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NICK CAVE: Meet me at the center of the Earth O N V I E W AT THE N O R T O N M USEUM O F AR T , W E S T PA L M BEACH


ARTCENTER/ SOUTH FLORIDA

ARTCENTER/ SOUTH FLORIDA 800, 810, & 924 LINCOLN ROAD MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

ARTCENTERSF.ORG | 305.674.8278


EXHIBITIONS

MIAMI POSTER PROJECT September 10 – October 17, 2010 Opening Reception: Saturday, September 11, 2010 | 7 – 10 pm Miami Poster Show is an exhibit of a series of related posters produced by artist Philip Brooker for the inaugural year of the Miami Poster Project, a brand-new community initiative. The exhibit’s intent is to update Miami’s image, and to launch a yearly contest for the public to create their own version of how they portray Miami. HOME WORK October 22 – November 21, 2010 Opening Reception: Saturday, October 23, 2010 | 7 – 10 pm This annual showcase presents our newest editions to the ArtCenter’s Juried Artist Residency Program, and is a testament to the talented hard working individuals that compose the dynamic environment of the ArtCenter. Home Work will transform the gallery into an interior where the artists use the home or home furnishings to compliment or comment on their works concept or materiality.

Good N’ Plenty will spotlight ArtCenter artists, from the first year the ArtCenter opened its doors in 1984 to present day. This show will highlight how the ACSF has influenced the work of artists during the most exciting time of the year.

ARTCENTER/ SOUTH FLORIDA: JURIED ARTIST RESIDENCY PROGRAM Meet some of South Florida’s most talented artists at our studios located at 800, 810 and 924 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach FL 33139.

EDUCATION

STUDIOS

ART BASEL: GOOD N’ PLENTY November 26 – January 2, 2011 Opening Reception: Wednesday, December 1st, 2010 | 8 – 10 pm

ARTCENTER/SOUTH FLORIDA LINCOLN ROAD’S SCHOOL OF ART THE SCHOOL AT 924 offers classes in drawing, painting, printmaking, digital photo, sewing, glass & accessory design THE ANNEX AT 800 offers lectures and classes in jewelry & traditional photography courses Evening, weekend and weekday classes and workshops are available.. For class descriptions, schedules and fees please visit www.artcentersf.org or call us @ 305.674.8278

Exhibitions and programs at ArtCenter/ South Florida are made possible through grants from the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; Tropiculture, Greater Miami; the City of Miami Beach Cultural Arts Council; the City of Miami Beach Community Development Block Grant ; the Miami Beach Mayor and City Commissioners and the State of Florida, Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Arts Council; the Dade Community Foundation; and the Walgreen’s Company. ArtCenter/ South Florida is a registered 501(c) 3. Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services registration # sc-06163. One hundred percent of all contributions are received by this organization. A copy of the official registration and financial information may be obtained from the Division of Consumer Services by calling 800.435.7352 within the State. Registration doesn’t imply endorsement, approval or recommendation by the State.


contents

October/November

2010

Vo l . 1 , N o . 4

on the cover: nick cave, SOUNDSUIT, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY right: nick cave, SOUNDSUIT, 2009, HUMAN HAIR, METAL ARMATURE, 98”H X 29”W X 25”D, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY photographs by james prinz

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NICK CAVE: Meet me at the center of the Earth O N V I E W AT T H E N O R T O N M U S E U M O F A R T, W E S T PA L M B E A C H

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Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth

An exuberant display of dazzling creations, by Chicago-based artist Nick Cave, awaits at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth is comprised of over thirty multilayered, mixed-media, wearable sculptures, called “Soundsuits”—derived from the audible sounds made by the suits when worn. The result is a captivating visual and performing arts experience that will entice viewers of all ages.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

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MOCA, North Miami hosts a stunning exhibition featuring artist Shinique Smith, whose work combines social and cultural references with a broad array of sources, including African American art, minimal sculpture and Japanese calligraphy.

The Museum of Art/ Fort Lauderdale presents the most comprehensive display of drawings ever assembled by Pop Art star Tom Wesselmann.

The Boca Raton Museum of Art debuts a series of eye-popping paintings by acclaimed photo-realist painter Robert Cottingham.

shinique smith: menagerie

tom wesselmann draws

robert cottingham: 20 ways to see a star

On View Destination:

washington, DC

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Washington DC’s outstanding art museums

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master plan: VISIONARY ARCHITECTS AND THEIR UTOPIAN WORLDS

Sustainable architecture, urban planning, and utopia are explored through models, drawings and animations by six leading architects, at Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Winter Park.

top (left to right): Shinique Smith, Twilight’s Compendium, 2009 , installation view: Denver Art Museum, photo: Jeff Wells; tom wesselmann, Drawing version of Bedroom Painting # 24, © the estate of Tom Wesselmann; robert cottingham, Southern Star, Courtesy of the American Image Atelier; Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, Crystal Center, © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

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commentary

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muse

Through his art, Malcolm Luckin battles the ravages of Parkinson’s disease.

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Dominique Labauvie

The lines of Dominique’s sculpture react to the surroundings, similar to musical notes of a composition.

calendar

Museum exhibitions

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Spotlight

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gallery

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Retrospective

ellen harvey

pictured: ellen harvey, The Nudist Museum (detail), 2010, 54 paintings in oil, second-hand frames, tape, collaged wallpaper, courtesy of the artist, Photo: Jan Baracz

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Yinka blends historical styles with “African” motifs in a playful, visually and conceptually engaging display.

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A selection of gallery artists

Profile

A series of works by Ellen Harvey is on view at the Bass Museum of Art in Miami. Ellen Harvey: The Nudist Museum includes 54 paintings, copied over from the Museum’s collection, showcasing a wide variety of different historical paradigms of nudity.

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charles turzak

American modernist Charles Turzak (18991986), is celebrated in an exhibition of woodcuts and paintings from the artist’s long and prolific career.


LES LALANNE AT FAIRCHILD, NOVEMBER 30, 2010

10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, FL 33156 • 305.667.1651 • www.fairchildgarden.org


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M A G A Z I N E

A s t h e s e a s o n c h a n g e s , we welcome an enticing array of Fall exhibitions. This issue includes On View’s largest Calendar to date—just brimming with entertaining and inspirational works. Our cover story, on pg. 50, features Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth, a dazzling, visual and performing arts experience which showcases imaginative, wearable sculptures that are, quite simply, a must-see for viewers of all ages. Stunning, multi-media works by New York-based artist, Shinique Smith, are on view in Shinique Smith: Menagerie, on pg. 58, where vibrant and exuberant paintings, sculptures and installations burst with color and texture. From the mundane to the sensual, larger-thanlife representations of everyday objects, as well as a celebration of sexuality, are presented through the works of a Pop Art icon in Tom Wesselmann Draws, on pg. 64. Photo-realism meets vintage Americana in a series of eye-popping paintings in Robert Cottingham: 20 Ways to See a Star, on pg. 70. And six leading architects shed light on the creative and practical processes involved with sustainable architecture and urban planning in MASTER/Plan: Visionary Architects and Their Utopian Worlds, on pg. 76. As always, we invite you to experience these world-class offerings through the pages of On View but hope we can also inspire you to venture out and see these amazing shows firsthand.

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

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INSIDE OUT: PHOTOGRAPHY AFTER FORM SELECTIONS FROM THE ELLA FONTANALS-CISNEROS COLLECTION CO-CURATED BY SIMON BAKER & TANYA BARSON

UTA BARTH, SUNDIAL, (07.13), 2007.

December 1, 2010 - March 6, 2011 Hours: Thursday to Sunday: 10am - 4pm Special hours during Art Basel Miami Beach: Wednesday, Dec. 1 - Sunday Dec. 5: 9am - 4pm

1018 N. Miami Ave. Miami, FL 33136 Tel: 305.455.3380 www.cifo.org


MUSE

Hope A N I N S P I R AT I O N A L S T O RY

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SIXTY-TWO YEAR OLD

Jacksonville Beach artist, Malcolm Luckin, has a passion for art and for life. He’s spent decades capturing still images and filming documentaries. He’s travelled the world and photographed the starving and homeless in Haiti, the Philippines and India. But in 2004, Luckin was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and the affliction now keeps him from holding a camera steady or maintaining focus with his eyes. The disease has pushed Luckin to reinvent his medium and


MUSE

...I’m hoping others may realize that they, too, can create beyond fear and limitations. tools. Lacking the funding for materials, he utilizes what’s free—trash. And his experimentation with unconventional materials and methods is what first attracted the attention of artist Lois Simon, who met Luckin while volunteering for Hart Felt

ministries, a Jacksonville organization that reaches out to people with special needs, like Malcolm. Lois encouraged the artist and helped organize and curate an exhibition of his work at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, where Luckin’s current collection is on display through November 6th. “The show,” says Simon, “is not really about selling. It’s to show what you can do and giving other people hope.” Through his art, he continues to battle the depression, loneliness and insomnia that have resulted from the disease. “Drastic changes in my circumstances will not prevent me from continuing with my creative expression,” Lukin said. “Before Parkinson’s disease totally robs me, I refuse to waste

PICTURED: malcolm luckin, self portrait, courtesy of the artist EXHIBITION: through 11.06.2010, THE CULTURAL CENTER, Ponte Vedra Beach www.ccpvb.org

a moment ... I’m hoping others may realize that they, too, can create beyond fear and limitations.” O n V iew OnV

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CALENDAR Current

10-11.2010 BOCA RATON 10.12-05.01.2011

Latin American Art from the Museum’s Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Exhibitions

the most important 20th century Latin American artists, including: Enrique Castro-Cid, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Julio Larraz, Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Zúñiga. 10.12-01.09.2011

Robert Cottingham: Twenty Ways to See a Star Boca Raton Museum of Art

This sampling of Latin American art, from the Museum’s collections, features 20 works by many of www.bocamuseum.org This show debuts a series of 20 eyepopping paintings by acclaimed photorealist painter and printmaker, Robert

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Cottingham, who established himself, in the early 1970s, as one of the first generation photorealists alongside such renowned artists as Richard Estes and Chuck Close. Abstraction and realism are skillfully wed in Cottingham’s shimmering paintings depicting the vanishing objects and icons of American culture. (See story on pg. 70.)

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Fine prints have been admired for their great artistic diversity and technical virtuosity since their origin in the 15th century. Examples by masters

1. Julio Larraz, Luna, 1999, oil on canvas, 55 x 73”, Museum Permanent Collection, gift of the artist 2. Robert Cottingham, Southern Star, 2009, silkscreen on canvas, 79 x 79”, courtesy of the American Image Atelier 3. Pablo Picasso, Faune dévoilant une dormeuse (Jupiter et Antiope, d’après Rembrandt), [Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt)], 1936, etching with aquatint on paper, 12-3/8 x 16-3/8”, Boca Raton Museum of Art Permanent Collection, bequest of Isadore and Kelly Friedman

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THE JAGUAR’S SPOTS ANCIENT MESOAMERICAN ART FROM THE UM LOWE ART MUSEUM

ON VIEW THROUGH OCTOBER 31, 2010

Related Events: October 7- LoweDown Happy Hour October 28- Closing Reception October 30- Adult Workshop For more information please visit our website: www.lowemuseum.org

Olmec (Gulf Coast, Mexico) ca. 1500-400 BCE, Mask, green jade

5000 Years of World Art Lowe Art Museum 1301 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33124 www.lowemuseum.org 305.284.3535 Exhibition organized by the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami. Curated by Dr. Traci Ardren, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Women's and Gender Studies Program at the University of Miami. Funding through the Jay W. Jensen and John W. and Thelma S. Jensen Endowment Fund with additional support by The State of Florida, Division of Cultural Affairs, The Florida Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners, and with the support of the City of Coral Gables. Additional funding provided by the Office of the Consul General of Mexico Miami, the Cultural Institute of Mexico Miami, HSBC Private Bank, E.R. Roberts Foundation, and Sergio Garcia-Granados.


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of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries include works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Francisco de Goya and Pablo Picasso, each of whom is celebrated for his pioneering experiments in graphic art. 10.12-01.09.2011

Valerio Adami Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Valerio Adami first

came to international prominence in the 1960s with Nouvelle Figuration, the French intellectual version of Pop Art. This exhibition includes 23 paintings representing

more than 4 decades of work. Adami’s famous Pop Art colors and flat forms with thick black contours evoke the appearance of cartoons, yet his imagery plays a fundamental role in conveying social, philosophical and literary references. CORAL GABLES

for uniquely documenting fleeting human moments of both humor and poetry, particularly against the backdrop of gritty urban scenes.

Thru 01.2011

Thru 10.31

Frank Paulin: An American Documentarian Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

The Jaguar’s Spots: Ancient Mesoamerican Art from the Lowe Art Museum Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.lowemuseum.org

A gift of 30 photographs by American photographer, Frank Paulin, has been made to the Lowe and are currently on display. Paulin is recognized

www.lowemuseum.org

This comprehensive exhibition includes a selection of 175 objects, from the Museum’s perma-

nent collection, that explore the complex relationship between art and the natural world. Pieces from the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec areas, spanning

a period of over 2,000 years, are on view. DAYTONA BEACH Thru 11.14

Spruce Creek and the St. Johns River: Silverprint Photography of Lee Dunkel Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

1. Valerio Adami, Finlandia, ca. 1987, acrylic on canvas, 79 x 105”, courtesy of Fondo Adami, Fondazione Europea del Disegno 2. Frank Paulin, Flower Messenger, Times Square, 1955 (printed later), gelatin silver print, 13 x 19-3/8”, gift of Bruce Silverstein, ©Frank Paulin; courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery 3. Olmec (Gulf Coast, Mexico), Mask, ca. 1500-400 BCE, green jade, 4-7/8 x 4-3/8 x 3”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Barry Fitzmorris

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OCTOBER 12, 2010 THROUGH JANUARY 9, 2011

Valerio Adami

VALERIO ADAMI (Italian, 1935-), Quadri Nel Paesaggio [Pictures In The Landscape], 2008, acrylic on canvas, 78 x 58 inches. Courtesy of Fondo Adami, Fondazione Europea del Disegno

ALSO ON EXHIBITION Robert Cottingham: Twenty Ways to See a Star 501 Plaza Real | Boca Raton, Florida bocamuseum.org | 561.392.2500

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso Latin American Art From the Museum’s Collection


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Daytona Beach continued...

Pockets of pristine Florida landscape are captured in this exquisite display of black

and white environmental and landscape photography by Lee Dunkel. (See story in the Aug./Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 64.) Thru 11.28

The Weird and Wonderful: Unique Decorative Arts from the Lightner Museum, St. Augustine Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Otto C. Lightner left behind an outstanding legacy through art objects and artifacts with international flair, relating to science and industry of the late 19th century. This exhibition explores and highlights some of his most exciting and historic purchases and includes: swan and Sphinx-decorated Egyptian revival furniture; oversized Oriental and European porcelains; Tiffany, Gallé and Brilliantcut glass; and other

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Thru 01.09.2011

Woof! Art of the Dog Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Contemporary portraits of dogs of all sizes, shapes and breeds are celebrated through paintings by artists and craftsmen such as: Ron Burns, Will Rafuse, George Rodrigue and William Wegman. Thru 11.07

richly ornamented objets d’art.

Home Stills consists of a series of largescale photographs and drawings that look at domestic gender role and identity. Schmidt’s

Bastienne Schmidt: Home Stills

work is influenced and informed by commercial photography from the ’50s and ’60s, which depicts the lives of women at home in different poses of domesticity and gender stereotypes.

1. Lee Dunkel, Spruce Creek 2. The Mandrill, Meissen porcelain, 19th century, 3’ h, from the collection of Lightner Museum, St. Augustine 3. Ron Burns, Madeline, n.d., giclée on canvas, 24 x 18” 4. Bastienne Schmidt, Home Stills (detail)

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Thru 12.16

Elaine Ling: Photographs Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Elaine Ling explores the shifting equilibrium between nature and the man-made in eloquent portraits and documents from the margins of communities and societies and the far-flung corners of the world. This exhibition brings together 2 series of her large format

photographs from 2 worlds that are utterly different; BaobabTree of Generations, from Mali, South Africa, Ivory Coast and Madagascar; and Florida Contact. Thru 11.07

Jonathan Torgovnik: Intended Consequences Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Intended Consequences portrays the intensely personal accounts of Rwandan rape victims and the children that were born as a result. Jonathan Torgovnik provides a glimpse into the lives of these women and their children through por-

traits and interviews that expose their daily struggles and feelings about raising a child who is a constant reminder of genocide. (See story in the Aug./Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 88.)

raphy and writing of his loving wife and care-partner, Judith Fox. Judith has been featured in numerous publications and her award-winning photography has been showcased

throughout the US and Europe.

Thru 12.16

Judith Fox: I Still Do Southeast Museum of Photography

D e LAND Thru 11.14

Women Painting Florida: Images of the State, 1880-1960 Florida Museum for Women Artists

www.smponline.org

I Still Do is a poignant portrayal of a man with Alzheimer’s disease, as documented through the photog-

1. Elaine Ling, Baobab-Tree of Generations, Mali 2. Jonathan Torgovnik, Sylvina with her daughter, Marianne, © Jonathan Torgovnik, courtesy Aperture Foundation 3. Judith Fox, I Still Do (detail)

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www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

Fifty major works, with Florida as subject, by notable female artists, such as Laura Woodward and Jane Peterson, are featured in this exhibition of diverse and stunning

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

DUNEDIN Thru 10.17

Sing to the Sun: The Art of Ashley Bryan Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.morikami.org

Monsters invade the Morikami Museum as vintage toys from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, inspired by Japanese tokusatsu films and TV shows, are on display in Kaijū! Monster Invasion! The exhibition features over 100 figures from an extensive private collection. (See story imagery. Their subjects in the Aug./Sept. range from gardens 2010 issue on pg. 80.) and citrus fruit to sweeping wild landscapes, local portraits and urban life. DELRAY BEACH Thru 10.17

Kaiju! Monster Invasion!

Thru 10.17

Kyoto: A Place in Art Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.dfac.org

The author or illustrator of more than

www.morikami.org

Works by painters representing art movements associated with Kyoto, Kyoto textiles, photographs of Kyoto gardens, woodblock prints, ceramics, and more, are displayed in this exhibition which explores why Kyoto remains the center of Japanese traditional culture.

30 books, Ashley Bryan’s art is infused with joy and imagination. Featured in this exhibition are a selection of his book illustrations and pow-

1. Victoria Ebbels Hutson Huntley, 1900-1971, Florida Swamp #2 (detail), ca. 1949, lithograph on paper 2. Gomora, from the TV Series, Ultraman (1966–1967), courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden 3. Courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden 4. Ashley Bryan, African Tales, image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center

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erful found-object puppets, made from treasures gathered on the shores of Little Cranberry Isle, off the coast of Maine. Thru 10.17

Visions of Enchantment: Janny Wurts & Don Maitz Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

DFAC presents the works of 2 stellar artists in the realm of science fiction and

fantasy art. This husband and wife creative team, based in Sarasota, are renown masters of the genre.

Latin American Collection Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

FORT LAUDERDALE

the 20th century, 10.16-01.09.2011 bringing a grittiness An Intimate to American painting Look at William that had, until then, Glackens and been dominated by the the Eight society portraits of Museum of Art / John Singer Sargent Ft. Lauderdale, and the picturesque Nova Southeastern coastal scenes of WinUniversity slow Homer. Included www.moafl.org in the exhibition are Along with fellow works by Glackens painters Robert Henri, and his contempoGeorge Luks, Ernest raries as well as a Lawson, Maurice special installation of Prendergast, Everlandscapes created by ett Shinn, and John Glacken from 1908 Sloan, William through the 1930s. Glackens sought to change the face of Thru 12.05 American art in Pearl and the first decade of Stanley Goodman

Pearl and Stanley Goodman began collecting Latin

American art in the early 1980s, as the field itself was being identified as an area worthy of attention, acquisition and scholarship. This exhibition investigates and explores the art of this fascinating region.

1. Janny Wurts, Taken to Task, image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center 2. William J. Glackens is a Philadelphian, newspaper clipping from unknown Philadelphia-based publication, date unknown, ink on newsprint, 7 x 4.75”, bequest of Ira Glackens 3. Diego Rivera, Stone Worker, detail, oil on canvas mounted on mason, 1945, collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman, © 2009 Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F., Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

vides testimony to the stunning range and depth and continuing talent that comes from Latin America. The exhibition spotlights the most recent gifts to the Museum. Thru 12.05

Recent Acquisitions from the Museum’s Latin American Art Collection Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Dine, Wesselmann created a body of works that helped define the visual identity of America in the 1960s. The exhibition, which spans from 1959 to 2004, includes more than 100 works, many 10.03-02.27.2011 large in scale and creTom Wesselated from materials not mann Draws usually associated with Museum of Art / drawing, including: Ft. Lauderdale, steel, aluminum, fabric Nova Southeastern and molded plastic. University (See story on pg. 64.) www.moafl.org

Tom Wesselmann was one of the originators

artistic talents of this great Olympian.

10.22-11.30

www.moafl.org

Recent Acquisitions illustrates the Museum’s commitment to add, to its contemporary holdings, art that reflects the character and heritage of Broward County’s growing Hispanic community—and pro-

FORT MYERS

forward into television, as a spokesperson for various corporations, as an advocate for breast cancer awareness and as an artist. This exhibition includes a selection of works which portray the

Peggy Fleming Art of the Olympians www.artoftheolympians.org

of Pop Art. Along with Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Jim

GAINESVILLE Thru 10.24

Highlights from the Modern Collection Harn Museum of Art

Peggy Fleming won the only Gold Medal for the US in 1968 at Grenoble. Her grace and beauty, on and off www.harn.ufl.edu the ice, have carried The Harn Museum

1. Xavier Esqueda, The Prayer of the Desert, oil on canvas 2. Tom Wesselmann, Drawing for Mouth # 3, 1963, charcoal on paper, 48 x 63-1/2”, ©The estate of Tom Wesselmann, courtesy of Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale 3. Image courtesy of Art of the Olympians Gallery

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highlights its holdings of modern American, European and Latin American art spanning the mid-19th century through the first half of the 20th century. Among the artists represented are: Claude Monet, Auguste Rodin, Childe Hassam, Gaston Lachaise, and Georgia O’Keeffe. Thru 01.02.2011

Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu



Jack Nichelson has been creating intricate

and evocative “box environments” for more than 40 years. Begun in 2000, Nichelson’s Sojourner Dream Reliquaries features 22 intricately detailed sculptures replicating the basic forms of travel trailers

from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. HOLLYWOOD 11.20-02.06.2011

Luis Alonzo Barkigia: Mundos Perfeitos Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Mundos Perfeitos offers a skewed geometric playground that speaks to the notion of Utopia, featuring an organic environment in which spheres, cubes, and planes have been transfigured and molded into aberrations of themselves. Thru 11.07

Patrick DeCastro: Quand le Soleil Brille

www.artandculturecenter.org

Haitian artist Patrick DeCastro shares the distinctive world of his personal experience with Haitian vaudou and New York high fashion in this exhibition featuring a selection of works in mixed media. Thru 01.09.2011

Sinisa Kukec: And Yet Another Wayward Landscape Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Undulating biomorphic forms, made of porcelain or plaster, and sculptures growing from found objects—some of almost

1. Claude Monet, Champ d’avoine (Oat Field), 1890, oil on canvas, gift of Michael A. Singer 2. Jack Nichelson, A Trip to the Moon, 2007,

hardwood veneer plywood construction with mixed media, collection of the artist, photo: John Knaub 3. Luis Alonzo Barkigia, installation view, courtesy of the artist 4. Patrick DeCastro, Journey, 2008, vintage picture frame, antique doll, found objects, and enamel paint, 13 x 12”, courtesy of the artist

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En Masse presents a selection of new works by Turkish-American, North Miami-based artist, Stephan Tugrul. Working with collage, Tugrul constructs new images through a process of combining found elements appropriated from a variety of source materials.

monolithic scale and others of undersized dimensions—appear in sharp contrast to the historically scriptJACKSONVILLE ed media of sculpture, craft and design. 09.17- 01.02.2011 Thru 01.09.2011

Stephan Tugrul: En Masse Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

East/West: Visually Speaking Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

www.cummer.org

reference to Western culture seems adoring, while in others, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values. 10.01-11.15

The Art of War The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

During World War II, a number of government issued posters were created to promote the American war effort and help unite the American people during a critical time in our nation’s history. The 28 posters featured in this exhibition are from the collection of Major General Gerry Maloney USAF (Ret.). LAKELAND Thru 12.12

Art and Design: Unity Polk Museum of Art

www.mocajacksonville.org

East/West: Visually Speaking, highlights 11 contemporary Chinese artists who have adapted Western ideas and art forms to create new styles of art. In some works, the

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Last in a series of exhibitions demonstrating the role of the principles of design within artworks from the

1. Sinisa Kukec, Sorry… I am a stranger here myself…, 2010, foam, epoxy, paint, graphite, and cardboard, 14 x 12 x 18”, courtesy of the artist 2. Stephan Tugrul, Release the Hounds (detail), 2009, mixed media, 48 x 60”, courtesy of the artist 3. Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China, 2002-2008, painted copper, collection of the artists 4. Adolph Trindler, She’s a WOW, Woman Ordinance Worker, 1942, 40-1/8 x 28-1/2”, collection of Major General Gerry Maloney USAF (Ret.)

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2010/2011 Exhibition Season Sept. 10 – Jan. 9  Sinisa Kukec: And Yet Another Wayward Landscape  Stephan Tugrul: En Masse Jan. 21 – Feb. 18  Abracadabra: Fourth Annual Fund-raising Art Exhibition and Raffle  Christiaan Lopez-Miro : All Roads Lead to Cassadaga

March 4 – April 10  Cristina Lei Rodriguez: Forever April 29 – June 5  Fifth All-Media Juried Biennial June 17 – Aug. 14  Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward

Plus frequently rotating exhibitions in the Project Room.

1650 Harrison Street Hollywood, FL 33020 954. 921. 3274 ArtAndCultureCenter.org

The Art and Culture Center of Hollywood is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization supported in part by its members; admissions; private entities; the City of Hollywood; the Broward County Board of County Commissioners as recommended by the Broward Cultural Council; the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture; and the National Endowment for the Arts. We welcome donations from all members of the community who wish to support our work. In addition, funding for these exhibitions is provided in part by Francie Bishop Good and David Horvitz, and the Hudson Family Fund of the Community Foundation of Broward. Image: Christina Lei Rodriguez, Community on the Edge (detail), 2004, from the collection of Arturo Mosquera.


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www.polkmuseumofart.org

Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibit focuses on unity, an effect that occurs when all of the principles of design have been applied correctly, thus creating a sense of order and completeness.

In a reprise of Visual Unity, hosted by the Morean Arts Center last year, a group of 19 regionally and nationally recognized artists have gathered for this collaborative exhibition, teaming up to produce two new creative, unexpected and unique artworks for display. Also featured are separate works representing each artist’s respective talents.

10.02-01.08.2011

10.02-01.08.2011

Visual Unity 2 Polk Museum of Art

Eye See America: Through the Lens of Joshua Mann Pailet Polk Museum of Art

eye for America, and he uses his camera to capture the people, places, and situations

that define a modern sense of Americana.

Not all photographs are printed with chemicals in a darkroom. Some are printed by computers, and others by master printers using plates and presses. This exhibition features photographs from the Polk’s permanent collection that were either digitally or manually produced. MAITLAND

10.09-01.30.2011

Thru 10.24

Photos in Ink Polk Museum of Art

Exquisite Harmony: Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson Maitland Art Center

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.artandhistory.org

Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson creates figurative collage “paintings” comprised of a diverse range of materials, including: hand-painted,

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Noted New Orleans photographer and gallery owner, Joshua Mann Pailet, has an

1. Herman Leonard, Frank Sinatra-Monte Carlo (detail), ca. 1958, silver gelatin print, gift of Peterson & Myers, P.A. & Bob and Malena Puterbaugh in memory of Judge E. Randolph Bentley 2. Jill Cannady and Tim Ludwig, Rabbit Platter, 2010, wheel thrown and altered earthenware and encaustic, photo: Randall Smith (rcsarts.com) 3. Joshua Mann Pailet, Lionel Batiste, Jazz Funeral, New Orleans (detail), 1998, gelatin silverprint, courtesy of and © Joshua Mann Pailet 4. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas (Our Lady of the Iguanas), 1996, photogravure, 29-7/8” x 25-1/8”, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, Graphicstudio Subscription Purchase through Kent Harrison Memorial Acquisition Fund

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www.artandhistory.org

hand-made, and found papers, maps, magazines, Scrabble tiles and various memorabilia. Exquisite Harmony features 35-40 collages which explore the theme of music.

Doodah DADA is the manifestation of Reedy’s distinct aesthetic and sociological experiences. Storytelling, family and faith play prominently in the creation of his art. His current works involve a more sculptural approach to the vessel and a mixed media form of painting and drawing.

um featuring selected works from the MIT Museum Collection and Florida Institute of Technology which includes: holograms, X-ray observations of

www.artcentersf.org

11.05-01.09.2011

Rob Reedy: Doodah DADA Maitland Art Center

MELBOURNE

lightning, engineered Thru 11/28 wallpaper, digital Analyze This: models of swarm intelScientific Art from ligence, and human MIT Museum and motion patterns. Artistic Science from Florida Tech Brevard Art Museum www.brevardartmuseum.org

Examine an experimental exhibition at the Brevard Art Muse-

This exhibition features a series of related posters produced by artist, illustrator, furniture maker and filmmaker, Philip Brooker, for the inaugural year of the Miami Poster Project, a brand-new initiative. The exhibit’s intent is to update Miami’s visual image and to break from the frequently stale and tourist-industry-driven imagery so often used to represent Miami. (See story in the Aug./

MIAMI 09.10-10.17

Miami Poster Project ArtCenter / South Florida

1. Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson, Sul Tasto, collage on paper, courtesy of the artist 2. Robert Reedy, Bottle (detail), clay/earthenware, 32” h 3. Marie Andree Cossette, Metamorphosis, 1981, hologram, courtesy of MIT Museum 4. Philip Brooker, Poster #4, Miami Poster Project, 2010, 6’w x 10’h

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Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 90.)

nity over the past 25 years.

11.26-01.02.2011

10.02-11.07

Art Basel: Good N’ Plenty ArtCenter / South Florida

Ellen Harvey: The Nudist Museum Bass Museum of Art

www.artcentersf.org

Good n’ Plenty spotlights ArtCenter artists, from the first year the organization’s doors

were opened, in 1984, to the present. Artists including: William Cordova, Luis Gispert, Beatriz Monteavaro, Gavin Perry, and Ellie Schneiderman, illustrate how ArtCenter has influenced their work and the commu-

that represent purity, titillation, truth, comedy, beauty, love and ugliness, as well as simple representations of the human body. (See story on pg. 88.)

Thru 11.07

Focus Gallery: Purvis Young Miami Art Museum

www.bassmuseum.org

Ellen Harvey’s Nudist Museum uses the Bass Museum’s collection to reveal a wide variety of different historical paradigms of nudity. By copying every nude in the collection, including: paintings, drawings and sculptures, from the Middle Ages to the present, Ellen showcases nudes

executed in a variety of media, including: painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, video, environmental installation and performance.

www.miamiartmuseum.org

This exhibition feaThru 10.17 tures a selection of New Work paintings that span Miami 2010 the career of Miami Miami Art painter, Purvis Young. Museum Young’s work reflects www.miamiartmuseum.org the condition experiNew Work Miami enced by residents of 2010 provides a parMiami’s Overtown, the tial snapshot of the Miami art scene at this moment. Approximately 35 artists, based in the Miami area, present new and recent artworks

1. Franklin Einspruch, Lexi and Vanessa’s House 2. Ellen Harvey, The Nudist Museum (detail), 2010, 54 paintings in oil, second-hand frames, tape, collaged wallpaper, photo: Jan Baracz, courtesy of the artist 3. Don Lambert, Flatland, 2009, maple, archival paper, Dibond, motors and controller, 120 x 103 x 26”, courtesy of the artist and Country Club–Cincinnati ï Los Angeles, photo: courtesy of Cincinnati Museum of Art 4. Purvis Young, Untitled (Horses), circa 1985-1999, paint on fiberboard, 48 x 48 x 1/4”, collection Miami Art Museum, gift of The Rubell Family Collection, courtesy of Miami Art Museum, photo: Peter Harholdt

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MOVING IN PLACE

101 West Flagler Street

Miami, Florida, 33130

305. 375. 3000

miamiartmuseum.org


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Miami continued...

historic African American neighborhood that was transformed from a thriving community to an impoverished inner-city environment, in the 1960s and ’70s, when interstate 95 was erected. Against this backdrop, Young’s work serves as inspiration for the capacity of the creative spirit to reclaim, transform, restore and renew. 11.07-03.06.2011

Susan Rothenberg: Moving in Place Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Moving in Place features a select group of 25 paintings, ranging from Rothenberg’s early horse paintings of the mid-1970s to her most recent body

of work, and explores a number of central motifs that have occurred throughout her 35-year career. Included in the exhibition are two major paintings from Miami Art Museum’s permanent collection, Folded

Buddha (1987–88) and Pin Wheel (1988). Thru 11.19

Shinique Smith: Menagerie Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Shinique Smith’s works combine complex social and cultural references

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Highlighting works from MOCA’s permanent collection, this with a broad array exhibition includes of sources, including key pieces such as African American art, an early painting by color field painting, Leon Golub, sculpminimal sculpture ture relief by Robert and Japanese calligMorris, an installation raphy. Her sculpture by Rivane Neuenand installations are schwander, work by composed of collecpioneering feminist tions and accumulaartist Hannah Willke, tions of found objects photographs by Elad and clothing, which Lassry and a video she ties together to projection by Alex form minimal cubes Hubbard, among or wraps into bundles. other pivotal works in (See story on pg. 58.) MOCA’s holdings. Thru 11.07

Pivot Points IV: Selections from MOCA’s Permanent Collection

1. Susan Rothenberg, Pin Wheel, 1988, 95 x 142-3/4”, Collection Miami Art Museum, promised gift of Mimi Floback 2. Shinique Smith, Twilight’s Compendium, 2009, mixed media, temporary site specific installation, dimensions variable, installation view: Denver Art Museum, Denver; Embrace!, November 14, 2009-April 4, 2010; photo: Jeff Wells 3. Ann-Sofi Siden, Station 10 and Back Again, 2001, DVD Installation, 17 channels, b/w silent , 18 surveillance monitors, 81-3/4 x 115 x 16”, collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, gift of the Martin Z. Margulies Foundation

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Henri Cartier-Bresson. Bruce Weber: These photographs put Haiti / Little Haiti a human face on the Museum of consequences of the Contemporary United States’ immiArt, North Miami gration policy and the www.mocanomi.org struggles of Haitian Haiti/Little Haiti inimmigrants. cludes approximately 75 photographs of 10.13-01.02.2011 11.18-02.13.2011

Miami’s Haitian community, from 2003 to the present, by photographer Bruce Weber. Although best known for his fashion photography and celebrity portraits for Vogue and Vanity Fair, Weber also considers himself a street photographer in the tradition of

Embracing Modernity: Venezuelan Geometric Abstraction The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

Embracing Modernity presents a historical

overview of the origins of the country’s abstract movement, from the late 1940s to the ’60s, featuring works by Omar Carreño, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Gertrude Goldschmidt (Gego), Gerd Leufert, Mateo Manaure, Alejandro Otero, Mercedes Pardo, Jesus Rafael Soto, and Oswaldo Vigas, among others. 10.13-12.05

Florida Artists Series: Anomie 1492-2006 Arnold Mesches The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

paintings and collages. Mesches’ ANOMIE series includes references to the overlapping histories and multi-cultural aspects of life. The 48 large acrylic paintings and 150 collages encompass postmodern concepts with old master techniques and structures. 10.13.10-1.02.2011

Sequentia: Xavier Cortada The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

thefrost.fiu.edu

Throughout his 65year career as an artist and professor, Arnold Mesches has woven many narratives into lush and virtuosic

thefrost.fiu.edu

Xavier Cortada’s solo exhibit at the Frost

1. Bruce Weber, Parishioner at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church, Little Haiti, Miami, May 11th, 2003 2. Alejandro Otero, De uso personal, 1965, mixed media, 13-3/4 x 10-5/8”, courtesy of The Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection 3. Arnold Mesches, Anomie 1910: Family Portrait, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 58”, courtesy of the artist

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Thru 02.20.2011

Speed Limits The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Art Museum explores the sequence of events that make up life on the planet from the molecular to the monumental. The title of the exhibit also references a series of actions Cortada will set in motion to create a unique strand of DNA. The artist will work with a molecular biologist to synthesize an actual DNA strand made from a sequence generated by museum visitors using Cortada’s art.

One hundred years ago, the Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism proclaimed that “the world’s magnificence has been

including: posters, books, drawings, clocks and appliances, paintings, video, and sound installations. (See story in the Aug./ Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 72.) NAPLES 10.01-12.05

11.14-06.30.2011

Don Gorvett: Woodcuts and Drawings Naples Museum of Art

Louise Nevelson: Dawn’s Forest Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.” Speed Limits probes the powers and limits of the modern era’s cult of speed. The exhibition features a variety of media,

evocative tonal harmonies not usually associated with woodcuts.

Don Gorvett is a New England artist who produces powerful images of the harbors, cities and architecture found along the rocky coasts of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. With a painter’s eye for color, Gorvett produces prints with elegant and

www.thephil.org

Dawn’s Forest consists of a series of sculptures by Louise Nevelson, created in the mid1980s and containing elements from previ-

1. Xavier Cortada, (The Four Nucleotides:) Cytosine, 2010, oil on canvas, 60 x 48”, courtesy of the artist 2. Edmond van Dooren (1896-1965), Cityscape (detail), ca.1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection 3. Don Gorvett, Night Lights, 1999, reduction woodcut, 29 x 31-1/2”,
© Don Gorvett, courtesy of Gravure Gallery, Gloucester, Massachusetts 4. Louise Nevelson, Dawn’s Forest (detail), 1986, painted balsa-plywood,
collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of GA-Met, a joint venture Georgia-Pacific, LLC,
© 2010 Estate of Louise Nevelson /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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Celebrate Art Basel Miami Beach at The Frost Art Museum

with

Enrique MartĂ­nez Celaya Sunday, December 5, 2010 9:30am - 12:00pm The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU

Complimentary Outdoor Breakfast

Informal talk with Enrique MartĂ­nez Celaya

Guided Tours of the Sculpture Park

Also on view: Embracing Modernity: Venezuelan Geometric Abstraction Sequentia by Xavier Cortada Florida Artist Series: Selections from Anomie 1492-2006 by Arnold Mesches

An official Art Basel Miami Beach sponsored event

For more information, call 305.348.2890 or visit http://thefrost.fiu.edu The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum Florida International University Modesto A. Maidique Campus 10975 SW 17th Street Miami, Florida 33199

Smithsonian Institution Affiliations Program


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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

ous sculptures dating to 1971. Nevelson (1899-1988) was one of the most important and influential figures in postwar American art, and the most internationally celebrated woman artist of her time. Her work continues to inspire contemporary sculptors today.

parts of his entire body of work. Assael’s paintings and drawings are both featured in this comprehensive exhibition. 10.01-12.26

10.01-01.09.2011

Steven Assael: Illusions of Reality Naples Museum of Art

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

www.thephil.org

Steven Assael is widely recognized as one of the leading figurative artists working today. A gifted painter, Assael is also a brilliant draftsman whose extraordinary pencil, charcoal and ink drawings are significant

Stephen Knapp began his artistic career as a fine art photographer. His curiosity about the reflective and refractive qualities of light led to his working with ceramic glazes and mosaic tiles, and finally with works constructed of kiln-formed glass. Called the first new art medium of the 21st century, Lightpaintings embody an inherently unique form of art that transforms the gallery environment and envelops the viewer in pure, glowing colors. 10.01-06.30.2011

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

This jewel of an exhibition recreates the atmosphere of Olga Hirshhorn’s art-packed house in Washington, DC, known as “The Mouse House,” and features intimate-sized

works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Giacometti, de Kooning and many others. Hirshhorn, a noted collector and part-time Naples resident, is the widow of Joseph Hirshhorn, founding donor of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC.

1. Steven Assael, Cassandra & Julie, 2008, oil on board, 33-1/2 x 48-1/4”, © Steven Assael, courtesy of Forum Gallery, NY 2. Stephen Knapp, Capriccio, 2003, light, glass and stainless steel,
11’ x 8’ x 10”, © Stephen Knapp 3. Image courtesy of Naples Museum of Art

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Design mirrors society. Technological advances are reflected in the shape of the items we surround ourselves with. Thousands of examples can be found at The Wolfsonian–FIU. And a few thousand more examples can be found at home.

Dressing table, 1929 Designed by Kem Weber

THE MUSEUM OF THINKISM 1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida www.wolfsonian.org


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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

sometimes unexpected examples of art glass. OCALA 10.23-01.09.2011 10.01-01.15.2011

Three Visions in Glass:
Cristiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira and Laura de Santillana Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Cristiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira and Laura de Santillana live in Venice and work in Murano, Italy—a mecca for the study and production of glass art. Working outside the expected forms, styles and techniques of traditional Murano glassmakers, these artists have created exceptional and

the eyes of some of America’s most important painters, including: Thomas Hart Benton, Frederick Carl Frieseke and Martin Johnson Heade.

Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965 ORLANDO Appleton Museum of Art Thru 01.02.2011 www.appletonmuseum.org Against All Odds: The Art of the Highwaymen Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

From the collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown are 69 paintings from one of the largest and most significant assemblages of Floridabased art. The works include views of Florida’s beaches, rivers, swamps and farmlands as seen through

The “Highwaymen” began as a group of African American artists who, against all odds, managed to prosper selling their paintings in the segregated South of the 1950s and ’60s. Learn about their fascinating story and see paintings by 26 artists, including

A. E. “Bean” Backus, an accomplished white Florida landscape artist who encouraged and inspired the Highwaymen. Thru 10.17

The Story of Harness Racing by Currier & Ives from the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame, Goshen, N.Y. Orange County Regional History Center

1. Laura de Santillana, Arancio, Meteor, 2008, hand-blown and shaped glass, 23-1/4 x 23-3/4”,
© Laura de Santillana, courtesy of Barry Friedman Ltd. 2. Charles Christian Eisele, Evening on the Suwannee River, 1885 3. Highwaymen painting from the collection of Geoff and Patti Cook 4. Color lithograph after James Henry Wright (1813-1883), Rysdyk’s Hambletonian, 1876, 
25 x 33”, 
published by Currier and Ives (1857-1907),
 The Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame, Goshen, NY

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www.thehistorycenter.org

Featured in this exhibition are more than 30 beautiful, detailed Currier & Ives lithographs depicting great trotting horses, bucolic mid-19th century scenes, comedic adventures, and a hands-on tack trunk where visitors can examine racing equipment and equine care tools. Thru 10.31

Dawn Roe: The Tree Alone Orlando Museum of Art

memory, and attempts to address how these issues intersect within and between the still and moving image.

imaginative and eccentric creative artists. The exhibition features approximately 170 objects drawn from the Gorey Charitable Trust, including selections from: The Gashly-crumb Tinies,

Thru 10.31

Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Elegant Enigmas presents the work www.omart.org of master artist and Dawn’s studio pracauthor, Edward tice involves both the Gorey (1925-2000). singular and combined Edward’s signature use of photographs pen-and-ink illustraand digital video. Her tions and witty writwork is concerned ings have led him with themes of perto be considered one ception, time and of America’s most

The Unstrung Harp, The Doubtful Guest, The Gilded Bat and other well-known publications. (See story in the Aug./Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 56.)

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

More than 40 paintings and sculptures, from the nation’s early years through the 20th century, are included in this exhibition. These works reflect many important trends in American art. Among the artists represented are: Robert Henri, Herman Herzog, George Inness, Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Charles Sheeler.

Thru 12.31

The American Collection

1. Dawn Roe, What It’s Like Down Here #2 (detail), 2010, dimensions variable, archival pigment print on paper, collection of the artist 2. ©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, Edward Gorey, Mr C(lavius) F(rederick) Earbrass is, of course, the well-known novelist, illustration for The Unstrung Harp; Or, Mr Earbrass Writes a Novel, 1953, pen & ink, 4-1/2 x 3-1/2”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, exhibition organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, PA 3. Herman Herzog, The St. Johns River Entering the Atlantic Ocean, ca. 1888-1890, oil on canvas, 62-1/2 x 52-1/2”, on long-term loan from the Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc

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10.15-01.30.2011

Maury Hurt & Grady Kimsey The Mennello Museum of American Art

Sacred Spaces: Devotional Images with Photography by Alex Harris The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

A beautiful selection of 18th to 20th century devotional artworks, www.mennellomuseum.com including retablos Maury Hurt’s paintings (paintings on tin or capture landscapes, wooden panels) and dreamscapes and porbultos (carvings in traits with a technical the round) depict the brilliance and authenfaith of generations, ticity of vision that emerging in religious transports the viewer objects set in the backinto another realm. ground of everyday Fusing dream-like fantasy with the interior physiological tensions of Surrealism, Grady Kimsey’s mixed-media figurative sculptures evoke mystery and narrative implications. 10.15-01.30.2011

lives. A dramatic series of color photographs by respected American artist, Alex Harris, provide context for the religious artworks.

McCann, one finds elaborate, layered narrative paintings, each scene depicting both action and human interaction.

ORMOND

PANAMA CITY

BEACH

11.05-12.04

Faces and Facets Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida www.vac.org.cn

In its 22nd year, this show is a regional 10.09-11.28 favorite and encomThe Tipping passes black and Point white and color imOrmond Memorial ages in a variety of Art Museum styles and techniques. & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

This solo exhibition features the works of Robert McCann. Stepping into the worlds created by

1. Maury Hurt, The Fox, 1970, oil on canvas, from the collection of Dr. Francis Martin, Jr. 2. Jose Renito Ortega, Bulto, ca. 1830-1870 3. Robert McCann, Fear Factor vs. Cops (detail), 2007, oil on panel, 43 x 86” 4. Photo (detail): Dave Head, courtesy of the artist and Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

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Pa n a m a C i t y c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 10.30

Niles Cruz: Assemblage, Collaged Mixed Media Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

PENSACOLA

SARASOTA

Thru 10.24

Thru 01.30.2011

Jayne Holsinger: Women Drivers Pensacola Museum of Art

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes of Central Asia The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.pensacola museumofart.org

This exhibition consists of 35 paintings

stones, each piece is imbued with symmetrical, yet organic, designs drawn from the tribes’ mythological interpretations of the natural world. 10.09-01.02.2011

www.ringling.org

Exquisite silver and gilt jewelry from the Turkomen tribes of www.vac.org.cn Iran, Afghanistan and Niles Cruz works Turkmenistan are prein mixed media, sented in this exhibicreating lyrical works from Jayne Holsinger’s tion. Included are more that suggest emotion Women Driving series. than 40 hand crafted and imminent transJayne finds inspiraobjects. Decorated formation through tion in her Midwestern with gilding, chains the play of color roots and by exploring and semi-precious and form. He utilizes the elements of pholinear shapes that tography in painting. multiply, interconThe paintings in this nect, reflect and particular series are expand into intricate personal and revealing and engaging patportraits of women in terns. the act of driving.

Threads of Gold: Renaissance Tapestries from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

World-renowned for its artistic treasures, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria, houses the art collections formed over centuries by successive generations of the House of Hapsburg, Austria’s royal family. Six of the eight

1. Niles Cruz, Rub The Bright Stone, 2006,
33 x 42-1/2”,
mixed media on transparencies 2. Jayne Holsinger, Bree and Casey, 2001, courtesy of the artist and Kenise Barnes Fine Arts, Larchmont, NY 3. Teke Tribe, Tumar (Amulet/Breastplate), dated first half of 20th century, gift of Mr. Stephen Va. C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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Sarasota continued...

tapestries presented in this exhibition are part of a set once owned by the Emperor Matthias and two are from another 16th century set that belonged to the Emperor Franz I. All of the tapestries

www.ringling.org

With the Greatest of Ease features posters printed in the 19th and 20th centuries featuring some of the most amazing feats performed above the circus ring. Thru 10.24

were recently and Yinka Shonibare painstakingly restored. MBE: Mother Thru 12.13

With the Greatest of Ease The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

and Father Worked Hard so I Can Play The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

The skill and daring of aerial artists has long been a popular subject for circus advertising.

Yinka is well known for his exploration of race and class through the use of headless mannequins dressed in period styles. This visually and conceptually engaging exhibition includes figures of playful children, dressed in Victorian costumes, appearing throughout the Ringling’s Astor galleries. (See story on pg. 90.) SAINT PETERSBURG Thru 01.09.2011

Transcending Vision: American Impressionism, 1870–1940, from the Bank of America Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.fine-arts.org

This spectacular exhibition features approximately 125 paintings, drawings, and prints by more than 70 artists. The survey mainly comprises oil

paintings and encompasses the Hudson River School, American Impressionism, and a few works on the cusp of Modernism. Thru 12.2010

Sharing Salvador: The History of the Dalí Museum and the Morse Collection

1. Brussels, Workshop of Frans Geubels, Romulus Invites the Neighbors to the Combat Games (detail), ca. 1560, wool, silk, silver and gold, courtesy of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Kunstkammer 2. Strobridge Lithographing Co., 1899, Forepaugh-Sells Shows Combined: Zorella, Ryan and Weitzel 3. Yinka Shonibare MBE, Boy with Marionette, 2009, life-size fiberglass mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton, mixed media, 44-1/2 x 19 x 42”, courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery, NY, photo: Jason Mandella 4. Robert Spencer (1879-1931), Bathers (detail), ca. 1920, oil on canvas, Bank of America Collection

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Dalí Museum

black & white prints that were made in the ’60s and ’70s by photographers Bhupendra Karia (1936-1994) and Derry Moore (1937- ).

TAMPA

www.thedali.org

Sharing Salvador presents a selection of paintings, objects and photographs accompanied by an historical narrative on the origins of the Dalí Museum. This important exhibition—the last in the Museum’s current location before the opening of the new Dalí Museum on January 11, 2011—pays

Thru 01.03.2011

Thru 11.06

Bhupendra Karia and Derry Moore: Stillness and Shadows/ Vintage Photographs of India Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

special homage to the Museum’s benefactors, the Morse Family.

This exhibition records a pivotal time in Indian history when the grandeur of India’s past met up with the dramatic repositioning of a post-colonial society. This dynamic shift is seen in the vintage

Leo Villareal: Recent Works Tampa Museum of Art

as personalities that develop into something organic. By building sequences and defining the conditions, the artist creates an immersive experience defined by light. (See story in the Aug./Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 50.) Thru 01.16.2011

www.tampamuseum.org

Leo Villareal explores the potency of light. He creates complex patterns of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on simple rules and encoded programming. While mathematical in origin, these pixels and patterns act

Musical Lines in My Hands: The Work of Dominique Labauvie Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

The lines of Dominique’s sculpture react to the surroundings, similar to musical notes of a composition. Organized around the introduction of a new site-specific work for the museum’s gallery, this exhibition is complemented by

1. Salvador Dalí with Reynolds and Eleanor Morse, 1943, The Dalí Museum Archives, St. Petersburg, Florida 2. Derry Moore, Amitra Patel, Daughter of Sardar Patel, New Dehli, 1976, © Derry Moore, courtesy sepia EYE 3. Leo Villareal, Solaris, 2005/2010, light emitting diodes, microcontroller, custom software, Plexiglas, and wood; edition 2 of 3, courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

approximately 7 interior works and 3 outdoor works, in addition to a site-specific wall

multi-media instalThe biggest names lations that focus on in 20th century phothe theme of urbantography, including: ism over a 3-decade Diane Arbus, Walker period. The Hidden Evans and Weegee City explores what are featured in this makes a city a city, exhibition, which bronze sculptures and acknowledges helps celebrate Vascreated by American the interconnections sar’s 150th birthday artists for the garden. and tensions among in 2011. the professionally drawing. (See story on Thru 12.05 designed, the imagipg. 92.) Thru 01.03.2011 The Hidden City: nary designed and the The American Selections make-shift. Works by 11.18-01.29.2011 Impressionists in from the Martin Doug Aitken, Peter Naked City: Pho- the Garden Z. Margulies Bialobrzeski, Donna tographs from Tampa Foundation Dennis, Pedro Cabrita Vassar College’s Museum of Art Tampa Reis and Do-Ho Suh Frances Lehman www.tampamuseum.org Museum of Art are on view.
 Loeb Art Center The theme of the Florida Museum garden in American Thru 01.16.2011 of Photographic art and society, in the 80s Photography Arts late 19th and early from the Collection 20th centuries, is exTampa plored in this display Museum of Art of paintings depicting www.tampamuseum.org European and Amerwww.tampamuseum.org The decade of the ican gardens by This special exhibi1980s was a pivotal American Imprestion features interperiod for the mesionists, along with national artists with dium of photography www.fmopa.org

1. Dominique Labauvie, Twist, 2008, forged and waxed steel, courtesy of the artist and Haim Chanin Fine Arts 2. Weegee [Arthur H. Fellig], Hollywood Premier, 1953, gelatin silver print, Collection The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, © Weegee / International Center for Photography/Getty Images 3. Carl Frederick Frieseke (1874-1939), The Garden Umbrella, ca. 1910, oil on canvas, 32 x 32”, Telfair Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia, bequest of Elizabeth Millar (Mrs. Bernice Frost) Bullard 4. Doug Aitken, Plateau, detail, 2002, Duratran in aluminum lightbox, edition 1 of 3, 52 x 122 x 14”, collection of Martin Z. Margulies

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

if only for the plurality of styles and approaches it witnessed. This exhibition provides a host of opportunities for exploration into a decade that, for many of us, seems like only yesterday—whereas for others it is truly of another century.

Inspired by the architecture and culture of his native Havana, Carlos Garaicoa explores issues relevant to global, contemporary society, such as urbanism, politics,

history and human rights, in large-scale installations. (See story in the Aug./Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 92.)

series of retrospectives organized by the Museum to honor pioneering women sculptors.

A Retrospective of Works by Lin Emery Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

New Orleans-based artist, Lin Emery, is highly recognized for her organic designs and engineering quality and is one of the premiere kinetic sculptors in the US. Her monumental sculptures are located in public art venues, museums and private collections. This exhibition is the 3rd in a

Thru 12.11

Carlos Garaicoa: La enmienda que hay en mí (Making Amends) 
 University of South Florida

TARPON SPRINGS 11.21-01.30.2011

Sculpture in Motion:

VERO BEACH Thru 01.02.2011

Clearly Color: Glass from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Clearly Color offers a dazzling cross section of American glass artists whose works are a study in contrast. The exhibition celebrates the medium and illustrates the revival and innovation of glassforming technologies. Included are works by Dale Chihuly, Benjamin Moore, Dante Marioni, Therman

1. Cindy Sherman, 
Untitled (#141), 1986, 
dye destruction – Cibachrome, edition 6 of 6,
Tampa Museum of Art, bequest of Edward W. Lowman by exchange 2. Carlos Garaicoa, Untitled (El Arte) from Untitled (Sentences) [Sin título (frases)] (detail), 2009, digital photograph, pins, thread, 60 x 48”, courtesy of the artist 3. Lin Emery, Rondelet (detail), 2010, polished aluminum, 158 x 84” orbit, 46 x 48” base, Lin Emery & Arthur Roger Gallery

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

object’s original function and purpose with a new identity and significance. Metamorphosis features 8 works from Federico’s Abstract-O series.

Statom, and Marc Petrovic.

pose or accompanying props. Black-andwhite photographs, large-format Polaroids and C-prints from the artist’s collection are on display, in addition

10.16-01.09.2011 Thru 01.02.2011

Metamorphosis: Abstract Works by Federico Uribe Vero Beach Museum of Art

William Wegman: Fay Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

William Wegman is www.verobeachmuseum.org best known for his Federico Uribe, takes photographs of Weiordinary objects and maraners and this transforms them into show focuses on his abstract installations beloved Fay. The of pattern, color, and works explore the form, replacing the collaboration between a man and his dog, an artist and his subject. Fay’s beauty is showcased through a range of captured expressions and emotions—each of which is heightened by her

to a selection of Wegman’s videos, including Alphabet Soup and The Hardly Boys.

www.norton.org

The first exhibition of work by John Storrs (1885–1956) in over 20 years, Machine-Age Modernist includes approximately 40 sculptures, drawings, and paintings drawn from various national collections. One of America’s foremost modernists, Storrs produced a remarkable body of sculpture and was at the forefront of both European and American avant-garde movements.

W. PALM BEACH 10.02 – 01.02.2011

John Storrs: Machine-Age Modernist Norton Museum of Art

1. Harvey Littleton, Blue Sliced Descending Form, 1988, barium/potash glass w/multiple cased overlays of Kugler colors, 2 parts: 14 x 12 x 6-1/2” and 6-1/2 x 4 x 3”, Museum purchase w/funds provided by the John McLaughlin Booth Endowment for Collections, the Dorothy Gay Poole Acquisition Fund Endowment, and the William B. and Marcia H. Howell Endowment for Collections 2. Federico Uribe, Oriente-Poniente, 2009, chopsticks and plastic forks, 60” diam. x 17”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 3. William Wegman, Basic Shapes in Color, 1993, color Polaroid, 24 x 20” 4. John Storrs, The Abbott, 1920, bronze, 17-1/8 x 8-1/8 x 12-1/8, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

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?

NOW WHAT

An exhibition of WHAT is hAppening NOW in contemporAry Art

12.15.10 561.832.5196 | norton.org

Organized by the Norton Museum of Art. Local sponsorship of this exhibition is made possible in part through the generosity The Contemporary and Modern Art Council of the Norton Museum of Art and The Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art.


C A L E N D A R

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

10.09 – 01.09.2011

Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Approximately 40 of Nick Cave’s “Soundsuits”—multilayered,

mixed-media, wearable sculptures—bring together visual and performing arts for a unique museum experience. As reminiscent of African, Mardi Gras and religious ceremonial costumes as they

are of haute couture, the Soundsuits explore ceremony, ritual, myth and identity through a subtle layering of references expressed through highly skilled techniques, varied traditions and an array of ordinary, scavenged yet seductive materials. (See story on pg. 50.) and innovations that arose as a result of Thru 11.21 cross-cultural exchangOn the Silk es are highlighted. Road and High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture and Commerce Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

The superb examples of Chinese ceramics, featured in this exhibition, were treasured at home and abroad, and considered rarities until the mid-18th century. Specific styles

WINTER PARK Thru 12.23

plored in an exhibition of models, drawings, and animations by 6 leading contemporary architects: Morris Adjmi, Alchemy Architects, Michael Graves, Chad Oppenheim, Adrien Smith+ Gordon Gill Architects and Paolo Soleri. The exhibition sheds light on the creative and practical processes involved with community planning today. Visitors will be able to design their own utopian city using an interactive

MASTER/Plan: Visionary Architects and Their Utopian Worlds Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Sustainable architecture, urban planning, and utopia are ex-

1. Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2009, human hair, metal armature, 99”h x 31”w x 27”d, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery 2. Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount, Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796-1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century
 porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamel-on-biscuit decoration,
17 x 10-1/4 x 6-3/4”, gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection 3. Chad Oppenheim, Oppenheim Architecture & Design, COR Tower, Miami, Fl

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

display by Alchemy Architects. (See story on pg. 76.) Thru 12.23

Remix 1: Old and New Acquisitions from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Remix 1 features a selection of works acquired by the Cornell Fine Arts Museum over the last year, installed with selected older pieces from the Museum’s collection. On view are works by Richard

Anuszkiewicz, Lorna Simpson, Martin Denker, Romare Bearden and Sam Gilliam, among others. Thru 12.23

Robert Motherwell and Jasper Johns: Poetic Works as Metaphor Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

for their serious intellectual tone and philosophical concerns. Thru 11.14

A Master of Modernism: Woodcuts and Paintings by Charles Turzak cfam.rollins.edu (1899-1986) Robert Motherwell The Albin (1915-1991), pioneer Polasek Museum and principal exponent & Sculpture of Abstract ExpresGardens

sionism, and Jasper Johns (1930- ), one of the leaders responsible for the breakthrough from Abstract Expressionism to the types of Pop Art and Minimalism which succeeded it, are closely examined in this exhibition

master woodblock printmaker, painter, WPA muralist, commercial illustrator and a beloved art teacher. His critically acclaimed graphics of the expanding urban skyline in his hometown of Chicago and working class heroes

www.polasek.org

A Master of Modernism is a retrospective exhibit of woodcuts and paintings by American Modernist Charles Turzak (1899-1986). Turzak enjoyed a long and prolific career as a

epitomized the Modern Art movement in America in the 1930s. Dynamic lines and pulsating movement are the trademarks of his style. (See story on pg. 94.) O n V iew

1. Martin Denker, 6.3DayChemicalHoliday, detail, 2008, C-print, edition of 6, 40 x 55” 2. Jasper Johns, Flagstones, 1976, lift-ground aquatint and open-bite from three plates printed in red, black & white, 11-9/16 x 18-5/16”, © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY, published by Petersburg Press, S.A. This exhibition was organized by Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions. Reproduction of this image, including downloading, is prohibited without written authorization from VAGA, 350 Fifth Ave.,Ste. 2820, NY, NY, 10118; 212.736.6666; fax: 212.736.6767; info@vagarights.com; www.vagarights.com; http://www.vagarights.org 3. Charles Turzak, The Dancers, 1939, woodcut

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

Artist: THIERRY FEUZ to the “psychotropical” universe of Thierry Feuz. His imagery depicts extraordinary explorations of the genesis, life and gradual decay of natural and abstract flowers and other organic forms. WELCOME

MIAMI

Gallery: Spinello Gallery www.spinellogallery.com

Artist: Pachi Giustinian ARGENTINE-NATIVE Pachi Giustinian seeks the splendor and allure contained in the dynamic composition of light. Colors are of particular interest to her as they relate to sensations, feelings, sound, and time. Giustinian abstracts mundane objects from their everyday use, transforming them to highlight their visual characteristics and challenge the structure of our subjective color experience. From left: Thierry Feuz, Silent Ways II (detail), 2007, lacquer and acrylic on canvas, 47 x 39”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Pachi Giustinian, courtesy of the artist and Spinello Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art www.cjazzart.com

Artist: Jen Stark

JEN’S VIBRANT oeuvre

pulsates with an intricate, PALM BEACH mingling of colors and lat- Gallery: tice of geometrical shapes, pushing the envelope of the artist’s own Gavlak Gallery expectations and exploding the ocular sense. www.gavlakgallery.com Artist: MARILYN MINTER

JACKSONVILLE

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery

the pathology of glamour in her photos and photorealistic enamel-onmetal paintings that shimmer like nail polish. Her works are sensual and infused with rich colors and textures. Marilyn has been featured in numerous exhibitions, including the 2006 Whitney Biennial. MARILYN STUDIES

www.jjohnsongallery.com

Artist: Carlos Betancourt CARLOS CREATES complex collages painstakingly assembled from innumerable individual images extracted from hundreds of the artist’s photos. Flowers, works of art, shells, jewels, figurines, and people dear to Betancourt explode in sunbursts of vibrant color.

Clockwise from top left: Jen Stark, Over and Out (detail), archival colored paper, 19 x 19”, courtesy of the artist and Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art; Marilyn Minter, Blue Shower, 2006, C-print, 50 x 36”, edition of 5, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery; Carlos Betancourt, Re-Collections VII (summer-colors) port hole, 2009, print on canvas, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Gallery www.artfusiongallery.com

Artist: ANNALÙ ANNALÙ WAS BORN

in San Donà di Piave, Venice, in 1976, and studied at the Venice Academy of Fine Arts. Her work is exhibited widely in Italy and she has been involved in many solo and group NAPLES

Gallery: Longstreth Goldberg Art www.plgart.com

Artist: Anthony Droege

ANTHONY’S PAINTINGS PULSE WITH COLOR, pattern and exhibitions around the country. Her art is sculptural and intricately formed using mediums such as cement and resin.

rhythm. The collection of objects, usually symmetrical arrangements of seashells, urns, antique serving pieces and other miscellaneous and intriguing treasures set against vivid patterns, do not just sit there. His objects appear to breathe, to float as though through space, defying physical limits. “I’m not into recreating reality. I want the process of animating to be exciting for me...when I’m most successful, the objects begin to create a sense of mystery.”

From left: Annalù, Color Blinks, 2008, paper and resinglass on woodtable, 63 x 63 cm, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Gallery; Anthony Droege, Flying Turbins, oil on canvas, 37 x 79”, courtesy of the artist and Longstreth Goldberg Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

NAPLES

GARDENS

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art

Gallery: Studio E Gallery www.studioegallery.com

www.trudylabellfineart.com

Artist: D. L. WATSON

Artist: Jean Larson

“I AM PRIMARILY inter-

“PAINTING FOR ME

ested in the emotions that are evoked by the wonderful interplay between light and color that is an essential feature of the places in which I now live.”

is an expression, a connection to my life and emotions, both conscious and subconscious.

KEY WEST

Gallery: Harrison Gallery www.harrison-gallery.com

Artist: Kevin Sloan

KEVIN DRAWS UPON the

diverse imagery acquired from his extensive travels to create the unique “magic realism” paintings that have made him such a well-known, collected artist.

There is seldom a plan as the process begins—the subject, medium and technique just emerge.”

Clockwise from top: Jean Larson, Le Temps Perdu V (detail), oil on canvas, 36 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; D.L. Watson, Mariposa V, mixed media on canvas, 30 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery; Kevin Sloan, The Unruly Bouquet, courtesy of the artist and Harrison Gallery

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NICKÊ MeetÊ MeÊ atÊ theÊ C On view at the

Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach

10.09.10–01. 50

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CAVE: CenterÊ ofÊ theÊ Earth 09.11


RIGHT: SOUNDSUIT, 2008, APPLIQUÉD FOUND KNITTED & CROCHETED FABRIC, METAL ARMATURE, PAINTED METAL AND WOOD TOYS, 94”h x 35”w x 35”d, PRIVATE COLLECTION, NY PREVIOUS PAGES: SOUNDSUIT, 2009, HUMAN HAIR, METAL ARMATURE, 98”h x 29”w x 25”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY


A

Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth

AN EXUBERANT DISPLAY OF DAZZLING

creations, by Nick Cave, awaits at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of The Earth is comprised of over thirty examples of multilayered, mixedmedia wearable sculptures, called “Soundsuits”— derived from the audible sounds made by the suits when worn. The result is a captivating visual and performing arts experience that will entice viewers of all ages. This is the only venue in the Southeastern United States to feature the nationally circulating exhibition—the most extensive presentation of the Chicago-based artist’s sculptures to date. Accompanying the show is a video montage of the suits in action, giving viewers a sense of the cacophony of sounds and sensations that are integral to the works. In addition, the artist will collaborate with the Norton and a group of local dance students for a special performance, as well as several other exciting programs. As Roberta Smith, critic for The New York Times, said in her 2006 review, “Whether Nick Cave’s efforts qualify as fashion, body art or sculpture…they fall squarely under the heading of Must Be Seen to Be Believed.” Evocative of African, Caribbean and other ceremonial

ensembles, as well as extreme design found in haute couture, Cave’s work explores issues of identity and transformation through his intuitive layering of cultural references. Each piece celebrates craftsmanship in its handmade construction from scavenged materials as varied as yarn, beads, buttons, sequins, bottle caps, vintage toys and human hair. Following in a long tradition of artists who use what is available and affordable, he finds the ordinary and discarded materials from our surroundings and re-contextualizes them into extraordinary and meaningful works of art. Nick describes the Soundsuits as a means for under-

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ABOVE: NICK CAVE, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, PHOTO: JAMES PRINZ

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standing those things which make one person the same, or different, from others. These full-body “masks” release the wearer (actual or imagined) from his day-to-day identity, allowing him to inhabit another, very different one.

“I don’t see myself as an artist but as a humanitarian using art to create change. My hope is that these new Soundsuits will cause people to find ways to live with each other, extend our compassion to other communities, and take care of our natu-

ABOVE (LEFT TO RIGHT): SOUNDSUIT, 2009, MIXED MEDIA, 89”h x 46”w x 34”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY; SOUNDSUIT, 2009, HUMAN HAIR, METAL ARMATURE, 99”h x 31”w x 27”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY

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Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth

ral resources. If I can create an opportunity to bring people of all creeds, identities, and interests together, then I am doing my work,” said the artist. Despite his significant accomplishments, Cave feels that his work is just beginning. His

love for what he does and his desire to share it with others— especially children—is an expression of generosity and hope. Through the Soundsuits, he invites us to dance with him, to play with him and, most of all, to dream with him, so that

ABOVE (LEFT TO RIGHT): SOUNDSUIT, 2009, HUMAN HAIR, METAL ARMATURE, 61-1/2”h x 34-1/2”w x 52”d, DIMS OF PIECE WITH POLAR BEAR, 88”h x 34-1/2”w x 101”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY; SOUNDSUIT, 2009, MIXED MEDIA, 106”h x 42”w x 34”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY OnV

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we may all feel the empowerment and magic of their imaginative transformation. Nick received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1982 and his MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of

Art in 1989. Although drawn to the expressive potential of textiles, Nick was also drawn to dance. He began training as a dancer, through an Alvin Ailey program, in Kansas City and in New York City during

ABOVE (LEFT TO RIGHT): SOUNDSUIT, 2009, METAL ARMATURE, EASTER BUNNY AND BASKETS, 106”h x 42”w x 34”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY; SOUNDSUIT, 2009, PLASTIC SANDWICH BAGS, BARBIE DOLLS COVERED & STITCHED IN FOUND KNIT FABRIC, METAL ARMATURE, 96”h x 37”w x 33”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY

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Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth

college. His desire to bridge art with dance became the foundation for his work. Among his numerous awards are the United States Artist Fellow Award (2006) and Joyce Award (2006). His work has

appeared in solo and group exhibitions across the United States and Europe. Nick also teaches in the Fiber Arts Program at the Art Institute of Chicago and has designed his own line of clothing. O n V iew

ABOVE (LEFT TO RIGHT): SOUNDSUIT, 2007, CERAMIC BIRDS, METAL ARMATURE, EMBROIDERY, APPLIQUÉD KNITTED & CROCHETED FABRIC, BEADS, WIRE, CHAIN, 88”h x 40”w x 32”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND THE COLLECTION OF DOREEN & GILBERT BASSIN; SOUNDSUIT, 2009, HUMAN HAIR, METAL ARMATURE, 97”h x 29”w x 24”d, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY OnV

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T H : M E N A G E R I E On view through 11.19.10 at MOCA, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Shinique Smith, Twilight’s Compendium, 2009, mixed media, temporary site specific installation, dimensions variable, installation view: Denver Art Museum, Denver; Embrace!, 11. 14.09-04. 04.10; photo: Jeff Wells


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Above: Surface Value III, 2007, fabric, clothing, twine and wood, 22 x 22 x 6”

Opposite: Untitled (Bringer), 2009-2010, clothing, fabric, rope, twine and stool, 36 x 20 x 20” Images © Shinique Smith, courtesy of the artist and Yvon Lambert Paris, New York *The exhibition will also be on view at Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison, WI 01.22– 05.08.2011

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SHINIQUE SMITH: MENAGERIE* is hosted by the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, as part of its Knight Exhibition Series. The show is the first large-scale US museum exhibition for New York-based painter/ sculptor Shinique Smith. Smith is known for her multimedia works that combine complex social and cultural references with a broad array of art historical sources, including: abstract expressionism, color field painting, minimal sculpture and Japanese calligraphy. Menagerie is a fitting title for the assortment of paintings, drawings, videos, and 3-dimensional work assembled by the artist. “Individually, they are vibrant and exuberant organisms that Smith masterfully tamed. Each of these works tells the progress of Smith’s hand; each piece is essential to her story,” says MOCA, North Miami’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, Bonnie Clearwater. Smith weaves a line both physically and figuratively throughout the space of the exhibition. An installation created from cloths, string and ribbons, at the entrance of MOCA’s gallery, forms a draping canopy that gradually shifts into ribbon and string toward the gallery’s center, where visitors can explore two of Smith’s earlier installations—TwilightÕ s Compendium, 2009 (shown on pgs. 58-59) and No dust, no stain, 2006—which have been recreated for the show. Much of Smith’s work speaks to nostalgia, reflecting on a period from her youth—a time during the mid-’80s. “This was a time when I felt free to fully express myself…the music, the clothes, the self-discovery of this time still inspires me,” said the artist. Urban life is suggested both in Smith’s sculptures of castoffs as well as

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Message, 2010, acrylic, fabric and collage on wood panel, 84 x 84 x 3”, ©Shinique Smith, courtesy of the artist and Yvon Lambert Paris, New York

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in the gestural strokes of her lively paintings. The expressive forms on the walls of her installations and canvases reflect her study of Japanese calligraphy­—language is crucial to Smith’s practice, and text appears throughout her work, in both literal form and also in her abstract brushstrokes. Her sculptures and installations are composed /N

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Shinique Smith: Menagerie of collections and accumulations of found objects, second-hand clothing, and vibrantly hued textiles, which she ties together to form minimal cubes, or wraps into bundles that comment on the sociological and ecological themes of excess consumption and waste. Smith embraces the discarded and handmade, utilizing materials for her sculptures from various sources: friends, thrift stores—even her own closet. She also finds treasures on the street. “I have found coats and scarves hanging on fences, and roller skates set out on a stoop…I think this anonymous exchange between city dwellers is sort of beautiful,” the artist once remarked. Born in 1971, Shinique Smith grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. She received her BFA and MFA degrees from The Maryland Institute College of Art, and MAT from Tufts University & The School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Smith moved to New York in 2003 and first exhibited her work in a juried group show at Art in General. Her first significant exposure came with the Frequency show at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2005. Smith’s artwork has been exhibited at The National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC; The New Museum, NY; PS 1 Contemporary Arts Center, NY; The Studio Museum in Harlem; The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, CO; and Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin. Her work is also included in public collections such as The Denver Art Museum, CO; The Studio Museum, NY; The Margulies Collection, Miami; The Rubell Family Collection, Miami; and the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore. Smith is represented by the Yvon Lambert Gallery in Paris and New York. O n V iew OnV

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Top to bottom: Favorite of the Gods, 2008, ink, acrylic, fabric, urban debris, feathers and collage on canvas over wood, 2 panels, 96 x 120 x 3” overall Take My Apples, sketch, 2005, colored pencil on paper, 9 x 12”, 13-11/16 x 16-3/4” frame Images © Shinique Smith, courtesy of the artist and Yvon Lambert Paris, New York

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THE MUSEUM OF ART|

Fort Lauderdale is hosting an exhibition of drawings by Pop artist Tom Wesselmann, who, alongside Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Claes Oldenburg, was one of the originators of Pop Art, a movement that helped define the visual identity of America in the 1960s. The exhibition was originally conceived by Wesselmann and his wife, Claire, before the artist’s death in 2004. Last year, Claire Wesselmann revisited the project with Emilio Steinberger, Senior Director

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of Haunch of Venison gallery, to bring it to fruition. Spanning more than four and a half decades, from 1959 to 2004, the show includes more than one hundred works, many of which are large in scale and created from materials not usually associated with drawing, such as steel, aluminum, fabric and molded plastic. It is the most comprehensive display of drawings by the artist that has ever been assembled—most have not been seen outside the artist’s studio. “We are immensely grateful to Claire Wesselmann not just

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for curating the exhibition and facilitating the loans of works from the artist’s estate, but also for including one of Tom Wesselmann’s giant cutout still lifes [Still Life #61] from 1976. Wesselmann goes beyond taking everyday objects—toothbrush, ruby ring, and a set of keys—and has memorialized them to an impossible level of reality,” said Irvin Lippman, Executive Director, Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale. A Cincinnati, Ohio native (b. 1931), Wesselmann was well into his twenties before he considered becoming a painter.

He had discovered his ability to draw while serving in the US Army, creating humorous cartoons about army life. After his discharge, he began taking art courses at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and then enrolled at the Cooper Union in NY, in 1956, where his focus shifted from cartooning to fine art. Upon his graduation in 1959, Wesselmann decided to devote himself to painting. His mix of references to modern masters, such as Matisse and Mondrian, with contemporary details from American life, which included television, advertising, con-

Tom Wesselmann Draws

PREVIOUS PAGES: Drawing version of Bedroom Painting # 24, 1972, Charcoal on gesso on canvas 75-1/4 x 93-1/4 x 19-5/8”, © the estate of Tom Wesselmann BELOW: Still Life # 61, 1976, Oil on shaped canvases, 104-1/2 x 391 x 79”, © the estate of Tom Wesselmann images courtesy of Moafl


Tom Wesselmann Draws

ABOVE: tom wesselmann, image Courtesy of the Estate of Tom Wesselmann

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sumer products and fast food, created a unique hybrid style of painting and collage that brought him immediate attention and success. His work was featured in a number of groundbreaking Pop Art exhibitions in the early ’60s, including New Realists at the Sidney Janis Gallery and The Popular Image at the Washington Gallery of Modern Art. Wesselmann’s art of the ’60s was innovative and extreme, and brilliantly conceived and composed. He produced a number of serial works in relatively quick succession,

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including: still-life “Bathtub Collages” and kitchen interiors, which incorporated found objects such as promotional items, refrigerator doors and towels; “Landscapes”, which projected full-scale representations of cars; “Seascapes”, which prominently portrayed female breasts and legs in silhouette across the horizon; lipsticked “Mouths”, with or without cigarettes, that conveyed sensuality and sexual pleasure; scenes of intimacy in “Bedroom Paintings”; and his famous “Great American Nudes”, with their flat forms

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and intense colors. By the mid-1960s, Wesselmann was experimenting with molded plastic, a medium which enhanced the already tactile and sensuous nature of his work. In the ’70s, his work became increasingly sculptural. His Standing Still Life series combined mundane objects such as a woman’s shoe, a belt, or a vase of flowers into dimensional compositions on a grand scale. In 1983, he made the first of an extended series of works from cut-out steel or aluminum. The artist further expanded on these themes

throughout the ’90s and early 2000s and, in his final years, returned to the female form in his Sunset Nudes series of oil paintings on canvas. Wesselmann’s graphic flair and fluency in drawing, devotion to the human figure and sense of humor, all played into the development of his particular brand of Pop Art. And his strong sense of being rooted in ordinary life brought authenticity to his art, which is emblematic of the vitality, openness and free spirit that we continue to associate with the ’60s. O n V iew

OPPOSITE PAGE: Drawing for Still Life #35, 1962, Charcoal on paper, 30 x 48”, © the estate of Tom Wesselmann BELOW: Drawing for Mouth # 3, 1963, Charcoal on paper, 48 x 63-1/2”, © the estate of Tom Wesselmann images courtesy of Moafl


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TWENTY WAYS TO SEE A STAR

debuts a series of 20 eye-popping paintings by acclaimed photorealist painter and printmaker, Robert Cottingham. Cottingham established himself, in the early 1970s, as one of the first generation photorealists, along with

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such renowned artists as Richard Estes and Chuck Close. Abstraction and realism are skillfully wedded in his shimmering paintings depicting the vanishing objects and icons of American culture, such as commercial neon signs, which are the inspiration behind his

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Star paintings. Wendy M. Blazier, Senior Curator at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, describes how the exhibition was conceived: “Almost two years ago, I was introduced to artist, author and publisher, Michael McKenzie. Michael’s American Image

Atelier, in New York, was the printer and publisher for Robert Indiana’s HOPE—based on Indiana’s classic LOVE graphic of the 1960s. When Michael mentioned he was printing a series of silkscreens with the great photorealist painter, Robert Cottingham, I jumped at

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OPPOSITE: Capella, 2009, silkscreen on canvas, 79 x 79” ABOVE: Southern Star, 2009, silkscreen on canvas, 79 x 79” PREVIOUS SPREAD: Southern Star (detail), 2009, silkscreen on canvas, 79 x 79” images Courtesy of the American Image Atelier

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Robert Cottingham:

Twenty Ways to See a Star

ABOVE: ROBERT COTTINGHAM, Courtesy of the American Image Atelier

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the chance to have the BRMA premiere this new series. I have always loved Robert Cottingham’s paintings—images of iconic American neon signs, and great cropped close-ups of 1940s and ’50s American commercial signage on building façades and marquees. His work is such a visual ‘knockout,’ and we have, for the last year, featured an important Robert Cottingham painting in the second floor collection galleries, entitled Bacon and Eggs, on long term loan from The Robert B. Mayer Family Collection, Chicago. So the new series of silkscreened paintings was a great opportunity to bring these works to South Florida— I thought it would be fantastic to put together ‘twenty ways to see a star!’” Star is one of Robert’s iconic images. He has used the “star” imagery in paintings of commercial signage since the ’70s. The image which he reappropriates from his past paintings for this new series, is the Star first painted in 1986, in oil on canvas. Cottingham’s Star image is a striking transformation of his original source material—a photograph he took, more than 30 years ago,

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of a neon commercial sign. In an article in American Artist magazine (February 1980), Cottingham explained: “I use the configurations of a sign as the basis for constructing a painting…the end result for me is a composite of line, form, and color that also happens to depict a sign. If the final work can be read on both levels—as a formal painting, taut and succinct and, at the same time, as a depiction of a sign—I feel the work approaches success.”

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LEFT: Star Canvas’, 2009, silkscreen on canvas, Courtesy of the American Image Atelier This exhibition is organized in conjunction with Rosenbaum Contemporary Gallery, Boca Raton.

This latest series, at the BRMA, presents Star in 20 different color combinations. Much like the Andy Warhol series of Marilyns or Campbell’s Soup cans, the effect is one of serial repetition and variation on a theme. The dynamism and energy of the image, with its angled viewpoint and strong contrasts, is further amplified through the multiplicity of images and color combinations. According to Blazier,“This is certainly one of the artist’s inten-

tions, as Robert Cottingham’s realism grew out of the Pop Art movement, and his work has always elevated the common objects of American culture to iconic imagery, ranging from commercial neon signage to the machine-like structures of vintage Remington typewriters or old Kodak cameras—objects of our collective commercial culture, tied to the beauty of typography and lettering.” Over the last 3 years, Robert worked with American

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Image Atelier to produce this new series of monumental Star paintings, silkscreened onto canvas. He worked on every detail of the process and even assigned all 20 variations new titles, such as: Electra, Rising Star, Classic Star, Shining Star, Rock Star, Night Star and Lucky Star, to name a few. This exhibition is an opportunity to experience, first hand, a piece of vintage Americana through the eyes and art of a true American icon. O n V iew

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On view through 12 . 23 CORNELL FINE ARTS MUSEUM

at Rollins College, Winter Park cfam.rollins.edu

MASTER /

V I S I O NA RY A R C H I T E C TS A N ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE, CRYSTAL CENTER, MODEL : ALUMINUM, © ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE


Plan:

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MASTER/Plan

urban planning, and utopia are explored in MASTER/Plan: Visionary Architects and Their Utopian Worlds, hosted by the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park. The show, organized by Biennale O, presents models, drawings and animations by six leading contemporary architects and sheds light on the creative and practical processes involved with community planning today. “Our mission was to create an exhibition of the best architecture and design in the world, as it relates to planning and building with sustainability. Our purpose was to begin a local conversation, a dialogue, in the hope that this will inspire our community to build better buildings and to be more thoughtful as we plan. Additionally, we wanted to introduce these masters, and their works, to the ‘next generation’ so that they will come away enthused and informed and become the next advocates,” says Mark Cosgrove, Executive Director of Biennale O. SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE,

ABOVE & OPPOSITE: CHAD OPPENHEIM, OPPENHEIM ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN, COR TOWER, MIAMI, FL

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Biennale O partners and show curators, Walt Geiger and David Stofcik, and team members, Theo Lotz and Laura Williams, worked in collaboration with CFAM on the exhibition for over three years. “For the visitors of the Cornell, they will experience the large gallery as they never have before, given the architects’ three-dimensional models and structures that were built for the exhibition. There is also a hands-on element to the show in the use/play of Alchemy Architects’ planning kit made of found objects,”

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adds Cosgrove. The unifying theme throughout MASTER/Plan is that of sustainability and pushing the envelope in terms of planning and building. A stellar roster of architects featured in the show includes: Chad Oppenheim, Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, Alchemy Architects, Morris Adjmi, Paolo Soleri and Michael Graves.

CHAD OPPENHEIM

“Stunning” is the word that comes to mind when describing Chad Oppenheim’s work.

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MASTER/Plan

RIGHT: ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE, MASDAR HEADQUARTERS, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES, MODEL, © ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE

He is passionate about sustainable design and preserving our ecosystem. Three-dimensional models, flat screen presentations and a series of projects from around the world are featured in MASTER/Plan—all testament to his innovative style, and trendsetting techniques. Oppenheim’s COR Tower, the first sustainable, mixed-use con-

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dominium in Miami, represents a dynamic synergy between architecture, structural engineering and ecology. Rising 400 feet above Miami’s Design District, Cor extracts power from its environment, utilizing the latest advancements in wind turbines, photovoltaics, and solar hot water generation, while integrating them into its archi-

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tectural makeup. Additional examples of Oppenheim’s work include an island resort that “disappears” into its tropical surroundings, an angled tower with a strategically placed opening which prevents the view of a neighboring historic building from being obscured, and an island residence that originates at tree-top level.

ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL

Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill have pushed the envelope on the design of high-performance, energy-efficient and sustainable architecture on an international scale. Masdar headquarters is an example of the firm’s brilliant design matched with the utilization of today’s cutting-edge

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ABOVE: ALCHEMY ARCHITECTS, PLANNING KIT RIGHT: ALCHEMY ARCHITECTS, MARFA WEEHOUSE, MARFA, TX, © ALCHEMY ARCHITECTS

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technologies and materials to produce a building that creates more energy than it consumes. The project is the centerpiece of Masdar City, a zero-waste, zero-carbon-emission development outside Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates. The building’s form emphasizes natural ventilation, sun shading, high thermal mass, courtyards and vegetation. AS+GG’s Crystal Center, a dramatic arts center prototype positioned in a waterfront setting (shown on pgs. 76-77), consists of jutting crystalline structures with cantilevers that afford occupants stunning interior spaces and exterior views, while employing a low maintenance passive sustainability strategy. Cantilevered roofs allow the building to shade itself in a hot climate, while mesh shading screens, on the building’s envelope, reduce solar heat gain. Also on display is AS+GG’s Chicago Eco Bridge project, the final waterfront component to the great American architects, Daniel Burnham and Edward H. Bennett’s 1909 master plan for the city of Chicago. The two-mile bridge—a breakwater and haven for fish and water •

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plants in the Monroe harbor, and a central Eco-Tower— designed to harvest wind and solar power, provide grand civic space with recreational opportunities and unparalleled views of the Chicago skyline.

ALCHEMY ARCHITECTS

The team of Alchemy Architects, from St. Paul Minne-


sota, have gained recognition by bringing sustainability to the individual residence through the creation of their weeHouses. These prefabricated houses, made of sustainable materials, are adaptable to any location and contain every modern convenience. Alchemy’s distinctive approach to architecture

and design combines a playful and harmonious blend of site, building and community. A special planning kit, developed by Alchemy and made up of found objects, has been commissioned for the exhibition, allowing visitors to create their own sustainable communities on a tabletop with kit components.

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MORRIS ADJMI

ABOVE: ALDO ROSSI AND MORRIS ADJMI, CELEBRATION PLACE, OFFICE COMPLEX, CELEBRATION, FL, 1999, © MORRIS ADJMI ARCHITECTS

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Aldo Rossi was the original architect on the Celebration Place project, originally designed as the headquarters for Walt Disney’s Imagineering Division, in Celebration, FL—its modern neo-classical lines and architectural elements set the tone for the Celebration community. Due

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to Rossi’s untimely death in 1997, Morris Adjmi took over the project and brought it to where it is today. The original concept for the complex, comprised of three office buildings and an obelisk, set atop a raised grass plinth, was based upon the Campo Santo, the main square of the city of Pisa, Italy. The ulti-

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MASTER/Plan

mate five building concept will include the highest level LEEDs (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) building in the US.

PAOLO SOLERI

At age 91, architect, author, visionary and pioneer, Paolo Soleri is still working in Arizona on his own sustainable

community, Arcosanti, begun in 1970. Soleri has made a lifelong commitment to research and experimentation in urban planning. Using a concept called “arcology”, Arcosanti combines architecture and ecology to explore ways in which urban conditions can be improved, while minimizing the destructive impact on

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the earth. The centerpiece to Paolo’s work in the exhibition is a 366 inch hand-drawn scroll of his sustainable city. Given the size of the scroll, only sections will be on view at a time, however, during the course of the show, the entire scroll will be revealed. From

this handwork, a sustainable, planned city of the future is laid out before our eyes.

MICHAEL GRAVES

Michael Graves, the “American voice of architecture,” is an influential theorist as well as a diversified and pro-

TOP: PAOLO SOLERI, ARCOSANTI: BABELNOAH, COASTAL FLAT REGION, PROPOSAL FOR A POPULATION OF 6 MILLION, ARCOLOGY DESIGN FROM CITY IN THE IMAGE OF MAN, PHOTO: COSANTI FOUNDATIONDAVID DEGOMEZ BOTTOM: MICHAEL GRAVES, MICHAEL GRAVES AND ASSOCIATES, EAST HILL TOWN (PARTIAL FAÇADE), MASTER PLAN FOR GRAN CANARIA IN THE CANARY ISLANDS

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lific designer. Since the early 1980s, his work has directly influenced the transformation of urban architecture. Among his numerous accolades, Graves was awarded the Topaz Medal from the American Institute of Architects, in 2010. Featured in the exhibi-

MASTER/Plan

tion are examples of Graves’ distinct award winning style, as applied to models on planning in today’s world. Complementing the show is an architecture film series, on October 6th, and a panel discussion, on November 10th. O n V iew

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SPOTLIGHT { E L L E N

H A R V E Y }

Exhibition

Ellen Harvey: The Nudist Museum On view October 10th - November 7th at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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THE DOMINANT MEANING

of nudity in our society is so strongly sexual that it can be hard to remember that the nude has historically meant many different things. Ellen Harvey’s Nudist Museum uses the Bass Museum’s collection to reveal a wide variety of different historical paradigms of nudity. By copying every nude in the collection, including paintings, drawings and sculptures, from the Middles Ages to the present, Ellen showcases nudes that represent purity, titillation, truth, comedy, beauty, love and ugliness, as well as simple representations of the human body. The nudes were copied from the museum’s documentation rather than from the originals, with the result that the level of detail in each painting strongly reflects the resolution of the source documentation. The images are also cropped to accentuate the nudes and Ellen chose to paint everything, other than the human body, in monochrome. The ornate secondhand frames have been painted


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so that the paintings appear to be ter’s National Studio Program. spilling out of the canvas, alertEllen’s work often deals with ing the viewer to the fact that the issues of cliché and failure in art apparently conventional salon- making and life, examining and style installation of old paint- revealing the problematic huings is not what it seems. Sim- man desire for the extraordinary. ilarly, upon closer inspection, Her clever and playful paintings, the wallpaper behind the paint- videos and installations are both ings can be seen to contain small philosophical and witty, and her examples of nudity found in to- curiosity about art’s functions day’s mass media, is contagious. She creating a humorous first gained attencontrast between the tion in 2001 with world-views of the New York Beautipaintings and that of fication Project for the world in which which she painted we live. traditional oval oil Born in 1967 in landscapes over Ellen’s NUDES Kent, England, Elgraffiti sites in New REVEAL a wide York City, without len Harvey’s early years were spent variety of different permission. A book in Marnhull, a ruof her experiencHISTORICAL ral Dorset village in es working on the PARADIGMS England. Her famiproject was pubof nudity. ly later emigrated to lished in 2005. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1981. Ellen’s work is exhibited She went on to graduate from widely in the US and internaHarvard College and Yale Law tionally. Prominent shows inSchool and practiced law brief- clude a solo exhibition at the ly before enrolling in the Whit- Whitney Museum of American ney Museum’s celebrated Inde- Art at Philip Morris in 2003 and pendent Study Program and the inclusion in the Whitney BienP.S.1 Contemporary Art Cen- nial in 2008. O n V iew

ABOVE & OPPOSITE PAGE: The Nudist Museum (details), 2010, 54 paintings in oil, second-hand frames, tape, collaged wallpaper; Photograph: Jan Baracz LEFT: Ellen Harvey, Photograph: Brooke Williams images courtesy of the artist


PROFILE { Y I N K A

S H O N I B A R E

A SELF-DESCRIBED “bi-cul-

M B E }

Exhibition

Yinka Shonibare MBE: Mother and Father Worked Hard So I Can Play On view through October 24th at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

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tural” artist, Yinka Shonibare MBE is best known for reinterpreting scenes, taken from 18th and 19th century European paintings, through the use of headless mannequins dressed in period styles. The costumes, however, are not constructed from historically accurate fabrics but rather from contemporary Dutch wax fabric produced in Europe for an African market. The fabric is used to make Victorian outfits covering sculptures of figures or stretched onto canvases and painted over. The artist once explained: “…the fabrics are not really authentically African the way people think. They prove to have a crossbred cultural background quite of their own. And it’s the fallacy of that signification that I like. It’s the way I view culture—it’s an artificial construct.” Yinka explores race and class through a range of media that includes sculpture, painting, photography, installation art, and moving image. By blending historical styles with “African” visual motifs, he confronts issues 2010


P R O F I L E

of authenticity, African identi- school that he became ill with ty, and European colonialism— an infection that left him partquestioning the meaning of cul- ly paralyzed. After three years tural and national definitions in, of physical therapy, he returned at times, a playful manner. to art school in 1986. Somewhat akin to a treasure Yinka’s big break came in hunt, Mother and Father Worked 2002, when he was commisHard So I Can Play, is a visu- sioned by artistic director, Okwui ally and conceptually engaging Enwezor, for the Documenta 11 exhibition where exhibition in Gerfigures of playmany. The piece he ful (and headless) created, Gallantry children, dressed and Criminal Conin Victorian cosversation, launched tumes made from him on an internaYinka’s signature tional stage. Dutch wax fabrics, Yinka’s awards Yinka appear throughout include the prestiEXPLORES the Ringling’s Astor gious MBE (Memissues of RACE galleries. The works and CLASS in an ber of the Order suggest the overinof the British Emoften PLAYFUL dulgence of a privipire), 2005; and a MANNER. leged class of youth. nomination for the Born in London, in 1962, Yin- Turner Prize, 2004. His work ka spent most of his childhood has appeared in major exhibiin Lagos, Nigeria. In the ear- tions at the Smithsonian Naly ’80s, he returned to London tional Museum of African Art, to study fine art, first at Byam Washington, DC; Brooklyn Shaw College of Art (now Cen- Museum, NY; and Coopertral Saint Martins College of Art Hewitt National Design Muand Design) and then at Gold- seum, NY, among others. Yinsmiths College, where he re- ka currently lives and works in ceived his MFA. It was at art London. On View

opposite page: Boy with Marionette, 2009, Life-size fiberglass mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton, mixed media, 44-1/2 x 19 x 42” above (top to bottom): 1. Girl on Scooter, 2009, Life-size fiberglass mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton, mixed media, 30 x 24 x 37-1/2” 2. Skipping Girl, 2009, Life-size fiberglass mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton, mixed media, 50-1/4 x 29 x 43” images Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery, NY Photos: Jason Mandella left: yinka shonibare, Portrait, 2009, Photo: Charlotte Player, Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, NY/Shanghai


FOCUS { D O M I N I Q U E

F O R S C U L P TO R Dominique

L A B A U V I E }

Exhibition

Musical Lines in My Hands: The Work of Dominique Labauvie On view through January 16th at the Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

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Labauvie, steel provides the perfect medium for the exploration of the gesture in space. The title of the exhibition, Musical Lines in My Hand, refers to the primacy that music, and its performance, has in the heart and mind of the artist. While not a musician, Dominique grew up in a family that inspired in him a love of music. He pays tribute to his paternal grandmother, a professional pianist, for this inspiration. Although a Tampa resident since 1998, Dominique has rarely exhibited locally. This show provides a very special opportunity for viewers to experience a range of work by the artist, including: smaller scale sculptures, outdoor works, a large-scale drawing and a sitespecific piece entitled Suspended Skylines, created for the Museum’s Farish Gallery. In Suspended Skylines, the artist unites the more literal form of a musical register with the abstracted impression of the skyline of Tampa. Hand cut and forged from 2010


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tough steel, Dominique’s had eight acclaimed solo exhisculptures appear, at first, del- bitions and published several icate—more about void than catalogues. mass. An assemblage of “calHis work is part of numerous ligraphic” lines and thicker public and private collections, masses, the works evoke or- including: Boca Raton Museganic shapes, movement and um of Art, Boca Raton, FL; solid grounding. The artist Runnymede Sculpture Park, once explained: Woodside, CA; the “The sculpture’s Museum of Decomomentum is cyrative Arts, Parclical; from line to is, France; the Navolume and back tional Collection again through the of Contemporary line. Within this Art, Paris, France; cycle, the viewthe Public Collecer becomes an action of Contempotor; part of its crerary Art of the City Dominique’s ation. When the enof Paris, France; sculptures ergy of the formal APPEAR, at first, and the Fondamovement is comtion Maeght, St. DELICATE— pleted, the white Paul, France. He more about void space takes over has been commisthan mass. and the intellectusioned to execute al dynamic begins.” large-scale public works in Dominique was born in France for the cities of ParStrasbourg, France in 1948. is, Draveil, Valence, Dijon, He studied literature, philoso- Livry-Gargan and Reims as phy and art history at the Uni- well as in Tampa. In 2009, he versity of Strasbourg before de- was the recipient of an Indiciding to become a sculptor. In vidual Support Grant from the 1987, he entered the prestigious prestigious Adolph and Esther Galerie Maeght with which he Gottlieb Foundation. On View

opposite page: Plugged, 2000, forged and waxed steel above (top to bottom): 1. Suspended Skyline, 2010, forged and waxed steel 2. Kendama, 2009, forged and waxed steel 3. Twist, 2008, forged and waxed steel left: dominique labauvie, courtesy of the artist


RETROSPECTIVE { C H A R L E S

AMERICAN MODERNIST

T U R Z A K }

Exhibition

A Master of Modernism: Woodcuts and Paintings by Charles Turzak On view through November 14th at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens,Winter Park www.polasek.org

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Charles Turzak (1899-1986), is celebrated in this exhibition of woodcuts and paintings from the artist’s long and prolific career. His critically acclaimed graphics epitomized the Modern Art movement in America in the 1930s. The works on display, dating from the ’30s to the ’60s, reflect his artistic development from Modernism to Abstraction. Born in 1899, in Streator, Illinois, Charles was the only son of Czech immigrants. As a child, drawings and cartoons were the channels for his self-taught artistic talent. In 1920, he won a contest sponsored by the Purina Company and gained entrance to the Chicago Art Institute. After graduation, Charles worked at various odd jobs before traveling to Europe, where he studied the Masters in galleries throughout Germany, Austria, and France. By the late ’20s, Charles had gained enough notoriety to establish a commercial career in advertising, but the 1929 Wall Street Crash took everything away. Through the early years of the depression, he eager-

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ly accepted jobs illustrating ist friends, including renowned books with his woodcuts and sculptor, Albin Polasek, who had The Works Progress Administra- been area residents for years. tion/Federal Arts Project providThough best known for his ed contract work, which helped highly stylized woodblock prints, him, and many other artists, sur- completed in the 1930s and ’40s, vive during this difficult time. Charles also painted in several Charles often sketched at abstract styles and, in the 1970s street corners in and ’80s, painted Grant Park or along floral still lifes and the lakefront in Chimarine scenes. He cago. A quick wit taught adult classand ready smile es and lectured on tempered his reart history, contemserved demeanor— porary art and dealthough a man of sign and enjoyed few words, he could showing his work tell a whole story at fairs and festivals Charles with a few strokes of throughout central CAPTURED his hand. He was an Florida. In May of the ROMANCE, artist of the people, 1985 he attended HUMOR and be they working or his last one-man DRAMA unemployed, waitexhibit at the Winof city dwellers. ing on line for a loaf ter Park Universiof bread, selling apples on the ty Club. That same year, he finstreets, or homeless. His 1930s ished his last painting. He passed urban Chicago landscapes, away in January of 1986. gouged from maple, bass and His art is included in the colRussian boxwood blocks, cap- lections of the Library of Contured the romance, humor, and gress, The Art Institute of Chidrama of city dwellers. cago, and Northwestern UniIn 1958 Charles relocated to versity’s Mary and Leigh Block Florida, joining several of his art- Gallery, among others. On View

opposite page: the dancers, woodcut, 1939 above (top to bottom): 1. Man with Drill, woodcut, 1932 2. the tank worker, woodcut, ca. 1930 left: charles turzak, self portrait


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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Washington D C Th e mu seu ms . . .

THE POWER OF WASHINGTON D C WILL SEDUCE YOU.

It was created with a single goal in mind—to showcase the greatness of our nation. With its impressive monuments and museums, its stately government buildings and mansions, D C is easily recognizable as the United States’ capital city. And within this 61-square-mile city, you’ll find staggering achievements in everything from architecture and art, literature, history, and political prowess. Our tour of the city’s finest art museums includes: Art Museum of the Americas; Corcoran Gallery of Art; Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens; National Gallery of Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts; the Smithsonian museums: American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, National Museum of African Art, and National Portrait Gallery; The Kreeger Museum; and The Phillips Collection. O n V iew

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Art Museum of the Americas

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ALEJANDRO OBREGON,
 ESTUDIANTE MUERTO (THE DEAD STUDENT), 1956, OIL ON CANVAS, 55 x 69” 2. CANDIDO PORTINARI,
 RETURN FROM THE FAIR, 1940,
 OIL ON CANVAS,
40 x 32”,
 GIFT OF JOSE GOMEZ-SICRE 3. ARMANDO MORALES,
 FIGURES, 1972,
 OIL ON CANVAS,
40 x 32”

WITH ITS UNIQUE regional

focus, the Art Museum of the Americas’ permanent collection of 20th century Latin American and Caribbean art is one of the most important collections of its kind in the US. Established in 1976, the museum’s collection has grown to nearly 2,000 objects, including: painting, sculpture, installations, prints, drawings and photographs. The works reflect the rich diversity of artistic expression found in

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ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS www.museum.oas.org 201 18th St., NW Washington, DC 202.458.6016

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the region and provide an overview of stylistic and iconographic trends beginning in the early 20th century. Noted architect, Paul Cret, designed the Spanish colonial style building which houses the museum. The museum’s white walls, red tiled roof and loggia, decorated with richly colored tiles, provides a warm and intimate atmosphere in which to enjoy art. O n V iew c t o b e r

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IMAGES COURTESY OF ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS


Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art + Design

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FOUNDED IN 1869, by Wil-

liam Wilson Corcoran, the Corcoran Gallery of Art is the largest privately supported cultural institution in Washington, DC. The museum’s main focus is American art. Its historic American collection spans the history of American art from colonial times through 1980 and includes remarkable paintings by such distinguished artists as John Singleton Copley, Frederic Church, Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer, George

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CORCORAN GALLERY OF ART AND COLLEGE OF ART + DESIGN www.corcoran.org 500 17th St., NW Washington, DC 202.639.1700

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Bellows, and Edward Hopper. The Corcoran also has particularly strong collections of Colonial and Federal era portraiture, neoclassical sculpture, Hudson River School painting, art of the American West, American Impressionism, and early 20th century realism. Its holdings include major works by painters Albert Bierstadt, Childe Hassam, and John Singer Sargent, as well as sculptors Paul Manship, Hiram Powers, and Bessie Potter Vonnoh. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Frederic Edwin Church, Niagara, 1857, oil on canvas, 42-1/2 x 90-1/2”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Museum Purchase, Gallery Fund 2. Gordon Parks, American Gothic, Washington, DC, 1942, gelatin silver print, 43-9/16 x 31-7/8”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, The Gordon Parks Collection 3. Mary Cassatt, Young Girl at a Window, ca. 1883-1885, oil on canvas, 39-1/2 x 25-1/2”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Museum Purchase, Gallery Fund images courtesy of the corcoran gallery of art

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Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens

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FOUNDED BY AMERICAN

collector and heiress to the Post cereal empire, Marjorie Merriweather Post, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens is one of the premier art collector’s museums in the US. The museum features the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia and a world-renowned collection of 18th century French decorative art and furnishings. Encircled by woodlands, the 25 acre estate pro-

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vides visitors a tranquil oasis of luscious formal gardens. Highlights from the collection, which features more than 16,000 objects, include a diamond crown worn by Empress Alexandra, at her marriage to Nicholas II; Beauvais tapestries designed by François Boucher; two Imperial Easter eggs by Carl Fabergé; La Nuit by WilliamAdolphe Bouguereau; and a collection of costumes and accessories worn by Mrs. Post or her family. O n V iew

HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM & GARDENS www.hillwoodmuseum.org 4155 Linnean Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.686.5807

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. HILLWOOD MANSION 2. EASTER EGG, 1895, FABERGÉ (FIRM); PERKHIN, MIKHAIL (WORKMASTER), RUSSIA: ST. PETERSBURG, GOLD, CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL, DIAMONDS, SATIN, 3-1/8 x 2-3/16”, BEQUEST OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1973 3. FRANK O. SALISBURY, PORTRAIT OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1934, OIL ON CANVAS, 49-1/4 x 39-1/4”, BEQUEST OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1973 IMAGES COURTESY OF HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND GARDENS


National Gallery of Art

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ESTABLISHED IN 1937,

the National Gallery of Art was created for the people by a joint resolution of Congress, with a substantial art collection donated by Andrew W. Mellon. The Gallery’s collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts, traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages to the present—including the only painting by Leonardo da

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART www.nga.gov 4th & Constitution Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.737.4215

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Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder. The Gallery’s campus includes the original neoclassical West Building designed by John Russell Pope, which is linked underground to the modern East Building, designed by I. M. Pei, and the 6.1 acre Sculpture Garden, which provides an informal, yet elegant, setting for works of modern and contemporary sculpture. Temporary special exhibitions spanning the world and the history of art are presented frequently. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. LEONARDO DA VINCI, GINEVRA DE’ BENCI [OBVERSE], CA. 1474/1478, OIL ON PANEL, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, AILSA MELLON BRUCE FUND 2. PABLO PICASSO, FAMILY OF SALTIMBANQUES, 1905, OIL ON CANVAS, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, CHESTER DALE COLLECTION 3. ALEXANDER CALDER’S GIANT MOBILE HAS GRACEFULLY PRESIDED OVER THE ATRIUM OF THE EAST BUILDING SINCE NOVEMBER 1977. GIFT OF THE COLLECTORS COMMITTEE, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON; PHOTO: ROB SHELLEY IMAGES COURTESY OF NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

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National Museum of Women in the Arts

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

of Women in the Arts is dedicated to recognizing the contributions of women artists. The core of the NMWA’s permanent holdings is the Holladay Collection, comprised of art assembled by Wilhelmina Cole Holladay and her husband, Wallace F. Holladay, who began collecting art in the 1960s. Their devotion to collecting art by women and to creating a museum that would showcase women artists, led to the

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establishment of the NMWA. The permanent collection includes more than 4,000 works, providing a comprehensive survey of art by women from the 16th century to the present. The work in the collection represents a wide range of styles and media—from the Renaissance paintings of Elisabetta Sirani to modern photographs by Barbara Morgan to Louise Nevelson’s contemporary sculptures. The NMWA also has several important special collections, including silver by 18th and 19th century Irish and English women silversmiths. O n V iew

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS www.nmwa.org 1250 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.783.5000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. SOPHIE TAEUBER-ARP, COMPOSITION OF CIRCLES AND SEMICIRCLES, 1935, GOUACHE ON PAPER, 10 x 13-1/2”, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS 2. CLAUDE RAGUET HIRST, A GENTLEMAN’S TABLE, AFTER 1890, OIL ON CANVAS, 18 x 32”, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS 3. JOAN MITCHELL, ORANGE, 1981, OIL ON CANVAS, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS IMAGES COURTESY OF NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS


Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery

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SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN

Info

Art Museum is home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Its artworks reveal key aspects of America’s rich artistic and cultural history from the colonial period to today. More than 7,000 artists are represented in the collection, including: John Singleton Copley, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam, Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM and the Renwick Gallery americanart.si.edu 8th and F Streets, NW Washington, DC 202.633.1000

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Christo, and David Hockney. The museum also features innovative public spaces such as: The Luce Foundation Center for American Art, a visible art storage and study center that allows visitors to browse more than 3,300 works from the collection; and the Lunder Conservation Center, the first art conservation facility to allow the public permanent, behindthe-scenes views of the preservation work of museums. The Renwick Gallery houses the Museum’s craft and decorative arts collection, which includes works from the 19th century to the present. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MUSEUM COURTYARD, PHOTO: KEN RAHAIM 2. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, MANHATTAN, 1932, OIL ON CANVAS, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF THE GEORGIA O’KEEFFE FOUNDATION 3. ALEXANDER CALDER, NENUPHAR, 1968, SHEET STEEL, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF THE ARTIST IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

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THE FREER GALLERY OF

Art, along with the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, forms the Smithsonian Institution’s national museums of Asian art. The two museums are connected by an underground exhibition space. The Freer houses 25,518 objects spanning 6,000 years of history, including, but not limited to, ancient Egyptian

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stone sculpture and wooden objects, ancient Near Eastern ceramics and metalware, Chinese paintings and ceramics, Korean pottery and porcelain, Japanese Byōbu, Persian manuscripts and Buddhist sculpture. Collections span from the Neolithic to modern eras. The Sackler Gallery takes you on an underground journey and is home to Dr. Arthur M. Sackler’s incomparable collection of art, which includes ancient Chinese jades and bronzes as well as contemporary Asian art. O n V iew

SMITHSONIAN FREER GALLERY OF ART & ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY www.asia.si.edu Freer Gallery of Art: Jefferson Dr. at 12th St., SW Arthur M. Sackler Gallery: 1050 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202.633.1000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. The Blue Dress, Thomas Wilmer Dewing (1851-1938), American, 1892, Oil on wood panel, 20 x 15-13/16”, Gift of Charles Lang Freer 2. FREER GALLERY COURTYARD 3. THUNDER GOD, HANGING SCROLL, KATSUSHIKA HOKUSAI (1760-1849), JAPAN, 1847, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, 89-5/16 x 26-5/8” (OVERALL), 49-15/16 x 21-3/16” (IMAGE), GIFT OF CHARLES LANG FREER IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SMITHSONIAN’S FREER AND SACKLER GALLERIES


Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

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SMITHSONIAN HIRSHHORN MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDEN www.hirshhorn.si.edu Independence Ave. at 7th St., SW Washington, DC 202-633-1000

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Alexander Calder, Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, and Clyfford Still, as well as the work of today’s most promising emerging artists. The museum’s architect, Gordon Bunshaft, conceived the Hirshhorn as “a large piece of functional sculpture.” The bold, drum-shaped structure, with a hollow-centered, elevated cylinder, floats above nearly four acres of landscaped grounds. The museum also features a Sculpture Garden with cool green spaces and a geometric reflecting pool, offering visitors an atmosphere of contemplation and retreat. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Photo: Lee Stalsworth 2. Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe’s Lips (detail), 1962, the Hirshhorn collection 3. Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: Glow, 1966, the Hirshhorn collection IMAGES COURTESY OF SMITHSONIAN HIRSHHORN MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDEN

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Smithsonian National Museum of African Art

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

of African Art, located on the National Mall, specializes in African art and culture. It was established as a private museum in 1964, and officially became a part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1979. The collection of the NMAfA embraces the diverse artistic expressions found throughout Africa, from ancient to contemporary times. Collection objects

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range from ceramics, textiles, furniture and tools to masks, figures and musical instruments. The arts of painting, printmaking, sculpture and other media are well represented by living artists whose works highlight individual creativity, address global and local art trends and innovatively transform artistic traditions into modern idioms.

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART africa.si.edu 950 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202.633.4600

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT 1. FACE MASK, CHOKWE PEOPLES, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, ANGOLA, EARLY 20TH CENTURY, WOOD, PLANT FIBER, PIGMENT, COPPER ALLOY, 15-3/8 x 8-3/8 x 9-1/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 2. BOY AND THE CANDLE, GERARD SEKOTO (1913-1993), BORN SOUTH AFRICA, 1943, OIL ON CANVAS, 18-3/16 x 13-1/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 3. BRACELET, YORUBA PEOPLES, NIGERIA, 16TH CENTURY, IVORY, 5-11/16 x 4-1/8 x 4 1/8”, GIFT OF WALT DISNEY WORLD CO., A SUBSIDIARY OF THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART


Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery

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SMITHSONIAN

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National Portrait Gallery shares with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, one of Washington’s oldest public buildings, a National Historic Landmark that was begun in 1836 to house the US Patent Office, and one of the nation’s finest examples of Greek Revival architecture. Generations of remarkable Americans are kept in the company of their fellow citizens at the National Portrait SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY www.npg.si.edu 8th and F Streets, NW 
 Washington, DC 202.633.8300

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Gallery. The Gallery presents the wonderful diversity of individuals who have left— and are leaving—their mark on our country and our culture. Through the visual and performing arts, we celebrate leaders such as George Washington and Martin Luther King Jr., artists such as Mary Cassatt and George Gershwin, activists such as Sequoyah and Rosa Parks, and icons of pop culture such as Babe Ruth and Marilyn Monroe. They all link us to our past, our present and our future. For anyone fascinated by famous Americans and their stories, the National Portrait Gallery is a must-visit destination. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN BY ALEXANDER GARDNER, ALBUMEN SILVER PRINT, 1865, IMAGE: 17-11/16 x 15-3/16” 2. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BY JOSEPH SIFFRED DUPLESSIS, OIL ON CANVAS, CA. 1785, STRETCHER: 28-1/2 x 23-1/2 x 1-1/2”, GIFT OF THE MORRIS AND GWENDOLYN CAFRITZ FOUNDATION 3. GEORGE WASHINGTON (LANSDOWNE PORTRAIT) BY GILBERT STUART, OIL ON CANVAS, 1796, STRETCHER: 97-1/2 x 62-1/2”, ACQUIRED AS A GIFT TO THE NATION THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF THE DONALD W. REYNOLDS FOUNDATION ALL IMAGES: COLLECTION OF THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION; COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

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The Kreeger Museum

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE KREEGER MUSEUM, PHOTO BY EILEEN WOLD 2. PAUL CÉZANNE, THE DARK BLUE VASE, III, CA. 1880, OIL ON CANVAS 3. CLAUDE MONET, CLIFFS AT LES PETITES-DALLES, 1884, OIL ON CANVAS

THE KREEGER MUSEUM

is located in the former home of David and Carmen Kreeger, designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson. The museum showcases the Kreegers’ collection of modern art, which includes paintings and sculptures from the 1850s to the 1970s. The Impressionists are represented by nine Monet paintings, as well as works by Renoir, Sisley and Pissarro. Other 20th century European artists include Edvard Munch,

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE KREEGER MUSEUM

Max Beckmann, Wassily Kandinsky, and Joan Miró. The American artists are introduced by the graceful motion of an Alexander Calder mobile. Visitors can either lose themselves in the infinite space of a painting by Clyfford Still, or enjoy the sly Pop humor of James Rosenquist’s Bowling Ball Diptych. Washington artists, such as: Gene Davis, Sam Gilliam, William Christenberry and Kendall Buster, as well as examples of traditional African and Asian Art, are also featured in the museum’s collection. O n V iew

THE KREEGER MUSEUM www.kreegermuseum.org 2401 Foxhall Road, NW Washington, DC 202.337.3050

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The Phillips Collection

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works of modern art in an intimate setting at The Phillips Collection, in Washington’s vibrant Dupont Circle neighborhood. The museum, which opened to the public in 1921, is America’s first museum of modern art. Paintings by Renoir, Degas, Cézanne, Gauguin, van Gogh, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Braque, Klee, Homer, Whistler, Hopper, Stieglitz, O’Keeffe, Calder and Rothko are among THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION www.phillipscollection.org 1600 21st St., NW
 Washington, DC 202.387.2151

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the many stunning impressionist and modern works that fill the museum’s distinctive building, which combines extensive new galleries with the family home of its founder, Duncan Phillips. The collection includes nearly 3,000 works and continues to develop with selective new acquisitions, many by contemporary artists. Special exhibitions and frequent changes in the arrangement of the permanent collection mean that there’s something new on every visit to the Phillips. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR, LUNCHEON OF THE BOATING PARTY, 1880-81, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1923 2. PAUL CÉZANNE, SELF-PORTRAIT, 1878-1880, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1928 3. VINCENT VAN GOGH, ENTRANCE TO THE PUBLIC GARDENS IN ARLES, 1888, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1930 IMAGES COURTESY OF THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

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Washington D C The galleries. . .

FOR A MORE INTIM AT E C U LT U R A L E X P E R I E N C E ,

the 50+ independent art galleries within the Washington DC area offer art lovers an opportunity to view the works of emerging and established artists, and a chance to enjoy the city’s diverse local talent. Contemporary and traditional art, paintings, prints, fine art photography, glass, sculpture, and other types of visual art are displayed within these fine art venues. Most of the galleries are located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood, a thriving cultural area with scores of top-notch restaurants, shops and nighttime entertainment, and along R Street and Connecticut Avenue in downtown DC—all easily accessible via one of the world’s best subway systems, the Metro. On the following pages, On View presents a selection of Washington’s exceptional galleries. O n V iew

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Washington DC Art Galleries

CARROLL

FOXHALL

SQUARE

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.foxhallgallery.com

ADAMSON

www.carrollsquare.com

3301 New Mexico Ave. NW

GALLERY

975 F St. NW

202.966.7144

www.adamsongallery.jimdo.com

202.638.3000

1515 14th St. NW

GALLERY

202.232.0707

CIVILIAN

555DC

ART PROJECTS

www.gallery555dc.com

ADDISON/RIPLEY

www.civilianartprojects.com

555 12th St. NW

FINE ART

1019 7th St. NW

202.393.1409

www.addisonripleyfineart.com

202.607.3804

1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW

GALLERY

202.338.5180

CONNER

PLAN B

CONTEMPORARY

www.galleryplanb.com

ALEX GALLERY

ART

1530 14th St. NW

www.alexgalleries.com

www.connercontemporary.com

202.234.2711

2106 R St. NW

1358 Florida Ave. NE

202.667.2599

202.588.8750

GEORGETOWN FRAME SHOPPE

AMERICAN

CROSS

www.georgetownframeshoppe.com

PAINTING

MACKENZIE

2902-1/2 M St. NW

FINE ART

CERAMIC

202.338.1097

www.classicamericanpainting.com

ARTS

5118 MacArthur Blvd. NW

www.crossmackenzieceramicarts.com

G FINE ART

202.244.3244

1054 31st St. NW

www.gfineartdc.com

202.337.7970

1350 Florida Ave. NE 202.462.1601

BURTON MARINKOVICH

CURATOR’S

FINE ART

OFFICE

GUARISCO GALLERY

www.burtonmarinkovich.com

www.curatorsoffice.com

www.guariscogallery.com

1506 21st St. NW

1515 14th St. NW

1120 22nd St. NW

202.296.6563

202.387.1008

202.333.8533

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Wa s h i n g t o n D C g a l l e r i e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

HAMILTONIAN

www.janehaslemgallery.com

www.watergategalleryframe

GALLERY

2025 Hillyer Pl. NW

design.com

www.hamiltoniangallery.com

202.232.4644

2552 Virginia Ave. NW

1353 U St. NW 202.332.1116

202.338.4488 LONG VIEW

HEMPHILL

www.longviewgallerydc.com

FINE ARTS

1234 9th St. NW

www.hemphillfinearts.com

202.232.4788

Dupont Circle Art Galleries

PARISH GALLERY

FOUNDRY

www.parishgallery.com

GALLERY

HONFLEUR

1054 31st St. NW

www.foundrygallery.org

GALLERY

202.944.2310

1314 18th St. NW

GALLERY

1515 14th St. NW 202.234.5601

202.463.0203

www.honfleurgallery.com

1241 Good Hope Rd. SE

P & C ART

202.536.8994

www.pcart.com

GALLERY 10, LTD.

3108 M St. NW

www.gallery10dc.com

202.965.3833

1519 Connecticut Ave. NW

INTERNATIONAL

202.232.3326

VISIONS GALLERY

PROJECT 4

www.inter-visions.com

www.project4gallery.com

MARSHA MATEYKA

2629 Connecticut Ave. NW

1353 U St. NW

GALLERY

202.234.5112

202.232.4340

www.marshamateykagallery.com

2012 R St. NW 202.328.0088

IRVINE

THE RALLS

CONTEMPORARY

COLLECTION

www.irvinecontemporary.com

www.rallscollection.com

STUDIO GALLERY

1412 14th St. NW

1516 31st St. NW

www.studiogallerydc.com

202.332.8767

202.342.1754

2108 R St. NW 202.232.8734

JANE HASLEM

THE WATERGATE

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On View 10-11.2010  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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