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ELEGANT ENIGMAS: The Art of Edward Gorey • AT T H E O R L A N D O M U S E U M O F A R T •

on iew FLORIDA

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2010


CONTENTS

August/September

ON THE COVER: ©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, He was recognized at once by Lady Isobel Stringless, Lord Wherewithal’s aunt, although they had last met seventeen years before on St Clot in the Maladroit Islands, illustration for The Secrets: Volume One, The Other Statue, 1968, pen and ink, 4 1/2 x 5 1/2”, Collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

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ELEGANT ENIGMAS: The Art of Edward Gorey • AT T H E O R L A N D O M U S E U M O F A R T •

on iew FLORIDA

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2010

2010

Vo l . 1 , N o . 3

Fe a t u r e s

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ELEGANT ENIGMAS: THE ART OF EDWARD GOREY Presented by the Orlando Museum of Art, this delightful exhibition pays tribute to the work of Edward Gorey (1925-2000). Described as “incredibly sophisticated...stylish and inventive” by the New York Observer, Edward’s signature pen-and-ink illustrations and unique wit have led him to be considered one of America’s most imaginative and eccentric artists. ABOVE: ©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, off which they rapidly ate a quantity of berries, illustration for Epiplectic Bicycle, 1969, pen and ink, 3-1/2 x 7”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50 Interview

64

72

Leo Villareal: Recent Works, at the new Tampa Museum of Art, features a dazzling display of light, color & motion. In a recent interview with On View, the artist discussed the process & inspiration behind his work.

Two exhibitions present works by renowned photographers, Clyde Butcher and Lee Dunkel, who share a passion for Florida’s beautiful, yet fragile, landscape.

The Wolfsonian–FIU presents an exhibition of more than 200 works, in a variety of media, which explores the role of speed and its impact on modern life.

LEO VILLAREAL

FRAGILE BEAUTY

SPEED LIMITS

On View Destination:

NEW YORK CITY

96 The Museums: An overview of

New York City’s outstanding art venues

108 A Gallery Tour: A fine art gallery listing OnV

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KAIJU! MONSTER INVASION!

Monsters invade the Morikami Museum this summer! Vintage toys from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, inspired by Japanese tokusatsu films and TV shows, are on display.

FROM TOP LEFT: leo villareal, courtesy of the artist; Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5, detail, 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108”, collection of the artist; Edmond van Dooren, Cityscape, detail, ca. 1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection; Gamera, from the motion picture, Gamera (1965)

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CONTENTS August/September

2010

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No.

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Fo c u s

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JONATHAN TORGOVNIK

A narrative

Jonathan’s moving portraiture and interviews provide intensely personal accounts of the lives of Rwandan rape victims.

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Profile

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COMMENTARY

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MUSE

CALENDAR

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Museum exhibitions

PHILIP BROOKER

A master of digital imagery, Philip uses his talent to create posters that excite and inspire.

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists

Memorial

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VOLF ROITMAN

PICTURED: volf roitman, portholes, 2002, laser cut metal and acrylic, 12 x 12”, courtesy of the artist

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A series of major works celebrating the 60-year-long career of Uruguayan painter, sculptor, architect, novelist, playwright, filmmaker and humorist Volf Roitman, who passed away in April of 2010, is on view at The Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum.

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Spotlight

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CARLOS GARAICOA

Architecture, urbanism, politics and human rights are elements Carlos utilizes in his art to open a dialogue with viewers.


Design mirrors society. Technological advances are reflected in the shape of the items we surround ourselves with. Thousands of examples can be found at The Wolfsonian–FIU. And a few thousand more examples can be found at home.

Cigarette Lighter, Torpedo, 1938 Designed by Benedict Sinclare

The Museum of Thinkism 1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida www.wolfsonian.org


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C O M M E N T A R Y

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Cool Stuff!

M A G A Z I N E

Editorial

It’s hot outside, so sit back, relax and take in some cool, refreshing art... Our cover story, Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey, on pg. 56, pays tribute to the work of Edward Gorey (1925-2000), whose eloquent and masterful drawings and witty, offbeat humor continue to delight and bemuse audiences worldwide. An interview with Leo Villareal, a pioneer in the use of LEDs and computer-driven imagery, on pg. 50, reveals the process and inspiration behind the digital animations of light and color featured in the artist’s engaging light sculptures and site-specific works. Fragile Beauty, on pg. 64, highlights two current exhibitions presenting the works of renowned photographers, Clyde Butcher and Lee Dunkel, who use their art form to capture the wondrous beauty of the Florida landscape. Speed Limits, on pg. 72, features an exhibition of works, in a variety of media, that reflects on the legacy of the Futurist movement’s celebration of speed—exploring its role and impact on modern life. Vintage art-toys from the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s, inspired by Japanese tokusatsu films and TV shows, appear in Kaijū! Monster Invasion!, on pg. 80. And, this summer, On View takes a bite out of “The Big Apple”, sampling some of New York City’s finest art venues, starting on pg. 96. Enjoy!

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View extends a special note of thanks to Allen Fisher. On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

www.onviewmagazine.com

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4 REASONS TO MEET ME AT

ARTCENTER SOUTH FLORIDA 800 Lincoln Road Meridian Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139

t.305.674.8278

www.artcentersf.org

MAM Staff Art Exhibition ArtCenter celebrates the talented artists working for the Miami Art Museum with this unique exhibition featuring the staff of one of South Florida’s most prestigious museums. On view July 30th – September 5th, 2010. Free opening reception Saturday, July 31 from 7 – 10 pm.

Miami Poster Project Artist Philip Brooker’s attempt to reinterpret South Florida’s image as a destination for pink flamingoes, pastels, and bathing beauties. Supported by the John S. & James L. Knight Foundation. This exhibit is on view from September 10 – October 17, Opening Reception on September 11th, 2010.

Lincoln Road Art Walk

Join ArtCenter’s artists-in-residence for the first Saturday of the month arts walk from 7 – 10 pm. Enjoy live performances, great art, and the South Beach café life.

ART STUDIES CLASSES & WORKSHOPS Fall’s coming and it’s the perfect time to learn to make your own jewelry, paint, sculpt, draw, and more. Sessions start in August and October. For information call 305.674.8278 or visit www.artcentersf.org. GALLERY AND STUDIO HOURS Tuesday-Thursday and Sunday 12pm - 10pm Friday and Saturday 12pm - 11pm Gallery Closed Mondays


MUSE

By Design B Y PA U L AT W O O D

I

T WAS A SIZZLING

afternoon in “The Big Apple.” On days like this, I miss the ocean shore, near my childhood home—the warm sand beaches, brilliant sunsets, and cool ocean breezes, a fond memory. As I indulged myself in reflection, a friend called to suggest we meet later that evening for drinks at a small watering hole near Rockefeller Plaza. By 7pm, the heat subsided ever so slightly as I waited


MUSE

... I found myself celebrating the moment, transported by the genius of this design.

by the Plaza. I was among the many tourists, taking in the grand urban landscape of soaring edifices, which rose and fell, as colossal dunes, beyond the shimmering sculpture of Prometheus, the Greek fire god—a glistening beacon amidst the waves of passersby. A gentle breeze tickled my face, and I found myself celebrating the moment, transported by the genius of this design­— the architecture and sculpture working harmoniously with the flow of life, as if nature had intended these elements as sun, sand and sea. OnV

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PICTURED: paul manship, prometheus, 1934, Photo: Sujit kumar

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CALENDAR Current

Exhibitions

C O M P I L E D

ative, this exhibition features nearly 70 exquisite masterpieces Boca Raton of African, Oceanic Thru 08.08 and Meso-American African, Oceanic art, including: sculpand Meso-Amer- tural figures, masks, ican Treasures ritual artifacts, archifrom the Musetectural elements, um’s Permanent adornments and perCollection formance items.

B Y

08-09.10

Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Visually stunning and intellectually provoc-

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Coral Gables Thru 01.2011

the pluralistic ways in which abstraction developed after 1950 by examining works in the Museum’s colThru 08.08 lection. Included are Late 20th Cenartworks representative tury Abstraction: of color field paintWorks from ing, lyrical abstraction, the Permanent minimalism, and Op Collection art by such recognized Boca Raton figures as Robert Museum of Art Motherwell, Jasper www.bocamuseum.org Johns, Richard AnuszThis exhibition seeks kiewicz and Stanley to unveil some of Boxer, to name a few.

Frank Paulin: An American Documentarian Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

A gift of 30 photographs by American photographer Frank Paulin has been made to the Lowe and are currently on display.

1. Etowah Ancestral Effigy Figures, Mississippian mound building culture, Etowah tribe, Georgia, 1200-1400 C.E., dolomite stone with traces of pigment, heights: 24 and 16”, permanent collection, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Irwin A. Weiser 2. Friedel Dzubas (1915-1994), Late Change, 1984-1985, magna acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40”, permanent collection, gift of Carol and Bernard Rosen 3. Frank Paulin, Flower Messenger, Times Square, 1955 (printed later), gelatin silver print, 13 x 19-3/8”, gift of Bruce Silverstein, ©Frank Paulin; courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery

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Bring Art to Life with a Simple Click.

Online Exhibition August 9 Through October 11 Why limit your love of art to regular Museum hours? Visit the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s new egallery, featuring 40 selected works from the Museum’s Permanent Collection. Experience art like never before, as every detail and image comes to life before your eyes, all from the convenience of your personal computer or mobile phone. Explore bocamuseum.org/egallery and discover an exciting new dimension in art.

501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park, Boca Raton, FL 33432 • bocamuseum.org/egallery • 561.392.2500


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Paulin is recognized for uniquely documenting fleeting human moments of both humor and poetry, particularly against the backdrop of gritty urban scenes. Thru 10.31

The Jaguar’s Spots: Ancient Mesoamerican Art from the Lowe Art Museum Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

This comprehensive exhibition includes a selection of 175 objects, from the

Museum’s permanent collection, that explore the complex relationship between art and the natural world. Pieces from the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec areas, spanning a period of over 2,000 years, will be on view—many of which have never been displayed before.

taking images provide fresh perspectives of this architectural triumph.

The works of clay artist Jan Kolenda and woodworking artist Bob Bagley are featured in this exhibition. The artists have created individual pieces as well as collaborated on large sculptures. Daytona Beach 08.06-11.14

Collaborations in Clay and Wood by Jan Kolenda and Bob Bagley Coral Springs Museum of Art

Spruce Creek and the St. Johns River: Silverprint Photography of Lee Dunkel Museum of Arts & Sciences

www.csmart.org

www.moas.org

Thru 08.21

Coral Springs Thru 08.21

All Sides of the Parthenon: Photography & Artifacts Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

This exhibition features large-scale photographs, by Peter Yalanis, depicting the reconstruction process of the Parthenon in Greece. These breath-

Pockets of pristine landscape, such as the Spruce Creek and St. Johns River basins, are captured in this exquisite display of traditional gelatinsilver black and white

1. Olmec (Gulf Coast, Mexico), Mask, ca. 1500-400 BCE, green jade, 4-7/8 x 4-3/8 x 3”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Barry Fitzmorris 2. Peter Yalanis, Parthenon and Greek Flag, ©Peter Yalanis 3. Jan Kolenda, Bougainvillea Treepot

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ADS ADVERTISE with us...

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on iew M A G A Z I N E

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environmental and landscape photography by Lee Dunkel. (See story on pg. 64.)

international flair, relating to science and industry of the late 19th century. This exhibition explores and highlights some of his most exciting and historic purchases and includes: swan and Sphinx-decorated Egyptian revival furniture; oversized

09.03-11.28

The Weird and Wonderful: Unique Decorative Arts from the Lightner Museum, St. Augustine Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Otto C. Lightner left behind an outstanding legacy in the form of a rare glimpse into the Gilded Age through art objects and artifacts, with

Oriental and European porcelains; Tiffany, Gallé and Brilliantcut glass; and other richly ornamented objets d’art. 09.03-01.09.11

Woof! Art of the Dog

the shifting equilibrium between nature and the man-made in eloquent portraits and documents from the margins of communities and societies and the far-flung corners of the world. Museum of Arts This exhibition brings & Sciences together two series www.moas.org of her large format Contemporary portraits photographs from two of dogs of all sizes, worlds that are utterly shapes and breeds are different; Baobabcelebrated through Tree of Generations, paintings by craftsmen from Mali, South and artists such as: Africa, Ivory Coast George Rodrigue, Ron and Madagascar; and Burns, Will Rafuse, Florida Contact. and William Wegman, among others. 09.25-12.16

Elaine Ling: Photographs Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Elaine Ling explores

1. Lee Dunkel, Spruce Creek 2. The Mandrill, Meissen porcelain, 19th century, 3’ h, from the collection of Lightner Museum, St. Augustine 3. Ron Burns, Madeline, n.d., giclée on canvas, 24 x 18” 4. Elaine Ling, Baobab-Tree of Generations, Mali

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09.04-11.07

Home Stills: Bastienne Schmidt Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

mesticity and gender stereotypes. 09.25-12.16

I Still Do: Judith Fox Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

photography has been showcased throughout the US and Europe. 09.04-11.07

I Still Do is a poignant portrayal of a man with Alzheimer’s disease as documented through the photography Home Stills consists and writing of his of a series of largeloving wife and scale photographs and care-partner, Judith drawings that look Fox. Judith has been at domestic gender featured in numerous role and identity. publications and Schmidt’s work is her award-winning influenced and informed by commercial photography from the ’50s and ’60s which depict the lives of women at home in different poses of do-

Rwanda/ Intended Consequences: Jonathan Torgovnik Southeast Museum of Photography

struggles and feelings about raising a child who is a constant reminder of genocide. (See story on pg. 88.)

www.smponline.org

Intended Consequences portrays the intensely personal accounts of Rwandan rape victims and the children that were born as a result. Jonathan Torgovnik provides a glimpse into the lives of these women and their children through portraits and interviews that expose their daily

DeLand Thru 08.2010

Witness to Creativity Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

Back in July, the Museum opened its doors to the public while a group of artists prepared their works. Viewers had

1. Bastienne Schmidt, Home Stills, detail 2. Judith Fox, I Still Do, detail 3. Jonathan Torgovnik, Sylvina with her daughter, Marianne, © Jonathan Torgovnik, courtesy Aperture Foundation

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a unique opportunity to engage the artists about their projects, work methods and messages. This dialog between the artists and viewers is part of the resulting art installations making

up this exhibition. The artists involved are: Jean Banas and Kathy O’Meara, who co-produced a work; Raina Benoit; Frances Gardner; Grace Leal; Martha Lent and Beau Wild.

the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Florida Museum for Women Artists

Their subjects range from gardens and citrus fruit to sweeping wild landscapes, local portraits and urban life.

www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

Delray Beach

Fifty major works, with Florida as subject, form a fascinating overview of the art produced by notable female artists, such as Laura Woodward and Jane Peterson, over an 80year period. These women created diverse and stunThru 10.17 ning imagery in a Kaiju! Monster wide range of styles. Invasion! Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

09.04-11.14

tage toys from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, inspired by Japanese tokusatsu films and TV shows, are on display in Kaijū! Monster Invasion! The exhibition features over 100 figures from an extensive private collection. (See story on pg. 80.) Thru 10.17

Kyoto: A Place in Art Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Works by painters representing art

www.morikami.org

Monsters invade the Morikami Museum this summer as vin-

Women Paint Florida, 1880– 1960, from

1. Shelters-Recycled, installation rendering by Jean Banas and Kathy OMeara 2. Victoria Ebbels Hutson Huntley, 1900-1971, Florida Swamp #2, detail, ca. 1949, lithograph on paper 3. Gomora, from the TV Series, Ultraman (1966–1967), courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden 4. Courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden

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movements closely associated with Kyoto, Kyoto textiles, photographs of Kyoto gardens, woodblock prints, ceramics, and more, are displayed in this exhibition which explores why Kyoto remains the center of Japanese traditional culture. Dunedin

nationally and abroad for her art and photojournalism. This exhibition features her mixed-media narrative portraits of lost innocence. Ft. Lauderdale Thru 12.05

Pearl and Stanley Goodman Latin American Collection Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Pearl and Stanley Thru 08.14

Carolina Cleere Dunedin Fine Art Center

Goodman began collecting Latin American art in the early 1980s as the field itself was being identified as an area worthy of attention, acquisition and scholarship. This exhibition investigates and explores the art of this fascinating region. Thru 12.05

Recent Acquisitions from the Museum’s Latin American Art Collection Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Recent Acquisitions illustrates the Museum’s commitment to add, to its contempo-

www.dfac.org

Native Floridian, Carolina Cleere, has been recognized

rary holdings, art that reflects the character and heritage of Broward County’s growing Hispanic community—and provides testimony to the stunning range and depth and continuing talent that comes from Latin America. The exhibition spotlights the most recent gifts to the Museum. Ft. Myers 08.24-10.02

Clyde Butcher Southwest Florida Museum

1. Carolina Cleere, The Muse, courtesy of the artist 2. Diego Rivera, Stone Worker, detail, oil on canvas mounted on mason, 1945, collection of Pearl and Stanley Goodman, © 2009 Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F., Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Xavier Esqueda, The Prayer of the Desert, oil on canvas

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F t . M ye r s c o n t i n u e d . . .

of History www.swflmuseumof

Western Everglades. (See story on pg. 64.)

history.com

Award winning Florida wetlandsbased landscape photographer, Clyde Butcher, explores his personal rela-

Gainesville Thru 09.05

America at Work: Art and Propaganda in the Early 20th Century Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

The main focal point of this exhibitionship with the tion is a group of environment through 30 work incentive his photography. The posters with colorexquisite beauty and ful designs, strong depth of his work graphics and draws the viewer into a relationship with nature. This exhibition features stunning large-format black and white photographs depicting the beauty and fragility of the

catchy phrases, that were produced between 1924 and 1925, and were intended to promote excellence in the American workplace. The graphic works tell a story about labor issues and demographics, popular culture, immigration trends and national identity in America during the first half of the 20th century. (See story in the June/ July 2010 issue on pg. 50.) Thru 01.02.11

Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu



Jack Nichelson has

been creating intricate and evocative “box environments” for more than 40 years. Begun in 2000, Nichelson’s Sojourner Dream Reliquaries represents the culmination of his long-standing fascination with the visual presence of religious reliquaries. Included are 22 sculptures replicating the basic forms of travel trailers from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. The compact size and shapes of the trailers lend themselves to the secular reliquary concept. The intricate, lighted interior of each work invites the

1. Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5, detail, 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108”, collection of the artist 2. Mather & Company, 2 strikes, 3 balls and he knocks the last ball over the fence, 1925, lithograph on paper, 44 x 36”, lent by Ronald, Elizabeth and Lauren DeFilippo 3. Jack Nichelson, A Trip to the Moon, 2007, hardwood veneer plywood construction with mixed media, collection of the artist, photography: John Knaub

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viewer to look very carefully at the details, both inside and outside. Completed over a 9-year period, the series has never before been exhibited in its entirety. Hollywood

Thru 08.15

Nathan Sawaya: Replay Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Back by popular

demand, Nathan Sawaya: Replay is sure to ignite the imaginations of children and adults alike. Nathan Sawaya creates awe-inspiring works out of some of the most unlikely things. This exhibition features portraits and large-scale sculptures using only toy building blocks—LEGO ® bricks to be exact. (See story in the June/July 2010 issue on pg. 36.)

Thru 08.29

Speaking, highlights 11 contemporary Chinese artists who were selected for their references to Western stylistic history. These artists have adapted Western ideas and art forms to create new styles of art. In some works, the reference to Western culture seems adoring, while in others, it Jacksonville appears to parody the 09.17- 01.02.11 West, its cultural symEast / West: bols and values. Each Visually Speaking artist presents a view Museum of of contemporary China Contemporary as it defines itself, Art, Jacksonville post-cultural revoluwww.mocajacksonville.org tion, and its new place East West: Visually on the world stage.

Tradition Redefined: The Larry and Brenda Thompson Collection of African American Art Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Redefining the landscape of American art, this collection of 72 works by recognized and emerging African American artists, documents the social and aesthetic concerns of the

1. Nathan Sawaya, Red, 2005, 24 x 49 x 26”, image courtesy of brickartist.com 2. Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China,

2002-2008, painted copper, collection of the artists 3. Frederick D. Jones, Female Figure at Shore, ca.1950, oil on masonite, 13 x 10”, © Frederick D. Jones, photography: Greg R. Staley

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Loïs Mailou

Jones

A Life in Vibrant Color

July 3 - September 26

Organized by the Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC, in collaboration with the Loïs Mailou Jones Pierre-Noël Trust, and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.

Sponsored by: ALPI and Tinsley Family Concessions, Inc. Additional Support by: Blackmon-Roberts Group

Located on Lake Morton behind Lakeland Public Library. Summer Hours: Tue. - Sat. 10AM - 4PM. Closed Sun. & Mon.

Art

Education

Events

Store


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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

African Diaspora through an intimate, inclusive and insightful perspective.

tery mingle with sculpture and cultural objects in this diverse exhibition.

Thru 09.12

Thru 08.08

Collectors’ Choice: Works of Art from Jacksonville Collections The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

Jazz ABZ: An A to Z Collection of Jazz Portraits by Paul Rogers The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

www.cummer.org

The Cummer celebrates works of art from top personal and corporate collections across Jacksonville. Porcelain, paintings, and pot-

Artist Paul Rogers teamed with jazz musician Wynton Marsalis to create the book, Jazz ABZ, which highlights jazz greats from A (Louis Armstrong) to Z (Dizzy Gillespie) through art and poetry. Each portrait and poem is evocative of the particular musician’s sound, and each work of art

Museum’s permanent collection. The exhibit focuses on unity, an effect that occurs when all of the principles of design have been alludes to song titles, applied correctly, artifacts, and other thus creating a sense markers of the time, including artistic references to wellknown artists who were particularly inspired by jazz music. Lakeland 08.14-12.12

Art and Design: Unity Polk Museum of Art

of order and completeness.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Loïs Mailou Jones: A Life in Vibrant Color Polk Museum of Art

This is last in a series of exhibitions demonstrating the role of the principles of design within artworks from the

Thru 09.25

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Loïs Mailou Jones

1. Hans Hofmann (1880 -1966), The Chair, 1944, oil on panel, 13-1/2 x 12 -3/4”, collection of Preston H. Haskell 2. Paul Rogers, Charlie Parker, 2005, acrylic and ink on Strathmore illustration board, 12-1/2 x 12-1/2”, on loan from the artist, © Paul Rogers 3. Herman Leonard, Frank Sinatra-Monte Carlo, ca. 1958, silver gelatin print, gift of Peterson & Myers, P.A. & Bob and Malena Puterbaugh in memory of Judge E. Randolph Bentley

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ways that now define www.polkmuseumofart.org contemporary art. This exhibition includes a survey of Maitland works by some of the more familiar names 09.10-10.24 in the Museum’s col- Exquisite lection. Artists such Harmony: as: Arshile Gorky, Elizabeth St. Robert RauschenHilaire Nelson berg, Pablo Picasso, Maitland Art Marc Chagall, BarCenter bara Kruger, Robert www.artandhistory.org Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson creates figurative collage “paintings” comprised of a diverse range of materials including: hand-painted, handMotherwell, Alexan- made, and found der Calder, and Judy papers, maps, magaChicago were often zines, Scrabble tiles defined by their early and various memocritics as unorthodox when, in fact, they were producing artworks which redirected and reformed the world of art in of Art

(1905-1998) is one of the original Harlem Renaissance painters who became known for paintings that were strongly influenced by her African-American heritage and travels that included African and Caribbean countries. The myriad of themes explored by Loïs, over her 75 year career, makes for a dynamic exhibition of more than 70 works, including: paintings, drawings and textile designs. Thru 10.03

Modern Masters Polk Museum

rabilia. Exquisite Harmony features 35-40 collages which explore the theme of music. Thru 09.05

William Vincent Kirkpatrick: American Impressionist Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

William Kirkpatrick

(1939-2004) was an Impressionist painter of landscapes, florals, figures, and portraits. His work can best be described as an explosion of color and light with

1. Loïs Mailou Jones, Mère du Senegal, detail, 1985, acrylic, 25” x 26”, courtesy of the Loïs Mailou Jones Pierre-Noël Trust 2. Arshille Gorky, Untitled, 1946, graphite and pastel on paper, gift of Jerry and Barbara Bassett 3. Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson, Sul Tasto, collage on paper, courtesy of the artist 4. William Vincent Kirkpatrick, Landscape 08, on loan from Baterbys Art Auction Gallery

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an unrestrained use of dramatic patterns of brushwork. A collection of 32 paintings are included in this exhibition. (See story in the June/July 2010 issue on pg. 42.) simultaneously. Robert H. Clarke passed 08.03-09.01 away in 2005, rarely From the showing his work Mind of Robert during his lifetime. H. Clarke This discovery is Brevard Art the first comprehenMuseum sive showing of www.brevardartmuseum.org his artwork. Robert H. Clarke used rhythmic lines and a Miami palette inspired by the masters to reconfigure 09.10-10.17 this world into his Miami Poster uniquely personal vi- Project sion. Using composi- ArtCenter / tion and scale to make South Florida the ordinary memowww.artcentersf.org rable, he energetically This exhibition fearecorded his inner tures a series of relatand outer world, often ed posters produced by Melbourne

artist, illustrator, furniture maker and filmmaker, Philip Brooker, for the inaugural year of the Miami Poster Project, a brand-new initiative. The exhibit’s intent is to update Miami’s visual image and to break from the

frequently stale and tourist-industry-driven imagery so often used to represent Miami. (See story on pg. 90.)

of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Human Rites examines ritual as a basic human activity, in terms of religious practices, and as the practice of contemporary artists, either as the subject of their work or the mode of their work. Viewers may leave this exhibition with a heightened sense of the deep and timeless need we have as humans for ritual, habit, repetition and pattern in our lives, or they may leave with the lines

Thru 10.03

Human Rites Bass Museum

1. Robert A. Clarke, Fishing & Fantasy, watercolor 2. Philip Brooker, Poster #4, Miami Poster Project, 2010, 6’w x 10’h 3. Thomas Hirschhorn, Necklace CNN, 2002, cardboard, foil, plastic, and gold wrapping paper, 98 x 31 x 4”, Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection

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CURRENTLY ON VIEW Volf Roitman: From MADI to The Ludic Revolution Thru August 29, 2010 Tap-Tap: Celebrating The Art of Haiti Thru September 5, 2010 Spiritual Healing – Shamans of the Northwest Coast Thru October 3, 2010

Opening September 1

Join us for the opening reception of two new exhibitions during Target Wednesday After Hours beginning at 6pm The Demons by Kathy Dambach After History by Jacek Kolasinski

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum Florida International University 10975 SW 17th Street Miami, Florida | 33199 http://thefrost.fiu.edu/ | 305.348.2890 Free and open to the public. Donations are appreciated. Smithsonian Institution Affiliations Program


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between religion, ritual, habit and pattern blurred.

phy, video, environmental installation and performance.

pieces, videos and text works, as well as new interventions by the artist, will be Thru 10.17 Thru 08.22 on view in addition New Work Claire Fontaine: to a screening area Miami 2010 Economies showing films and Miami Art Museum of videos that have Museum Contemporary influenced Fontaine’s www.miamiartmuseum.org Art, North Miami work. Managed by New Work Miami www.mocanomi.org her “assistants,” 2010 provides a parThis exhibition Fontaine’s practice is explores the work deeply imbedded in of Paris-based artcollaborative modes ist Claire Fontaine. of working and quesFontaine took her tioning possibilities name from a popular for social change. brand of school note- (See story in the books and declared June/July 2010 issue tial snapshot of the herself a “readymade on pg. 64.) Miami art scene at artist” in 2004. Older this moment. Approx- works, including: Thru 10.03 imately 35 artists, sculptures, light Spiritual Healbased in the Miami ing: Shamans area, will present new of the Northwest and recent artworks Coast executed in a variety The Patricia of media, including: & Phillip Frost painting, sculpture, Art Museum drawing, photograthefrost.fiu.edu

Spiritual Healing is designed to enlighten audiences about the

artistic accomplishments of the Northwest Coast Native tribes and, specifically, their cultural approach to healing.
The shaman is the ritual healer who draws directly upon his helper spirits to drive away illness using a wide variety of objects. These objects have the power to connect a shaman to his spirits, and embody the respect and fear generated

1. Don Lambert, Flatland, 2009, maple, archival paper, Dibond, motors and controller, 120 x 103 x 26”, courtesy of the artist and Country Club – Cincinnati ï Los Angeles, photo: courtesy of Cincinnati Museum of Art 2. Claire Fontaine, CHANGE, 2006, 12 twenty-five cent coins, steel box-cutter blades, solder and rivets 90 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Pedestal), 32 x 40.5 x 40.5 cm (Plexiglass box), courtesy Galerie Neu, Berlin 3. Mask, Old Man, late 20th century, wood, carved and painted, hair, 9 x 8 x 3-1/2”, © Gary Mercer 2010

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by the shaman. Both historic and new objects are featured, including: masks, amulets, rattles, a shaman’s crown and necklace.

exhibition features works by artists of the lost patrimony from The Frost Art Museum’s large collection of Haitian art. Thru 08.29

Thru-09.05

Tap-Tap: Celebrating the Art of Haiti The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Volf Roitman: From MADI to the LUDIC Revolution The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

09.17-02.20.11

thefrost.fiu.edu

Speed Limits The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

thefrost.fiu.edu

As part of a larger project to contribute works lost in the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and assist in the rebuilding of the island’s cultural and artistic heritage, this

filmmaker, and humorist, Volf Roitman, is featured in this exhibition. Included are a splendid array of motorized, kinetic works of a humorous style— a celebration of the LUDIC, or playfulness and whimsy, which is the basis of his creations. (See story on pg. 94.)

A series of major works celebrating the 60-year-long career of Uruguayan painter, sculptor, architect, novelist, playwright,

www.wolfsonian.org

One hundred years ago, the Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism proclaimed that “the world’s magnificence has

been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.”

Speed Limits probes the powers and limits of the modern era’s cult of speed. The exhibition features a variety of media, including: posters, books, drawings, clocks and appliances, paintings, video, and sound installations. (See story on pg. 72.) Orlando 09.25-01.02.11

Against All Odds:

1. Yvens Leger, Tap-Tap, ca. 1983, papier mâché, 20 x 30 x 5-1/2” 2. Volf Roitman, Series Chaplin’s Quest, Lumières de la Ville II, 2010, plastic, wood and light, 90 x 42”, courtesy of Anna and Edmund Wood 3. Edmond van Dooren (1896-1965), Cityscape, detail, ca.1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection

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The Art of the Highwaymen Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

The “Highwaymen” began as a group of African American artists who, against all odds, managed to prosper selling

more than 200,000 paintings over a 30-year period. Learn about their fascinating story and see paintings by 26 artists, including one by A. E. “Bean” Backus, an accomplished white Florida landscape artist who encouraged and inspired the Highwaymen.

Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

This collection of 30 photo transfers by Florida fine art photographer, Barbara Ery, highlights landmark buildings and signs such as: the Howard Vernon Motel, The Plaza Theatre, the Johnson’s Diner sign, the McNamara Pontiac sign, and more.

Thru 09.12

their paintings in the segregated South of the 1950s and ’60s. One charismatic man dreamed big and developed a fast method of painting that he generously shared with 25 others, and they collectively produced

Orlando Landmarks: Photo Transfers by Barbara Ery

08.27-10.17

The Story of Harness Racing by Currier & Ives from the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame, Goshen, N.Y. Orange County Regional History Center

www.thehistorycenter.org

Featured in this exhibition are more than 30 rare, original Currier & Ives lithographs celebrating harness racing’s history and heroes, a 6-poster series on “What is Harness Racing?,” a handson tack trunk where visitors can examine racing equipment, equine care tools, and other memorabilia. 08.13-10.31

Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey

1. Highwaymen painting from the collection of Geoff and Patti Cook 2. Barbara Ery, McNamara Pontiac 3. Color lithograph after James Henry Wright (1813-1883) 
Rysdyk’s Hambletonian, 1876, 
25 x 33”, 
published by Currier and Ives (1857-1907),
The Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame, Goshen, NY

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O r A n g e

C O u n T y

r e g i O n A l

H i s T O ry C e n T e r THE STORY OF HARNESS RACING

Against All Odds:

The Art of the Highwaymen

BY CURRIER & IVES

A History Center Special 10th Anniversary Exhibit

From the Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame, Goshen, N.Y.

September 25, 2010January 2, 2011

Lithographs, gear, and posters tell the history of the popular sport.

Painting from the collection of Geoff and Patti Cook

26 African Americans from the segregated south of the ’50s find success as artists.

Upcoming exhibitions: Florida in the Civil War, February 5-June 12, 2011 The Working White House: 200 Years of Tradition and Memories, March 19-May 29, 2011 A Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition

Games People Play: The Evolution of Video Games, July 2-September 10, 2011 65 E. Central Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32801 (800) 965-2030 • thehistorycenter.org

OV710

Image courtesy the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame, Goshen, N.Y.

August 27-October 17, 2010


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Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Elegant Enigmas presents the work of master artist and author, Edward Gorey (1925-2000). Edward’s signature pen-and-ink illustrations and witty writings have led him to be considered one

drawn from the Gorey Charitable Trust, including selections from: The Gashly-crumb Tinies, The Unstrung Harp, The Doubtful Guest, The Gilded Bat and other wellknown publications. (See story on pg. 56.) Thru 08.29

Knuffle Funny: The Art and Whimsy of Mo Willems Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

of America’s most imaginative and eccentric creative artists. The exhibition will feature approximately 170 objects

Author and illustrator, Mo Willems, has been hailed by The New York Times Book Review as “the biggest new talent to emerge thus far in the ’00s.” Winner of several prestigious

More than 40 paintings and sculptures, from the nation’s early years through the 20th century, are included in this exhibition. These works reflect many important trends in Ameri-

Caldecott Honor awards, Willems began his career as a writer and animator for television. He garnered six Emmy awards for his writing on Sesame Street, and created Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City. In 2003, Willems launched his picture book career with the bestselling can art. Among the Don’t Let the Pigeon artists represented are: Drive the Bus! Robert Henri, Herman Herzog, George InThru 12.31 ness, Thomas Moran, The American Georgia O’Keeffe, Collection and Charles Sheeler. Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 09.01

www.omart.org

John Grabach and Henry

1. ©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, Edward Gorey, Mr C(lavius) F(rederick) Earbrass is, of course, the well-known novelist, illustration for The Unstrung Harp; Or, Mr Earbrass Writes a Novel, 1953, pen & ink, 4-1/2 x 3-1/2”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, exhibition organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, PA 2. ©2004 Mo Willems, illustration for Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, 2003, published by Hyperion Books for Children, exhibition organized by the National Ctr. for Children’s Illustrated Literature, Abilene, TX 3. Herman Herzog, The St. Johns River Entering the Atlantic Ocean, ca. 1888-1890, oil on canvas, 62-1/2 x 52-1/2”, on long-term loan from the Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc

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Gasser: Teacher and Student The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

This exhibit explores the relationship of how two artists, deriving from the

feeling that most can identify with.

sent a unique artistic expression.

Thru 08.29 Thru 09.2010

Summer Fare: Selections from the Permanent Collections The Mennello Museum of American Art

Art on a String Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

Ormond Beach

www.vac.org.cn

The Visual Arts Center is hosting this vibrant and striking summer exhibit of more than 200 kites from around

www.mennellomuseum.com

New York School, captured the world around them as they saw it. Glorifying the harsh realities of everyday life, gritty urban street scenes and common portrayals of American coastal life, this collection demonstrates a sense of place and

Panama City

Boats, horses and landscapes take over the gallery in this exhibit featuring works by contemporary artists such as: Michael Sastre, Chip Gillespie and Florence Putterman—many of whom live and work in Florida and repre-

08.14-09.26

About Face Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

About Face considers different styles of portraiture produced by three current artists, from hyper realism, to contemporary avant-garde, to modern classical.

the world! Colorful and beautiful, these kites are true works of art. (See story in the June/July 2010 issue on pg. 70.)

1. Henry Gasser, View from Bay Hill, detail 2. Florence Putterman, Escape from Bosnia, detail 3. Richard Currier, Within Ones Self, dimensional bifurcated panel, 76 x 56” 4. Image courtesy of the Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

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Pa n a m a C i t y c o n t i n u e d . . .

Pensacola 08.27-10.24

Jayne Holsinger: Women Driving Pensacola Museum of Art

09.10-10.24

Niles Cruz: Assemblage, Collaged Mixed Media Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

Sarasota

www.pensacola

Thru 09.06

museumofart.org

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

This exhibition consists of 35 paintings

www.vac.org.cn

Niles Cruz works in mixed media, creating lyrical works that suggest emotion and imminent transformation through the play of color and form. He utilizes linear shapes that multiply, interconnect, reflect and expand into intricate and engaging patterns.

personal and revealing portraits of women in the act of driving.

photographs of Frederick W. Glasier (18661950). The exhibition features more than 60 photographs and several lithographic posters that depict the circus coming to town, performances of spectacular feats, and the behind-thescenes life of circus members. (See story in the April/May 2010 issue on pg. 44.)

www.ringling.org

from celebrated New York artist Jayne Holsinger’s Women Driving series. Ms. Holsinger finds inspiration in her Midwestern roots and by exploring the elements of photography in painting. The paintings in this particular series are

HEYDAY offers a glimpse into the most dynamic period of the American circus through the rarely seen

Thru 01.30.11

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes of Central Asia John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Exquisite silver and gilt jewelry from the Turkomen tribes of Iran, Afghanistan

1. Niles Cruz, Rub The Bright Stone, 2006,
33 x 42-1/2”,
mixed media on transparencies 2. Jayne Holsinger, Bree and Casey, 2001, courtesy of the artist and Kenise Barnes Fine Arts, Larchmont, NY 3. Frederick W. Glasier (1866-1950), Pete Mardo, 1923, from the collection of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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and Turkmenistan are presented in this exhibition. Included are more than 40 objects, hand crafted by the semi-nomadic

Upham’s love of the American landscape, Thru 09.26 is demonstrated by the A Passion for photographs of Alan Photography: Ross, John Sexton and Selections from Don Worth. Striking the Carol A. images of Florida Upham Donation by Clyde Butcher and Museum of Woody Walters are Fine Arts, also on view. St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Turkomen people, featuring headdress ornaments, bracelets, and clothing clasps with carnelian and lavish decorative elements of silver and gold. Decorated with gilding, chains and semi-precious stones, each piece is imbued with symmetrical, yet organic, designs drawn from the tribes’ mythological interpretations of the natural world.

This select exhibition features approximately 30 photographs by many of the 20th century’s leading figures including: Edward Curtis, Walker Evans, Sally Mann, W. Eugene Smith, Joel Sternfeld and Arthur Tress. Mrs.

Thru 09.26

Changing Identities: The Len Prince Photographs of Jessie Mann Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Len Prince is celebrated for glamorous portraits of Hollywood stars and sleek advertisements for Cartier and Estée Lauder. In 2001 he met a self-possessed young woman, Jessie Mann. What

followed was a 5-year collaboration making compelling images that reference paintings, famous photographs, historical figures, and mythology. Theatrical and seductive, these unforgettable images explore the relationship between viewer, subject, and artist by examining personae and their meaning, as well as the very nature of the self. 08.28-01.09.2011

Transcending Vision: American Impressionism 1870–1940 from

1. Teke Tribe, Tumar (Amulet/Breastplate), dated first half of 20th century, gift of Mr. Stephen Va. C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 2. Arthur Tress, Hockey Player, NY (1972), gelatin silver print, gift of Carol A. Upham, © Arthur Tress 3. Len Prince, Untitled, Plate 140, 2006, gelatin silver print, 23-3/4 x 21-1/4”, gift of William K. Zewadski, © Len Prince

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

the Bank of America Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

needle. Artists include: Whistler, Hassam, Anders Zorn, James Ensor, and Joseph Pennell.

Thru 08.15

www.fine-arts.org

This spectacular exhibition features

Turmoil and Triumph: American Works on Paper from the World War II Era Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

approximately 125 paintings, drawings, and prints by more than 70 artists. The survey mainly comprises oil paintings and encompasses the Hudson River School, American Impressionism, and a few works on the cusp of Modernism.

This dynamic exhibition captures, in graphic form, pressing social issues and events of the years leading up to and during WWII featuring over 70 prints, drawings, watercolors, and posters by more than 50 artists working between 1935 and 1945.

Thru 08.15

Thru 12.2010

Whistler, Hassam, and the Etching Revival Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Sharing Salvador: The History of the Dalí Museum and the Morse Collection The Dalí Museum

www.fine-arts.org

The Etching Revival (1850–1930) occurred in reaction to lithography, wood engraving, and steel engraving, which dominated graphic output at this time. This exhibition highlights this highly complex and cosmopolitan period when painters put down their brushes to pick up the etching

www.thedali.org

Sharing Salvador presents a selection of paintings, objects and photographs accompanied by an historical narrative on the origins

1. Robert Spencer (1879-1931), Bathers, detail, ca. 1920, oil on canvas, Bank of America Collection 2. Richard V. Correll, Air Raid Wardens, 1942, woodcut, collection of Robert C. and Elizabeth B. Sanchez 3. James Tissot (1836-1902), Soirée d’ Été (Summer Evening), 1881, etching and drypoint on paper, gift of J. Howard Franklin in memory of his mother, Florence Rees Franklin 4. Salvador Dali with Reynolds and Eleanor Morse, 1943, The Dali Museum Archives, St. Petersburg, Florida

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A Passion for Photography: Selections from the Carol A. Upham Donation and

Changing Identities: The Len Prince Photographs of Jessie Mann Through September 26

2000 Years of Glass Celebrating the opening of The Chihuly Collection at 400 Beach. Discover outstanding glass art in the galleries. A Decade of Collecting for the Community Treasures throughout the Museum Dreams and Realities: Latin American Prints, Drawings, and Watercolors, 1959-1976

Childe Hassam, Old House, East Hampton (1917) Bank of America Collection

Transcending Vision: American Impressionism 1870 -1940 Provided by Bank of America Art in our Communities™ program MORE THAN 120 SPECTACULAR PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, AND PRINTS BY SOME OF AMERICA’S MOST GIFTED ARTISTS August 28, 2010-January 9, 2011 media sponsor:

October 2, 2010 – February 6, 2011

255 Beach Drive N.E. • 727.896.2667 • www.fine-arts.org


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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

of the Dalí Museum. This important exhibition—the last in the Museum’s current location before the opening of the new Dalí Museum on January 11, 2011—pays special homage to the Museum’s benefactors, the Morse Family. Tallahassee Thru 09.19

North by Southwest: Native American Art from the Collection of I.S.K. Reeves V and Sara W. Reeves The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science www.thebrogan.org

Over 200 Native American art objects and artifacts of The Plains, Northwest

Vintage Photographs of India Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

This exhibition reCoast, Inuit and cords a pivotal time in Southwest are showIndian history when cased in this exhibithe grandeur of India’s tion. Dating from the past met up with the mid-19th to the early dramatic reposition20th centuries, historic ing of a post-colonial ceremonial and utilisociety. This dynamic tarian objects include: shift is seen in the masks, beaded mocvintage black & white casins, hand-loomed prints that were made textiles, ledger drawin the ’60s and ’70s ings, Kachina dolls, by renown photogparfleche bags, pottery, raphers Bhupendra basketry, silver jewKaria (1936-1994) elry, and more. and Derry Moore. Tampa 09.16- 11.06

Bhupendra Karia and Derry Moore: Stillness and Shadows/

Thru 09.05

Jesper Just: Romantic Delusions Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Romantic Delusions presents four films by critically acclaimed

Danish artist, Jesper Just. The films explore the complexities and contradictions of human emotion. Using overlapping cinematic, musical and literary references, the films adapt popular songs to communicate the vulnerability and insecurity in personal

1. Plains Hair Roach, ca. 1850 2. Derry Moore, Daughter of Sardar Patel, Delhi 1976, © Derry Moore, courtesy sepia EYE 3. Jesper Just, Bliss & Heaven, 2004, Super 16mm transferred to DVD, duration: 8 minutes 10 seconds, image courtesy of the artist and Perry Rubenstein Gallery, NY

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relationships. These short films present polished Hollywood production values that use narrative story lines, as well as create a film noir-like atmosphere without a conventional plot line. Thru 01.03.11

Leo Villareal: Recent Works Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Leo Villareal explores the potency of light. He creates complex patterns of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on simple rules

and encoded programming. While mathematical in origin, these pixels and patterns act as personalities that develop into something organic. By building sequences and defining the conditions, the artist creates an immersive experience defined by light. (See story on pg. 50.)

by American Impressionist artists, along with bronze sculptures created by American artists for the garden.

what makes a city a city, and acknowledges the interconnections and tensions among the professionally designed, the imaginary designed and the make-shift. Works by Doug Aitken, Peter Bialobrzeski, Donna

Thru 12.05 09.25-01.03.11

The American Impressionists in the Garden Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

The theme of the garden in American art and society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries is explored in this exhibition which features paintings depicting European and American gardens

The Hidden City: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Foundation Tampa Museum of Art

Dennis, Pedro Cabrita Reis and Do-Ho Suh are on view.

www.tampamuseum.org

This special exhibition features international artists with multi-media installations that focus on the theme of urbanism over a threedecade period. The Hidden City explores

Thru 08.07

Broadcast
 University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

Broadcast explores

1. Leo Villareal, Solaris, 2005/2010, light emitting diodes, microcontroller, custom software, Plexiglas, and wood; edition 2 of 3, courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art 2. Carl Frederick Frieseke (1874-1939), The Garden Umbrella, ca. 1910, oil on canvas, 32 x 32”, Telfair Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia, bequest of Elizabeth Millar (Mrs. Bernice Frost) Bullard 3. Doug Aitken, Plateau, detail, 2002, Duratran in aluminum lightbox, edition 1 of 3, 52 x 122 x 14”, collection of Martin Z. Margulies

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South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

ways in which artists, since the late 1960s, have engaged, critiqued, and inserted themselves into official channels of broadcast television and radio. The exhibition features works, in a variety of media, by an international group of artists including: Dara Birnbaum, Chris Burden, Gregory Green, Doug Hall, Chip Lord and Jody Procter, among others. 08.23-12.11

Carlos Garaicoa: La enmienda que hay en mí (Making Amends)
 University of

Inspired by the architecture and culture of his native Havana, Carlos Garaicoa explores issues relevant to global, contemporary society, including:

Ink Drawings by Patricia Miller Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

Patricia Miller is a master of pen and ink drawings, many with watercolor embellishment. Artistically, she admires architectural structures and often focuses on doors, windows and other building features. This exhibition is a stunning reminder of urbanism, politics, his- the beauty that can tory and human rights, be found in architecin large-scale instaltural details. lations. (See story on pg. 92.) Tarpon Springs Thru 08.29

Doors, Porches and Victorian Dreams: Pen and

Vero Beach Thru 01.02.11

Clearly Color: Glass from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Clearly Color offers a

dazzling cross section of American glass artists whose works are a study in contrast. The exhibition celebrates the medium and illustrates the revival and innovation of glassforming technologies. Included are works by Dale Chihuly, Benjamin Moore, Dante

1. Doug Hall, Chip Lord, and Jody Procter, The Amarillo News Tapes, 1980, courtesy of the artists and Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), NY 2. Carlos Garaicoa, Untitled (El Arte) from Untitled (Sentences) [Sin título (frases)], detail, 2009, digital photograph, pins, thread, 60 x 48”, courtesy of the artist 3. Patricia Miller, Queen of the Road, 2008, on loan from the artist 4. Harvey Littleton, Blue Sliced Descending Form, 1988, barium/potash glass w/multiple cased overlays of Kugler colors, 2 parts: 14 x 12 x 6-1/2” and 6-1/2 x 4 x 3”, Museum purchase w/funds provided by the John McLaughlin Booth Endowment for Collections, the Dorothy Gay Poole Acquisition Fund Endowment, and the William B. and Marcia H. Howell Endowment for Collections

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Institute for Research in Art Contemporary Art Museum exhibitions

“Best Contemporary Art Venue” 2009 Best of the Bay, Creative Loafing “This museum has a critical role as a center of learning and an educational resource…” [Former] Governor Jeb Bush “USFCAM’s commitment to public service, high professional standard and excellence in education and stewardship is to be commended.” Senator Bill Nelson

Graphicstudio editions

“The work I am creating at Graphicstudio would surely not have been possible to realize without their assistance.” Diana Al-Hadid, Artist, Recipient 2010 Nucci Award “The Graphicstudio archives will contribute enormously to the representation of the finest in contemporary art at our National Gallery.” J. Carter Brown, [Former] Director, National Gallery of Art “Graphicstudio would go all out, I mean they would go all out in almost any kind of experiment, do anything that the artist wanted to do…” James Rosenquist, Artist

Connect with Contemporary Art Director’s Circle 2010 – 2011

Join us as a member of the Director’s Circle, an exclusive group investing in creative capital for our community and sharing a passion for contemporary art. Membership Benefits Include: Invitations to exclusive VIP events Cocktail parties at private residences with honored guests Intimate conversations with contemporary artists and curators Exclusive tours of contemporary exhibitions Special art-related travel opportunities Please call (813) 974-3503 for detailed information on this season’s special events. Visit www.ira.usf.edu to learn more about Tampa Bay’s best kept cultural secret.


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 3 o f 2 6 }

Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Marioni, Therman Statom, and Marc Petrovic. Thru 09.26

Connections: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Works in variety of media are paired together to depict different interpretations of a similar subject, illustrate artistic influences or aesthetic connections, and create interesting comparisons and contrasts. The exhibition pairs together

artists such as: Conrad Marca-Relli and Joan Miró, James Rosenquist and Frank Stella, William Glackens and Liselotte Moser, and Ellsworth Kelly and Sonia Delaunay.

Clyde Butcher, Betsy McKean, and James Balog, among others.

and form, replacing the object’s original function and purpose with a new identity and significance. Metamorphosis features 8 works from Frederico’s AbstractO series.

Thru 09.05

In Focus: Photography Selections from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art

09.25- 01.02.11

Metamorphosis: Abstract Works by Federico Uribe Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

www.verobeachmuseum.org

In Focus is an engaging look at the diversity of photography in the Museum’s permanent collection. A variety of subject matter, technique, composition, and aesthetics are featured in the exhibition by artists Maggie Taylor, Carol Joyce Seid, Ke Francis,

W. Palm Beach Thru 09.05

Beyond the Figure: Abstract Sculpture in the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition, drawn from the Federico Uribe, takes ordinary objects and transforms them into abstract installations of pattern, color,

1. Conrad Marca-Relli, Untitled, 1950, oil on canvas, 46 x 50”, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Athena Society 2. Clyde Butcher, Loxahatchee River 1, detail, 1991, gelatin silver print, gift of the artist 3. Federico Uribe, Oriente-Poniente, 2009, chopsticks and plastic forks, 60” diam. x 17”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 4. Dale Chihuly, Macchia, 1994, blown glass, 24-1/4 x diam. 32” irregular, purchase, acquired through the generosity of Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Adler, Mr. & Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and Mr. & Mrs. Robert Sterling, © Dale Chihuly

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C A L E N D A R

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Norton’s American, European and Contemporary collections, presents a grouping of over 20 abstract sculptures gathered and organized around such themes as “Lines,” “Assemblages” and “Vessels.” Artists Dale Chihuly, Nancy Graves, Sol Lewitt, Louise Nevelson, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, and Howard Ben Tré are represented. Thru 09.05

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

James Gurney invites viewers to enter a whimsical world in which

dinosaurs and humans live side-by-

side. Recounted in words and pictures in the best-selling book series Dinotopia, the artist’s compelling tale has enchanted readers. Gurney’s luminous paintings, beautifully crafted drawings and hand-made models, which are featured in this exhibition, explore the wonders of the distant past through the lens of the imagination. (See story in the June/July 2010 issue on pg. 76.)

Specific styles and innovations that arose as a result of cross-cultural exchanges are highlighted.

08.21-11.21

On the Silk Road and High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture and Commerce Norton Museum of Art

Thru 09.30

Ordinary Moments Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

www.norton.org

The superb examples of Chinese ceramics, featured in this exhibition, were treasured at home and abroad, and considered rarities until the mid-18th century.

The paintings and sculpture on view in this exhibition span 4 decades and reveal a sometimes irreverent and sobering take on such traditional subjects as still life and the figure.

1. James Gurney, Birthday Pageant, 1995, illustration for Dinotopia: The World Beneath, oil on canvas mounted to plywood 2. Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount, Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796-1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century
 porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamelon-biscuit decoration,
17 x 10-1/4 x 6-3/4”, gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection 3. Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Flowers, detail, 1964, acrylic, silkscreen on canvas, 24 x 24”, exchange with Jules Brassner, © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 5 o f 2 6 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 09.30

Winter Park

The Big Gesture Norton Museum of Art

09.11-12.23

MASTER/Plan: Visionary Architects and Their Utopian Worlds Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

www.norton.org

This exhibition features the highly gestural painting styles of artists such as:

Thru 09.30

Recent Acquisitions Norton Museum of Art

cfam.rollins.edu

www.norton.org

The truly international character of modern and contemporary photography is epitomized by this selection of works made by artists such as: Graciela Iturbide (Mexican), Drew Tal (Israeli), Taryn Simon (American), Tacita Dean (British), and Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao (Taiwanese).

Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. Grouped under the term “Abstract Expressionism” or “the New York School,” their robust manner of applying paint was highly inspirational to a generation of artists who immediately followed them.

Sustainable architecture, urban planning, and utopia are explored in an exhibition of models, drawings, and animations by seven leading contemporary architects: Paolo Soleri, Adrien Smith, Michael Graves,

Morris Adjmi, Alchemy Architects, David Rockwell, and Chad Oppenheim. The exhibition sheds light on the creative and practical processes involved with community planning today. Visitors will be able to design their own utopian city or enjoy David Rockwell’s portable playground with their children. 09.11-12.23

Remix: Old and New Acquisitions from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Remix features a se-

1. Drew Tal, Faith, 2004, color photograph, gift of Marcia and Alan Docter, 2010, courtesy EFG-Art Gallery, © Drew Tal 2. Alexander Liberman (1912-1999), Triad VII, 1972–73, oil on canvas, 90-3/4 x 114-1/2”, gift of Mrs. Samuel I. Newhouse, © The Alexander Liberman Trust, 2010 3. Paolo Soleri, Arcosanti, Babelnoah, detail, coastal flat region, proposal for a population of 6 million, Arcology Design from “City in the Image of Man”, photo: Cosanti Foundation-David DeGomez

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 6 o f 2 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

lection of works, all acquired by the

Cornell Fine Arts Museum over the last year, installed with selected older works from the collection. The exhibition follows the Wonderful and Curious exhibition (featured last year), which highlighted the origins of the museum’s permanent collection. Included are works by Richard Anuszkiewicz, Chakaia Booker, Martin Denker, Sam Gilliam and Christian Jankowski. The works on display

reflect the great diversity of work being acquired by the Cornell which now includes a concern for video, new media, installation and collaborative works.

Expressionism, and Jasper Johns (1930- ), one of the leaders responsible for the breakthrough from Abstract Expressionism to the types of Pop art and Minimalism which succeeded it, are closely examined in this exhibition for their serious intellectual tone and philosophical concerns with reference to issues that serve to help interpret their works.

09.11-12.23

Robert Motherwell and Jasper Johns: Poetic Works as Metaphor Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

The Japan Craze and Western Art: 1880-1920 The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

features a number of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany, John La Farge and Rookwood, among others, that reflect the transforming influence of Japan on late 19th- and early 20th century Western art.

www.morsemuseum.org

O n V iew

cfam.rollins.edu Thru 08.08

Robert Motherwell (1915-1991), pioneer and principal exponent of Abstract

Morse Museum vignettes—a tradition established by Museum founder Jeannette Genius McKean—are themed interior scenes developed from objects in the collection. This new Morse vignette

1. Martin Denker, 6.3DayChemicalHoliday, detail, 2008, C-print, edition of 6, 40” x 55” 2. Jasper Johns, Flagstones, 1976, lift-ground aquatint and open-bite from three plates printed in red, black & white, 11-9/16 x 18-5/16”, © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY, published by Petersburg Press, S.A. This exhibition was organized by Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions. Reproduction of this image, including downloading, is prohibited without written authorization from VAGA, 350 Fifth Ave.,Ste. 2820, NY, NY, 10118; 212.736.6666; fax: 212.736.6767; info@vagarights.com; www.vagarights.com; http://www.vagarights.org 3. Katsushika Hokusai, The Bridge detail, 19th century, colored woodblock print on paper

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SEE FEEL LIVE

ViSit norton.org tO See the exhiBitiONS ANd cOllectiONS ON VieW NOW.

ColleCtions | exhibitions | events | Programs | tours | shoP | Dine 1451 S. Olive Avenue | West Palm Beach, Florida 33401 | 561.832.5196 | Norton.org


gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Onessimo Fine Art www.onessimofineart.com

Artist: MARIO MADIAI THE PASSAGE OF

time is a central theme that runs through all of Mario Madiai’s works. His painting can be seen as a perception of an image present in the continuous flux of time, as if vision were being transformed into contemplation, or a drama—the drama of life itself.

MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: Yoko Iwanaga “I CONSTRUCT IMAGES based on [childhood] memories, layering and manipulating several times. Some of these images are clear, but some are blurred the way memories often become, creating a work of mixed realities with imaginative hidden childlike worlds. I hope that my work will encourage happy memories from the viewers, triggering memories of their own.”

From left: Mario Madiai, Red Roses on Lavendar, oil on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Onessimo Fine Art ; Yoko Iwanaga, Can’t Catch Me (detail), 2008, 48 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Artist: Pamela Carroll THE WITTY and charming narratives by Pamela Carroll entice viewers with a sense of light and warmth that fills the canvas. Pamela’s small masterpieces harken back to the early Dutch masters whose work also captivated by focusing on storytelling, illumination and exquisite technical clarity.

NAPLES

Gallery: Longstreth Goldberg Art www.plgart.com

Artist: DANIELLE MAILER

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary

MYSTERY AND MAGIC

www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

Artist: Lorraine Peltz

“M Y C H A N D E L I E R S are

meant to conjure up memories from a past culture. They relate specifically to the roots of my mother’s Austro-Hungarian heritage and they are a good way to address celebration.” Lorraine joins the images of her chandeliers with Pop details, combining the present and the past.

abound in Danielle’s fertile imagination. Her paintings and sculpture, which range in size from miniature to lifesize, are highly creative and wildly popular— at once autobiographical, satirical and rich with a myriad of symbols signifying all that is important in her life.

Clockwise from top left: Pamela Carroll, Steamer Trunk, oil on canvas, 16 x 20”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Danielle Mailer, Spoken From The Heart, courtesy of the artist and Longstreth Goldberg Art; Lorraine Peltz, Because I Said So, 2009, oil on canvas, 40 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary

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G A L L E R Y

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TAMPA

Gallery: Clayton Galleries www.claytongalleries.net

Artist: CLAUDIA RYAN CLAUDIA IS AN ARTIST

and an art educator currently residing in Bradenton, Florida. The rich texture of her work, which features heavily in repetition and line work, is built up through a process of repetitive layering of charcoal, pastel and acrylic.

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Artist: Margarita Dittborn

IF ANY TWO VISUAL ART FORMS can be linked together in their

development and potentials, they are painting and photography. Painting and its history, trying to redefine it and establish a dialogue with it, from the photography field, are at the core of Margarita Dittenborn’s compositions. She is heavily influenced by the Baroque artists, especially Diego Velázquez, and parodies early religious and still life paintings, setting them in an apparent time warp. Margarita combines a detailoriented practice with her skill as a modern photographer to compose rich photomontages complete with banquets, toy figures, and a host of creatures emerging from darkness. From left: Claudia Ryan, Untitled, 2005, mixed media on paper, 82 x 59”, courtesy of the artist and Clayton Galleries; Margarita Dittborn, Enferma de amor III, archival Lambda color photograph, 2008, printed 2009, 31-1/2 x 47-1/4”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

SARASOTA

ST. AUGUSTINE

Gallery: Hodgell Gallery

Gallery: Cutter & Cutter Fine Art Galleries

www.hodgellgallery.com

Artist: RACHEL RADER

www.cutterandcutter.com

Artist: Don Dahlke

“IN MY ARTWORK,

I try to translate ‘a story’ through extravagant visual narratives. I make work that is explosive with texture and color... Inspired by

REMINISCENT OF A TRIP

to paradise, Don’s imagery captures the allure of island ambiance, sun, warmth, tropical shadows and color.

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak Gallery www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: T. J. Wilcox

ARTIST AND FILMMAKER

T.J. Wilcox creates visual narratives that are intelligent and romantic. His large-scale collages blur the distinctions between fact and fiction, weaving imaginative tales based upon history and historical subjects.

the heroes of my childhood: Rainbow Brite, Pee-wee Herman, the Care Bears and so on, I have developed my own sugar coated language.”

Clockwise from top: Don Dahlke, Doorway to a Dream, oil on canvas, 80 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Cutter & Cutter Fine Art Galleries; Rachel Rader, Mermaid Food 06, 2009, blown glass, hot sculpted glass and sand-cast glass, 17 x 12 x 12”, courtesy of the artist and Hodgell Gallery; T.J. Wilcox, Tragedy (Sissi at the Sala Terrena), 2007, archival inkjet print with watercolor and collage on watercolor paper 47-1/2 x 33-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery

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Interview

LEO VILLAREAL

LEO VILLAREAL: RECENT WORKS,

on view

through January 3rd at the new TAMPA MUSEUM OF ART,

features a

dazzling display of LIGHT, COLOR & MOTION.

In a recent interview, with ON VIEW, the artist discussed the PROCESS & INSPIRATION

behind his work.

Left: Leo Villareal, courtesy of the artist; Above: Solaris, 2005/2010,

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light emitting diodes, microcontroller, custom software, Plexiglass and wood, edition 2 of 3. Image courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art


L

LEO VILLAREAL orchestrates digital animations of light and color and is regarded as a pioneer in the use of LEDs and computer-driven imagery. Known both for his light sculptures and architectural, site-specific works, he presents innovative art that responds and relates to the technology of the 21st century. Leo Villareal: Recent Works offers visitors a chance to get up close to his works and understand how the smaller, interior sculptures work in concert with the larger, exterior works. The Tampa Museum of Art will also include a video loop of Sky (Tampa), a site-specific installation on the south façade of the museum which incorporates programmable LED lights, 45 feet high and 300 feet long, embedded within two layers of perforated aluminum panels that illuminate the downtown core. Leo began experimenting with light, sound, and video while studying set design and sculpture at Yale University, where he received his BA. He earned his MPS in the design of new

1. Sky (Tampa), installation view, Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL, permanent installation 2. Horizon (2), 2008, light emitting diodes, Plexiglas tubes, Mac mini, circuitry and custom software. Images courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art

OV: What inspired you to work with light as an abstract art form?

LV: I spent many years studying virtual reality in the 1990’s as a graduate student at NYU and a researcher at Interval Research Corporation in Palo Alto. Our goal was to simulate and recreate

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the world—in order to do this, we needed everincreasing computational power coupled with motion sensors and feedback devices. In 1997, I created my first light sculpture using 16 strobe lights and a very simple microcontroller. I had the ability to turn the lights off and

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Interview

media, computational media, and embedded computing from New York University’s pioneering Interactive Telecommunications Program at the Tisch School of the Arts. The wondrous and transporting light sculptures are firmly rooted in the artist’s interest in underlying structures and rules. By incorporating principles of math and physics, he creates custom code that allows him to play with parameters like velocity and mass, adding different behaviors and complexity to the patterning and movement of light. For almost two decades, he has been developing a rich visual vocabulary based on the use of strobe lights, incandescent bulbs, and LEDs. Leo’s work has been included in numerous solo and group exhibitions and he has produced site-specific commissions at major cultural institutions throughout the US and abroad. His installations can be found at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC; P.S.1 MoMA, Queens, NY; Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY; Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; and the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park, KS. Leo lives in New York City with his wife, Yvonne, and their son Cuatro. On View’s interview with Leo Villareal was arranged through Gering & López Gallery, NY.

3. Dark Matrix 20*20, 2008, 400 light emitting diodes, microcontroller, circuitry, custom software and anodized aluminum, edition 2 of 5. Image courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art

on, a binary system that alternated between zero and one. I had an epiphany down at the lowest level of computation and found that I could create very powerful artwork with a tiny amount of information. It was very liberating to discover this new territory full of possibility. OnV

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OV: Can you give us an idea of your process and what you consider to be the most important considerations when designing installations?

LV: The element of chance is central to my work. My goal is to create a rich environment

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Interview

in which emergent behavior can occur without a preconceived outcome. I am an active participant, serving as editor in the process through this careful selection of compelling sequences. These selections are then further refined via combination with other sequences through simple operations such as addition, subtraction and multiplication. The sequence’s opacity, speed and scale can all be manipulated using custom software. Ultimately, complex compositions are formed and then displayed in random order and for a random amount of time in the final artwork. The visual manifestation of the code in light is at the core of my interest.

physics. The idea of discovering an underlying ‘truth’ excites me.

OV: Where do you find inspiration for creating art?

LV: Working with teams of contractors, engineers, architects and designers over a span of several years requires tenacity and is much different from the traditional ‘artist working in the studio’ model. The biggest thrill for me is to finally begin the sequencing of a piece that I never could have created on my own and finding a solution that adds up to more than the sum of its parts.

LV: Starting at the beginning, using the simplest forms, I build elements within a framework. My work explores not only the physical but also the dimension of time, combining both spatial and temporal resolution. My forms move, change, interact and ultimately grow into complex organisms. Inspired by mathematician John Conway’s work with cellular automata and the Game of Life, I seek to create my own sets of rules. I find inspiration in geometry, natural systems and in the laws of

OV: How much time do you typically allow to complete an installation?

LV: I am constantly developing the custom programmed software tools I use to create my work and there is certainly an evolutionary process—one thing leads to the next. Each installation is unique and presents its own challenges. Some projects might take eight years and others only a few months.

OV: What part of the process do you find most exciting and challenging?

OV: What has been your most ambitious project to date?

LV: Sky (Tampa), an exterior installation fea-

“I FIND INSPIRATION IN GEOMETRY, NATURAL SYSTEMS AND IN THE LAWS OF PHYSICS. THE IDEA OF DISCOVERING AN UNDERLYING ‘TRUTH’ EXCITES ME.”

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Diamond Sea, 2007, 
white LEDs, mirror finished stainless steel, custom software, and electric hardware,
120 x 180 x 6”, courtesy Gering & López Gallery, NY; Opposite page: Bulbox 4.0, 2007, gold-plated aluminum, LEDs, custom software, electrical hardware, 9 x 9 x 3”, edition 25, image courtesy of Gering & López Gallery and Editions Fawbush, NY

tured on the south façade of the Tampa Museum of Art (see pg. 52), is the largest piece I have completed, measuring 45 feet tall by 300 feet wide. Multiverse, an interior installation which illuminates the Concourse walkway between the East and West Buildings of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, uses 41,000 individually controllable LEDs and is the highest resolution piece to date. The scale and complexity of these two works make them my most ambitious.

OV: The Recent Works exhibition gives viewers an opportunity to see a range of work from small interior pieces to a major site-specific installation. What do you hope viewers may take away from this experience?

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pieces on each wall of the gallery that maintain individual identities while working in concert. Light bleeds from one piece to the next, washing the space and the people within. My goal is for viewers to feel engaged and transported.

OV: How do you see your work evolving over the next few years?

LV: The work I am making today would be impossible without the relatively recent invention of the blue LED, which allows for the mixing of millions of colors. I look forward to advances in lighting technology that will produce even more efficient and longer lasting fixtures. I am interested in finding new algorithmic approaches to creating my work as well as forward-thinking groups with whom to collaborate, pushing software controlled lighting to its limits. O n V iew

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Elegant

ENIGMAS: The Art of Edward Gorey ON VIEW AT THE ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

08 .1 3 -1 0.3 1 ©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, Mr C(lavius) F(rederick) Earbrass is, of course, the well-known novelist,

illustration for The Unstrung Harp; Or, Mr Earbrass Writes a Novel, 1953, pen and ink, 4-1/2 x 3-1/2”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania

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ELEGANT ENIGMAS pays tribute to the work of Edward Gorey (1925-2000), whose masterful drawings and witty, offbeat humor have brought him critical acclaim and an avid following throughout the world.

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The exhibition, hosted by the Orlando Museum of Art, features original illustrations, preparatory sketches, unpublished drawings and ephemera by the artist and author. Described as “incredibly sophisticated...styl-

2010


ish and inventive” by the New York Observer, Edward’s signature pen-and-ink illustrations and unique wit have led him to be considered one of America’s most imaginative and eccentric artists. The exhibition includes

approximately 170 objects, featuring selections from such well-known publications as The Gashlycrumb Tinies, The Doubtful Guest, The Unstrung Harp and The Gilded Bat, among others.

Elegant

ENIGMAS

©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, off which they rapidly ate a quantity of berries, illustration for Epiplectic Bicycle, 1969, pen and ink, 3-1/2 x 7”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.


During his lifetime, Edward published more than 100 books, designed sets and costumes for numerous theater productions (including his Tony-award winning 1977 production of Dracula) and illustrated works for a wide array of authors such as: Samuel Beckett, Charles Dickens, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, H.G. Wells and John Updike. In 1980, Derek Lamb’s animated opening credits for the PBS series Mystery!, based on Edward’s drawings, introduced the artist’s work to millions of television viewers. In the whimsically twisted world of Edward Gorey, nothing is quite what it seems. His

imaginative and often enigmatic books are filled with a mixture of the ordinary and the ominous, with non sequiturs and brief statements that often leave as much to the imagination as they reveal. They cover a wide array of subjects from the ballet to a haunted tea-cosy to wickedly funny “alphabet” books and include an Edwardian-inspired cast of genteel ladies, men in smoking jackets, children in pinafores and sailor suits, and maids in proper uniform—the artist himself sometimes pops up as a character in his own work, dressed in a gigantic beaver coat. While the images that accompany Edward’s minimal-

©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, The top of the zagava tree / Was frequently where they had tea, illustration for The Osbick Bird, 1970, pen and ink, 4 x 5”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

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ist text appear simple, the pen work is often complex. These eloquent images might complement the text and, on other occasions, raise puzzling questions. He rarely depicts murder or mayhem, portraying instead the actions that precede an event or suggest the immediate aftermath. Viewers are left to decipher meaning or to complete ongoing narratives for themselves. The result is often a delicate balance between the hilarious and ominous uncertainty. When asked about the effect of his work on readers, he replied, “In a way I hope it is mildly unsettling.” Although considered eccentric by some, and perhaps mis-

Elegant

labeled as grim or morbid, his work is in fact whimsical, with just a twist of macabre humor. “Only very occasionally do I try to shock in a mild sort of way. I’m very squeamish really,” he once explained. Edward’s illustrations, which often suggest scenes from Edwardian England, tend to foster the erroneous belief that he was English and of that bygone era. And so it is surprising to some to find that he was their contemporary. Born and raised in Chicago, Edward attended Harvard University from 1946-1950 where he studied French. He rarely traveled and went abroad only once as an adult, sojourning in the Scot-

ENIGMAS

©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, ‘I am the Bahhum Bug,’ it declared; ‘I am here to diffuse the interests of didacticism’, illustration for The Haunted Tea-Cosy: A Dispirited and Distasteful Diversion for Christmas, published in Amphigorey Again, 2006, pen and ink, 2-1/2 x 3-1/8”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

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“O

nly very occasionally do way,” Edward said, “I’m

A bearded, bejeweled, and often fur-clad dandy in tennis shoes, Edward Gorey portrayed himself as an eccentric of the highest order. “Part of me is genuinely eccentric, part of me is a bit of a put-on,” he once said. “But I know what I’m doing.”

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tish isles, not in England. Edward studied art for one semester at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 1943, and served in the U.S. Army from 1943 to 1946. From 1953 to 1960, he lived in New York City and worked for the art department of Doubleday Anchor, but his real passion was creating his own bizarre stories and illustrating them. “Line drawing is where my talent lies,” the artist said, yet he chose to work almost exclusively in black and white for practical reasons—since it was cheaper to print, he was more likely to get his marketing-challenged creations published. His ideas were often misinterpreted as “ghoulish,” and he was turned down by publisher after publisher until The Unstrung Harp came out in 1953 and his reputation began to grow. He would continue publishing an average of one to two new books a year for the next 45 years.

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Once asked where he found inspiration for his enigmatic tales, he remarked, “God knows my influences are eclectic. There’s hardly anything I haven’t filched some time or another. ...silent films... Japanese literature...nineteenth century book illustrations.” Edward voraciously absorbed the world around him, assimilating from his 25,000 volume

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Elegant

ENIGMAS

I try to shock in a mild sort of very squeamish, really.” library, newspapers, television and movies­—all potential fodder for his work. Although he had no children, Edward featured them prominently in many of his illustrations, but he used children to represent all of us—vulnerable, powerless inhabitants of an inexplicable universe. In 1983, Edward moved to Cape Cod where he maintained

a semi-reclusive lifestyle in his Yarmouth port home dating back nearly 200 years. When he was not working on the 100 or so projects he had outlined for himself at any given time, he indulged himself in the production of small experimental plays on Cape Cod, cared for his brood of six cats and watched old movies or his favorite television shows. Shortly before his death of a heart-attack in 2000, Edward reflected upon his legacy. “My name turns up in a review of a book or something where they say it’s very ‘Edward Goreyish’ or something like that. That happens often enough, so I feel I’ve made a tiny mark somewhere.” Ten years after his death, his work continues to inspire artists such as Lemony Snickett creator Daniel Handler and filmmaker Tim Burton, and will continue to do so as long as readers dare to enter his delightfully enigmatic world. O n V iew

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©The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. Edward Gorey, He and Miss Skrim-Pshaw mentioned a great many people who had done things in their conversation, illustration for The Remembered Visit: A Story Take from Life, 1965, pen and ink, 3-9/16 x 4-15/16”, collection of The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. This exhibition has been organized by the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.

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FRAGILE Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5, 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108�, collection of the artist


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Two exhibitions present inspirational works by renowned photographers, Clyde Butcher and Lee Dunkel, who share a passion for photography and Florida’s beautiful, yet fragile, landscape.

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A

A S F L O R I D A D E A L S with the aftermath of

the single largest environmental catastrophe in our nation’s history, we cannot help but feel a great sense of pain and frustration. Restoring wetlands and wildlife habitats along the Gulf Coast will take far beyond the time needed to resolve the immediate effects of this man-made disaster—and the region’s environment may retain hazardous chemicals left behind by the BP oil spill for years to come. This tragic event is one we can only hope to learn from and pray that we never see again. So it becomes painfully clear how fragile this ecosystem truly is—a delicate balance of subtropical flora and fauna indigenous to this region alone—and we are grateful to the photographers who have dedicated themselves to preserving the essence and glory of this diverse wilderness. On View is proud to feature two exhibitions presenting the masterful works of renowned Florida landscape photographers, Clyde Butcher and Lee Dunkel, who use their art form to celebrate the wonder and beauty of this natural treasure. Lee Dunkel, Spruce Creek, courtesy of the artist

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E x h i b i t i o n

08.24-10.02 CLYDE BUTCHER:

Big Cypress Swamp & the

Western Everglades on view at the Southwest Florida Museum of History, Ft. Myers www.swflmuseumofhistory.com

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Clyde Butcher THERE ARE FEW who would brave difficult

swamps, cypress strands and a host of toothy native critters in order to understand the beauty and peace found in the Everglades ecosystem of South Florida. Clyde has a deep connection with this land and the stunning landscapes portrayed in his photography serve as an inspiration for others to work together to preserve nature’s places of spiritual sanctuary for generations to come. Clyde Butcher, Tamiami Trail 2, 1990, silver gelatin fiber print, 36 x 46”, collection of the artist

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E x h i b i t i o n

08.06-11.14 SPRUCE CREEK & THE ST. JOHNS RIVER:

Silverprint Photography of Lee Dunkel on view at the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach www.moas.org

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Lee Dunkel Lee is attracted to the medium of black and white photography because of the abstract quality it lends to her imagery. She does not think of herself as strictly a landscape photographer, rather an environmental photographer. Her work reflects an intimate study of specific geographic areas and anomalies found in nature, while employing the photographic techniques of Ansel Adams to capture the variety, serenity and sensual quality of the Florida landscape. Lee Dunkel, St. John’s River, courtesy of the artist

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September 17thFebruary 20th, at the Wolfsonian-Florida International University, Miami Beach

SPEED Print: Benton Spruance (1904-1967), People Work–Evening, 1937, Philadelphia, lithograph, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection

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LI M ITS


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T h e W o l f s o n i a n – FIU presents Speed Limits, an exhibition of more than 200 works, in a variety of media, which explores the role of speed and its impact on modern life. One hundred years ago, the Manifesto of Futurism proclaimed that “the world’s magnificence has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.” A century later, the tempo of life continues to accelerate. Speed Limits reflects on the legacy of the Futurist movement’s celebration of speed, probing the powers and limits of the modern era’s cult of speed in five key domains: circulation and transit, construction and the built environment, efficiency, the measurement and representation of rapid motion, and the mind/body relationship. Paintings, posters, drawings, books, videos, clocks and appliances, on display throughout the exhibition, present striking examples of Futurism’s dream of a fast-paced world. Speed Limits is all about complex choices and complex consequences, polarities, and also the intertwinings between the fast and the slow. 74

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Above: Drawing: Edmond van Dooren (1896-1965), Cityscape, ca.1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection


CIRCULATION and TRANSIT

Multiple perceptions of traffic and its models are vital to an understanding of the city and society. Speed Limits bears witness to the prevalent dream of an urban space with

freely-flowing traffic, and illustrates the concept of the grid, or network, that governs the movement of persons and goods as well as information. This is juxtaposed with the breakdown of circulation as

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the scale and complexity of such movement expands— the traffic jam. As the pace, complexity, and interconnectivity of systems increase, so does risk. Predictable only in the

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wake of its occurrence, the accident’s explanation lurks somewhere between operator error, systemic flaws, and circumstance. With the aid of science, it becomes possible to probe these zones, reconstruct accidents and improve the efficiency of transportation systems.

Below: Photomontage of projects by Mart Stam from the 1920s, 1930, Ilse Bing (1899-1998), gelatin silver prints, 19-3/5 x 15-3/4”, CCA Collection, Montréal

CONSTRUCTION and the BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Once the slowest art, due to the arduous nature of construction processes and the enduring nature of the resulting creations, architecture revs up in the modern era. The tempo of construction is altered by techniques such as prefabrication, standardization and modular construction. For centuries, architectural success implied the creation of works that passed the “test of time,” however new tests of time arise in the era of industry based upon factors like the pace of assembly.

EFFICIENCY

According to the Scientific Management movement, speed means efficiency and Speed


Left: Illustration from For the Home of Today, 1937, published by Crane Co., Chicago, CCA Collection, Montréal Below: Advertisement: Sous le signe. Guillaume Nusslé, ca. 1930, published by Haefeli & Co., La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, ink on paper, 11 5/8 x 8 1/4”, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection

Limits focuses on two types of space transformed by speed, one domestic and the other public: the kitchen and the office. The kitchen becomes a specialized realm of food production where minutes count, precision is the rule, and tradition is overruled by modern science. So-called “continuous kitchens” were designed like production lines so that the sequence of fixtures, cabinets, and work surfaces could provide a seamless support for the food preparation process. Contemporary, all-stainless descendants of these first industrial

kitchens fulfill the dream of a fusion of home and factory. The office becomes the factory’s white collar double—a production site where labour consists of clerical tasks such as calculating, recording, and filing. With the transition to steel furnishings, typewriting supplants handwriting and devices such as telephones become the key components of a new work station. Paper records expand to such a degree that they are forced to migrate to vertical filing cabinets which soon develop into freestanding walls. Their

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demise occurs as computers absorb the multitude of instruments that once populated physical desktops.

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The fast tempo of life in the industrial era engenders a rich assortment of visual conventions for representing bodies in motion. Posters and graphics, whose design captures the notion of speed, are created to promote cars, tires, oils, and other products or services. With the advent of photography and film, the language further expands to encompass frame-by-frame timeslices, stroboscopic repetitions, blurring, and simple but suggestive geometries—zigzags, spirals and s-curves.

The MIND/BODY RELATIONSHIP

Above: Poster: Magneti Marelli, Licenza Bosch (Magneti Marelli, Bosch License), 1938, designed by Filippo Romoli (1901-1969), printed by SAIGA Barabino and Graeve, Genoa, commercial color lithograph, 39 x 27 1/2”, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection; Photo: Silvia Ros Right: Clock: Modernique, model no. 431, ca. 1928, designed by Paul Theodore Frankl (1886-1958), manufactured by Warren Telechron Co., Ashland, MA, Silverplate, Bakelite, metal, paint, 7 7/8 x 5 3/4 x 3 3/4”, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection; Photo: Bruce White

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The MEASUREMENT and REPRESENTATION of RAPID MOTION

The tempo of modern life is marked by the ticking of clocks. They pulse both visibly and invisibly within the heart of electronic devices. In the company of these ubiquitous timepieces appears an everexpanding family of motion and position measurement devices: accelerometers, altimeters, odometers, and speedometers. Pace and calculation are always closely coupled.

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Speed Limits suggests different ways in which acceleration is associated on the one hand with pleasure—ecstasy,

2010


the search for powerful sensations, and overstimulation— and on the other with exhaustion, risk, and injury. For the past century, hyperbolic exertion has been the new standard. Representations of the body in motion include the transformation of the body itself into a speeding object, gymnastics and popular athleticism in the early 20th century, natural and artificial improvements in physical culture, stimulants and tranquilizers, and the remedies associated with stimulants. Among speed’s pharmaceutical avatars are caffeine, cocaine, amphetamines, and the active ingredients in energy drinks. With the increasing tempo of existence, the contemplative attitude (once the defining

feature of mental life) gives way to the emergence of a powerful mode of real-time, on-the-fly deliberation based on quick thinking, fast reflexes and intensified eye-hand coordination, and simultaneous processing of multiple data streams. Modern humanity continues its struggle to acquire the cognitive skill-set and forms of intelligence required to sustain the pace and navigate the complexity of a world perpetually on the move. O n V iew

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Above: Advertisement: Insomnia – Neurinase – Alepsal, ca.1935, published by Laboratoires A. Genevrier, Paris, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection Left: Periodical: Physical Culture, February 1927, New York, The Wolfsonian–FIU, gift of Robert J. Young

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KAI! MONSTER INVASI O N

on view through 10.17 at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray www.morikami.org


I!JU! Beach

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M Previous spread: Gomora, from the TV Series, Ultraman (1966–1967).

Ultraman. For nearly 50 weeks, the creators of Ultraman designed a new monster each week.

motion picture, Gamera (1965). Gamera is a giant flying turtle with tusks, to rival Toho’s Godzilla in popularity. Gamera is usually

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KAIJŪ! MONSTER INVASION!

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By Tom Gregersen, Cultural Director, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens MONSTERS HAVE INVADED Morikami Muse-

um this summer as vintage toys from the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s, inspired by Japanese tokusatsu films and TV shows, appear on display in, Kaijū! Monster Invasion! The exhibition features over 100 figures from the extensive private collection of Dr. James Levy. Kaijū—characters used to write this word have the meaning of “strange beast”—are monsters presented in the context of science fiction rather than folklore, and have been potent expressions of Japanese popular culture for over half a century. Beginning with the release of the film Gojira (Godzilla) in 1954, kaijū of all types have captured the imagination of legions of fans worldwide and have spawned a lucrative toy industry that endures to this day.

CREATURE FEATURES

Kaijū were imagined and created to appear in

special effects movies and television programs in which stuntmen portrayed them by wearing rubber suits and moved about on a set of miniatures to simulate great size. The monsters were the products of unfettered imaginations in the design departments of motion picture production companies, most notably Tsuburaya Productions, founded by special effects master Eiji Tsuburaya. The designs of the monsters were inspired by a variety of sources, including dinosaurs, insects, plants, marine life, and robots, to name a few. Very often, designers combined elements from more than one of these sources, and others as well, to create their fantastic creatures. These movie and TV monsters inspired a host of soft vinyl toys that began appearing in the 1960s. Figures were designed in the likenesses of the monsters that appeared on both the big and small screens, then molds were made for mass production, but manufacturing soft vinyl toys was mainly a cottage industry. The final steps in

Gomora was the only monster to appear in a story arc that lasted more than one program of the original series of Gomora was the first kaij ū foe to beat Ultraman in a fight, a story element that shocked Japanese youngsters. Opposite page: Gamera, from the featured in a popular series of kaij ū films produced by the Daiei Motion Picture Company. The creature was intended

bipedal, but occasionally walks on all fours. Flames shoot from the soles of his feet when he flies.

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KAIJŪ! MONSTER INVASION!

preparing figures for market were carried out by individual artisans who brought a certain creativity and individuality to each piece. Figures were painted by hand—early figures from the ’60s and ’70s appear to have been brush-painted while those that are more recent, or even contemporary, have colors applied by airbrushes­—insuring that each was unique in some way while, at the same time, conforming to a general set of standards. A certain thoughtful decision-making process governed the final outcome of a piece.

MONSTER APPEAL

The individuality of the final product, resulting from the artisan’s vision and skill set, has gained importance today as young artists create and promote limited editions of art-toy figures, taking over all aspects of the creation process from conception to finished product. While early artisans probably did not think of themselves as doing anything especially creative, the figures they produced fascinated young artists decades later who wanted to emulate the early toys with self-consciously applied color schemes of their

own. Some even began creating creatures in the spirit of the early toys, even if the monsters themselves never appeared in actual television shows. Rather, they were inspired to create by the outrageous, compelling, and fascinating look of the monsters born in the studios of production companies like Tsuburaya Productions. This urge to create and recreate the monsters of the ’60s and ’70s motivated artist toy makers not only in Japan but all around the world.

FEAR FACTOR

While extremely popular and inspirational, these grotesque creatures appear to have originated in a dark place within the human psyche. They seem to express our basest fears of the consequences of humankind’s careless exploitation of science and technology. Some have been called

All foes of Chojin Barom-1 (Superhuman Barom-1), from the TV Series of the same name. Doruge, Barom-1’s nemesis, created mutant clones from his body parts to fight Barom. 1. Kuchibiruge (Lip Monster) 2. Udegeruge (Hand Monster) 3. Nogeruge (Brain Monster)

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KAIJU

SEEM TO EXP

of the consequences of humankind’s carel “atomic monsters” because, like Godzilla, they are, in part, the result of careless use of atomic materials and indiscriminate testing, within the context of the stories in which they appear, and are often capable of mass destruction on a scale that is possible, in real life, only by nuclear

weapons. It is often remarked that Godzilla was the creation of the only nation to experience, first-hand, the horrors of atomic warfare. Add to this the environmental, biological, and chemical threats that have followed, beginning in the 1950s and ’60s as Japan hurried, sometimes

Left page: This trio of kaij ū includes Gabora (left), Big Eye (in back), and Dragon King (right). Dinosaur-like in appearance, Gabora has appendages around its neck, which close to form a kind of protective mask over the Each week the show’s hero, a mysterious humanoid alien from space, would fight a giant monster threatening Earth’s inhabitants. Dragon When Barom-1 defeated Doruge’s mutants, he created clones from his body parts, like the hand, brain, and eye monst

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KAIJŪ! MONSTER INVASION!

XPRESS OUR BASEST FEARS

less exploitation of science and technology. recklessly, to re-establish its industrial base in the wake of World War II. Kaijū might best be understood as substitutes for late 20th century perils that continue to plague us today. Fortunately, on shows like Ultraman and others, they were neatly vanquished each week by the

titular super heroes, transformed by means of stock gestures, poses, and spoken phrases from ordinary human beings. Perhaps the message of optimism from these shows was that even the greatest dangers to the existence of humankind were not insurmountable. O n V iew

Gabora was an adversary of the original Ultraman in the TV series, Ultraman (1966–1967). monster’s face. Big Eye is from the television series, Mirrorman (1971–1972). Its premise was similar to that of Ultraman. King battled the hero Zone Fighter, whose television series aired in 1973. Right Page: More monsters from the TV series, Chojin Barom-1. ers. 1.Togeruge (Thorn Monster) 2. Hyakumeruge (One-hundred eyes Monster) 3. Urokoruge (Fish scale monster)

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FOCUS { J O N A T H A N

IN 1994, in the East African

T O R G O V N I K }

Exhibition

Rwanda/Intended Consequences: Jonathan Torgovnik On view September 4th-November 7th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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nation of Rwanda, one million ethnic Tutsi people were slaughtered in a genocide committed by their Hutu countrymen. The scars left by these murderers go well beyond the death toll—they live on, in the lives of the women they held captive and raped. Some 20,000 children were born as a result of the genocide, and 15 years later, the mothers of these children still face enormous challenges, including the stigma of bearing and raising a child fathered by a Hutu militiaman. Over the past 3 years, photographer Jonathan Torgovnik has documented the stories of these women. The portraits and testimonies featured in Intended Consequences offer intensely personal and honest accounts of these survivors’ experiences. The project has deeply moved the photographer: “It’s changed my life and the way I do things and look at things...It’s important for me to tell these stories. I feel it’s an obligation because these women have no voice, no power. I need to try and give them 2010


F O C U S

as much of a voice as I can.” tween the Rwandan genocide As he interviewed these victims and the Jewish people women, it became clear that who experienced the Holocaust. their outlook was bleak. They “What I am proud of, more have struggled economical- than anything, are the rely and many are HIV-positive sults that my photography has and worry about surviving long achieved in creating awareness enough to care for their chil- of this problem. And if we can dren. Any sense of also create a soluhope came from tion that will help the possibility that these kids to get their children might an education, I will receive an educadefinitely be most tion. This motivatproud of that.” ed Jonathan to coJonathan’s phofound Foundation tographs have been “...these women Rwanda, a not-for- have NO VOICE, published in Newsprofit initiative that week, Aperture, NO POWER. I supports secondary GEO, and The Sunneed to try to give school education day Times Magathem as much for children born zine. He has been of a voice as I can.” of rape during the in numerous solo Rwandan genocide. and group exhibitions around Jonathan is the latest in a long the world and his work is in the line of documentary photogra- permanent collection of The phers who have used their art to Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; inspire social change and help the Bibliotheque National De improve people’s lives. It is not France, Paris; and the Library surprising that Jonathan is so of Congress, Washington, DC. keenly sensitive to the plight of Jonathan is also the author of Invictims of genocide. His grand- tended Consequences: Rwanda father was murdered by the Na- Children Born of Rape (Aperzis. He has felt the parallels be- ture, 2009). O n V iew

OPPOSITE PAGE: Delphine with her daughter, Sophie ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Valentine with her daughters, Amelie and Inez 2. Yvette with her son, Isaac 3. Sylvina with her daughter, Marianne images © Jonathan Torgovnik, courtesy aperture foundation LEFT: Jonathan Torgovnik, photograph by Matt Mallams


PROFILE { P H I L I P

THE MIAMI POSTER PROJECT

B R O O K E R }

Exhibition

Miami Poster Project On view September 10th-October 17th at the ArtCenter/South Florida, Miami Beach www.artcentersf.org

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is a visually uplifting exhibit featuring a series of related posters produced by artist, illustrator, furniture maker and filmmaker, Philip Brooker, for the inaugural year of the Miami Poster Project, a brand-new initiative. The exhibit’s intent is to update Miami’s visual image—to provide visual content that is a reflection of the complex and fascinating place that is Miami, and to break from the frequently stale and tourist-industry-driven images we are so familiar with and so often used to represent Miami. A master of digital imagery, Philip Brooker uses his talent to create posters that excite and inspire. These posters are often comprised of a collage of many images, some found and some drawn, incorporating multiple scenes and perspectives, vibrant palettes and a whimsical sense of humor. “The digital medium bit me and hasn’t let go. It’s still a miracle to me how one can take a photo or scan in a document

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P R O F I L E

or image, and, from that, pro- Philip was Art Director for duce something quite remark- The Miami Herald. He now able,” said the artist. freelances full time, producPhilip was born in 1956 and ing illustrations through his raised in England before “es- company, A Nice Cup of Tea caping” to America. Accord- Production, and is working ing to his mother, he was an on fine art and film projects. artist from the very beginning. Philip’s illustrations have “My mother said I created been featured in publicacave drawings in her womb, tions such as: BusinessWeek, and of course, she Entertainment should know.” In Weekly, The Los the UK, he attendAngeles Times, ed Bradford ReThe Washington gional School of Post, The New Art in 1973, at the York Times, U.S. tender age of 16 News and World (the youngest stuReport, Sports “The DIGITAL dent ever to be acIllustrated and medium BIT cepted into the ME and HASN’T Architectural Dischool), and congest. He has won LET GO.” tinued on to the numerous awards Cardiff School of Art. With for his work, including: the a Diploma in Art and De- Print magazine award, Sosign, a Bachelor of Arts degree ciety of Newspaper Design, and a roll of 30 paintings, he Communication Arts, and headed off to New York City, American Illustration, to where he lived and exhibited name a few. Philip’s fine art his work until 1988. He then has also been exhibited in headed south to a brightly shows worldwide. He currentlit studio in Miami where ly resides in Miami and Parhe continued to paint and is and occasionally enjoys “a show his work. Up until 2007, nice cup of tea.” O n V iew

OPPOSITE PAGE: Poster #4, Miami Poster Project, 2010, 6’w x 10’h THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Poster #3, Miami Poster Project, 2010, 6’w x 10’h 2. Poster #5, Miami Poster Project, 2010, 6’w x 10’h LEFT: philip brooker self portrait images courtesy of the artist


SPOTLIGHT { C A R L O S

G A R A I C O A }

Exhibition

Carlos Garaicoa: La enmienda que hay en mí (Making Amends) On view August 23rd-December 11th at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

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RENOWNED CUBAN ARTIST,

Carlos Garaicoa, addresses politics and ideologies through the examination of the contemporary city. Architecture, urbanism, modernism, history, politics and human rights are all elements he utilizes in his art to open a dialogue with viewers. “The visual arts, like literature, music, or any other artistic language, are platforms on which to discuss social and political issues, and for exercising our critical commitment towards society. I believe in art that is still capable of creating meaning, where the role of an artist and an intellectual as bearer of that meaning is the most important component. Supreme beauty can originate and be extracted from that social commitment.” La enmienda que hay en mí features works in a variety of media, many of which are serial. Crown Jewels, for example, consists of 8 cast silver sculptures depicting structures from around the world­—each connected, in the public’s view, to military authority, surveillance, 2010


S P O T L I G H T

repression and aggression. in the army, he worked as a Co-curator, Corina Matam- draftsman, learning the skills oros, writes of the Crown Jewels: he would use later in his prac“Like jewels carefully encased tice as an artist. He studied viin vitrines, the artist offers to the sual arts at the Instituto Superipublic spectacular gems that, or de Arte in Cuba, from 1989 with their magnificent craft, to 1994. Although never formaterial beauty and surpris- mally trained as an architect, he ing appearance, are has been an active luxury items...These observer of archijewels are mounted tecture and has apon a setting of vigorplied this discourse ous political dissent. to his artwork. Once again the artist Unlike many of plants decoys in his his contemporaries, work and seems to he does not live in “... I believe in ask us which symbol exile. He has had ART that is of surveillance, agthe opportunity to still CAPABLE gression or represtravel and develop OF creating sion we would take work all over the MEANING...” home for the valworld and is one of ue of the silver. How far are we the most well-known Cuban artwilling to involve ourselves in ists in the international sphere. the intricacies of power? What Recent exhibitions include is its true nature? How have the the Venice Biennale, 2009; Haprerogatives of power histori- vana Biennale, 2009; La Caixa cally influenced architectural Cultural, Rio de Janeiro, 2008; expression?” Institute of Contemporary Art, Carlos was born in Havana, Philadelphia, 2007; the RoyCuba, in 1967. He studied ther- al Ontario Museum, Toronto, modynamics at the Instituto Her- 2006; and Documenta II, Kasmanos Gómez before his man- sel, 2002. Carlos lives and works datory military service. While in Havana and Madrid. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. National Stadium of Chile (Estadio Nacional de Chile) from The Crown Jewels (Las joyas de la corona), 2009, Cast silver, Variable dimensions 2. Pentagon (Pentágono) from The Crown Jewels (Las joyas de la corona), 2009, Cast silver, Variable dimensions above (top to bottom): 1. Carlos Garaicoa, Untitled (El Arte) from Untitled (Sentences) [Sin título (frases)], detail, 2009, Digital photograph, pins, thread, 60 x 48” 2. The Word Transformed, Part 1 (La palabra transformada, parte 1), 2009, Detail, 6 lightboxes with Duratrans black & white photography, 35 1/2 x 25 x 4” each images courtesy of the artist


MEMORIAL { V O L F

R O I T M A N }

Exhibition

Volf Roitman: From MADI to the LUDIC Revolution On view through August 29th at The Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

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VOLF ROITMAN: From MADI

to the Ludic Revolution is a series of major works celebrating the 60-year-long career of Uruguayan painter, sculptor, architect, novelist, playwright, filmmaker and humorist Volf Roitman, who passed away in April of 2010. The exhibition explores the LUDIC, or playfulness and whimsy­—the basis of his creations—and includes a splendid array of motorized, kinetic works of a humorous style. His newest innovations include giant MADI banners and MADI lightboxes. Some say MADI stands for “Movimiento Artistico De Invencion” or “MAterialismo DIalectismo (Dialectical Materialism).” MADI integrates complexity with playfulness by focusing on geometric shapes that spill out of the traditional frame and articulated mobile structures—wall pieces become light boxes, sculpture is robotic, objects move in space and change from every vista. Volf’s large interactive works include kinetic sculpture and mathematical puzzle pieces 2010


M E M O R I A L

called “tridimensional,” charac- mensional cardboard cut-outs terized by irregular frames, flat with glass or Plexiglas frames, surfaces, geometric shapes and some with complex metal supplanes of color. The moveable ports. He later utilized laser techworks invite participation— nology to express the same intriMADI artists practiced their art cacy and lightness of his paper with all seriousness, but want- work in colorful metal sculped viewers to have fun. tures. The most complete examVolf was born in Montevideo, ple of his aesthetic is the façade Uruguay in 1930. he designed for the His family later MADI Museum in moved to Buenos Dallas using exuAires where he studberant metal panied architecture. In els laser-cut with 1951, Volf moved to fantastical shapes. Paris and co-foundVolf’s work has ed the MADI Rebeen featured in “I have search Study Cen- considered PLAY, numerous MADI ter. During this group and one-man FUN, HUMOR time, he experishows and gallery and JOY to be mented with variand museum exhiVERY SERIOUS ous abstract trends bitions around the matters indeed!” and started producworld. He devoted ing rigorous, architecturally- his life to the arts and, through inspired paintings with cut-out his artwork, tried to capture joy, frames. From 1958 to 1961, luminosity and sometimes even Volf lived in New York City, melancholy, which he likened to where he created the Icon The- the eternal quest for the meanatre group and produced sev- ing of life. This exhibition celeeral plays. In 1960, he directed brates the artist and puts forth his Georg Büchner’s Leonce and motto: “I have considered play, Lena at the Orpheum Theater. In fun, humor and joy to be very the ‘80s, he began making 3-di- serious matters indeed!” On View

opposite page: spatial echoes , 1998, wood and laser cut metal, 68 x 50”, courtesy of the artist above (top to bottom): 1. series chaplin’s quest, lumières de la ville I, 2010, plastic, wood and light, 81 x 43”, courtesy of anna and edmund wood 2. portholes, 2002, laser cut metal and acrylic, 12 x 12”, courtesy of the artist


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New York City The museums. . .

AMERICA’S CULTURAL CAPITAL,“The Big Apple”, is iconic,

diverse and ever-changing. The city is home to the best and the brightest the world has to offer. From the newest culinary creations, to trendsetting fashion, to glittering Broadway shows, “The Big Apple” lives up to its reputation. New Yorkers, and visitors alike, enjoy a cultural experience second to none. And, no visit to New York City would be complete without taking in the exciting exhibitions and collections available at the city’s myriad of fine art venues. Join us as we take a brief tour of the premier fine art museums located throughout this wonderful metropolis, including: American Folk Art Museum, Cooper-Hewitt National Museum of Design, International Center of Photography, Museum of Arts and Design, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Frick Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art—“Taxi!” O n V iew

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American Folk Art Museum

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THE AMERICAN FOLK ART

Museum is the premier institution devoted to the aesthetic appreciation of traditional folk art and creative expressions of contemporary self-taught artists. The Museum preserves, conserves, and interprets a comprehensive collection of the highest quality, with objects dating from the 18th century to the present. The Museum’s collection was launched in 1962 and, in the 45+ years since, has con-

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AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM www.folkartmuseum.org 45 West 53rd Street New York, NY 212. 265. 1040

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tinued to grow and evolve to include works by US and international self-taught artists, demonstrating an exciting new collecting initiative. The visual connections between American artists and their European counterparts are compelling and speak eloquently of common creative ground shared by all artists unindoctrinated in either fine art canons or mainstream art trends. O n V iew u g u s t

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. UNCLE SAM RIDING A BICYCLE WHIRLIGIG, ARTIST UNKNOWN, CA. 1880–1920, PAINT ON WOOD WITH METAL, 37 x 55 1/2 x 11”, AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM, BEQUEST OF DOROTHEA AND LEO RABKIN 2. Waterfalls, Maceptaw Bogun (1917-1995), New York City, 1971, Oil on canvas with carpet, 30 x 37 x 2”, American Folk Art Museum, gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill Jr. 3. WOMAN IN VEIL, ATTRIBUTED TO EMILY EASTMAN (1804–CA. 1841), CA. 1825, WATERCOLOR AND INK ON PAPER, 14 9/16 x 10 5/8”, AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM, PROMISED GIFT OF RALPH ESMERIAN IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

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THE COOPER-HEWITT,

National Design Museum is the only museum in the nation devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. The Museum was founded in 1897 by Amy, Eleanor, and Sarah Hewitt—granddaughters of industrialist Peter Cooper—as part of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. A branch of the Smithsonian since 1967, Cooper-Hewitt is housed in the landmark Andrew Carn-

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COOPER-HEWITT, NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM www.cooperhewitt.org 2 East 91st Street New York, NY 212.849.8400

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egie Mansion on Fifth Avenue. The campus also features two historic townhouses and a unique terrace and garden. Cooper-Hewitt’s collection encompasses the rich holdings of the Museum’s library, archives, and four curatorial departments: product design and decorative arts; drawings, prints, and graphic design; textiles; and wallcoverings. The Museum is currently undergoing a renovation that will include a spectacular new third-floor gallery. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Massive Paisley, detail, Designed by Maharam Design Studio, Produced by Maharam, New York, NY, 2007, Woven polyester and cotton, Gift of Maharam, Photo: Matt Flynn 2. Handbag watch: Case designed by Simon DeVaulchier (1893–1971) and George W. Blow (1897–1960), DeVaulchier and Blow, Manufactured by Westclox, Us, 1933, Bakelite, metal, glass, paper, Gift of Max Pine and Lois Mander, Photo: Andrew Garn 3. Book: page from New Illustration of the Sexual System of Carolus Von Linnaeus, Written and illustrated by Robert John Thornton (ca. 1768–1837), London, England, ca. 1807, Hand-colored engraving, Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Institution Libraries, Photo: Matt Flynn images courtesy of the museum

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International Center of Photography

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LOCATED IN THE HEART

of New York City, the ICP is a world-class museum and school, dedicated to exploring the possibilities of the photographic medium through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs. ICP presents a wide range of historical and contemporary photographs in its acclaimed exhibitions, and houses a collection of more than 100,000 original prints that span the history of the photographic

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medium, from daguerreotypes to gelatin silver and digital chromogenic prints. The collection is strongest in its holdings of American and European documentary photography of the 1930s to the 1990s and is comprised of large bodies of work by W. Eugene Smith, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Farm Security Administration photographers, Alfred Eisenstadt, Lisette Model, Gordon Parks, James VanDerZee, and Garry Winogrand. O n V iew

INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY www.icp.org 1133 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 212.857.0000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. DMITRII BALTERMANTS,
 FORWARD, 1943,
INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY, GIFT OF GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, 2006, © ESTATE OF DMITRI BALTERMANTS 2. WEEGEE,
SIMPLY ADD BOILING WATER, CA. 1937, © WEEGEE / INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY / GETTY IMAGES 3. DAVID SEIDNER, BERNADETTE JURKOWSKI, CA. 1995, © INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY, DAVID SEIDNER ARCHIVE ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY


Museum of Arts and Design

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THE MUSEUM OF ARTS

and Design–formerly the American Craft Museum–has served as the country’s premier institution dedicated to the collection and exhibition of contemporary objects created in media such as clay, glass, wood, metal, and fiber. MAD collects, displays, and interprets objects that document contemporary and historic innovation in craft, art, and design. In its exhibitions and educational programs, the

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MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN www.madmuseum.org 2 Columbus Circle New York, NY 212.299.7777

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Museum celebrates the creative process through which materials are crafted into works that enhance contemporary life. In 2008, the Museum moved into its new home at 2 Columbus Circle. Working in collaboration with architect Brad Cloepfil, of Allied Works Architecture, MAD has developed a building design that will enable the institution to meet the growing public demand for its exhibitions and display its rapidly expanding permanent collection. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JOHN ERIC BYERS, HAT BOX (CHEST OF DRAWERS),1998, WOOD, PAINT, MAHOGANY, SUGAR PINE, FOUND BRASS SCREWS; CARVED, ROUTED, PAINTED, 65 x 18 3/4 x 18 3/4, GIFT OF THE ARTIST AND TERCERA GALLERY, 1998, PHOTO: EVA HEYD 2. LIA COOK, CRAZY QUILT: ROYAL REMNANTS III,1988, ABACA, RAYON, ACRYLICS, DYES; PAINTED, WOVEN, PRESSED, 63 x 54”, GIFT OF THE ARTIST, 1993, PHOTO: GARY SINICK 3. HIROSHI SUZUKI, DUAL RIVULET VII, 2005, FINE SILVER 999, BRITANNIA STANDARD SILVER 958; HAMMER-RAISED, DOUBLE SKINNED, 8 1/4 x 14 3/4 x 14 3/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY NANETTE L. LAITMAN, THE WINDGATE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, & THE COLLECTIONS COMMITTEE, 2005, PHOTO: MAGGIE NIMKIN IMAGES COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

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New Museum of Contemporary Art

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THE NEW MUSEUM OF

Contemporary Art is a leading destination for new art and new ideas. It is Manhattan’s only dedicated contemporary art museum and is respected internationally for the adventurousness and global scope of its curatorial program. Conceived as a sculptural stack of rectilinear boxes dynamically shifted off-axis around a central steel core, the New Museum’s innovative structure has a variety of open,

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fluid, and light-filled spaces, with skylights created by the setbacks between floors. The exterior is clad in a seamless, anodized aluminum mesh, dressing the whole building in a delicate, softly shimmering skin. The elegantly rough structure suits both the New Museum’s character as well as its neighborhood. The edifice appears as a shimmering beacon, visually mutable and dynamic, animated by the changing light of the day—a perfect metaphor for the everchanging nature of contemporary art. O n V iew

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART www.newmuseum.org 235 Bowery New York, NY 212.219.1222

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. RIVANE NEUENSCHWANDER, I WISH YOUR WISH, 2003, DETAIL, RIBBONS, PHOTOGRAPH BY BENOIT PAILLEY. 2. RIVANE NEUENSCHWANDER, CHOVE CHUVA (RAIN RAINS), 2002, DETAIL, ALUMINUM BUCKETS, WATER, STEEL CABLE, LADDER, DIMENSIONS VARIABLE 3. MUSEUM EXTERIOR, PHOTOGRAPH BY DEAN KAUFMAN IMAGES COURTESY OF NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART


Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

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C O M P L E T E D I N 1 9 5 9 , the

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Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed museum is among the 20th century’s most important architectural landmarks. The museum’s great rotunda has been the site of many celebrated special exhibitions, while its smaller galleries are devoted to the Guggenheim’s renowned collection of over 7,000 works ranging from Impressionism through contemporary art. Visitors can experience speSOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM www.guggenheim.org 1071 Fifth Avenue
 New York, NY 212.423.3500

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cial exhibitions, lectures, performances and film screenings, and daily tours of the galleries led by experienced docents. The story of the Guggenheim collection is essentially the story of several very different private collections that have been brought together. Augmented through numerous acquisitions under the leadership of the Foundation’s directors, curators, and international partners, these collections form a unique, shared global collection that reflects the rich trajectory of art from the mid-19th century through the present. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. CAMILLE PISSARRO, THE HERMITAGE AT PONTOISE, 1867, OIL ON CANVAS, 59 5/8 x 79”, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, THANNHAUSER COLLECTION, GIFT, JUSTIN K. THANNHAUSER, 1978 2. EDOUARD MANET, BEFORE THE MIRROR, 1876, OIL ON CANVAS, 36 1/4 x 28 1/8”, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, THANNHAUSER COLLECTION, GIFT, JUSTIN K. THANNHAUSER, 1978 3. MUSEUM INTERIOR, PHOTO: DAVID M. HEALD, © SRGF, NY

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : NEW YORK CITY

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

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The Frick Collection

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A VISIT TO THE FRICK

Collection evokes the splendor and tranquillity of a time gone by and, at the same time, testifies to how great art collections can still inspire viewers today. Housed in the New York mansion built by Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919), one of America’s most successful coke and steel industrialists, are some of the best-known paintings by the greatest European artists, major works of

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sculpture (among them one of the finest groups of small bronzes in the world), superb 18th century French furniture and porcelains, Limoges enamels, Oriental rugs, and other works of remarkable quality, displayed in a serene and intimate setting. Each of the sixteen galleries offers a unique presentation of art arranged, for the most part, without regard to period or national origin, in the same spirit as Mr. Frick enjoyed the art he loved before he bequeathed it to the public. O n V iew

THE FRICK COLLECTION www.frick.org 1 East 70th Street New York, NY 212.288.0700

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE FRAGONARD ROOM OF THE FRICK COLLECTION, WITH ITS FAMOUS SERIES OF PANELS PAINTED FOR MADAME DU BARRY; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB 2. THE LIVING HALL OF THE FRICK COLLECTION, FEATURING FURNITURE BY BOULLE AND PAINTINGS BY EL GRECO, HOLBEIN, TITIAN, AND BELLINI; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB 3. johannes VERMEER, MISTRESS AND MAID, CA. 1665-1670, OIL ON CANVAS, THE FRICK COLLECTION; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB IMAGES COURTESY OF THE FRICK COLLECTION


The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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“ T H E M E T ” is one of the

world’s largest and finest art museums. Nearly five million people visit each year to experience its notable special exhibitions and permanent collections, which include more than two million works of art spanning five thousand years of world culture, from prehistory to the present and from every part of the globe. Founded in 1870, “The Met” is located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what

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THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART www.metmuseum.org 1000 5th Avenue New York, NY 212.535.7710

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is known as “Museum Mile”. A roof garden offers views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline and features an annual summertime single artist sculpture exhibition. A much smaller second location in upper Manhattan, at “The Cloisters”, houses a remarkable collection of medieval art. O n V iew i e w

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : NEW YORK CITY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Claude Monet (1840–1926), Garden at Sainte-Adresse, 1867, oil on canvas, 38 5/8 x 51 1/8”, purchase, special contributions and funds given or bequeathed by friends of the Museum, 1967 2. Fernando Botero (born 1932), Dancing in Colombia, 1980, oil on canvas, 74 x 91”, anonymous gift, 1983 3. John Singer Sargent (1856–1925), Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau), 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4”, Arthur Hoppock Hearn Fund, 1916 IMAGES COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

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The Museum of Modern Art

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. SALVADOR DALÍ

THE RICH AND VARIED

collection of The Museum of Modern Art constitutes one of the most comprehensive and panoramic views into modern art. From an initial gift of eight prints and one drawing, MoMA’s collection has grown to include over 150,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, architectural models and drawings, and design objects. The Museum maintains an active schedule of modern and

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contemporary art exhibitions addressing a wide range of subject matter, mediums, and time periods, highlighting significant recent developments in the visual arts and new interpretations of major artists and art historical movements. Works of art from its collection are presented in rotating installations so that the public may regularly expect to find new works on display. Visitors also enjoy access to a bookstore offering an assortment of publications and reproductions, and a design store featuring objects related to modern and contemporary art and design. O n V iew

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART www.moma.org 11 West 53rd Street
 New York, NY 212.708.9400

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(1904-1989), THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY, 1931, OIL ON CANVAS, 9 1/2 x 13”, GIVEN ANONYMOUSLY, © 2010 SALVADOR DALÍ, GALA-SALVADOR DALÍ FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY 2. KAZIMIR MALEVICH (1878-1935), WOMAN WITH PAILS: DYNAMIC ARRANGEMENT, 1912-13, OIL ON CANVAS, 31 5/8 x 31 5/8”, 1935 ACQUISITION CONFIRMED IN 1999 BY AGREEMENT WITH THE ESTATE OF KAZIMIR MALEVICH & MADE POSSIBLE WITH FUNDS FROM THE MRS. JOHN HAY WHITNEY BEQUEST (BY EXCHANGE) IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART


Whitney Museum of American Art

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THE WHITNEY MUSEUM

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of American Art presents a full range of 20th century and contemporary American art, with a special focus on works by living artists. The Whitney’s Permanent Collection— arguably the finest holding of 20th century American art in the world—is comprised of approximately 18,000 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, and photographs, representing more than 2,600 artists including: Thomas Hart WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART whitney.org 945 Madison Avenue
 New York, NY 212.570.3600

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Benton, Edward Hopper, Roy Lichtenstein, Georgia O’Keeffe and Andy Warhol. The Museum presents acclaimed exhibitions ranging from historical surveys and indepth retrospectives to group shows introducing emerging artists to a larger public. The Biennial, an invitational show of work produced in the preceding two years, is the only continuous series of exhibitions in the US to survey recent developments in American art. O n V iew i e w

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FROM TOP: 1. EDWARD HOPPER (1882-1967), EARLY SUNDAY MORNING, 1930, OIL ON CANVAS, OVERALL: 35 3/16 x 60 1/4”, FRAMED: 68 1/2 x 43”, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY; PURCHASE, WITH FUNDS FROM GERTRUDE VANDERBILT WHITNEY 31.426, © WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY 2. RICHARD DIEBENKORN, GIRL LOOKING AT LANDSCAPE, 1957, OIL ON CANVAS, 59 x 60 3/8”, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY; GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. ALAN H. TEMPLE 61.49, © THE ESTATE OF RICHARD DIEBENKORN IMAGES COURTESY OF WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

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New York City The galleries. . .

WITH OVER 600 ART G A L L E R I E S , “The Big Apple” is

the planet’s premier marketplace for contemporary art and host to the most extraordinary and cutting-edge exhibitions, featuring a mind-blowing display of global talent. Over the past 10 years, more than 250 galleries have moved into the Chelsea area of Manhattan alone. Galleries have taken over many of the city’s former warehouse and industrial spaces—revitalizing neighborhoods and creating wonderful new walkable arts districts. And although a vast majority of galleries feature contemporary art, you will find the finest in every genre of visual art and expression here. A leisurely stroll through the city’s gallery districts is a wonderful way to spend an afternoon, transporting yourself to a world of inspiration and artful bliss. On the following pages, On View presents a sampling of New York City’s outstanding galleries. O n V iew

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • N E W Y O R K C I T Y : A gallery tour

Chelsea Galleries (by street) JOSHUA LINER GALLERY

MARY RYAN GALLERY

AGORA

www.maryryangallery.com

GALLERY

527 West 26th St.

www.agora-gallery.com

212.397.0669

530 West 25th St. 212.226.4151

www.joshualinergallery.com

548 West 28th St.

MITCHELL-INNES

212.244.7415

& NASH

AMSTERDAM

www.miandn.com

WHITNEY GALLERY

NANCY HOFFMAN GALLERY

534 West 26th St.

www.amsterdamwhitneygallery.com

www.nancyhoffmangallery.com

212.744.7400

511 West 25th St.

520 West 27th St.

212.255.9050

212.966.6676

NICOLE KLAGSBRUN GALLERY

BORTOLAMI

SUNDARAM TAGORE

www.nicoleklagsbrun.com

GALLERY

GALLERY

526 West 26th St.

www.bortolamigallery.com

www.sundaramtagore.com

212.243.3335

510 West 25th St.

547 West 27th St.

212.727.2050

212.677.4520

SARA MELTZER GALLERY

DILLON GALLERY

BARRY FRIEDMAN LTD.

www.sarameltzergallery.com

www.dillongallery.com

www.barryfriedmanltd.com

521 West 26th St.

555 West 25th St.

515 West 26th St.

212.727.9330

212.727.8585

STEPHEN HALLER

GALLERY HENOCH

JENKINS JOHNSON GALLERY

GALLERY, INC.

www.galleryhenoch.com

www.jenkinsjohnsongallery.com

www.stephenhallergallery.com

555 West 25th St.

521 West 26th St.

542 West 26th St.

917.305.0003

212.629.0707

212.741.7777

212.239.8600

LENNON MAGNAN METZ GALLERY

1500 GALLERY

WEINBERG, INC.

http://magnanmetz.com

www.1500gallery.com

www.lennonweinberg.com

521 West 26th St.

511 West 25th St.

514 West 25th St.

212.244.2344

212.255.2010

212.941.0012

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The 2010 Chelsea International Fine Arts Competition Exhibition Group Show (Main Gallery) Opening Reception: August 19th, 2010 6-8pm August 17th - September 7th, 2010

Portal: PAUL COTE Solo Exhibition (Gallery II) Opening Reception: August 19th, 2010 6-8pm August 17th - September 7th, 2010

Masters of the Imagination: The Latin American Fine Art Exhibition Group Show (Main Gallery) Opening Reception: September 16th, 2010 6-8pm September 10th - October 1st, 2010

530 West 25th St., NY, 10001 | www.Agora-Gallery.com | info@Agora-Gallery.com


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MARLBOROUGH

ANDREA ROSEN

GLADSTONE GALLERY

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.gladstonegallery.com

www.marlboroughgallery.com

www.andrearosengallery.com

515 West 24th St.

545 West 25th St.

525 West 24th St.

212.206.9300

212.463.8634

212.627.6000 MATTHEW MARKS

MCKENZIE

ATM

GALLERY

FINE ART

GALLERY

www.matthewmarks.com

www.mckenziefineart.com

www.atmgallery.com

523 West 24 St.

511 West 25th St.

542 West 24th St.

212.243.0200

212.989.5467

212.375.0349 METRO PICTURES

NANCY MARGOLIS

CYNTHIA - REEVES

www.metropicturesgallery.com

GALLERY

www.cynthia-reeves.com

519 West 24th St.

http://nancymargolisgallery.com

535 West 24th St.

212.206.7100

523 West 25th St.

212.714.0044

212.242.3013

MARGARET THATCHER DANZIGER

PROJECTS

NOHO GALLERY

PROJECTS

www.thatcherprojects.com

www.nohogallery.com

www.danzigerprojects.com

539 West 23rd St.

530 West 25th St.

534 West 24th St.

212.675.0222

212.367.7063

212.629.6778 PAVEL ZOUBOK

P.P.O.W.

FREIGHT AND VOLUME

GALLERY

www.ppowgallery.com

www.freightandvolume.com

www.pavelzoubok.com

511 West 25th St.

542 West 24th St.

533 West 23rd St.

212.647.1044

212.691.7700

212.675.7490

WINSTON WÄCHTER

GAGOSIAN

LESLIE TONKONOW

FINE ART

GALLERY

ARTWORKS + PROJECTS

www.winstonwachter.com

www.gagosian.com

www.tonkonow.com

530 West 25th St.

555 West 24th St.

535 West 22nd St.

212.255.2718

212.741.1111

212.255.8450

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303 GALLERY

CHAMBERS FINE ART

SLOAN FINE ART

www.303gallery.com

www.chambersfineart.com

www.sloanfineart.com

547 West 21st St.

522 West 19th St.

128 Rivington St.

212.255.1121

212.414.1169

212.477.1140

PAULA COOPER

Lower East Side Galleries

WOODWARD GALLERY

GALLERY

www.woodwardgallery.net

133 Eldridge St.

www.paulacoopergallery.com

534 West 21st St.

CHINASQUARE

212.255.1105

GALLERY

212.966.3411

Downtown Galleries

www.chinasquareny.com ACA GALLERIES

102 Allen Street

www.acagalleries.com

212.255.8886

529 West 20th St.

D. WIGMORE FINE ART

212.206.8080

ELEVEN RIVINGTON

www.dwigmore.com

www.elevenrivington.com

730 5th Ave.

ELIZABETH HARRIS

11 Rivington St.

212.581.1657

GALLERY

212.982.1930 EDWYNN HOUK GALLERY

www.eharrisgallery.com

529 West 20th St.

LISA COOLEY

www.houkgallery.com

212.463.9666

www.lisa-cooley.com

745 5th Ave.

34 Orchard St.

212.750.7070

212.680.0564

JONATHAN LEVINE GALLERY

GERING & LÓPEZ GALLERY

www.jonathanlevinegallery.com

GALLERY SATORI

www.geringlopez.com

529 West 20th St.

www.gallerysatori.com

730 5th Ave.

212.243.3822

164 Stanton St.

646.336.7183

646.896.1075 KATHRYN MARKEL

GREENBERG VAN DOREN

FINE ARTS

SIMON PRESTON GALLERY

GALLERY

www.markelfinearts.com

www.simonprestongallery.com

www.gvdgallery.com

529 West 20th St.

301 Broome St.

730 5th Ave.

212.366.5368

212.431.1105

212.445.0444

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LEO VILLAREAL: NEW WORKS

OPENING 11.04.2010

TRAVELING SURVEY EXHIBITION: SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART 08.21.2010 -01.09.2011


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HAMMER

MARLBOROUGH

53 East 58th St.

GALLERIES

GALLERY

212.832.1400

www.hammergalleries.com

www.marlboroughgallery.com

33 West 57th St.

40 West 57th St.

TIBOR DE NAGY GALLERY

212.644.4400

212.541.4900

www.tibordenagy.com

724 5th Ave. 212.262.5050

HOWARD GREENBERG

MARY BOONE

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.howardgreenberg.com

www.maryboonegallery.com

THROCKMORTON

41 East 57th St.

745 Fifth Ave.

FINE ART

212.334.0010

212.752.2929

www.throckmorton-nyc.com

145 East 57th St. 212.223.1059

JADITE GALLERIES

MAXWELL DAVIDSON

www.jadite.com

GALLERY

413 West 50th St.

www.davidsongallery.com

WALLY FINDLAY

212.315.2740

724 Fifth Ave.

GALLERIES

212.759.7555

www.wallyfindlay.com

124 East 57th St.

JASON McCOY, INC.

www.jasonmccoyinc.com

SCOTT JACOBSON

41 East 57th St.

GALLERY

212.319.1996

www.scottjacobsongallery.com

ZABRISKIE GALLERY

114 East 57th St.

www.zabriskiegallery.com

212.872.1616

41 East 57th St.

LAURENCE MILLER

212.421.5390

212.752.1223

GALLERY www.laurencemillergallery.com

SPANIERMAN

20 West 57th St.

GALLERY

212.397.3930

www.spanierman.com

Uptown Galleries

45 East 58th St. 212.832.0208

MARIAN GOODMAN

ADAM BAUMGOLD

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.mariangoodman.com

SPANIERMAN

www.adambaumgoldgallery.com

24 West 57th St.

MODERN

60 East 66th St.

212.977.7160

www.spaniermanmodern.com

212 861.7338

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Uptown galleries continued...

ACQUAVELLA

GERALD PETERS

KNOEDLER

GALLERIES, INC.

GALLERY

& COMPANY

www.acquavellagalleries.com

www.gpgallery.com

www.knoedlergallery.com

18 East 79th St.

24 East 78th St.

19 East 70th St.

212.734.6300

212.628.9760

212.794.0550

ADELSON GALLERIES

GODEL & CO. FINE ART

KOUROS GALLERY

www.adelsongalleries.com

www.godelfineart.com

www.kourosgallery.com

19 East 82nd St.

39A East 72nd St.

23 East 73rd St.

212.439.6800

212.288.7272

212.288.5888

AMERICAN

HIRSCHL & ADLER

LEO CASTELLI GALLERY

ILLUSTRATORS

GALLERIES

www.castelligallery.com

GALLERY

www.hirschlandadler.com

18 East 77th St.

www.americanillustrators.com

21 East 70th St.

212.249.4470

18 East 77th St.

212.535.8810

212.744.5190

MITCHELL-INNES HELLY NAHMAD

& NASH GALLERY

ANITA SHAPOLSKY

GALLERY

www.miandn.com

GALLERY

www.hellynahmadgallery.com

1018 Madison Ave.

www.anitashapolskygallery.com

975 Madison Ave.

212.744.7400

152 East 65th St.

212.879.2075

212.452.1094

TILTON GALLERY JANE KAHAN GALLERY

www.jacktiltongallery.com

DIDIER AARON

www.janekahan.com

8 East 76th St.

www.didieraaron.com

922 Madison Ave.

212.737.2221

32 East 67th St.

212.744.1490

212.988.5248

VAN DE WEGHE KEITH DE LELLIS

FINE ART

GAGOSIAN GALLERY

GALLERY

www.vdwny.com

www.gagosian.com

www.keithdelellisgallery.com

1018 Madison Ave.

980 Madison Ave.

1045 Madison Ave.

212.744.1900

646.453.1050

212.327.1482

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On View 08-09.2010  

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