Soul, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48”.

1 08

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

three brothers, each possessing their own unique talent. One of his first memories is of drawing some lines for his amazed parents, as a baby. His subsequent birthday and Christmas gifts were all limited to pencils, crayons, and drawing materials. Although his obsession with drawing

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

and painting was apparent, Leal went on to study electrical engineering, and graduated with honors. According to the artist, it wasn’t long before his “circuits became lines, numbers became colors, and brushes replaced the sweep of physics theories.” Now, he paints all the


ABOUT FACE: The Art of JOTA

time—and blames his obsession on his parents. “They made me believe it was something I was good at. I have not stopped painting since.” In 2001, Leal traveled to Spain where he immersed himself in the history and technique of art. He then returned to his hometown in Venezuela, where he received the Caricaturist of the Year Award in 2003. His art follows the grand tradition of great portrait painters of the past, as well as the more recent caricature masters. His oeuvre is often considered on par with the likes of Honoré Daumier and Otto Dix. His sense of humor shows the delicate whimsy of Max Beerbohm or Al Hirschfeld, but with a more fully rendered painting style. Leal has exhibited in fine art galleries across the US and Asia. In 2012, Leal’s work served as a prime attraction and key art for the World of Art Showcase exhibition at the Wynn resort in Las Vegas. He was also guest of honor at the 2013 International Society of Caricature

Artists annual convention. Leal’s art book, A B O U T F A C E , was released with international distribution in 2013 and includes drawings, paintings, and the artist’s personal comments on his life and work. Jota Leal is represented by Morpheus Fine Art in Las Vegas. To view more of the artist’s work, visit: www.jotaleal.com. On View OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

Above: Surfin’ USA, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 40”. Opposite: Marilyn at the Beach, acrylic on canvas, 22 x 30”. Coral Springs Museum of Art is located in the Coral Springs Center for the Arts at 2855 Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs, Florida. For Museum information visit: coralspringsmuseum.org.

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

111


FOCUS {CHARLES

M

c

THE FIRST MAJOR MUSEUM

GILL}

Exhibition:

Charles McGill: Front Line, Back Nine On view 04.21.16–07. 03.16 at Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

112

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

exhibition featuring works by Charles McGill explores his fascination with the subject and objects of golf, and provides a thought provoking means for us to examine race and social differences in our community. Included are golf bags adorned with collages of imagery of black history and popular culture from the artist’s Baggage series; golf bags dissected and manipulated into soft sculpture constructions in his Skinned series; and works created for McGill’s performance projects, including his golf pro “alter ego,” Arthur Negro; and ironic line of sporting equipment, Club Negro. The Boca Raton Museum of Art is surrounded by no less than 76 golf courses within a 10-mile radius, most of which form the centerpieces of gated, mostly white and upper-income communities. Meanwhile, in walking distance to the Museum, is Boca Raton’s first community—the historically African American neighborhood of Pearl City. Through artist res-


F O C U S

idency activities, McGill (an experienced educator and exceptional speaker) will bring together Boca Raton’s black and white residents for artistat-work demonstrations, collaborative community art-making workshops, and performances inspired by a game that is central to our community’s identity. An adjunct professor of painting and drawing, Charles McGill has spent the last 20+ years making and exhibiting his work professionally. His artwork has been reviewed in The New York Times and Art in America and appears in several private and public collections. He is also a published illustrator. As an eclectic and versatile artist, McGill’s work runs the gamut from painting and drawing to performance-based media and sculpture. He holds a BFA, from the School of Visual Arts, an MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art, and a residency at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. He is represented by Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC and lives and works in Peekskill, NY. O n V iew

opposite page: Arthur Negro II, 2007-10, mixed media, 7 x 5 x 5 ft., Courtesy of Bill and Pamela Royall, Try-Me Collection, Richmond, Va. this page (clockwise from top RIGHT): 1. Homage, 2010, 40 x 17 x 21”. 2. Heart Of Darkness, 2014, 18 x 24 x 22”. 3. Quilt, 2016, 48 x 48 x 2.5”. 4. Horse Run Afoul, 2015, 30 x 17 x 22”. 5. Summertime, 2015, 72 x 72”. Photography by Pete Mauney. All images courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York .


FORM {CAROLE

FEUERMAN} CAROLE FEUERMAN HAS

Exhibition:

Carole Feuerman: Still Life On view 04.08.16–07. 03.16 at Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

114

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

carved a very special niche for herself. Internationally recognized as one of the world’s most prominent hyperrealist sculptors with a prolific career spanning four decades, Feuerman creates colorful provocative figures that begin as casts taken directly from her subjects and end up as free standing sculptures in interior and exterior spaces. Most of her models appear to be the all- American girl next door on summer vacation. Her human-figure sculptures express a refreshing perspective on the mundane but intensely personal activities of modern life. Feuerman’s powers of observation and versatility are expressed through various materials that include marble, bronze, vinyl, and painted resins. She also incorporates both ancient and contemporary methods in the creation of her works. Her intention is to capture and to project the individuality of her


F O R M

subject, while at the same time removing the individual from the social and ethnic context, almost to push characterization to the point of caricature. Unlike George Segal’s anonymous and static figures, which never look like anything but the plaster casts they are, Feuerman’s subjects appear real and caught in the act of daydreaming, swimming or other things people do. “Carole Feuerman’s swimmers and bathers, which are the building blocks of her artistic expression, convey artistic sensuality that unconsciously draw spectators into their power,” said

Museum of Art - DeLand CEO, George Bolge. Feuerman’s work is collected worldwide and has been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, Italy. She has also received numerous awards such as the prestigious Amelia Peabody and Betty Parsons awards in sculpture. The list of notable individuals who privately collect her work includes His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and former President, Bill Clinton, and former Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Carol Feuerman with Survival of Serena, 2013, Lacquer on Bronze, 37 x 81 x 31”. 2. New York City Slicker, 2014, lacquer on resin, 63 x 36 x 28”, (can be an outdoor public work). this page (top to bottom): 1. Monumental Brooke with Beach Ball + Video Projection, 2015, lacquer on resin, 60 x 43 x 45”, (interactive video changes with viewers’ movement). 2. Kendall Island, 2014, oil on resin, 70 x 28 x 39”, (from a series of Feuerman’s pieces that involve the sculpture interacting with a pedestal, calling attention to standard presentation methods in the art world). Photos courtesy of the artist .


PROFILE {KENTON

PA R K E R }

K E N TO N PA R K E R ’ S W O R K

Exhibition:

Kenton Parker: Everything Counts in Small Amounts On view 06.11.16–08. 21.16 at the Art and Culture Center / Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

116

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016

is about setting a stage for innocence, for steadfast friendship, for sharing and helping, for letting go and moving on. His tributes to friendship and first love take place in modestly scaled vernacular structures— a flower shop, a tree-house, a tool shed. In these structures, re-created in the gallery, Parker channels every child’s escapist fantasy of a hideaway, a special place in which they can dream, be themselves, invite their favorite friends, and be close to nature. The gentle life cycle of flowers and butterflies provides a mirror for the emotions and transitions of youth. For the familiar dramas of being close and then moving apart. 


P R O F I L E

Parker’s studio practice is content driven, full of the charisma and charm of the artist’s personality, and able to tackle any media. Drawing from the psychological underbelly of humanity, Parker’s work develops from crude and witty musings incessantly scribbled on thousands of papers and gathered into an archive. These ideas are then translated into sculpture, painting, installation, videos, and murals. The overall result is a multitude of interpretations that tap into the dark humor of lifetime achievements and dis-

appointments. Kenton Parker (b. 1968) received his BFA from San Diego State University. He has exhibited internationally, most recently at The Arts Initiative and SOHO House. Parker is represented by PRIMARY in Miami and currently lives and works in Los Angeles. O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. kenton parker portrait, stoic man. 2. My First Kiss, 2014, treehouse installation, Mixed Mediums. this page (clockwise from top RIGHT): 1. installation view, Room With A View, 2015, Mixed Mediums. 2. installation view, Always Sorry - Flower Shop, 2013, Mixed Mediums. 3. Always Sorry - Flower Shop (detail), 2013, Mixed Mediums. photography: Zack balber. Photos courtesy of the artist and primary, miami.


SPOTLIGHT {STEPHEN

STEPHEN KNAPP DISPEN-

ses with traditional media to create sculptural canvases composed entirely of light and glass. Heralded as the first new art medium of the 21st century, the artist has been developing his “lightpaintings” since the late 1990s. These works explore color, light, and space through the use of specially cut dichroic glass, shaped and polished to create a palette that refracts light onto the walls and surrounding space into abstract compositions. The fabricated glass and steel works are the crossroads of painting, sculpture, and technology. “The walkaround quality is key,” explained Knapp, “There has to

KNAPP}

Exhibition:

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings On view 04.22.16–08. 27.16 at Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacolamuseum.org

118

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/J

u n e

2016


S P O T L I G H T

be depth and movement. I want it to be sculptural. There’s this incredible sense of illusion, of going back into the wall. Its almost like a portal opening to

another dimension.” Knapp has gained an international reputation for largescale works of art held in museums, public, corporate, and private collections. He has had solo museum exhibitions at the Boise Art Museum, ID; the Chrysler Museum of Art, VA; The Baker Museum / Artis— Naples, FL; the Butler Institute of Art, OH; and the Polk Museum of Art, FL; among others. The Pensacola Museum of Art will present 14 of the artist’s lightpaintings this spring and summer. O n V iew

opposite page (top): Into the Narrows, 13 x 11’. above and left: installation views, Polk Museum of Art, lakeland, fl. Photos courtesy of the artist. Pensacola Museum of Art’s presentation of Stephen Knapp: lightpaintings is sponsored by silver sands premium outlets.

On View Magazine Spring 2016  

On View Magazine is your online source for world-class fine art museum and gallery exhibitions taking place throughout Florida. Each edition...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you