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CUT!

Costume

DECEMBER 2010/JANUARY 2011

and the Cinema

AT THE BOC A RATON M USE UM O F A RT


CONTENTS December

2 0 1 0 /Ja n u a r y

2011

Vo l . 1 , N o . 5

Fe a t u r e s

48

CUT! COSTUME AND THE CINEMA

The glamour, luxury and artistry of cinematic couture awaits in the exhibition CUT! Costume and the Cinema, on view from January 19th through April 17th, at the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

ON THE COVER & RIGHT: KATE WINSLET wore this costume as Sylvia Llewelyn Davies in Finding Neverland (2004), Costume Design by Alexandra Byrne, Academy Award and BAFTA nomination for Costume Design

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

58 W. Palm Beach

66 St. Petersburg

72 Coral Gables

78 Delray Beach

The Norton Museum of Art showcases more than 90 original vintage prints by the most important photographers working in Hollywood from 1920-1960.

The new Dalí Museum presents an inaugural exhibition of works in the museum’s stunning new home.

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden hosts Les Lalanne, an exhibition of works by French sculptors Claude and FrançoisXavier Lalanne.

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens presents over 50 woodblock prints from one of the last great ukiyo-e print designers, Yōshū Chikanobu.

MADE IN HOLLYWOOD

VIVA LA REVELACIÓN!

ART IN THE GARDEN

On View Destination:

SAN FRANCISCO

98 The Museums: An overview of

San Francisco’s distinctive art museums

108 A Gallery Tour: Fine art gallery listings OnV

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MODERNITY & NOSTALGIA

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): Robert Coburn, Rita Hayworth for “Gilda”, 1946, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, Courtesy of the John Kobal Foundation; image courtesy of the new dalí; FrancoisXavier Lalanne, Vache Paysage (La Grande), 2006, Bronze, Edition of 8, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and Artist, Rendering by Spine3D; YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, ICHIKAWA DANJURO IX IN THE ROLE OF SAIGO TAKAMORI, WITH OTHER ACTORS (DETAIL), 1878, WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

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CONTENTS December

2 0 1 0 /Ja n u a r y

2011

Vo l u m e

1,

No.

5

6

COMMENTARY

8

MUSE

Retrospective

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RAFAEL SORIANO

One of the major Latin American artists of his generation, Rafael utilizes light, form, space and shadow to explore the energy of the imagination.

Magical events for art lovers to enjoy this holiday season

Profile

10

DAWOUD BEY

94

CALENDAR

Dawoud’s revealing portraits of high school students capture an important moment of transition between childhood and adulthood.

Museum exhibitions

44

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists

Spotlight Fo c u s

PICTURED: LORNA BIEBER, TREE/TREE TRUNKS, 2005-6, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, 68 x 42”; COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; BOX GALLERY, SANTA FE, NM; AND C. GRIMALDIS GALLERY, BALTIMORE, MD

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STEPHEN KNAPP

Stephen’s Lightpaintings LORNA BIEBER embody a unique form Lorna Bieber explores alternative photographic of art that transforms the processes and techniques, resulting in gallery environment photographic compositions that are hauntingly and envelops the viewer beautiful and moving. in pure, glowing colors.

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Š Cathleen Naundorf, "Hommage to Horst," Chanel by Karl Lagerfeld, Silver Gelatin Photograph, 20 x 24 inches

HOLDEN LUNTZ GALLERY 256 Worth Avenue Palm BEach, FLorida 33480

T - 561.805.9550 www.holdenluntz.com


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Cheers!

M A G A Z I N E

W ith th e h o lid a y s a p p ro a ch in g , we want to take a moment to wish you all a happy and healthy holiday season. A selection of fun seasonal festivities can be found in Muse, on pg. 8. In this issue, the magic of Hollywood takes center stage in two dazzling exhibitions: Our cover story, CUT! Costume and the Cinema, on pg. 48, showcases the glamour, luxury and artistry of cinematic couture; and Made in Hollywood, on pg. 58, presents more than 90 original vintage prints by the most important photographers working in Hollywood, from 1920-1960. In celebration of the grand opening of the new Dalí Museum, on January 11th, On View is pleased to present highlights from its inaugural exhibition, Viva la Revelación!, on pg. 66. For an enchanting outdoor experience, Art in the Garden, on pg. 72, features Les Lalanne, a spectacle of large-scale works set amongst 83-acres of lush, tropical landscape, by French sculptors Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne. And, images portraying the modernization and Westernization of Japanese society in the late 19th century are beautifully depicted in over 50 woodblock prints from one of the last great ukiyo-e print designers, Yōshū Chikanobu, in Modernity & Nostalgia, on pg. 78. We look forward to ringing in the new year and bringing you highlights from the exciting new shows coming in 2011—so stay tuned. Cheers!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

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MUSE

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IF YOU LOVE ART

and are looking to add some magic to the holidays, here are a few events you might like to consider... DAYTONA BEACH: Through December 5th, The Museum of

Arts and Sciences presents its 6th Annual Festival of Trees featuring designer Christmas trees and holiday decorations to delight the young and young at heart. Call for details: 386.255.0285 DUNEDIN: Through December 23rd, the Dunedin Fine Art

Center lights up the holidays with Wondrous, an invitational exhibition featuring a collection of works from around the country that any of your friends or relatives would be delighted to find under their tree. Call for details: 727.298.DFAC LAKELAND: The Polk Museum of Art celebrates Kwanzaa

on December 26th. Learn about the principles that Kwanzaa is founded upon, and do a little dancing with the Kuumba Dancers


MUSE and Drummers of Tampa Bay. Call for details: 863.688.7743 PALM BEACH: On December 5th, the Flagler Museum holds

its Annual Tree Lighting ceremony featuring the 16-foot Grand Hall Christmas tree adorned with lights and traditional ornaments in the Gilded Age style. Seasonal refreshments, brief organ and piano performances and holiday caroling add to the festivities. Call for details: 561.655.2833 VERO BEACH: Join the Vero Beach Museum of Art on

December 5th, for a free traditional holiday party for the children and families of the Treasure Coast. Call for details: 772.231.0707 WEST PALM BEACH: Stroll through the enchanted

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, December 4th-5th and 8th-12th, to view over 25 evergreen trees decorated as a salute to artists in the 4th annual Festival of Trees “Les Artistes”. Call for details: 561.832.5328 WEST PALM BEACH: The Norton Museum of Art’s

Holiday Family Festival takes place on December 5th and embraces holiday traditions of many cultures. Acclaimed storyteller Madafo, live performances, holiday inspired art activities and celebrity designer decorated Christmas trees await! Call for details: 561.832.5196 WINTER PARK: On December 11th the Albin Polasek Muse-

um and Sculpture Gardens provides prime viewing for the Winter Park Boat Parade and Festival of Lights and live music to kick off the festivities. For details call: 407.647.6294 WINTER PARK: On December 24th, the Morse Museum invites

the public to the museum’s galleries to enjoy, at no charge, works that include Louis Comfort Tiffany’s century-old, leaded-glass

PICTURED: christmas tree adorned in traditional Gilded Age style at the flagler museum, image courtesy of Flagler Museum

windows and celebrated 1893 chapel—a peaceful respite from the busy holiday season. Call for details: 407.645.5311 O n V iew OnV

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CALENDAR Current

12-01.2011 BOCA RATON 01.19-04.17.2011

California Impressionism: Paintings from The Irvine Museum Boca Raton Museum of Art

Exhibitions

C O M P I L E D

Museum, arguably the most important collection of West coast American Impressionism. The colorful collection of more than 60 paintings presents the work of more than 44 artists, including: William Wendt, Guy Rose, Dona Schuster, Granville Redmond and Alson Clark.

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appreciate the quality of these costumes up close—some of which only fleetingly glanced on the screen. (See story on pg. 48.) Thru 05.01.2011

Latin American Art from the Museum’s Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art

and film with 43 extraordinary period costumes worn by lumiwww.bocamuseum.org nous film stars: Sandra This exhibition presBullock, Johnnie ents masterpieces of 01.19-04.17.2011 Depp, Robert Downey www.bocamuseum.org California Impression- CUT! Costume Jr., Colin Farrell, This sampling of Latin ism from The Irvine and the Cinema Nicole Kidman, Heath Boca Raton Ledger, Vanessa Museum of Art Redgrave, Maggie www.bocamuseum.org Smith, Kate Winslet, CUT! Costume and the Renée Zellweger Cinema explores the and others. This exintersection of fashion hibition allows us to 1. Granville Redmond, Flowers Under the Oaks, n.d., oil on canvas, 20 x 25”, private collection, courtesy of The Irvine Museum. 2. Keira Knightley wore this costume as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, in The Duchess (2008), Costume Design by Michael O’Connor, Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design 3. Roberto Matta, Etoile Des Jardins [Star of the Gardens], 1995, carborundum etching on handmade paper, edition #100/125, 40 x 40”, permanent collection, gift of Nordstamp Publishers

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Boca Raton continued...

American art, from the Museum’s collections, features 20 works by many of the most important 20th century Latin American artists, including: Enrique Castro-Cid, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Julio Larraz, Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Zúñiga. Thru 01.09.2011

Robert Cottingham: Twenty Ways to See a Star Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

This show debuts a series of 20 eyepopping paintings by acclaimed photorealist painter and printmaker, Robert Cottingham, who established himself, in the early 1970s,

Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

as one of the first generation photorealists alongside such renowned artists as Richard Estes and Chuck Close. Abstraction and realism are skillfully wed in Cottingham’s shimmering paintings depicting the vanishing objects and icons of American culture. (See story in the October/November 2010 issue on pg. 70.) Thru 06.19.2011

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso

www.bocamuseum.org

Valerio Adami first came to international prominence in the 1960s with Nouvelle Figuration, the French intellectual version of

Fine prints have been admired for their great artistic diversity and technical virtuosity since their origin in the 15th century. Examples by masters of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries include works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Francisco de Goya and Pop Art. This Pablo Picasso, each of exhibition includes whom is celebrated for 23 paintings representing more than 4 decades of work. Adami’s famous Pop Art colors and flat forms with thick black contours his pioneering experi- evoke the appearments in graphic art. ance of cartoons, yet his imagery plays Thru 01.09.2011 a fundamental role Valerio Adami in conveying social, Boca Raton philosophical and Museum of Art literary references.

1. Robert Cottingham, Southern Star, 2009, silkscreen on canvas, 79 x 79”, courtesy of the American Image Atelier 2. Pablo Picasso, Faune dévoilant une dormeuse (Jupiter et Antiope, d’après Rembrandt), [Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt)], 1936, etching with aquatint on paper, 12-3/8 x 16-3/8”, Boca Raton Museum of Art Permanent Collection, bequest of Isadore and Kelly Friedman 3. Valerio Adami, Finlandia, ca. 1987, acrylic on canvas, 79 x 105”, courtesy of Fondo Adami, Fondazione Europea del Disegno

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CORAL GABLES

Fairchild’s botanic paradise. (See story on pg. 72.) Thru 01.2011

Frank Paulin: An American Documentarian Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Thru 05.31.2011

Les Lalanne at Fairchild Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

The Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden hosts a series of premiere works by French sculptors Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne as part of its renowned, annual visual art program. The Lalannes’ sculptures create an extraordinary element of surprise and wonder set within

www.lowemuseum.org

A gift of 30 photographs by American photographer, Frank Paulin, has been made to the Lowe and are currently on display. Paulin is recognized for uniquely documenting fleeting human moments of both humor and poetry,

particularly against the backdrop of gritty urban scenes.

“Oneiric Luminism” by which Soriano combines a purely abstract form of light, 01.29-03.27.2011 form, space and shadRafael Soriano: ow, with an interest Other Worlds in poetic and metaWithin, a 60 Year physical impulses. Retrospective (See story on pg. 92.) Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Thru 01.16.2011

www.lowemuseum.org

Miami resident Rafael Soriano is one of the major Latin American artists of his generation of modernists, and one of the premier painters of Cuba. His work embodies a style best described as

The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Collection of AfricanAmerican Art: Works on Paper Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Selections from one of the premier collections of African American art provide a rare opportunity for the public to view master graphics spanning 3 centuries. The 69

1. Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Mouton Transhumant (Brebis), 1988, The Palmetum at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, epoxy stone and bronze, 35.425 x 41 x 15.375”, edition of 250, courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and artist, rendering by Spine3D 2. Frank Paulin, Flower Messenger, Times Square, 1955 (printed later), gelatin silver print, 13 x 19-3/8”, gift of Bruce Silverstein, ©Frank Paulin, courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery 3. Rafael Soriano, Quimerica Luz (Chimerical Light), 1992, oil on canvas, 50 x 60”

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Coral Gables continued...

works in the exhibition include drawings, etchings, lithographs, watercolors, pastels, acrylics, gouaches, and screen prints by such noted artists as Henry Ossawa Tanner, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Elizabeth Catlett, and Alison Saar. 01.29-03.27.2011

Useable Art: African Aesthetics in Daily Life from the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

While the containers,

textiles, tools, and assorted furnishings presented in this exhibition consist of objects that serve some purpose of daily living, they can also be appreciated for the appeal of their forms, the beauty of

their patterns, and the quality of craftsmanship they display. DAYTONA

hearted exhibition of 34 gouache paintings by French illustrator Robert Gring, whose “Cartoon modern” style is now recognized as an important offshoot of modernism that strongly influenced animation art, such as the animated titles in the original Pink Panther films of the 1960s. The droll, ironic sense of humor so typical of the French can be found throughout Gring’s elegantly painted illustrations.

BEACH Thru 04.10.11

C’est la Vie: Robert Gring’s France Museum of Arts & Sciences

Thru 01.09.2011

Woof! Art of the Dog Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Contemporary portraits of dogs of all sizes, shapes and breeds are celebrated through paintings by Ron Burns, Will Rafuse, George Rodrigue and William Wegman. 01.29-05.29.2011

Images: Found and Lost Southeast Museum of Photography

www.moas.org

C’est la Vie is a light-

1. Ron Adams, Blackburn, 2002, color lithograph, edition 55/80, 25 x 35” 2. Africa, Fulani people (Ghana, Chad, Cameroon, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso and Guinea-Conakry), Cattle Herder’s Hat, collected between 1960-1973, raffia, leather and dye, 8” h x 15-1/4” diameter, gift of Professor and Mrs. Robert R. Ferens 3. Robert Gring, Untitled, ca. 1950, 12 x 8” 4. Ron Burns, Madeline, n.d., giclée on canvas, 24 x 18”

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Daytona Beach continued...

Southeast Museum of Photography

www.smponline.org

Images: Found and Lost presents the mural-sized photographs of Lorna Bieber. Lorna’s process incorporates a range of traditional and non-traditional photographic tech-

niques resulting in hauntingly beautiful and moving images and narratives. (See story on pg. 90.)

www.smponline.org

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

I Still Do is a poignant portrayal of a man with Alzheimer’s disease, as documented through the photography and writing of his loving wife and care-partner, Judith Fox. Thru 02.06.2011

Odyssey: Linda Connor

Thru 12.16

I Still Do: Judith Fox

Using a large-format view camera, Linda Connor reveals the spirit embedded in everyday life, presents compelling combinations of timelessness and captures the dynamic relationship between the natural world and the sacred. Thru 12.16

Photographs: Elaine Ling Southeast Museum of Photography

ties and societies and the far-flung corners of the world. Thru 02.06.2011

Spirit: Bill Armstrong Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Bill Armstrong creates de-materialized

www.smponline.org

Elaine Ling examines the shifting equilibrium between nature and the man-made in eloquent portraits and documents from the margins of communi-

1. Lorna Bieber, Tree/Tree Trunks, 2005-6, gelatin silver print, 68 x 42”, courtesy of Lorna Bieber, Box Gallery, Santa Fe, NM and C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, MD 2. Judith Fox, I Still Do (detail) 3. Linda Connor, Muhammad Ali Mosque, Cairo, Egypt, 1989 4. Elaine Ling, BaobabTree of Generations, Mali 5. Bill Armstrong, Mandala 451

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Daytona Beach continued...

or ephemeral images representing a completely different world—a spirit world or parallel universe. By combining collaged images with extreme blur, Armstrong conjures a world of abstract color fields and figures which appear to enter into another dimension. 01.29-05.29.2011

Springs and Swamps: Karen Glaser Southeast Museum of Photography

shot underwater and combined with elements of street shooting, documentary, the pictorial and the ethereal.

Prints by Yoshu Chikanobu Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

This exhibition presents 60 single-sheet and triptych prints from Yōshū Chikanobu on subjects ranging from customs and manners of DELRAY BEACH Japanese women to Thru 02.20.2011 the Sino-Japanese Modernity War to nostalgic and Nostalgia: representations of Woodblock the feudalistic Edo Period. (See story on pg. 78.)

www.dfac.org

The 36th Annual International Miniature Art Society Exhibition features over 300 selected works by the finest calligraphers, painters

and sculptors working worldwide in miniature today.

www.smponline.org

Karen Glaser’s large-scale photographs of Florida’s wilds provide a unique view, shot from a vantage point unfamiliar to most—landscapes

DUNEDIN

FORT

01.08.11 – 01.30.11

The Miniature Art Society of Florida Dunedin Fine Art Center

LAUDERDALE Thru 01.09.2011

An Intimate Look at William Glackens and The Eight

1. Karen Glaser, Pollen Skin, 2009 2. Yoshu Chikanobu, Mirror of the Ages: Kenmu (1334-35, 1336-37), 1897, woodblock print, ink and color on paper, loaned by the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College 3. Jane Mihalik, 45 Decanter With Bread, oil painting, 2 x 2-3/4”

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Included in this exhibition are works by Glackens and his contemporaries as well as a special installation of landscapes created

by Glacken from 1908 through the 1930s. Thru 02.27.2011

Tom Wesselmann Draws Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

one of the originators of Pop Art. Along with Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Jim Dine, Wesselmann created a body of works that helped define the visual identity of America in the 1960s. The exhibition, which spans from 1959 to 2004, includes more than 100 works, many large in scale and created from materials not usually associated with drawing, including: steel, aluminum, fabric and molded plastic. (See story in the October/ November 2010 issue on pg. 64.)

www.moafl.org

Tom Wesselmann was

embroidered silk vestments, uniforms of the Papal Swiss Guard, as well as an elaborately decorated gold and silver reliquary containing bone fragments of Saint Peter and Saint Paul. 01.29-04.24.2011

Vatican Splendors: A Journey Through Faith and Art Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

One of the largest collections of art, documents and historically significant objects from the Vatican ever to tour North America, Vatican Splendors presents spectacular paintings, mosaics, sculpture, Papal jewels, intricately

FORT MYERS Thru 12.31

Clyde Butcher Southwest Florida Museum of History www.swflmuseumof history.com

Award winning landscape photographer, Clyde Butcher, explores his personal

1. William Glackens, Sledding, Central Park (detail), 1912, oil on canvas 2. Tom Wesselmann, Drawing for Mouth # 3, 1963, charcoal on paper, 48 x 63-1/2”, ©The estate of Tom Wesselmann, courtesy of Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale 3. Bust of an Angel, Giotto di Bondone, after 1304, polychrome mosaic, The Reverenda Fabbrica of Saint Peter, Vatican City State, photo © Città del Vaticano 4. Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5 (detail), 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108”, collection of the artist

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Fo r t M ye r s c o n t i n u e d . . .

relationship with the environment through his photography. Featured in this stunning exhibition are largeformat black and white photographs depicting the beauty and fragility of the Western Everglades. (See story in the August/September 2010 issue on pg. 64.) GAINESVILLE Thru 01.02.2011

Class Pictures: Photographs by Dawoud Bey Harn Museum of Art

of the economic, racial and ethnic spectrum in both public and private high schools. (See story on pg. 94.) Thru 01.02.2011

Jack Nichelson: Sojourner Dream Reliquaries Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

Dawoud Bey’s teenage subjects defy stereotypes of American youth during this complicated age. For Class Pictures, Bey photographed young people from all parts

and evocative “box environments” for more than 40 years. Begun in 2000, Nichelson’s Sojourner Dream Reliquaries features 22 intricately detailed sculptures replicating the basic forms of travel trailers from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. HOLLYWOOD

Jack Nichelson has been creating intricate

portraiture, landscape and still life. 01.22-02.20.2011

01.22-02.20.2011

Christiaan Lopez-Miro: All Roads Lead to Cassadaga Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

www.harn.ufl.edu



diums and healers. With this exhibition, Lopez-Miro combines

The works in this series present a tapestry of images of a small town whose unique residents are all psychics, me-

Lea Nickless: Water & Oil Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

The works on paper presented in Lea Nickless’ Water & Oil

1. Dawoud Bey, Odalys, 2003, chromogenic development print 2. Jack Nichelson, A Trip to the Moon, 2007, hardwood veneer plywood

construction with mixed media, collection of the artist, photo: John Knaub 3. Christiann Lopez-Miro, Spiritual Piano, 2008, C-Print, 30 x 30” 4. Lea Nickless, Blood and Sand, oil pigment on paper, 22 x 15”

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Holly wood continued...

focus on the environmental calamity in the Gulf of Mexico. Floating oil pigment on water and capturing the moment on paper creates works oddly reminiscent of NASA satellite imagery of the area.

that speaks to the notion of Utopia, featuring an organic environment in which spheres, cubes, and planes have been transfigured and molded into aberrations of themselves. Thru 01.09.2011

Luis Alonzo Barkigia: Mundos Perfeitos Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Sinisa Kukec: And Yet Another Wayward Landscape Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 02.06.2011

Mundos Perfeitos offers a skewed geometric playground

Undulating biomorphic forms, made of porcelain or plaster and sculptures growing from found objects—some of almost monolithic scale and others of undersized dimensions—appear in sharp contrast to the

historically scripted media of sculpture, craft and design.

Miami-based artist, Stephan Tugrul. Working with collage, Tugrul constructs new images through a process of combining found elements appropriated from a variety of source materials. JACKSONVILLE

Thru 01.09.2011

Stephan Tugrul: En Masse Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

En Masse presents a selection of new works by TurkishAmerican, North

Thru 01.02.2011

East/West: Visually Speaking Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

East/West: Visually Speaking, highlights

1. Luis Alonzo Barkigia, installation view, courtesy of the artist 2. Sinisa Kukec, Sorry… I am a stranger here myself…, 2010, foam, epoxy, paint, graphite, and cardboard, 14 x 12 x 18”, courtesy of the artist 3. Stephan Tugrul, Release the Hounds (detail), 2009, mixed media, 48 x 60”, courtesy of the artist 4. Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China, 2002-2008, painted copper, collection of the artists

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

11 contemporary Chinese artists who have adapted Western ideas and art forms to create new styles of art. In some works, the reference to Western culture seems adoring, while in others, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values. Thru 01.23.2011

Hyperbolic Nature: Plein Air Paintings by Lilian Garcia-Roig Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Lilian’s plein-air paintings capture the character of seemingly ordinary, dense landscapes in a way that reflects a passion-

ate engagement with each scene and with the painting process­— lush, gestural paint marks, squeezed-out paint patches and areas of raw canvas, reinforce the abstract nature of her work and reveal the landscapes in cumulative and unexpected ways.

tory, innovation and construction of American chair design from the 1800s to the present. Each of the chairs in the exhibition are chosen for their beauty and historical context with important social, economic,

www.polkmuseumofart.org

political and cultural influences.

01.15-03.26.2011

01.21-04.03.2011

The Art of Seating: 200 Years of American Design Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

The Art of Seating presents the his-

LAKELAND 12.18-04.17.2011

Heavy Metal Polk Museum of Art

Metal is a valuable material for artists seeking a durable, rigid and slick result. Polk Museum of Art presents a fine assortment of artworks assembled, poured and shaped by this heavy material.

Humberto Calzada Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Cuban-born artist Humberto Calzada

1. Lilian Garcia-Roig, Hyperbolic Nature (detail) 2. Designed by Thomas E. Warren, manufactured by the American Chair Company, Troy, NY; Centripetal Spring Arm Chair, ca. 1850; courtesy of The Jacobsen Collection of American Art; photo by Michael Koryta, Photographer, and Andrew VanStyn, Art Director of Photography 3. Jorgen Aguerrevere, Novus Mundus, PMoA Permanent Collection

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Retrospect Restoration January 15 - March 26, 2011

Exhibition related merchandise available in the Museum Shop ANNUAL EXHIBITION FUND SPONSORS

Cowles Charitable Trust The Reitzel Foundation

800 East Palmetto Street

Dorothy Chao Jenkins

Mark & Lynn Hollis

The Hazelle Paxson Morrison Foundation

Lakeland

Ron & Becky Johnson

BCI Engineers & Scientists

T 863.688.7743

Summitt Consulting, Inc.

www.PolkMuseumofArt.org

Located on Lake Morton behind Lakeland Public Library. Hours: Tue. - Sat. 10AM - 5PM; Sun. 1-5PM; Closed Mon.


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is known for his dream-like paintings of architectural structures. The surreality in Calzada’s work lies in a broken boundary between landscape and architecture and the Hopper-esque quiet-

Polk’s Permanent Collection. Thru 01.08.2011

Visual Unity 2 Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

exhibition, teaming up to produce two new creative, unexpected and unique artworks for display. Also featured are separate works representing each artist’s respective talents.

a modern sense of Americana.

Thru 01.08.2011

Eye See America: Through the Lens of Joshua Mann Pailet Polk Museum of Art

In a reprise of Visual Unity, hosted by the Morean Arts Center last year, ness of his painted a group of 19 regionenvironments. ally and nationally recognized artists 01.15-03.26.2011 have gathered for www.polkmuseumofart.org The Big this collaborative Noted New Orleans Picture photographer and Polk Museum gallery owner, Joshof Art ua Mann Pailet, has www.polkmuseumofart.org an eye for America, Beautifully enand he uses his camgaging, this exhibiera to capture the tion features the people, places, and largest works in the situations that define

Thru 01.30.2011

Photos in Ink Polk Museum of Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Not all photographs are printed with chemicals in a darkroom. Some are

1. Artwork by Humberto Calzada 2. Artwork by Theo Wujcik 3. Jill Cannady and Tim Ludwig, Rabbit Platter, 2010, wheel thrown and altered earthenware and encaustic, photo: Randall Smith (rcsarts.com) 4. Joshua Mann Pailet, Lionel Batiste, Jazz Funeral, New Orleans (detail), 1998, gelatin silverprint, courtesy of and © Joshua Mann Pailet 5. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas (Our Lady of the Iguanas), 1996, photogravure, 29-7/8” x 25-1/8”, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, Graphicstudio Subscription Purchase through Kent Harrison Memorial Acquisition Fund

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printed by computers, and others by master printers using plates and presses. This exhibition features photographs from the Polk’s permanent collection that were either digitally or manually produced. MAITLAND Thru 01.09.2011

Rob Reedy: Doodah DADA Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

proach to the vessel and a mixed media form of painting and drawing. MIAMI

Doodah DADA is the manifestation of Reedy’s distinct aesthetic and sociological experiences. Storytelling, family and faith play prominently in the creation of his art. His current works involve a more sculptural ap-

lights ArtCenter artists, from the first year the organization’s doors were opened, in 1984, to the present. Artists including William Cordova, Luis Gispert, Beatriz Monteavaro, Gavin Perry and Ellie Schneiderman illustrate how ArtCenter has influenced their work and the community over the past 25 years.

integrated plaza and flooring designs, this exhibit explores a cross section of

innovative public art commissions currently being implemented in Miami-Dade County. Thru 04.10.2011

Thru 01.02.2011

01.08-02.20.2011

Art Basel: Good N’ Plenty ArtCenter / South Florida

Not the Usual Suspects: [New] Art in [New] Public Spaces ArtCenter / South Florida

www.artcentersf.org

Good n’ Plenty spot-

www.artcentersf.org

Rendered in various media, from interactive video panels and new media technologies to highly

Focus Gallery: Robert Rauschenberg Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

MAM presents a new exhibition in the Focus Gallery section of its Permanent Collection installation, dedicated to works by the late Robert Rauschen-

1. Robert Reedy, Bottle (detail), clay/earthenware, 32” h 2. Franklin Einspruch, Lexi and Vanessa’s House 3. Ivan Toth Depeña, proposal for Stephen P. Clark Government Center lobby, anticipated completion: fall/winter 2011, Miami-Dade County Public Art Collection

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berg, one of the first artists to incorporate mass media imagery into his artwork. Thru 03.06.2011

Susan Rothenberg: Moving in Place Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Moving in Place features a select group of 25 paintings, ranging from Rothenberg’s early horse paintings of the mid-1970s to her most recent body of work, and explores a number of central motifs that have occurred throughout her 35-year career.

These photographs put a human face on the consequences of the United States’ immigration policy and the struggles of Haitian immigrants.

includes early works of miniature dioramas and tableaux that combine sculpture with painting and models for opera stage sets.

12.01-02.13.2011

Thru 01.02.2011

Jonathan Meese: Sculpture Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Embracing Modernity: Venezuelan Geometric Abstraction The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Thru 02.13.2011

Bruce Weber: Haiti / Little Haiti Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Haiti/Little Haiti includes approximately 175 photographs of Miami’s Haitian community, from 2003 to the present, by photographer Bruce Weber. Although best known for his fashion photography and celebrity portraits for Vogue and Vanity Fair, Weber also considers himself a street photographer in the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson.

www.mocanomi.org

thefrost.fiu.edu

This mid-career survey of German artist Jonathan Meese focuses on his sculptural work, but also

Embracing Modernity presents a historical overview of the origins of the country’s abstract movement, from the late 1940s to the ’70s, featuring works by Omar Carreño, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Gertrude Goldschmidt (Gego), Gerd Leufert, Mateo Manaure, Ale-

1. Susan Rothenberg, Pin Wheel, 1988, 95 x 142-3/4”, Collection Miami Art Museum, promised gift of Mimi Floback 2. Bruce Weber, Parishioner at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church, Little Haiti, Miami, May 11th, 2003 3. Jonathan Meese, DER KÄMPFER de LARGE (Der Zueshagen von Troja de NEUTRAL), 2008, bronze, 266 x 130 x 210cm, edition 1 of 3 +1 AP, collection of Carlos and Rosa de La Cruz, photo courtesy of Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin

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A LOOK BACK AT 25 YEARS OF ART MAKING AT THE ARTCENTER/ SOUTH FLORIDA BY PAST AND PRESENT RESIDENT ARTISTS

Alex Heria Beatriz Monteavaro Brandon Opalka Carlos Alves Carlos Betancourt Carlos de Villasante Carolina Sardi Damian Sarno David Packer David Rohn Diane Hanson Edouard Duval-Carrié Ellie Schneiderman Ena Marrero Ernie Sandidge Franklin Einspruch Gavin Perry Gustavo Roman JC Carroll Jenny Brillhart Jonathan Peck Joshua Levine Juan Carballo Julie Davidow Kerry Phillips Kristen Thiele Luisa Basnuevo Luis Garcia-Nerey Luis Gispert Natasha Duwin Nina Surel Robert Flynn Sara Stites Shirley Henderson Susan Lee Chun Tawnie Silva Teri Romkey TM Sisters Vickie Pierre Vincent Hemphill Wendy Wischer William Cordova William Keddell Yolanda Sánchez

GOOD & PLENTY LINCOLN MIAMI BEACH Curated by Kristen Thiele and organizedROAD by ArtCenter/ South Florida.

ARTCENTER /SOUTH FLORIDA

800/810/924 Lincoln Road • Miami Beach, FL 33139 Tel: 305 674 8278 Fax: 305 674 8772 www.artcentersf.org

Opening Wednesday December 1 7-10 pm 800 / 810 /Reception, 924 Lincoln Road On view November 26th – January 2nd, 2011 Miami Beach, FL 33139

Programming is made possible through grants from the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; The Children's Trust; the City of Miami Beach Cultural Arts Council; the City of Miami Beach Community Development Block Grant Program; the Miami Beach Mayor and City Commissioners; the State of Florida, Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Arts Council; the Dade Community Foundation and the Chestler Family Fund at Dade Community Foundation; ArtéCity and Target.

W artcentersf.org

Exhibitions and programs at ArtCenter/ South Florida are made possible through grants from the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; the City of Miami Beach Cultural Arts Council; the Miami Beach Mayor and City Commissioners and the State of Florida, Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Arts Council; National Endowment for the Arts; The John S. & James L. Knight Foundation; the Dade Community Foundation; and the Walgreen’s Company.


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this exhibition in the Wolfsonian Teaching Gallery at the Frost Art Museum. By presenting a variety of materials from the collection of The Wolfsonian– jandro Otero, MerFlorida International cedes Pardo, Jesus Ra- University, La Habana fael Soto, and Oswaldo Moderna explores how Vigas, among others. international, commercial and cultural Thru 01.02.2011 links contributed to the La Habana emergence of a modModerna ern identity for the city The Patricia in the decades before & Phillip Frost the Cuban Revolution. Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

Havana is the focus of

Thru 1.02.2011

Sequentia: Xavier Cortada The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

Xavier Cortada’s solo exhibit explores the sequence of events that make up life on the planet from

the molecular to the monumental. The title of the exhibit also references a series of actions Cortada will set in motion to create a unique strand of DNA from a sequence

generated by museum visitors using Cortada’s art.

ago, the Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism proclaimed that “the world’s magnificence has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.” Speed Limits probes the powers and limits of the modern era’s cult of speed. The exhibition features a variety of media, including: posters, books, drawings, clocks and appliances, paintings, video, and sound installations. (See story in the Aug./ Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 72.)

Thru 02.20.2011

Speed Limits The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

One hundred years

1. Narciso Debourg, Jaune Sur Noir, 1972, painted wood, 23-5/8 x 23-5/8, Art&Art, LLC Collection 2. Magazine, Bohemia (November 24, 1929), Havana, 12-1/8 x 9”, The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami Beach, FL, The Vicki Gold Levi Collection 3. Xavier Cortada, (The Four Nucleotides:) Cytosine, 2010, oil on canvas, 60 x 48”, courtesy of the artist 4. Edmond van Dooren (1896-1965), Cityscape (detail), ca.1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection

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50 NE 40th Street, Miami FL 3 0 5 . 4 3 8 . 4 3 8 3 EtraFineArt.com

Robert Indiana The Hartley Elegies The Complete Series D e c . 2 0 1 0 - J a n . 2 0 1 1


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NAPLES

Naples Museum of Art

12.11-01.09.2011

www.thephil.org

Naples Collects 2011 Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Thru 06.30.2011

Featuring paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture loaned from some of Naples’ most prominent art collections, Naples Collects offers a rare view of privately held treasures.

Louise Nevelson: Dawn’s Forest Naples Museum of Art

This exhibition features 35 rare etchings by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn executed between 1629 and 1654. These etchings illustrate

www.thephil.org

Dawn’s Forest consists of a series of sculptures by Louise Nevelson (1899-1988), one of the most important and influential figures in postwar American art, and the most internationally celebrated woman artist of her time.

Rembrandt’s technical brilliance as a printmaker, and reveal him as a poet as well as an artist, an idealist and also a realist.

01. 22-03.27.2011

Thru 01.09.2011

Sordid and Sacred: The Beggars in Rembrandt’s Etchings

Steven Assael: Illusions of Reality Naples Museum of Art

Steven Assael is widely recognized as one of the leading figurative artists working today. Assael’s paintings and drawings are both featured in this comprehensive exhibition. Thru 12.26

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

1. Robert Jay Wolff (1905-1977), Untitled, 1939, watercolor on paper, 20 x 13” 2. Louise Nevelson, Dawn’s Forest (detail), 1986, painted balsaplywood,
collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of GA-Met, a joint venture Georgia-Pacific, LLC,
© 2010 Estate of Louise Nevelson /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, Left: A Peasant in a High Cap, Standing Leaning on a Stick, 1639, etching, 3-1/4 x 1-3/4”; Right: A Beggar Woman Leaning on a Stick, 1646, etching, 3-5/8 x 2-5/8” 4. Steven Assael, Cassandra & Julie, 2008, oil on board, 33-1/2 x 48-1/4”, © Steven Assael, courtesy of Forum Gallery, NY 5. Stephen Knapp, Capriccio, 2003, light, glass and stainless steel,
11’ x 8’ x 10”, © Stephen Knapp

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These exciting exhibitions are also on display this season at the museum: WORKS BY ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG From the Dr. John B. and Frances C. Fenning Collection January 12-March 20, 2011

Sordid and Sacred: The Beggars in REMBRANDT’S ETCHINGS January 22-March 27, 2011

JOYCE TENNESON’S THE VIEW PROJECT Through March 13, 2011

THE PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS OF LYNN DAVISON January 22-March 27, 2011

BLOSSOM II: THE ART OF FLOWERS February 1-April 10, 2011

ALBERT PALEY SCULPTURE February 4-April 17, 2011

SELECTIONS FROM THE NMA PERMANENT COLLECTION

LOUISE NEVELSON: DAWN’S FOREST Through June 30, 2011 This season, the Naples Museum of Art unveils the most important addition to its permanent collection since the museum opened in 2000: Louise Nevelson’s monumental Dawn’s Forest. Nevelson’s largest and most complex sculptural environment, Dawn’s Forest consists of multiple sculptures, created in the mid-1980s and containing elements from previous sculptures dating to 1971. It is Nevelson’s last major work.

PATTY & JAY BAKER

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART 5833 Pelican Bay Blvd., Naples, FL 34108 (800) 597-1900 • ThePhil.org Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunday, noon- 4 p.m.

April 2-June 30, 2011

TUSCANY: WANDERING THE BACK ROADS Photographs by Paula Chamlee and Michael A. Smith April 9-June 30, 2011

FLORIDA CONTEMPORARY 2011 April 23-June 30, 2011

MODERN MEXICAN MASTERS

Featuring works from the Pollak Collection and the Bryna Collection Through June 30, 2011

LEADERS IN AMERICAN MODERNISM

Selected works from the American Modernism Collection A permanent collection featuring works made possible by William J. and Suzanne V. von Liebig Through June 30, 2011

THE MOUSE HOUSE Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Through June 30, 2011

(Detail) Louise Nevelson, Dawn's Forest, 1986, Painted balsa-plywood. Collection of the Naples Museum of Art. 2010.7. Gift of GA-Met, a joint venture GeorgiaPacific, LLC. © 2010. Estate of Louise Nevelson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

style, combined with her striking narratives, adds even more potency to her already compelling and evocative figures.

www.thephil.org

Stephen Knapp’s Lightpaintings embody an inherently unique form of art that transforms the gallery environment and envelops the viewer in pure, glowing colors. (See story on pg. 96.)

etti, de Kooning and many others.

Thru 06.30.2011

01. 22-03.27.2011

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

The Paintings and Drawings of Lynn Davison Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

This jewel of an exhibition recreates the atmosphere of Olga Hirshhorn’s art-packed house in Washington, DC, known as “The Mouse House,” and features intimate-sized works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Giacom-

www.thephil.org

Aging, bulky forms, bearing the scars of

real life, are the dominant subject in Davison’s art. Her unique

to them—see if you agree. Thru 01.15.2011

The View Project Naples Museum of Art

Three Visions in Glass:
Cristiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira and Laura de Santillana Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

www.thephil.org

12.18-03.13.2011

Photographer Joyce Tenneson asked colleagues to send her images of places that “speak to our heart in an unforgettable manner,” and also requested each photographer write a statement describing exactly what makes these particular images memorable

Cristiano Bianchin, Yoichi Ohira and Laura de Santillana live in Venice and work in Murano, Italy—a mecca for the study and production of glass art. Working outside the expected forms, styles and techniques of traditional Murano glass-

1. Image courtesy of Naples Museum of Art 2. Lynn Davison, Party Time, 2009, oil on canvas, 60-1/2 x 72”, ©2009 Lynn Davison, courtesy of the artist 3. Patti Bose, Red Saree, Taj Mahal, India, 1997, © Patti Bose, courtesy of the artist and Tenneson Studio 4. Laura de Santillana, Arancio, Meteor, 2008, hand-blown and shaped glass, 23-1/4 x 23-3/4”,
© Laura de Santillana, courtesy of Barry Friedman Ltd.

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

makers, these artists have created exceptional and sometimes unexpected examples of art glass.

Thru 01.09.2011

Thru 01.02.2011

Reflections: Paintings of Florida, 1865-1965 Appleton Museum of Art

The Unseen Eye: Photography from the Collection of W. M. Hunt Appleton Museum of Art

www.appletonmuseum.org

OCALA

Thru 01.23.2011

European Sporting and Pastoral Masterpieces from a Private Collection Appleton Museum of Art

From the collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown are 69 paintings from one of the most significant assemblages of Florida-based art. The works include views of Florida’s beaches, rivers, swamps and farmlands as interpreted by some of America’s most important painters, including: Thomas Hart Benton, Frederick Carl Frieseke and Martin Johnson Heade.

www.appletonmuseum.org

View 18 masterpieces created by some of Europe’s most important artists from the 18th and 19th centuries.

ORLANDO

www.appletonmuseum.org

A dramatic display of 176 photographs, from the collection of W. M. Hunt, includes

Thru 01.02.2011

Against All Odds: The Art of the Highwaymen Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

The “Highwaymen” began as a group of African American artists who, against works by Avedon, Ar- all odds, managed to bus, Cartier-Bresson, prosper selling their Mapplethorpe, William paintings in the segKlein, Robert Frank regated South of the and Lee Friedlander. 1950s and ’60s. Learn All of the subjects in about their fascinating this compelling exhistory and see paintings bition have their eyes by 26 artists, including hidden or obscured. A. E. “Bean” Backus,

1. George Stubbs (1724-1806), Gray Stallion With Groom 2. Charles Christian Eisele, Evening on the Suwannee River, 1885 3. Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Solange (detail), 1929 4. Highwaymen painting from the collection of Geoff and Patti Cook

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an accomplished white Florida landscape artist who encouraged and inspired the Highwaymen. 01.01-06.30.2011

American Visions: Changing Viewpoints Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

American Visions explores how artists have represented American life and culture over the past century. Works by Ansel Adams, Richard Estes, Malcolm Morley, Earl Cunningham and many others are included.

01.01-06.30.2011

12.18-06.05.2011

Aztec to Zapoctec II: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection Orlando 01.01-06.12.2011 Museum of Art Currents in www.omart.org Contemporary Aztec to Zapotec II Art: Process features more than and Materials 180 works drawn from Orlando Museum of Art

XX-XY/Gender Representation in Art Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

A hallmark of contemporary art is its diversity and acceptance of varied approaches to creating art. Additionally, artists have the OMA’s compreborrowed styles and hensive Art of the imagery from the past, Ancient Americas other cultures and Collection and gives popular media. Among a rare glimpse into the artists represented the life and culture of are: Ursula von Rydnumerous civilizations ingsvard, John Chamfrom the North, Cenberlain, Frank Moore, tral and South Ameri- Chuck Close and can regions. Howardena Pindell.

www.omart.org

Drawing from the OMA’s Permanent Collection and from important local, private and public collections, this exhibition examines the roles of men and women and how they are portrayed visually. Featured works are divided into four themes: Magnetism, Domesticity, Power and Enhancements.

1. Jane Hammond, Untitled, 1993, oil on canvas with metal leaf, 70 x 80”, Acquisition Trust Purchase 1993 2. Seated Figure Urn, AD 300-600, Zapotec; Oaxaca, Monte Alban, Mexico, ceramic, 12”, Gift of Howard Phillips 3. John Chamberlain, Lazzarini’s Pie, 1990, painted metal, 46 x 70 x 46”, Acquisition Trust Purchase 1991, © 2010 John Chamberlain / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 4. Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1967, screenprint on paper; edition of 250, 36 x 36”, gift of Council of 101, © 2010 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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www.mennellomuseum.com

A beautiful selection of 18th to 20th century devotional artworks, including retablos (paintings Thru 01.30.2011 on tin or wooden Maury Hurt & panels) and bultos Grady Kimsey (carvings in the The Mennello round) depict the Museum of faith of generations, American Art emerging in religious www.mennellomuseum.com objects set in the Maury Hurt’s paintings background of everycapture landscapes, day lives. A dramatic dreamscapes and porseries of color phototraits with a technical graphs by respected brilliance and authenAmerican artist, ticity of vision that Alex Harris, provide transports the viewer context for the into another realm. religious artworks. Thru 01.30.2011

Sacred Spaces: Devotional Images with Photography by Alex Harris The Mennello Museum of American Art

ORMOND

PALM BEACH

BEACH

12.04-01.16.2011

12.11-01.16.2011

Visual Haiku Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Object of Devotion: Medieval English Alabaster Sculpture from the Victoria and Albert Museum The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

Visual Haiku features the artwork of Dorothy Churchill-Johnson and original haiku by members of the Tomoka Poets. Dorothy’s paintings create a realm of virtual reality by selecting natural objects, exaggerating and isolating them in otherworldly landscapes.

Presented in this exhibition are 60 carved alabaster panels and free-standing figures that were displayed in the homes, chapels, and churches of aristocratic and non-aristocratic Christians in the 15th and 16th centuries.

1. Maury Hurt, The Fox, 1970, oil on canvas, from the collection of Dr. Francis Martin, Jr. 2. Jose Renito Ortega, Bulto, ca. 1830-1870 3. Dorothy Churchill-Johnson, Lotus Angeles, 20 x 18” 4. Head of St. John the Baptist, late 15th century, alabaster, on loan from the Victoria and Albert Museum

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PANAMA CITY

Pensacola Museum of Art

12.10-01.15.2011

www.pensacola

Bay Annual Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

museumofart.org

tion for his sculptures from ancient BEACH constructions and Thru 12.29 mystical carvings The Works of such as Stonehenge, Gretchen Ebersol New Grange and & Paul Braun Knowth. PONTE VEDRA

Collector Jim Rabourn amassed an extensive collection of fine www.vac.org.cn silverwork, decoraThe Bay Annual is tive furnishings, and a members’ art religious icons over 30 exhibit showing the years while working best works of regional and traveling throughartists. Over 50 out Europe and Russia. artists participate The works exhibited in From Russia with Love chronicle the historic events of late 19th century Russia from the opulence of the Tsars through the each year in this Russian Revolution signature show. and rise of Socialism. PENSACOLA Thru 01.23.2011

From Russia with Love: Selections from the Rabourn Collection

SARASOTA Thru 01.30.2011

The Cultural Center

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes of Central Asia The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ccpvb.org

www.ringling.org

Gretchen Ebersol’s intricate mixedmedia work is an exploration of nature’s flora and fauna from Florida, the Caribbean and Central and South America. Paul Braun draws inspira-

Exquisite silver and gilt jewelry from the Turkomen tribes

1. Image courtesy of Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida 2. Russian icona, Moisei Ivanov, Master, 1847 3. Paul Braun, Tocatta #7, tiger-eye alabaster 4. Teke Tribe, Tumar (Amulet/Breastplate), dated first half of 20th century, gift of Mr. Stephen Va. C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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of Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan are presented in this exhibition. Each piece is imbued with symmetrical, yet organic, designs drawn from the tribes’ mythological interpretations of the natural world. Thru-01.02.2011

Threads of Gold: Renaissance Tapestries from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

World-renowned for its artistic treasures, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, Austria, houses the art collections formed over centuries by successive generations of the House of Hapsburg, Austria’s royal family. Six of the 8 tapestries presented in this exhibition are part of a set once owned by the Emperor Matthias and 2 are from another 16th century set that belonged to the Emperor Franz I. All of the tapestries were recently and painstakingly restored. Thru 12.13

With the Greatest of Ease The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Organized thematically with over 30 www.ringling.org works based on the The skill and daring of imagination or on aerial artists has long observation, or both, been a popular subject the exhibition sugfor circus advertising. gests the nature of With the Greatest of Ease features posters printed in the 19th and 20th centuries featuring some of the most amazing feats performed above the circus ring. and themes found in Latin American art ST. created after 1950. PETERSBURG Among the artists Thru 02.06.2011 represented are: Julio Dreams and Larraz, José Luis Realities: Latin Cuevas and Francisco American Prints, Zúñiga, Roberto Drawings, Matta, Carlos Poveda, and Watercolors, Omar Rayo, and 1959-1991 Antonio Seguí.

1. Brussels, Workshop of Frans Geubels, Romulus Invites the Neighbors to the Combat Games (detail), ca. 1560, wool, silk, silver and gold, courtesy of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Kunstkammer 2. Strobridge Lithographing Co., 1899, Forepaugh-Sells Shows Combined: Zorella, Ryan and Weitzel 3. Julio Larraz,
Magic Eye, 1989,
colored etching and aquatint on paper,
Museum purchase with funds donated by Hanna Koch

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

and a few works on the documented period of Transcending cusp of Modernism. Dalí’s artistic producVision: American tion, but also shed new Impressionism, Thru 12.31.2010 light on how Dalí’s 1870–1940 Dalí, Dance + ideas—and SurrealMuseum of Beyond ism—evolved during Fine Arts, The Dalí this period. Thru 01.09.2011

St. Petersburg

Museum

www.fine-arts.org

www.thedali.org

This spectacular exhibition, provided by Bank of America Art in our Communities™ program, features approximately 100 paintings, drawings and prints by more than 70 artists. The survey mainly comprises oil paintings and encompasses the Hudson River School, American Impressionism,

benefactors, the Morse Family.

Thru 12.31.2010

Dalí, Dance + Beyond features never-beforedisplayed photographs, films, and objects documenting Salvador Dalí’s celebrated collaboration in the field of dance. The exhibition includes more than 45 images, postcards, books, correspondence and other printed materials. They reveal not only an insufficiently

Sharing Salvador: The History of the Dalí Museum and the Morse Collection The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

Sharing Salvador presents a selection of paintings, objects and photographs accompanied by an historical narrative on the origins of the Dalí Museum. This important exhibition pays special homage to the Museum’s

Opening 01.11.2011

Viva la Revelación! The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

The new Dalí Museum, which opens on January 11th, will be occupied throughout 2011 with a special exhibition called Viva la Revelación!. The exhibition will display paintings and highlight other major works from the Museum’s collection, to celebrate the new

1. Robert Spencer (1879-1931), Afternoon Bathers (detail), ca. 1920, oil on canvas, Bank of America Collection 2. Salvador Dalí, Untitled (Salvador Dalí using a model as a desk), 1947, photo: Bob Sandberg, Museum of the City of New York, The LOOK Collection 3. Salvador Dalí with Reynolds and Eleanor Morse, 1943, The Dalí Museum Archives, St. Petersburg, Florida

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building. (See story on pg. 66.) TAMPA Thru 01.29.2011

Naked City: Photographs from Vassar College’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.fmopa.org

The biggest names

in 20th century photography are featured in this exhibition, which helps celebrate Vassar’s 150th birthday in 2011. 01.08-02.27.2011

American Modernism from the Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Mark S. Kauffman Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

American Modernism examines the developments in American art from 1910 through the latter decades of the 20th century with special emphasis placed on the struggle between a lingering representational mode and an emerging modernist aesthetic.

01.29-05.15.2011

www.tampamuseum.org

Herb Snitzer: A Jazz Memoir Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

St. Petersburg resident and former photojournalist for Life, Look and Fortune magazines, Herb Snitzer has spent nearly 5 decades capturing the world around us. Upon the publication of a new collection of his images, Glorious Days and Nights, the TMA presents a selection of Snitzer’s worldfamous jazz images. Thru 01.16.2011

Musical Lines in My Hands: The Work of Dominique Labauvie Tampa Museum of Art

The lines of Dominique’s sculpture react to the surroundings, similar to musical notes of a composition. Organized around a new site-specific work for the museum’s gallery, this exhibi-

tion includes interior and outdoor works, and a site-specific wall drawing. (See story in the October/November 2010 issue on pg. 92.) 01.08-02.27.2011

Otto Neumann: A Reluctant Modernist Tampa Museum of Art

1. Salvador Dalí , Daddy Longlegs of the Evening... Hope!, 1940, ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, Fl, 2010; worldwide rights: ©Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2010 2. Weegee [Arthur H. Fellig], Hollywood Premier, 1953, gelatin silver print, Collection The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, © Weegee / International Center for Photography/ Getty Images 3. Dominique Labauvie, Twist, 2008, forged and waxed steel, courtesy of the artist and Haim Chanin Fine Arts

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German artist Otto Neumann (18951975) exposed his psyche through his exploration of mythology. His work leaps from his imagination and offers a highly personalized interjection into the story of modernism.

Realism provides a compelling view of the realist tendencies in the visual arts of the last 30 years. The exhibition juxtaposes stellar examples of the Photo-Realist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural installations by leading contemporary artists.

Thru 07.17.2011

Thru 01.02.2011

Realism: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

Robert Rauschenberg: Studies for Chinese Summerhall Tampa Museum of Art

Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

Summerhall—28 of the images were reproduced as C-print color photographs that comprise Study for Chinese Summerhall.

American gardens by American Impressionists, along with bronze sculptures created by American artists for the garden.

Thru 01.03.2011

Thru 01.16.2011

The American Impressionists in the Garden

80s Photography from the Collection Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

In 1982, Robert Rauschenberg traveled to China and took hundreds of photographs reflecting his encounters, producing a 100-foot-long collage titled Chinese

This exhibition provides a host of opportunities for exploration into a decade that, for many of us, seems like only yesterday—and for

The theme of the garden in American art and society, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is explored in this display of paintings depicting European and

1. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies 2. Carl Frederick Frieseke (1874-1939), The Garden Umbrella, ca. 1910, oil on canvas, 32 x 32”, Telfair Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia, bequest of Elizabeth Millar (Mrs. Bernice Frost) Bullard 3. Cindy Sherman, 
Untitled (#141) (detail), 1986, 
dye destruction – Cibachrome, edition 6 of 6,
Tampa Museum of Art, bequest of Edward W. Lowman by exchange

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others, is truly of another century.

cal installations that thrust the viewer literally and figuratively into his personal, idiosyncratic and, at times, heretical weave of words and images.

01.14-03.10.2011

Trenton Doyle Hancock: WE DONE ALL WE COULD AND NONE OF IT’S GOOD

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

highly recognized for her organic designs and engineering quality and is one of the premiere kinetic sculptors in the US. VERO BEACH

TARPON

Thru 05.08.2011

SPRINGS

www.ira.usf.edu

New and selected works by Trenton Doyle Hancock are presented in this exhibition. The Texasbased artist is best Thru 01.30.2011 known for his ongoing Sculpture in narrative and theatriMotion:

Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Celebrating 25 Years presents an engaging look at the Museum’s outdoor sculpture colA Retrospective lection. The works inof Works clude welded sculpture by Lin Emery by John Henry and Leepa-Rattner David Hayes, kinetic Museum of Art sculpture by Jerome www.spcollege.edu/museum Kirk, bronze work by New Orleans-based Thomas Ostenberg and artist Lin Emery is the Museum’s most

recent sculpture acquisition, Hanneke Beaumont’s Bronze #56. Thru 01.02.2011

Clearly Color: Glass from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Clearly Color offers a dazzling cross section of American glass artists whose works are a

1. Trenton Doyle Hancock, Give Me My Flowers While I Yet Live, version 1, 2010, mixed media on paper, 7-1/2 x 7-5/8” 2. Lin Emery, Rondelet (detail), 2010, polished aluminum, 158 x 84” orbit, 46 x 48” base, Lin Emery & Arthur Roger Gallery 3. Jane Manus, End of the Day, 1988, painted and welded aluminum, 86 x 58 x 42”, gift of Janet and Clark Daugherty 4. Harvey Littleton, Blue Sliced Descending Form, 1988, barium/potash glass w/multiple cased overlays of Kugler colors, 2 parts: 14 x 12 x 6-1/2” and 6-1/2 x 4 x 3”, Museum purchase w/funds provided by the John McLaughlin Booth Endowment for Collections, the Dorothy Gay Poole Acquisition Fund En-dowment, and the William B. and Marcia H. Howell Endowment for Collections

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

study in contrast. The exhibition celebrates the medium and illustrates the revival and innovation of glassforming technologies.

a new identity and significance. Metamorphosis features 8 works from Federico’s Abstract-O series.

captured expressions and emotions. W. PALM BEACH 12.18-03.20.2011

Thru 01.09.2011 Thru 01.02.2011

Metamorphosis: Abstract Works by Federico Uribe

William Wegman: Fay Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

William Wegman is best known for his photographs of Weimaraners and this show focuses on his beloved Fay, whose beauty is showcased through a range of

Vero Beach Museum of Art

Celebrating 70: The Qianlong Emperor and Exchanges of Buddhist Gifts Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

In 1777, the Panchen Lama presented a set of paintings to the Qianlong Emperor. This sparked elaborate exchanges of gifts between the Chinese court and the lamas of Tibet, culminating with the Panchen Lama attending the celebration of the emperor’s 70th birthday in 1780. This installation explores how the art and traditions of Tibet

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Federico Uribe takes ordinary objects and transforms them into abstract installations of pattern, color and form, replacing the object’s original function and purpose with

influenced the creation of Buddhist art in the court of this Chinese emperor. Thru 01.02.2011

John Storrs: Machine-Age Modernist Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

1. Federico Uribe, Oriente-Poniente, 2009, chopsticks and plastic forks, 60” diam. x 17”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 2. William Wegman, Basic Shapes in Color, 1993, color Polaroid, 24 x 20” 3. Seated Figure of the Buddha Amitayus China, Qing dynasty, Qianlong, dated 1761, gilt bronze, traces of polychrome decoration 8-1/2 x 4-5/8 x 3-3/4”, purchase, the R.H. Norton Trust in honor of the Elizabeth Norton Society and our volunteers who serve in education, the library, membership, museum store, office support, special events and visitor services 4. John Storrs, The Abbott, 1920, bronze, 17-1/8 x 8-1/8 x 12-1/8, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

The first exhibition of work by John Storrs (1885–1956) in over 20 years, Machine-Age Modernist includes approximately 40 sculptures, drawings, and paintings from one of America’s foremost modernists. 12.12-03.06.2011

Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Drawn from the London-based archive of the late author and collector John Kobal, this exhibition reveals the importance of photography in manufacturing the myth of Hollywood—a magical place, inhabited by glamorous stars, where dreams came true. (See story on pg. 58.)

practice, showcasing some of the most engaging work being made today. 12.15-03.13.2011

the October/November 2010 issue on pg. 50.)

STARE: The Pleasures of the Intensely Familiar and the Strangely Unexpected

12.15-03.13.2011 Thru 01.09.2011

Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Approximately 40 of Nick Cave’s “Soundsuits”—multilayered, mixed-media, wearable sculptures—bring together visual and performing arts for a unique museum experience. (See story in

Now WHAT? Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Now WHAT? provides a snapshot of this moment in contemporary artistic

Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Stare examines that singular moment when we cannot look away. It is about the shock that only a photograph can invoke and the

1. Scotty Welbourne, Humphrey Bogart for High Sierra, Warner Brothers, 1940 2. Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2009, human hair, metal armature, 99”h x 31”w x 27”d, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery 3. Image courtesy of the Norton Museum of Art 4. John Coplans (1920–2003), Back of Hand, No. 1, 1986, gelatin silver print, 41 x 38”, © The John Coplans Trust

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minutiae within the image that can only be discovered when the viewer gets up close and personal. WINTER PARK Thru 12.23

MASTER/Plan: Visionary Architects and Their Utopian Worlds Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

plored in an exhibition of models, drawings, and animations by 6 leading contemporary architects. (See story in the October/November 2010 issue on pg. 76.)

the Museum’s collection. Thru 12.23

Robert Motherwell and Jasper Johns: Poetic Works as Thru 12.23 Metaphor Remix 1: Old and Cornell Fine New Acquisitions Arts Museum at from the Perma- Rollins College nent Collection cfam.rollins.edu

cfam.rollins.edu

Sustainable architecture, urban planning, and utopia are exCornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Remix 1 features a selection of works acquired by the Museum over the last year, installed with selected older pieces from

Robert Motherwell (1915-1991), pioneer and principal exponent of Abstract Expressionism, and Jasper Johns (1930- ), one of the leaders responsible for the breakthrough from Abstract Expressionism to the types of Pop Art and Minimal-

ism which succeeded it, are examined in this exhibition for their serious intellectual tone and philosophical concerns. Thru 01.23.2011

Turn On the Light: Plein Air Paintings by Morgan Samuel Price

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Price creates representational scenes painted with a beautiful sense of design and simplicity. O n V iew

1. Chad Oppenheim, Oppenheim Architecture & Design, COR Tower, Miami, Fl 2. Martin Denker, 6.3DayChemicalHoliday (detail), 2008, C-print, edition of 6, 40 x 55” 3. Jasper Johns, Flagstones, 1976, lift-ground aquatint and open-bite from three plates printed in red, black & white, 11-9/16 x 18-5/16”, © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY; published by Petersburg Press, S.A. ; exhibition organized by Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions.; reproduction of this image, including downloading, is prohibited without written authorization from VAGA, 350 Fifth Ave.,Ste.2820, NY, NY, 10118; 212.736.6666; fax: 212.736.6767; info@vagarights.com; www.vagarights.com; http://www.vagarights.org 4. Morgan Samuel Price, Emily’s Visitor, 2010, 16 x 20”, oil on canvas, photo: Albin Polasek Archives

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MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts www.dlfinearts.com

Artist: IRENE CLOUTHIER

gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

“MY WORK IS ABOUT

recreating stories in artificial places... I use plastic to simulate stories as a reflection of my childhood, to enact fantasies, as a statement about the bubble wrap society I live in, the disposable culture, the loss of sensibility and the embrace of plastics as the cool material of our emptiness.” BOCA RATON

Gallery: Karen Lynne Gallery www.karenlynnegallery.com

Artist: Steven Glucksberg

STEVEN IS A CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN REALIST who lives

and works in Potomac, Maryland. He paints scenes of cars, flowers, rivers, oceans, towns and other outside views in eye-popping photorealistic style. From left: Irene Clouthier, Flower Power, 2008, C-print on plexi, 40 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts; Steven Glucksberg, Pink Cadillac, oil on canvas, 46 x 66”, courtesy of the artist and Karen Lynne Gallery

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{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

MELBOURNE

Gallery: LoPressionism Gallery www.lopressionism.com

Artist: Jeff Pullen

JEFF USES FOUND

objects such as doors, shutters, louvers, brick and even hoods from cars, as the “canvas” for his work. By painting his imagery on these constructions, he further confronts the viewer with a three-dimensional feel and sets up a constant reality/illusion tension.

MIAMI

Gallery: Giovanni Rossi Fine Art www.giovannirossi fineart.com

Artist: PABLO CONTRISCIANI

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Art Galleries

PABLO’S PAINTINGS

www.artfusiongallery.com

Artist: Art by Lo

LO MAALUE LYNGHØJ finds

inspiration through travels to Berlin, New York, Los Angeles, Sweden and India, among other places. Her paintings combine organic shapes with graphic patterns and Scandinavian shades of dirt, blue and green, as well as fluorescent colors.

play between two elements: shape and color—sometimes they merge, and sometimes there is tension between them. The play in tension between pictorial surfaces and applied materials creates complex and straightforward layers of expressive abstractions.

Clockwise from top left: Jeff Pullen, Getting Ready, 36 x 48”, oil on found objects, courtesy of the artist and LoPressionism Gallery; Pablo Contrisciani, Untitled 16 (detail), mixed media on canvas, 48 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and Giovanni Rossi Fine Art ; Lo Maalue Lynghøj, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Art Galleries

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G A L L E R Y

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BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebaker gallery.com

Artist: ROBERT HARMS proponent of gestural painting, Robert builds his imagery with skittering brush strokes, calligraphic lines, and densely layered patches of color. As abstract A LONG-TIME

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Onessimo Fine Art www.onessimofineart.com

Artist: Jennifer Scott McLaughlin

IN THE PRESENCE OF JENNIFER’S PAINTINGS, ONE FEELS

transported to a lush garden. The flora grows whimsically, flowing and diffused as these with little concern for botany. Leaves and branches course from shimmering images water to air to earth with plant forms that surge thickly or float in are, they also carry the isolation. The eye dances across the surface from leaf to branch, specificity of a landand is drawn back to the gleaming atmospheric warm copper washscape seen at a particu- es and cool blue and green patinas that seem to go on forever into lar time and condition. the horizon. From left: Robert Harms, Sea Sense (detail), 1999, oil on canvas, 52 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; Jennifer Scott McLaughlin, Patina Study 1, oil and patina on copper mounted on birch panel, 20 x 25”, courtesy of the artist and Onessimo Fine Art

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PONTE VEDRA BEACH

SARASOTA

Gallery: Stellers Gallery

Gallery: Hodgell Gallery

www.stellersgallery.com

www.hodgellgallery.com

Artist: Lois Simon

Artist: BRAD COPPING

“I HAVE ALWAYS

been in awe of the magnificent creation that surrounds us, and hope to capture glimpses of it in my work. I choose to emphasize the positive and the beauty of our country, awakening our feelings toward them. Sunlight is the principle in my works, creating silent patterns which constantly change, giving one variety and never ending choices.”

“I HAVE ALWAYS MADE

work that reaffirms our ties to the natural world; that acknowledges we are part and parcel of that world.” Brad works from his

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery www.jjohnsongallery.com

Artist: Craig Kaths

SCREEN PRINTING ON

paper or wood panel, Craig creates intricate and graphic patterns and rhythmic layered compositions comprised of a multitude of mechanical characters and diagrams.

home on the edge of the Canadian Shield, near Apsley, Ontario. His work has been featured at the Corning Museum of Glass and is in the permanent collection of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Clockwise from top: Lois Simon, Ocean Path, acrylic on canvas, 26 x 33”, courtesy of the artist and Stellers Gallery; Brad Copping, Teal Bird Flight Burleigh, 2008, blown glass, carved, sand and acid etched, 6 h x 8.5 w x 4.75”d, courtesy of the artist and Hodgell Gallery; Craig Kaths, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery

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CUT!

Costume and the

Cinema ! at the

BOCA RATON MUSEUM OF ART

01.19-04.17.2011 www.bocamuseum.org

OPPOSITE: 1700’s corset and pannier (detail). it is important for actors to be dressed historically accurate–right down to their shoes and their underwear–so they can inhabit a role.

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CUT! Costume and the Cinema

T

The glamour, luxury and artistry of cinematic couture awaits in the exhibition CUT! Costume and the Cinema, on view from January 19th through April 17th, at the Boca Raton Museum of Art. Here one can walk through five centuries of fashion and style as interpreted by award-winning costume designers, be surrounded by sumptuous fabrics, lavish lace and embroidery, witness unparalleled craftsmanship and creativity, and experience the ambiance of big-screen cinema and the allure of famous film stars—and unlike actual period clothing, which must be preserved behind glass cases when displayed, viewers can get close enough to almost touch the exquisitely dressed forms on display. OPPOSITE: JOHNNY DEPP wore this costume as Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003); Costume Design by Penny Rose, Best Costume Award from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films

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Visitors to this exhibition are transported from fairy tale England (Angelica Huston, Ever After) to colonial Virginia (Colin Farrell, The New World) to 18th century England (Keira Knightley, The Duchess) and to 19th century Paris (Emmy Rossum, The Phantom of the Opera). The fashions of the early 20th century, including World War I Italy (Sandra Bullock, In Love and War),

seedy Shanghai in the 1930s (Natasha Richardson and Ralph Fiennes, The White Countess) and World War II Belarus (Daniel Craig, Defiance) take us through a history of style and history itself. More than 30 actors are represented from some 25 films, all of which have been recognized in the trade and appreciated by the public for the quality of their costumes and their faith-

ABOVE & OPPOSITE: KIERA KNIGHTLEY wore this costume as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, in The Duchess (2008); Costume Design by Michael O’Connor, Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design

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CUT! Costume and the Cinema

fulness to the eras represented. The 43 costumes in this exhibition come from a stock of more than 100,000 costumes and accessories made by the renowned British costumer, Cosprop Ltd.. Founded in 1965 by John Bright, an award-winning costume designer in his own right, Cosprop specializes in creating costumes for film, television and theater, from the 15th century to the swinging ’60s. Cosprop

has a staff of 40 experts in designing, tailoring, cutting, fitting, millinery, jewelry making and repair, and dyeing and printing. Reference for their work comes from an extensive library and a collection of original garments. Many of the costumes in this stunning collection have won major awards, including Oscars from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and BAFTAs from the Brit-

ABOVE & OPPOSITE: HEATH LEDGER wore this costume as Giacomo Casanova in Casanova (2005); Costume Design by Jenny Beavan

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ish Association of Film and Television Arts. As these awards testify, costume is the essential ingredient in the authenticity of a period film. Costumes set the scene by providing information about where and when the drama is taking place and introduce characters by giving clues about their status, age, class and wealth, as well as their role in the story. Costumes created for period films must

not only withstand the test of time, but must also stand up to intense visual scrutiny. When a camera zooms in for a close-up, every handcreated detail must look authentic and perfectly executed. This exhibition allows the viewer to get close to the stories portrayed on screen and to appreciate the fine details that often can only fleetingly be glanced on the screen. O n V iew

ABOVE & OPPOSITE: ANGELICA HOUSTON wore this costume as Baroness Rodmilla De Ghent in Ever After (1998); Costume Design by Jenny Beavan, Best Costume Award from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films

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Made in

HOLLYWOOD Photographs from the JOHN KOBAL FOUNDATION at the NORTON MUSEUM OF ART , West Palm Beach

12.12-03.06.2011 www.norton.org


Made in Hollywood

Hayworth, Garbo, Dietrich, Swanson, Gable, Hepburn, Bogart—these are some of the names synonymous with the Golden Age of Hollywood—but what about George Hurrell, Clarence Bull, Ruth Harriet Louise, Robert Coburn, or Ernest Bachrach? These names, while perhaps less recognizable, fundamentally filled some of the most important roles in Hollywood history—they were the photographers of the stars, and they launched many a successful career­—keeping the best in the limelight and Hollywood as a place where dreams came true. Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation, at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, showcases more than 90 original vintage prints by the most important photographers working in Hollywood from 1920-1960.

PREVIOUS PAGES: CLARENCE SINCLAIR BULL, ALFRED HITCHCOCK AND THE MGM LION, 1958, GELATIN SILVER PRINT OPPOSITE: Robert Coburn, Rita Hayworth for “Gilda”, 1946, GELATIN SILVER PRINT all images Courtesy of the John Kobal Foundation

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ABOVE: SCOTTY WELBOURNE, HUMPHREY BOGART FOR HIGH SIERRA, WARNER BROTHERS, 1940 OPPOSITE: JOHN ENGSTEAD, MARLON BRANDO FOR A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, WARNER BROTHERS, 1950 OnV

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The collection of works is chosen from The John Kobal Foundation, a fine art archive of more than 4,500 original vintage photographs featuring the major studios and stars from the late teens until about 1960. The Foundation is the legacy of John Kobal (1940-1991), who was among the pioneering generation of Hollywood historians and among the first to seriously examine the photographs taken to promote the stars, the films, and Hollywood. Among the collections is a vast trove of original, 8x10” negatives and extensive documents, including oral histories relating to the life and career of the photographers who recorded this important aspect of American cultural life. “[John] Kobal first started seriously examining and acquiring Hollywood portraits and stills in the 1960s when this material was considered nothing more than insignificant Hollywood ephemera,” notes Robert Dance, a film historian and author who has written about John Kobal’s important place in Hollywood history, and provided a lucid overview of the still and portrait photographer’s place in the Hol-

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lywood studio system. “Only a few film enthusiasts, including Kobal, scrambled and competed to acquire original studio photographs. Kobal did, however, collect better than the others, and in the end used his extraordinary collection in the service of restoring the reputations of the photographers who had helped create the stars in the first place.” Kobal’s fascination with the movies began when he was a boy in Austria, in the 1940s, and eventually bloomed into a ravenous tenacity to get close to Tinseltown’s elite. He began an obsessive accumulation of star portraits­—acquiring single prints, small collections and, when the opportunity presented itself, a star’s or photographer’s archives. As his collection grew to include original negatives, Kobal arranged to have the classic images printed, bringing vintage Hollywood to life once again—to be introduced to a new generation of film enthusiasts. Kobal strongly believed that the careers of legendary stars were made possible through photography. These portraits were an essential link to the hundreds of thousands of fans

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Made in Hollywood

ABOVE: GEORGE HURRELL, JOHN KOBAL, 1982

OPPOSITE: GEORGE HURRELL, ROBERT MONTGOMERY AND PHOTOGRAPHER GEORGE HURRELL, MGM, 1937

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who anxiously awaited new pictures each month. Performers worked as hard, or, as Kobal saw it, perhaps even harder, in the portrait studio than on the movie set. In order to achieve the effects of the great portraits, a level of trust had to be reached between photographer and subject that would ultimately reveal the hunger and drive lurking within each star. Kobal took on quite a challenge collecting and chronicling Hollywood’s Golden Age. By the 1970s, many of the photographers and their subjects, who had worked in the ’20s and ’30s, were retired or had died. While many of the portraits were embossed or stamped with the photographer’s name, scene-stills were almost never credited. Kobal painstakingly set about attempting to discover exactly who shot what. In his quest to discover the whereabouts of surviving stillsmen, Kobal came to know a few, including George Hurrell, Laszlo Willinger, Robert Coburn, William Walling and Ted Allan­—each of whom shared memories and prints from their negatives. In return, Kobal started what became his most important

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work—publishing the anthologies of the photographers’ work, resurrecting forgotten careers. A year before his death, in 1991, Kobal formed The John Kobal Foundation­, to which he donated the photographic negatives and fine art photographs that he had collected over the years. These provide a source of income that is used by the foundation to encourage interest in and help advance the appreciation and awareness of photography—particularly the area which most interested John—the fine art of portrait photography. “The wonderful thing about an exhibition like Made in Hollywood is that it works and succeeds on many levels for distinctly different museum visitors,” says Norton Museum curator of photography, Charles Stainback. “The people who grew up with such celebrities are naturally captivated. A younger audience will be intrigued by another notion of glamour. And the photography loving visitor is drawn to the beauty of the photographs themselves. All-in-all a great exhibition for almost everyone.” O n V iew

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V Viva la REVELACIÓN! O P E N I N G 0 1 . 11 . 2 0 11 at the

NEW DALÍ

T H E D A L Í M U S E U M , S T. P E T E R S B U R G www.thedali.org

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O Viva la Revelación!

all works are from the new Dalí’s inaugural exhibition, viva la revelación!

ON JANUARY 11, 2011, THE

new Dalí Museum is scheduled to open in downtown St. Petersburg and the public is invited to participate in a surreal procession, departing from the current museum—located at 1000 Third Street South in St. Petersburg, at 10 a.m.—and concluding at the new museum—located eight blocks north, at One Dali Boulevard. Entertainment, a dedication program with S.A.R. la Infanta Cristina of Spain, Duchess of Palma de Mallorca, and a ribbon cutting ceremony with Spanish Royalty presiding, starting at 11:00 a.m., will mark the beginning of a new era for the Dalí at its new location. Festivities will continue until 3 p.m. The procession, ribbon cutting

and outdoor festivities are free and open to the public. Timed tickets to visit the museum on January 11th, after the opening ceremony, will be available for sale online—on a limited basis—beginning December 10th. The opening of the stunning new $36 million structure doubles the original space of the Dalí Museum to 66,450 square feet. Construction of the new museum began in December of 2008, and the innovative design was conceived to protect the priceless collection of Dalís. “The building is a fortress,” says architect Yann Weymouth. Weymouth’s team from the firm, HOK, started with the unusual step of putting all of the art up high, on the 2nd and 3rd floors, above the near-

PREVIOUS PAGE: The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used As a Table, 1934 THIS PAGE: The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory, 1952-1954 OPPOSITE: Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus” (detail), 1933-1935

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Viva la Revelación!

THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): Daddy Longlegs of the Evening—Hope!, 1940; lobster phone, 1936 OPPOSITE: apparatus and hand, 1927 ALL IMAGES COPYRIGHT: In the USA: ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, Fl, 2010; Worldwide rights: ©Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2010

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ly thirty-foot storm surge of a category 5 hurricane. The roof is comprised of 12-inch thick solid concrete and the walls are even thicker, at18 inches. The museum’s exterior is itself a work of art, featuring a geodesic glass structure—the “Glass Enigma”. Outside, a waterfront garden—the Avant Garden—creates a unique environment of tranquility, featuring a labyrinth for exploration and enjoyment. Inside, The Grotto introduces visitors to the subtropical flora of Florida and The Helical Staircase— a spiral that ascends to the third floor galleries—is the main architectural focus. The new Dalí will be occupied throughout 2011 with a special

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exhibition called Viva la Revelación!, displaying paintings and highlighting other major works from the Museum’s collection, to celebrate the new building. For the first time, the Museum has ample space to showcase visiting exhibitions while maintaining the display of works in the permanent collection— which includes 96 oil paintings, over 100 watercolors and drawings, and thousands of sculptures, photographs, and archival materials—more Dalí masterworks than any other museum in the world, and the largest collection outside of Spain. So synchronize your soft watches and be among the first to experience the phenomenon that is the new Dalí. O n V iew

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ARTin the GA ON VIEW

The art of

through

05.31.2011:

CLAUDE

and

FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALAN


ARDEN NE

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Art in the Garden

PREVIOUS PAGES: François-Xavier Lalanne, Vache Paysage (La Grande), 2006, View of Bailey Palm Glade at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Bronze, 49-3/5 x 84-3/5 x 31”, Edition of 8, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and Artist, Rendering by Spine3D

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CONTINUING AN ANNUAL

tradition that began in 2003, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables presents Les Lalanne, the first large-scale outdoor exhibition of works by renowned French sculptors Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne to be publicly exhibited in the US. The exhibition, which coincides with Art Basel Miami Beach, features more

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than twenty sculptures and one multi-piece work, comprised of more than a dozen individual sculptures, installed throughout the Garden’s 83-acres of rich, tropical landscape. Drawing surrealist imagery from flora and fauna, the Lalannes’ sculptures create an extraordinary element of surprise and wonder set within Fairchild’s botanic paradise of rare

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LEFT: François-Xavier Lalanne, Mouton Transhumant (Brebis), 1988, The Palmetum at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, epoxy stone and bronze, 35.425 x 41 x 15.375”, edition of 250, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and Artist, Rendering by Spine3D

palms, cycads, and flowering plants. “Fairchild is thrilled to present the outdoor exhibition of the remarkable works of renowned French artists Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne,” said Carl Lewis, Director of Fairchild. “The artists’ exuberant sculptures, set amongst Fairchild’s world-class, unusual, tropical plant collections, are sure to enchant visitors of OnV

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all ages, as well as support our commitment to culture in South Florida.” Among the many works featured in this monumental exhibition are François-Xavier Lalanne’s Vache Paysage (2006), a bronze cow with its center doubling as a window through which to view the lush setting of Fairchild’s tropical gardens; Moutons (1988–1994), which Ma

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features a life-size flock of more than a dozen sheep and lambs, crafted from epoxystone and bronze; Lievre de Maillac I (fontaine) (1998 or 2004), a series of four small, seated rabbits made of bronze, doubling as fountains; and François-Xavier’s final sculpture, Singe Avisé (Très Grand), a regal monkey in a seated position with a pensive expression. Included 2010/Ja

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Art in the Garden

BELOW: Claude Lalanne, Grand Olympe, 2001, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and Artist

among Claude Lalanne’s sculptures are Dimetrodon II (1998), a unique copper and steel topiary shaped in the form of a dinosaur from the Permian period, displaying a large Marlin-like fin and spouting water through shark-like teeth; Grand Olympe (2001), depicting a young girl modeled after the image of the artists’ granddaughter, with cast lettuce leaves draped as a man-

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tle upon her shoulders and a triumphant spray of water shooting up from her right hand; and Pomme d’Hiver (2008), a large-scale bronze sculpture of a golden apple, which serves as an iconic piece in the artist’s oeuvre. The beauty of the garden’s landscape is also enhanced by a series of Claude’s elegant outdoor furniture pieces cast from nature.


LEFT: Claude & FrançoisXavier Lalanne, Dimetrodon II, 1998, The Sibley Victoria amazonica Pool at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Unique copper, steel, and stainless steel topiary with internal attachment for house to spout water, 65 x 159 x 29”, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and Artist, Rendering by Spine3D

Having rediscovered the Renaissance art of casting forms from life, then employing contemporary electro-plating techniques, Claude Lalanne achieves a delicacy and sensitivity in her work unparalleled in cast bronze. François-Xavier Lalanne (1927–2008) similarly found inspiration for his works in nature. In his words, “The animal world constitutes the richOnV

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est and most varied forms on the planet.” His subjects consist of a menagerie of animals, stylized forms oftentimes married with functionality. His works achieve streamlined elegance in their profound simplicity. The Lalannes’ work, known individually and collectively since the 1960s, has been exhibited extensively and is represented in major private and Ma

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public collections, including: Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, NY; Musée Nationale d’Art Moderne/Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris; the City of Paris; the City of Santa Monica; and the City of Jerusalem. Les Lalanne at Fairchild is presented in conjunction with Paul Kasmin Gallery, NY. O n V iew 2010/Ja

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MODERNITY

& N O S TA L G I A :

WOODBLOCK

PRINTS BY

YOSHU

CHIKANOBU O n v i e w t h ro u g h 0 2 . 2 0 . 2 0 11 a t

M O R I K A M I M U S E U M A N D J A PA N E S E G A R D E N S ,

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Modernity & Nostalgia

one of the last great ukiyo-e print designers, produced images of the kabuki stage, beautiful women, and historical and legendary events. He also illustrated murders and other sensational news of his day and chronicled a time of great reform in Japan, with the modernization and Westernization of Japanese society, as the country opened its ports to the world in the late 19th century. YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU (1838–1912),

ABOVE: YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, CUSTOMS OF EDO: ENUMERATED FORTUNES: BLESSED WITH CHILDREN, 1890, WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

Modernity & Nostalgia, at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, presents over 50 woodblock prints from this prolific artist on subjects ranging from customs and manners of Japanese women to the Sino-Japanese War to nostalgic representations of the recently ended feudalistic Edo Period. While illustrated books and paintings also comprised Chikanobu’s artistic output, it was his single-sheet and triptych prints that best reflected a shift

in the subject matter of ukiyoe prints of the Meiji Period (1868–1912). Many of Chikanobu’s prints documented the momentous changes to the society of his age with images of current events, crime, and the life-style of the Meiji Emperor and his family. This exhibition considers Chikanobu’s woodblock prints within the context of social, political and literary milieus of the period, an era of profound change as Japan struggled to define its place in a modern world. The

PREVIOUS PAGES: YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, MIRROR OF THE AGES: KENMU (1334-35, 1336-37), 1897, WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE OPPOSITE: YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, CUSTOMS OF EDO: ENUMERATED FORTUNES: WESTERN CLOTHING, 1889, WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

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YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, MOON VIEWING OVER SARASHINA RICE FIELDS, 1891, WOOD

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exhibition is a survey of Chikanobu’s contributions in documenting the transformation of Japan to achieve this result. As Japan embarked upon an .

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often tumultuous path to modernization during the Meiji Period, artists rushed to record the revolutionary events taking place. As one of these art-

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BLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

ists, Chikanobu was affected by the rapid transformation of the social and technological landscape: traditional wooden structures, with sliding paperOnV

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YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, THE MEIJI EMPEROR WATCHES HORSERACING AT UENO, 1884,

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were shorn of their topknots and stripped of their swords. Combined with advancements in medicine and manufacturing, such changes inspired .

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awareness, incited anxiety, and sparked social and political debate that found expression in art. The prints that Chikanobu

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WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

published in the 1880s advocated modernization, but by the 1890s the artist had shifted his focus nostalgically to traditional subjects and values. OnV

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Y ŌSH Ū CHIKANOBU, ICHIKAWA DANJURO IX IN THE ROLE OF SAIGO TAKAMORI, WITH OTHER ACTORS , 1878, WOOD

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prints often used synthetic pigments, or aniline dyes, newly imported from Europe. The bright aniline dyes, in reds and purples, gave his images a .

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bolder, more modern sensibility in keeping with the contemporariness of the subject matter—and they tended to retain that vibrancy longer, provided

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MASTER/Plan

BLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

the prints were not exposed to direct sunlight. Most of the prints, dealing with the Sino-Japanese War, were commissioned by the OnV

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government as propaganda. Other prints were exported abroad, where they were displayed in parlors and drawing rooms of grand Victorian Ma

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homes, their ornate surface decorations reflecting Western tastes that made “oriental” interior design all the rage in Europe and America. 2010/J

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YŌSHŪ CHIKANOBU, BATTLE AT YASHUMA: PROTECTING HIS MASTER, TSUGUNOBU IS FELLED BY NORITSUNE’S ARROW, 1898,

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Modernity and Nostalgia includes Chikanobu’s woodblock prints as well as threedimensional works of art of the Meiji Period from the .

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Morikami Museum’s own collection. The exhibit, which runs through February 20th, was organized by the Ruth Chan-

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WOODBLOCK PRINT, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, LOANED BY THE RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY, SCRIPPS COLLEGE

dler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College in Claremont, California and Bruce A. Coats, Professor of Art History and the Humanities OnV

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at Scripps College. Text by Tom Gregersen, Cultural Director, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens; SusanMa

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na Brooks Lavallee, Curator of Japanese Art, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens; and Professor Bruce A. Coats, Scripps College. O n V iew 2010/Ja

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FOCUS { L O R N A

LORNA BIEBER HAS BEEN

B I E B E R }

Exhibition

Images: Found and Lost On view January 29th - May 29th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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exploring alternative photographic processes and techniques since the ’80s. And although the photographic compositions she creates do not exist in our world, they form images that reside in the depths of our collective consciousness. Her mural-sized photographs begin with a variety of generic found images, ranging from birds and sled dogs to pastoral landscapes and office and residential interiors. The images are then reinterpreted through a multi-layered method of production, which includes collage, paint, copier and computer technology, as well as traditional and non-traditional photographic techniques.“By altering the ‘root’ picture in these ways,” says Lorna, “I can create new ‘branches’ whose narratives are utterly different from the original, bringing the observer to see the world in dramatically unexpected ways.” The resulting images are hauntingly beautiful and moving—often revealing unnoticed and unappreciated images that were previously imbedded with2011


F O C U S

in their generic sources. as Helen Levitt and Danny Lyon. Born in 1949, Lorna grew up Chuck was very supportive of in Cleveland, Ohio and received Lorna’s process and has been proher BFA from Ohio’s Kent State ducing her projects ever since. University. Lorna’s interest in In 2005, while working in resphotography began while work- idence at the acclaimed Macing as Assistant Art Director at Dowell Colony in Peterborough, Newsweek, where she had access NH, Lorna began a process of edto a color copier and an endless iting her images on large blank supply of discardwalls—the inceped images from the tion of her multimagazine’s photo part montage installab. Lorna took the lations, which imimages, made copmerse viewers in ies, experimented a series of intriguwith them and creing narratives and ated collages—she vignettes. loved the ability to Through her imtake preexisting imagery, Lorna hopes Lorna Bieber’s ages and make them to awaken a sense images are her own. of the ineffable and HAUNTINGLY In the early 80s, open our minds to BEAUTIFUL Lorna had an oppornew discoveries. and MOVING. tunity to show her Her work is includportfolio to Maria Morris Ham- ed in collections at The Metropolbourg, then Head of the Depart- itan Museum ofArt; Bibliothèque ment of Photographs at the Met- nationale de France and Norropolitan Museum of Art in NY. ton Museum of Art, West Palm Maria saw great potential in Lor- Beach, FL. Lorna has exhibited na’s work and introduced her to at the Fogg Art Museum, CamMaster Printer Chuck Kelton of bridge, MA; Museum of Fine Kelton Labs, who worked with Arts, Houston; Brooklyn Musesuch renowned photographers um of Art; and PS 1, NY. On View

opposite page: Birds & Flowers (detail), 2008, Gelatin Silver Prints, 108 x 228”, (120 individual 11 x 17” prints) above (top to bottom): 1. three birds/front view, 2000-01, gelatin Silver print, 50 x 65” 2. Tree/Tree Trunks, 2005-6, Gelatin Silver Print, 68 x 42” left: Lorna Bieber images courtesy of Lorna Bieber, Box Gallery, Santa Fe, NM and C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, MD


RETROSPECTIVE { R A FA E L

S O R I A N O }

Exhibition

Rafael Soriano: Other Worlds Within, a 60 Year Retrospective On view January 29th-March 27th at Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables www.lowemuseum.org

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C U B A N - B O R N PA I N T E R

Rafael Soriano is one of the major Latin American artists of his generation. Along with other third-generation modernists Agustín Cárdenas, Rolando López Dirube, Agustín Fernández and Antonia Eiriz, Rafael broke with regional and folkloric themes that once dominated Cuban art in the mid-1920s. He first mastered geometric abstraction as a style in the 1950s, but by the late 1960s had defined his signature approach to painting. Through his work, Soriano explores the unconscious. By employing a purely abstract form of light, form, space and shadow, he seeks to embody the fluid metamorphosing energy of the imagination. “I do not pretend to transmit a message of reality: I am moved by the longing to travel through my paintings in a dimension of spirit where the intimate and the cosmic converge. My paintings have been called ‘Oneiric Luminism’, from there is where the atmosphere

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R E T R O S P E C T I V E

of mystery and daydreams are wife Milagros and his daughsuggested,” says the artist. ter Hortensia. He worked as Born in 1920 in the town a graphic designer and occaof Cidra, in the province of sionally taught, first at the Matanzas, Rafael displayed Catholic Welfare Bureau, and an early inclination for later at the Cuban Cultural painting. After completing Program of the University seven years of study at Ha- of Miami. vana’s prestigious Escuela Soriano has exhibited wideNacional de Bellas ly throughout the Artes San AlejanUS and abroad. dro, he graduated His works are inin 1943 as Procluded in major fessor of Paintpublic collections ing, Drawing and such as: Museo Sculpture. SoriaNacional de Belno then returned las Artes, Havana; to Matanzas where Zimmerli Art Muhe taught visual seum/Rutgers Rafael SEEKS arts for nearly two University, New TO EMBODY decades. He was Brunswick; Denthe FLUID one of the foundver Art Museum; metamorphosing ers, and later DiArcher HuntingENERGY of rector, of the Eston Gallery/Unithe imagination. cuela de Bellas versity of Texas, Artes de Matanzas, the most Austin; Lowe Art Museum/ important art school in Cuba, University of Miami; Muoutside of Havana. His first seum of Art/Fort Lauderexhibiton was in the Lyce- dale; Museum of the Amerum Club in Havana, Cuba icas/OAS,Washington DC; in 1947. Galería Arte Moderno, SanIn 1962 Rafael went into ex- to Domingo; and Zea Museile, settling in Miami with his um of Art, Medellín. O n V iew

opposite page: Angustia del olvido (Anguish of Forgetfullness), 1996, oil on canvas, 36 x 40” above (top to bottom): 1. Soledad en la monta (Solitude on the Mountain), oil on canvas, 1994, 40 x 50” 2. Quimerica luz (Chimerical Light), 1992, oil on canvas, 50 x 60” 3. Cabeza Hechizada (Bewitched Head), 1994, oil on canvas, 54 x 50” left: the artist at work


PROFILE { D AW O U D

F O R T H E PA S T 1 5 Y E A R S ,

B E Y }

Exhibition

Class Pictures: Photographs by Dawoud Bey On view through January 2nd at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville www.harn.ufl.edu

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photographer Dawoud Bey has been making large-scale portraits of high school students across the US. At the start of each sitting, a student is asked to write a brief autobiographical statement. Together, these words and images offer unusually respectful and perceptive portraits from one of the best portraitists at work today. Dawoud inherited his first camera from his godfather when he was 15 years old. He started making photographs seriously in 1975, on the streets of Harlem. These images were shown in his debut one-person museum show, Harlem, USA, at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. “From the very beginning, I was interested in using the camera to describe the experience of ordinary people,” says Dawoud. “Since 1992, I’ve been focused on teenagers as the primary subjects of my work, wanting to capture something about this important moment of transin u a ry

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P R O F I L E

tion between childhood and in each school, taking formal adulthood.” portraits of individual stuClass Pictures: Photographs dents—each made in a classby Dawoud Bey includes 40 room or other school setting photographic portraits of during one 45 minute period. high school students. For The resulting portraits, 40 x the exhibition, Bey photo- 30” color prints, are arresting graphed young people from both compositionally and psyall parts of the chologically. economic, racial Born in New and ethnic specYork in 1953, Datrum in both public woud earned his and private high MFA from Yale schools in Detroit; University School Andover and Lawof Art and is Prorence, Massachufessor of Photogsetts; New York raphy at ColumCity; Orlando; and bia College ChiDawoud Bey San Francisco. cago. He has been CAPTURES the The statements featured in numerimportant displayed alongous exhibitions— TRANSITION side the portraits including a midbetween childhood were written by the career survey at and adulthood. students and edited Walker Art Cenby Bey. These revealing words ter, Minneapolis, in 1995—and are an integral part of the proj- has received several awards, ect—many of the statements including grants from the Naare touching, funny or har- tional Endowment for the Arts rowing—deepening our ap- and a Guggenheim Fellowpreciation for young adults ship. He is represented by Rhofacing the challenges of the na Hoffman Gallery, Chicago 21st century. and Howard Yezerski Gallery, Dawoud spent 3 to 4 weeks Boston. O n V iew

opposite page: Usha, 2006* above (top to bottom): 1. Kevin, 2005* 2. Lauren, 2006* *From the book Class Pictures (Aperture, 2007), image courtesy Aperture Foundation left: dawoud bey, courtesy of the artist, photo: bart harriss


SPOTLIGHT { S T E P H E N

K N A P P }

Exhibition

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings On view through December 26th at the Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

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S T E P H E N K N A P P ’ S Light-

paintings expand the concept of light sculpture and light art and continue the traditions of kinetic art, op art and abstract painting. His sculptural canvases appear to be painted, but are, in fact, created with light and glass. Lightpaintings are the intersection of painting, sculpture and technology—exploring color, light and space—a harbinger of the future of painting. For more than 30 years, light has played a major part in Stephen’s work. He began his artistic career as a fine art photographer. His curiosity about the reflective and refractive qualities of light led to his working with ceramic glazes and mosaic tiles, and finally with works constructed of kiln-formed glass. “Glass allows me to manipulate and explore light and illusion, creating pure colors. I revel in their purity, their breathtaking richness—yet I am most drawn to the edges and the soft shadows that overlay a whisper of color and the borders that den u a ry

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S P O T L I G H T

fine space. It is here that mys- glass to the light source—oftery and depth and wonder can ten just one halogen light. Hues be found,” says Stephen. are also determined by the orLightpaintings embody an der of metallic layers. Plates inherently unique form of art of glass are laminated in pairs that transforms the gallery en- with the coating sandwiched in vironment and envelops the the middle for protection. Colviewer in pure, glowing colors. or changes are determined by Through his Lightthe angle of glass paintings, Stephen to light, spatial restrives to free the lationships and mind and open our angles of shapes eyes to new possito each other and bilities. With each to the edges of the piece he creates panel. The shadows destinations, placcast by the mountes for introspection ing brackets and and meditation. screws, and lines Lightpaintings Stephen spent cast by the edges of ENVELOP the a decade developthe glass, all conVIEWER IN ing ideas and techtribute to the final PURE, glowing niques for creating result­—a magical COLORS. his Lightpaintings. and masterful symHe works closely with crafts- phony of illuminated shapes men, fabricators and manufac- and colors. turers from around the world. Stephen works and lives with Safety glass is used in all of the his family in Worcester, MA. “paintings”. Each piece has up His work has been featured in to 24 microscopically thin lay- numerous solo and group exhiers of lightfast metallic coating. bitions and is included in muThe color that is reflected or pro- seum, public, corporate and jected on the white wall or pan- private collections throughel is affected by the angle of the out the US and abroad. On View

opposite page: New York Suite; 2003; 13’ x 7’ x 10”; Light, glass and stainless steel; © Stephen Knapp above (top to bottom): 1. Cityscape; 2003; 13’ x 10’ x 10”; on panel 3’ x 2’; Light, glass and stainless steel; © Stephen Knapp 2. Self Portrait-Spring; 2007; 10’ x 8’ x 10”; on panel 3’ x 2’; Light, glass and stainless steel; © Stephen Knapp left: stephen knapp, courtesy of the artist


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San Francisco Th e mu seu ms . . .

SAN FRANCISCO IS A UNIQUE AND BREATHTAKING

metropolis renowned for its chilly summer fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of Victorian and modern architecture, and its famous landmarks, which include the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, Fisherman’s Wharf, Chinatown and Alcatraz Island. Regularly voted best city in the USA in national polls, San Francisco is a visual feast that offers something for every eye. Works of art are on display in a myriad of museums where one can find inspiration and sample the city’s great ethnic and cultural diversity. Join us as On View heads west for a tour of the Golden Gate City’s art museums, including the Asian Art Museum, Cartoon Art Museum, Contemporary Jewish Museum, de Young Museum, Legion of Honor, Museum of Craft and Folk Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. O n V iew

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Asian Art Museum

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. KOREAN GALLERY 2. INDIA GALLERY 3. CONTEMPLATIVE ALCOVE

THE ASIAN ART MUSEUM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAZ TSURUTA

of San Francisco is one of the largest museums in the Western world devoted exclusively to Asian art. But it is more than just an art museum— it’s your ticket to Asia. Here, you can travel through 6,000 years of history, trek across seven major regions, and sample the cultures of numerous countries. The Museum’s collection includes approximately 17,000 objects ranging from

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ASIAN ART MUSEUM

tiny jades to monumental sculptures, paintings, porcelains and ceramics, lacquers, textiles, furniture, arms and armor, puppets and basketry. About half of the objects in the collection were donated by Chicago industrialist Avery Brundage in the 1960s. His contribution includes some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects—including a gilt bronze Buddha dated 338—the oldest known dated Chinese Buddha in the world and often cited as a textbook example of Chinese Buddhist art. O n V iew

ASIAN ART MUSEUM www.asianart.org 200 Larkin St. San Francisco 415.581.3500

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Cartoon Art Museum

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LOCATED DOWNTOWN IN

San Francisco’s Yerba Buena cultural district, the Cartoon Art Museum is home to over 6,000 pieces of original, cartoon and animation art, a comprehensive research library and five galleries of exhibition space. This is the only museum in the western US dedicated to the preservation and exhibition of cartoon art in all its forms. From editorial cartoons to comic books, graphic novels to anime, Sunday funnies to Satur-

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CARTOON ART MUSEUM http://cartoonart.org 655 Mission St San Francisco 415.CAR.TOON 415.227.8666

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day morning cartoons—CAM has something for everyone. While its key function is to preserve, document, and exhibit this unique and accessible art form, the Museum has taken cartoon art and used it to communicate cultural diversity in the community, as well as the importance of self-expression. Whether it’s nostalgic, educational, or just plain fun, a trip to the Cartoon Art Museum will be an experience you will never forget. O n V iew g a z i n e

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. cartoon art museum’s permanent collection gallery 2. Chuck Jones, Bugs Bunny 3. Will Eisner, The Spirit images courtesy of cartoon art museum

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Contemporary Jewish Museum

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SINCE ITS FOUNDING

in 1984, the Contemporary Jewish Museum has engaged audiences of all ages and backgrounds through dynamic exhibitions and programs that explore contemporary perspectives on Jewish culture, history, art and ideas. The Museum has distinguished itself as a welcoming place where visitors can connect with one another through dialogue and shared experiences with the arts. The Museum’s structure,

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which features over 10,000 square feet of exhibition space, combines the history of an early 20th century San Francisco landmark building, the Pacific Gas & Electric Power Substation, with the dynamism of contemporary architecture. Ever changing, the Museum is a non-collecting institution that partners with national and international cultural institutions to present exhibitions that are both timely and relevant and represent the highest level of artistic achievement. O n V iew

CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM www.thecjm.org 736 Mission St. San Francisco 415.655.7800

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. CURIOUS GEORGE SAVES THE DAY: THE ART OF MARGRET AND H. A. REY PARIS, H. A. REY, FINAL ILLUSTRATION FOR HOW DO YOU GET THERE? (1941), PARIS, EARLY 1940, WATERCOLOR ON BOARD, H. A. & MARGRET REY PAPERS, DE GRUMMOND CHILDREN’S LITERATURE COLLECTION, McCAIN LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES, THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, © 2010 BY HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT PUBLISHING COMPANY 2. CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM, KORET-TAUBE GRAND LOBBY, PHOTO: MARK DARLE 3. RECLAIMED: PAINTINGS FROM THE COLLECTION OF JACQUES GOUDSTIKKER, MASTER OF THE MANSI MAGDALENE (CA. 1510–30), ST. MARY MAGDALENE, OIL ON PANEL, MAREI VON SAHER, THE HEIR OF JACQUES GOUDSTIKKER IMAGES COURTESY OF CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM

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de Young Museum

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FOUNDED IN 1895 IN

San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, the de Young Museum has been an integral part of the cultural fabric of the city and a cherished destination for millions of residents and visitors to the region for over 100 years. The Museum showcases priceless collections of American art from the 17th through the 21st centuries, international textile arts and costumes, and art from the Americas, the Pacific and Africa.

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DE YOUNG MUSEUM http://deyoung.famsf.org 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Dr. San Francisco 415.750.3600

The state-of-the-art facility, designed by the renowned Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron, is constructed of warm, natural materials, including copper, stone, wood and glass, and blends with and complements its natural surroundings—integrating art, architecture and the natural landscape in one multi-faceted destination. Visitors can also enjoy a sculpture garden, children’s garden and observation floor, offering panoramic views of the entire Bay Area.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. DE YOUNG MUSEUM, © FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO 2. GEORGE CALEB BINGHAM (AMERICAN, 1811-1879), BOATMEN ON THE MISSOURI, DETAIL, 1846, OIL ON CANVAS, 25-1/8 x 30-1/4”, FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER 3rd 3. BARBARA HEPWORTH, 1902–1975, PIERCED MONOLITH WITH COLOUR, 1965, © FINE ARTS MUSEUMS OF SAN FRANCISCO IMAGES COURTESY OF DE YOUNG MUSEUM

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Legion of Honor

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LEGION OF HONOR, located

in Lincoln Park, is San Francisco’s most beautiful museum. Built to commemorate Californian soldiers who died in World War I, the Museum’s stunning neoclassical building displays an impressive collection of 4,000 years of ancient and European art in a breathtaking setting overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Golden Gate Bridge and all of San Francisco—its collections include Rodin’s Thinker, which sits in the museum’s Court of

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Honor, European decorative arts and paintings, Ancient art, and one of the largest collections of prints and drawings in the country. Visitors can also enjoy the Legion’s magnificent Skinner pipe organ, built in 1924 by the Ernest M. Skinner Organ Company in Boston. Public organ concerts are presented at the Legion on Saturdays and Sundays at 4 pm, with a repertoire ranging from Bach to Gershwin to musical thunderstorms, Sousa marches, Gilbert and Sullivan, and the great film music of Hollywood. O n V iew

LEGION OF HONOR http://legionofhonor.famsf.org Lincoln Park | 100 34th Ave. San Francisco 415.750.3600

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. SKINNER PIPE ORGAN, LEGION OF HONOR, SAN FRANCISCO, 2009, PHOTO: STEVE WHITTAKER, ©FAMSF 2. LEGION OF HONOR, SAN FRANCISCO, 2009, PHOTO: STEVE WHITTAKER, ©FAMSF 3. AUGUSTE RODIN (FRENCH, 1840-1917), THE THINKER, CA. 1880, BRONZE, 72 x 38 x 54”, GIFT OF ALMA DE BRETTEVILLE SPRECKELS IMAGES COURTESY OF LEGION OF HONOR

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Museum of Craft and Folk Art

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MUSEUM OF CRAFT AND FOLK ART 2. INSTALLATION VIEW: CLARE ROJAS: WE THEY, WE THEY; PHOTO: JAY JONES 3. FAVIANNA RODRIGUEZ, VOLVER: MEXICAN FOLK ART INTO PLAY

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED

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in the Yerba Buena Museum District in downtown San Francisco, the Museum of Craft and Folk Art provides innovative exhibitions and educational programs to enrich and inspire, honor cultural traditions past and present, and celebrate the creative spirit. As the only folk art museum in Northern California, the museum is known for a rich offering of focused and

unique exhibitions of traditional and contemporary folk art and craft from around the world—demonstrating how folk art, contemporary craft, and fine art are all part of the same continuum. O n V iew

IMAGES COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF CRAFT AND FOLK ART

MUSEUM OF CRAFT AND FOLK ART www.mocfa.org 51 Yerba Buena Lane San Francisco 415.227.4888

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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

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FOUNDED IN 1935, SFMOMA

was the first museum on the West Coast devoted to modern and contemporary art. From the outset, the museum has championed the most innovative and challenging art of its time, and continues to exhibit and collect work by both modern masters and less-established artists. A dynamic schedule of events include special exhibitions and changing presentations from the Museum’s collection of more than 26,000

artworks, photographs, and design objects. Located just a short walk from downtown San Francisco, SFMOMA’s landmark building features a soaring atrium topped by its signature turret and oculus skylight. The MuseumStore offers a fine selection of modern and contemporary art books, design objects, furniture, jewelry, and children’s products. The Museum’s cafe serves gourmet fare in a lightfilled space with indoor and outdoor seating. O n V iew

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART www.sfmoma.org

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151 Third St. San Francisco 415.357.4000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JACKSON POLLOCK, GUARDIANS OF THE SECRET, 1943, 48-3/8 x 75-3/8”, OIL ON CANVAS, COLLECTION SFMOMA, ALBERT M. BENDER COLLECTION, ALBERT M. BENDER BEQUEST FUND PURCHASE, © POLLOCK-KRASNER FOUNDATION / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY 2. SFMOMA, EXTERIOR VIEW: MAIN FACADE, © SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, PHOTO: HENRIK KAM 3. Henri Matisse, Femme au chapeau (Woman with the Hat), 1905, Collection SFMOMA, bequest of Elise S. Haas, © Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY IMAGES COURTESY OF SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

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Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

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FROM THE GROUND UP,

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts was designed to embrace and celebrate a diversity of arts, cultures, and audiences. YBCA explores contemporary artistic expressions from an amazing range of sources and influences. Created on the model of the European Kunsthalles, with no permanent art collection, YBCA bridges the seemingly contradictory worlds of pop culture, contemporary art, and community

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YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS www.ybca.org 701 Mission St. San Francisco 415.978.2700

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aesthetics. Exhibitions, performance, film/video, and community engagement programs are organized thematically in an effort to connect art and community life, and a host of community engagement programs connect audiences with art, artists and ideas. YBCA’s two landmark buildings include Galleries, a flexible “Forum” space and film/video screening room designed by Fumihiko Maki, in association with RMW Architecture and Interiors, and the Novellus Theater designed by James Stewart Polshek. O n V iew g a z i n e

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Yerba Buena Center for the Arts: Galleries & Forum building, photo: Richard Barnes 2. Audience as Subject, Part 1: Medium, Adrian Paci, Turn On (detail), 2004, video, courtesy Adrian Paci 3. YBCA lobby, When Lives Become Form exhibition (detail), artist: Beatriz Milhazes, photo: James Im IMAGES COURTESY OF YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

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San Francisco The galleries. . .

A SEASIDE METROPOLIS, JUST SEVEN BY SEVEN

miles square, San Francisco brims with cosmopolitan appeal and exciting neighborhood niches. The city is all about neighborhoods—each has a distinct look and vibe. You could easily spend a day in each or hop on a streetcar to sample a few. It’s wonderfully easy to tap into the city’s exciting gallery arts scene. From sophisticated galleries in San Francisco’s downtown art district that feature master works, to South Market galleries that double as bars and clubs, to Mission art galleries specializing in art and activism, San Francisco is the city for art on the West Coast. On the following pages, On View brings you a sampling of the diverse array of intimate gallery venues, showcasing local and international talent, throughout this gem of a city by the bay. O n V iew

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San Francisco Art Galleries

ARTIST-XCHANGE

CHANDLER FINE ART

www.artist-xchange.com

www.chandlersf.com

3169 16th St.

170 Minna St.

415.864.1490

415.546.1113

2461 Buchanan St.

ARTZONE 461 GALLERY

CHRISTOPHER CLARK

415.776.3206

www.artzone461.com

FINE ART

461 Valencia St.

www.clarkfineart.com

415.441.8680

377 Geary St.

ADDISON FINE ARTS www.addisonfinearts.com

ALTMAN SIEGEL GALLERY

415.397.7781

www.altmansiegel.com

49 Geary St.

BRAUNSTEIN/

415.576.9300

QUAY GALLERY

CITY ART

www.bquayartgallery.com

www.cityartgallery.org

ANDREA SCHWARTZ GALLERY

430 Clementina St.

828 Valencia St.

www.asgallery.com

415.278.9850

415.970.9900

BRIAN GROSS

COHEN ABEE

FINE ART

GALLERY

ANTHONY MEIER

www.briangrossfineart.com

www.cohenresegallery.com

FINE ARTS

49 Geary St.

320 Geary St.

www.anthonymeierfinearts.com

415.788.1050

415.781.4278

CALDWELL SNYDER

CROWN POINT PRESS

GALLERY

GALLERY

ARTHAUS

www.caldwellsnyder.com

www.crownpoint.com

www.arthaus-sf.com

341 Sutter St.

20 Hawthorne St.

411 Brannan St.

415.392.2299

415.974.6273

CATHARINE CLARK

DOLBY CHADWICK

THE ARTISTS ALLEY

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.theartistsalley.com

www.cclarkgallery.com

www.dolbychadwickgallery.com

863 Mission St.

150 Minna St.

210 Post St.

415.522.2440

415.399.1439

415.956.3560

525 2nd St. 415.495.2090

1969 California St. 415.351.1400

415.977.0223

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DON SOKER

GEORGE KREVSKY

965 Mission St.

CONTEMPORARY ART

GALLERY

415.281.3770

www.donsokergallery.com

www.georgekrevskygallery.com

100 Montgomery St.

77 Geary St.

JENKINS JOHNSON GALLERY

415.291.0966

415.397.9748

www.jenkinsjohnsongallery.com

464 Sutter St. 415.677.0770

ELINS EAGLES-SMITH

HAINES GALLERY

GALLERY

www.hainesgallery.com

www.eesgallery.com

49 Geary St.

JOHN BERGGRUEN GALLERY

49 Geary St.

415.397.8114

www.berggruen.com

415.981.1080

228 Grant Ave. 415.781.4629

HANG ART FRAENKEL GALLERY

www.hangart.com

www.fraenkelgallery.com

567 Sutter St.

JOHN PENCE GALLERY

49 Geary St.

415.434.4264

www.johnpence.com

415.981.2661

750 Post St. 415.441.1138

HESPE GALLERY FREY NORRIS

www.hespe.com

GALLERY

251 Post St.

MARK WOLFE

www.freynorris.com

415.776.5918

CONTEMPORARY ART

456 Geary St.

www.wolfecontemporary.com

415.346.7812

HOSFELT GALLERY

1 Sutter St.

www.hosfeltgallery.com

415.369.9404

GALLERY 16

430 Clementina St.

www.gallery16.com

415.495.5454

MARX & ZAVATTERO

501 Third St.

www.marxzav.com

415.626.7495

JACK FISCHER GALLERY

77 Geary St.

www.jackfischergallery.com

415.627.9111

GALLERY PAULE

49 Geary St.

ANGLIM

415.956.1178

MEYEROVICH GALLERY

www.gallerypauleanglim.com

www.meyerovich.com

14 Geary St.

JANCAR JONES GALLERY

251 Post St.

415.433.2710

www.jancarjones.com

415.421.7171

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MICAELA GALLERY

77 Geary St.

SERGE SOROKKO

www.micaela.com

415.788.5126

GALLERY

49 Geary St.

www.sorokko.com

415.551.8118

PAUL THIEBAUD GALLERY

55 Geary St.

www.paulthiebaudgallery.com

415.421.7770

MODERNBOOK GALLERY

645 Chestnut St.

www.modernbook.com

415.434.3055

STEPHEN WIRTZ GALLERY

49 Geary St.

www.wirtzgallery.com

415.732.0300

RENA BRANSTEN GALLERY

49 Geary St.

www.renabranstengallery.com

415.433.6879

MODERNISM

77 Geary St.

www.modernisminc.com

415.982.3292

TOGONON GALLERY

685 Market St.

www.togonongallery.com

415.541.0461

ROBERT KOCH GALLERY

77 Geary St.

www.kochgallery.com

415.398.5572

MONTGOMERY GALLERY

49 Geary St.

www.montgomerygallery.com

415. 421.0122

TOOMEY-TOURELL

406 Jackson St.

GALLERY

415.788.8300

SCOTT NICHOLS GALLERY

www.toomey-tourell.com

www.scottnicholsgallery.com

49 Geary St.

RATIO 3

49 Geary St.

415.989.6444

www.ratio3.org

415.788.4641

1447 Stevenson St.

VELVET DA VINCI

415.821.3371

SCOTT RICHARDS

www.velvetdavinci.com

CONTEMPORARY ART

2015 Polk St.

THE NORTH POINT GALLERY

www.srcart.com

415.441.0109

www.northpointgallery.com

251 Post St.

407 Jackson St.

415.788.5588

WHITE WALLS

415.781.7550

www.whitewallssf.com SHOOTING GALLERY

835 Larkin St.

PATRICIA SWEETOW

www.shootinggallerysf.com

415.931.1500

GALLERY

839 Larkin St.

www.patriciasweetowgallery.com

415.931.8035

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On View 12-01.2011  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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