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ANNIVERSARY OF

American

STUDIO GLASS...

DECEMBER 2011/JANUARY 2012

PLUS

Barbara Sorensen:

TOPOGRAPHIES AT T H E

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

F E AT U R I N G

Evolution/

REVOLUTION AT T H E

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART AND

STUDIO

Glass

AT T H E

NORTON MUSEUM OF ART, W E S T PA L M B E A C H

AND

Martin Schoeller: CLOSE UP

AT T H E B O C A R AT O N

MUSEUM OF ART


CONTENTS December

2 0 1 1 /Ja n u a r y

2012

V o l . 2 , N o .5

ON THE COVER : DAVID BENNETT, HANDSTAND WITH BENT LEG, 2011, BLOWN GLASS AND BRONZE, 56 x 24 x 24” RIGHT: DEBORA MOORE, SUNSET EPIDENDRUM GIGANTICA, 2011, HOT SCULPTED GLASS, 18 x 16 x 10” IMAGES COURTESY OF HABATAT GALLERIES, MI

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on iew FLORIDA

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DECEMBER 2011/JANUARY 2012

ANNIVERSARY OF

American

PLUS

Barbara Sorensen:

TOPOGRAPHIES

AT T H E

STUDIO GLASS...

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

F E AT U R I N G

Evolution/

REVOLUTION AT T H E

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART AND

STUDIO

Glass

AT T H E

AND

Martin Schoeller: CLOSE UP

NORTON MUSEUM OF ART,

AT T H E B O C A R AT O N

MUSEUM OF ART

W E S T PA L M B E A C H

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50 th ANNIVERSARY OF AMERICAN STUDIO GLASS

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In celebration of the golden anniversary of American studio glass, the Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art and Norton Museum of Art are each showcasing exquisite works from leading American glass artists of the past half century, in two sparkling new exhibitions.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

56 Boca Raton

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78 West Palm Beach 88 Coral Gables

SCHOELLER:

TOPOGRAPHIES

CULTURE

MARTIN

BARBARA SORENSEN:

CLOSE UP

The world’s most famous visages merge with the unknown in a succession of strippeddown, hyper-close portraits that tempt the viewer to look again and again in this captivating exhibit, hosted by the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

Barbara Sorensen’s sculptural forms take viewers on a topographical expedition at the Orlando Museum of Art. PLUS: An interview with the artist on pg. 76.

COCKTAIL

WOMEN, WINDOWS

Elan and chemistry fizz together in this intoxicating look at the cultural phenomenon of the “cocktail hour,” presented by the Norton Museum of Art.

DIVERGING

AND THE WORD:

PERSPECTIVES ON ISLAMIC ART

This intriguing exhibition, on display at the Lowe Art Museum, provides an opportunity for viewers to gain vistas into the complex and dynamic field of Islamic art.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

On View Destination: Coral Gables RIGHT: WILL RYMAN, ICON (WITH PETALS), 2011, RENDERING OF INSTALLATION AT FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, ©WR STUDIO INC./ PHOTO BY KIRKLAND HYMAN, COURTESY FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN

MARTIN SCHOELLER, FRANKIE

FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN

VELILLA, 2001; BARBARA SORENSEN, SHIELD DE PYRENEES W4-07, 2007; BARBARA MULLEN, BLOWING KISS,

108 Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden un-

veils new, large-­scale works by artist, Will Ryman, as part of its highly anticipated, annual visual art program—a celebration of art and culture. OnV

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NY, CIRCA 1958, REINTERPRETED 1994, COURTESY OF LILLIAN BASSMAN; APHRODITE DÉSIRÉE NAVAB, I AM NOT A PERSIAN PAINTING, 2000-2001, GIFT OF DR. AND MRS. HAROLD STEINBAUM, ©2001 APHRODITE DÉSIRÉE NAVAB

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CONTENTS December

2 0 1 1 /Ja n u a r y

2012

Vo l u m e

2,

No.5

5

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

Festive events for art lovers to enjoy this holiday season

Drawing on history, humor and philosophy, Erwin creates lighthearted works which, at times, convey serious messages.

GUERRA DE LA PAZ

The collaborative efforts of Guerra de la Paz focus primarily on the use of garments as visual metaphors in their thought-provoking works.

Museum exhibitions

40

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists

Craft

106

Retrospective

TOMMY SIMPSON

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THEO WUJCIK

PICTURED: Theo Wujcik, Elton John/Little Boy Blue, 2008, acrylic on canvas, 115 x 90”, photo: Joe Traina

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Theo is masterful at combining fragmented images of contemporary popular culture to create powerful works that convey a range of themes, iconography and experiences.

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Tommy is best known for his mixed-media sculptures made from carved, laminated or wheel-turned wood, combined with found objects and vivid hand-brushed colors.


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Cheers!

M A G A Z I N E

A s the holidays approach , I want to wish you all a very happy holiday season. A selection of fun seasonal festivities can be found in Muse, on pg. 6. Each year, in early December, the art world converges around Miami for several prestigious art fairs such as Art Basel Miami Beach (www.artbasel.com), Design Miami (www.designmiami.com), Art Now Fair (www.artnowfair.com), Pool Art Fair (www. poolartfair.com) and PULSE Miami (www.pulse-art. com), to name a few. And once again, Miami’s leading private collections—among them, the Rubell Family Collection, CIFO, the De la Cruz Collection Contemporary Art Space, World Class Boxing, the Margulies Collection, and the Dacra Collection—open their homes and warehouses to the public. In Addition, the museums of South Florida are staging important exhibitions to coincide with Art Basel, including Enrique Martinez Celaya and American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s at the Miami Art Museum; Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach; Jenny Saville at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach; Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity: French Design for Living at The Wolfsonian-FIU, Miami Beach; and Mark Handforth: Rolling Stop at MOCA North Miami— details on each can be found in our Calendar section. It’s an exciting time and I hope you’ll have an opportunity to experience one or more of these world-class events. Cheers!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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MUSE

Celebrate

I

IF YOU LOVE ART

and are looking to add some magic to the holidays, here are a few events you might like to consider... DUNEDIN: Through December 23rd, the Dunedin Fine Art

Center presents The Greatest (Holiday) Show on Earth!, an invitational exhibition featuring a collection of works from around the country that any of your friends or relatives would be delighted to find under their tree. Call for details: 727.298.DFAC LAKELAND: The Polk Museum of Art celebrates Kwanzaa

on December 26th. Learn about the principles that Kwanzaa is founded upon and do a little dancing with the Kuumba Dancers and Drummers of Tampa Bay. Call for details: 863.688.5423 OCALA: Through December 31st, the Appleton Museum of

Art presents A Dicken’s Christmas: The Urban Family Holiday Collection, an exhibition of miniature Charles Dickens-era


MUSE villages, toy trains, Christmas trees, holiday decorations and ornaments. Call for details: 352.291.4455

PALM BEACH: On December 4th, the Flagler Museum

holds its Annual Tree Lighting ceremony featuring the 16-foot Grand Hall Christmas tree adorned with lights and traditional ornaments in the Gilded Age style. Seasonal refreshments, brief organ and piano performances and holiday caroling add to the festivities. Call for details: 561.655.2833 VERO BEACH: Join the Vero Beach Museum of

Art, on December 4th, for a free traditional holiday party for the children and families of the Treasure Coast. Call for details: 772.231.0707 WEST PALM BEACH: Stroll through the enchanted

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, December 3rd-4th and 7th-11th, during the 5th annual Festival of Trees, with over 25 trees decorated around “The Magic of the Movies” theme. Call for details: 561.832.5328 WEST PALM BEACH: The Norton Museum of Art’s

Holiday Family Festival takes place on December 4th and embraces holiday traditions of different cultures. Treasure hunts, face painting, storytelling, live music and dance, holiday inspired art activities and decorated trees await! Call for details: 561.832.5196 WINTER PARK: On December 10th, the Albin Polasek Muse-

um and Sculpture Gardens provides prime viewing for the Winter Park Boat Parade and Festival of Lights. Food, drink and live music will kick off the festivities. For details call: 407.647.6294 WINTER PARK: On December 24th, the Morse Museum

invites the public to enjoy the museum’s galleries, at no charge—

PICTURED: image courtesy of Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

a peaceful respite from the busy holiday season. Call for details: 407.645.5311 O n V iew OnV

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{S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S*

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

1 2 . 2 0 1 1-0 1.2 0 1 2 BOCA RATON

ples of American art from the 19th to the late 20th centuries, featuring a virtual who’s who of American masters. 01.18-03.18.12

12.13.11-03.18.12

American Treasures: Masterworks from the Butler Institute of American Art Boca Raton Museum of Art

Martin Schoeller: Close Up Boca Raton Museum of Art

This exhibition presents 48 arresting, large-format images that challenge the viewer to question topics such as selfrepresentation, celebrity and photographic honesty as well as the impressive explanatory power of portrait photography. (See story on pg. 56.)

www.bocamuseum.org 01.18-03.18.12

Natura Morta: Photographs by Patrizia Zelano Boca Raton Museum of Art

www.bocamuseum.org

American Treasures includes a selection of significant exam-

www.bocamuseum.org

Natura Morta (Still Life) features 18 color photographs by one of Italy’s most interesting and controversial photographers. Included are works from three portfolios: Attesa silente (Quiet Wait), Cenci (Rags) and In Carne ed Ossa (In Flesh and Blood). Thru 01.08.12

Outsider Visions: Self-taught

1. Frank Weston Benson, Red and Gold, 1915, oil on canvas, 31 x 39”, courtesy of The Butler Institute of American Art 2. Martin Schoeller, Jackson, 2005, C-Print, ©Martin Schoeller, courtesy of the artist, Ace Gallery and August Agency 3. Patrizia Zelano, In Carne ed Ossa [In Flesh and Blood]#6 Caravaggio, 2008, archival digital print on dibond and plexiglass, 23.6 x 35.4”, courtesy of the artist

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Boca Raton continued...

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

www.bocamuseum.org

Southern Artists of the 20th Century Boca Raton Museum of Art

From the pensive gaze of Georgia O’Keeffe in profile, to the powerful punch of Mohammed Ali’s fist, this exhibition presents more than 50 images in all media, exploring the intimate, as well as very public,

www.bocamuseum.org

A veritable feast of more than 75 captivating works by selftaught artists, this exhibition presents rare and fascinating pieces from the collection of Ted and Ann Oliver. Thru 05.13.12

Portraits from the Permanent Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art

faces of artists, celebrities, politicians and everyday people.

www.fairchildgarden.org

According to Federico Uribe Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Colombian conceptual artist, Federico Uribe, is known for his fascinating transformation of everyday objects into art. Included in this exhibition are works from Uribe’s 2008 Animal Farm and the debut of his new creations. (See story in the August/ September 2011 issue on pg. 64.) CORAL GABLES

12.13.11-01.08.12

Selections from The World

12.01.11-05.31.12

Will Ryman

Sculptor, Will Ryman, has designed a series of largerthan-life fiberglass and stainless steel flowers and insects for the Fairchild’s 2011-2012 art season. Viewers,

young and young at heart, will enjoy Ryman’s organic and playful sculptures set amidst the Fairchild’s lush tropical gardens. (See On View Destination on pg. 108.)

1. Mose Tolliver, Siamese Twins, 1980s, house paint on plywood, 24 x 21”, courtesy of Ann and Ted Oliver 2. Andy Warhol, Muhammad Ali, 1979, silkscreen on Strathmore Bristol paper, edition no. 3/150, 4 panels, 40 x 30” each, Permanent Collection, gift of Dr. Richard Golden 3. Federico Uribe, Bull, 2008, wood and shoe soles, 96 x 72 x 36”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 4. Rendering of Icon (with Petals) by Will Ryman, 2011, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, ©WR Studio Inc. / photo by Kirkland Hyman, courtesy Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

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Coral Gables continued...

and the Word: Diverging Perspectives on Islamic Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Thru 01.15.12

China: Insights Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

CORAL SPRINGS Thru 01.03.12

www.lowemuseum.org

www.lowemuseum.org

This exhibit brings together the work of 7 photographers from mainland China—each has undertaken the long-term documentation of one or more aspects of Chinese culture that reflects something vital about China now—whether emerging or vanishing.

The complex theme of Islamic art is examined in 3 intertwining themes: Muslim women as creators and subjects of art, Western views of the Islamic world, and decoration and the written word. (See story on pg. 88.)

Thru 09.23.12

Saintly Blessings from Mexico: The Joseph D. and Janet M. Shein Collection of Retablos Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Dagmar Hollmers:
 Connecting to Nature Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

A series of mixedmedia and collage, Connecting to Nature examines South Florida’s palettes and curious vegetation.

www.lowemuseum.org

Painted devotional images of saints, called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects of veneration and to seek favors, are on exhibit for the first time.

Thru 04.22.12

Women, Windows

1. Yu Haibo, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum 2. Aphrodite Désirée Navab, I Am Not a Persian Painting, 2000-2001, gelatin silver print, 18-5/8 x 14-7/8”, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbaum, ©2001 Aphrodite Désirée Navab 3. El Alma de Maria, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum 4. Dagmar Hollmers, Veiled Metaphors, 24 x 36”, acrylic, leaf, petals, gel on canvas

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Coral Springs continued...

Thru 02.11.12

ToulouseLautrec and His 19th Century Mentors Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Thru 01.03.12

Michael Mills: The Object in Question Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

The Object in Question presents recent photographs by the locally based artist and art critic, Michael Mills, who finds inspiration in industrial matter, found objects and things that have been used and discarded.

Mucha, Edgar Degas, Edouard Manet, James Whistler, PierreAuguste Renoir and other notable Impressionists.

‘neath the surface of the ground.

DAYTONA

Coral Springs Museum of Art presents a one-ofa-kind exhibition of 19th Century Impressionist art created by internationally known artists, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Mary Cassatt, Alphonse

BEACH Thru 12.11.11

Florida and its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

This exhibition highlights Harry Moulis’ love of Florida’s wetlands and waterways and the creatures of its dusk and dawn, including those that wing across its rosy sunrise and burrow

(See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 50.) 12.15.11-03.18.12

Greek and Russian Icons: From the MOAS Collections + Illuminated Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts: From the Collection of Ronald R. McCarty

1. Michael Mills, Marquee Moon, courtesy of the artist and Coral Springs Museum of Art 2. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Divan Japonais, 1893, lithograph, printed in color, 31-5/8 x 23-7/8” 3. Harry Moulis, MD, Morning ‘Do, 2011, Yellow-Crowned Night Heron, Ormond Beach, FL

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Daytona Beach continued...

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The iconic visions of Russian and Greek saints, and the historic stories of the saints themselves, are beau-

manuscripts with colored, gold and silver margins and pictorial ornamental letters is exquisitely presented in a rare collection of text leaves, Biblical miniatures and Books of Hours. Thru 04.01.12

Historic Portraits from the Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Oil paintings from the tifully and strikingly historic international represented in Greek scene by Eastman and Russian Icons, Johnson, Thomas depicting both miracu- Sully and the famed lous stories of the past English artist, George and the rich heritage Morland, are featured of both nations. in addition to bronze In Illuminated Mediand marble portrait eval and Renaissance busts, delicate porceManuscripts, the art lains, daguerreotypes of embellishing hand- and the perfection of scribed books and French and Ameri-

can framed miniature portraits. Thru 03.25.12

Reflections II: Watercolors of Florida 18352000, from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Arts & Sciences

pressionism, Post-Impressionism, Ashcan, Regionalism, Modernism and varieties of Abstraction. Ongoing

www.moas.org

A stunningly beautiful follow-up to Reflections I, which debuted at MOAS in 2009, Reflections II presents a broad, fullcolor survey of watercolors of Florida in a range of styles, including examples within Realism, Im-

The Arts of Africa from the MOAS Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

This collection of exquisite African tribal objects is considered one of the most exciting and exotic groupings within the Museum Collection as a whole. In their historic homeland, these items

1. Courtesy of Museum of Arts & Sciences 2. Laura Woodward, Royal Poinciana at Lake Worth, Florida, 1889 3. Courtesy of Museum of Arts & Sciences

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Daytona Beach continued...

originally played vital roles in daily events such as ceremonies for celebration, initiation from childhood into adulthood and preparation for war or harvesting.

9-11 by Kate Brooks Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

portraits of celebrities alongside iconic stills taken on the sets of acclaimed films. (See story in the October/ November 2011 issue on pg. 74.)

Thru 02.19.12

Douglas Kirkland Retrospective: Fifty Years of Photography Southeast Museum of Photography

Thru 12.16.11

In the Light of Darkness includes a collection of images that chronicle Brooks’ 10-year passage from the mountains of Tora Bora to the uprisings in the Arab world in early 2011. ((See The Power of the Image in the August/September 2011 issue on pg. 44.)

www.smponline.org

Renowned for his work in photojournalism, celebrity portraiture and film photography, Douglas Kirkland’s retrospective is a compelling look into a career spanning over 5 decades. With just under 200 images, this exhibition features

Thru 12.16.11

Portraits from Afghanistan by Khalid Hadi Southeast Museum of Photography In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey after

www.smponline.org

Portraits of wounded fighters, orphans and children, injured by

land mines and bombs, form a moving visual record of the toll taken on the population of Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation. (See The Power of the Image in the August/

September 2011 issue on pg. 46.) D e LAND Thru 01.15.12

4 Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

1. Douglas Kirkland, Elizabeth Taylor, 1961, ©Douglas Kirkland 2. Image (detail) ©Kate Brooks 3. Image ©Khalid Hadi

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DeLand continued...

4 showcases the remarkable talents of four Florida-based women artists. Featured are paintings in oil and acrylic by plein air artist, Pam Griesinger; works in oil and pastel by Rainey Dimmitt; digital photography and transfers by Anna Tomczak; and creations in acrylic and print by Trish Thompson.

This show of fine works by contemporary Florida Craftswomen, is presented in the Museum’s Lee Gallery, which has been transformed into an interactive installation of purchasable fine art crafts.

Wrap it Up Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

www.morikami.org

On display are more than 40 exquisite examples of Japanese snuff bottles, produced during the Meiji Period (1868–1912), for export abroad. DELRAY BEACH These small, intricately designed bottles exemplify the superb technical virtuosity and artistic sensibility of late 19th and early 20th century Japanese craftsmen.

Thru 01.22.12 Thru 01.15.12

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Small Wonders: Japanese Snuff Bottles from the Trammell and Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art

and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Featured in this exhibition are paintings, calligraphy and ceramics by Zen masters of the 17th to the 20th centuries. The works are examples of the genre of Japanese art called zenga, which originated in the 17th century as spiritual exercises, Thru 01.22.12 aids to meditation and Zenmi—A Taste visual sermons showof Zen: Paintings, ing the path to Zen Calligraphy and enlightenment. Ceramics from the Collection of Riva Lee Asbell Morikami Museum

DUNEDIN Thru 12.23.11

Believe It or Not?


1. Image courtesy of Florida Museum for Women Artists 2. Image courtesy of the Trammell and Margaret Crow Collections 3. Image courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

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Dunedin continued...

Dunedin Fine Art Center

Thru 12.23.11

The Greatest (Holiday) Show on Earth! 
 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.dfac.org

This international show features contemporary artists whose creations are quite simply—unbelievable! Included are works by Carrie Ann Baade, Cheryl

www.dfac.org

Each year, DFAC curators put together the best art, with a gift-giving perspective in mind, resulting in a collection of works from around the country that any of your friends or relatives would be delighted to find under their tree!

featuring another stunning array of works by the finest calligraphers, painters and sculptors working worldwide in miniature today.

Featuring tapestries and paintings by some of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, this highly-acclaimed exhibition includes paintings by Sandro Botticelli, Parmigianino, Alessandro Allori, Luca Giordano

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 04.08.12

Coon, Cynthia Holmes, Jennifer Lederhouse, Jennifer Maestre, Carol Prusa, Brian Ransom, Jason deCaires Taylor and collaborative artists, Comenius Roethlisberger and Admir Jahic.

Offering of the Angels: Old Master Paintings and Tapestries from the Uffizi Gallery Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

01.15-02.05.12

The Miniature Art Society of Florida 

 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

The 37th Annual International Miniature Art Society Exhibition returns

www.moafl.org

and Lorenzo Monaco, selected by Antonio Natali, director of Florence’s famous Uffizi Gallery. Thru 05.27.12

Primordial: Paintings and Sculpture by

1. Cynthia Holmes, Friends, oil on panel 2. Lynn Ponto-Peterson, The Nutmeg Lantern, watercolor, 3 x 3” 3. Alessandro Di Mariano Filipepi (called Sandro Botticelli), Madonna with Child (Madonna della loggia), ca. 1466-1467, oil on panel, collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Isabel De Obaldía, 1985–2011

Auturo Herrera, Gavin Perry, Jen Stark and Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

The Museum of Art Museum of Art / has just unveiled four Fort Lauderdale, new art installations Nova Southeastern commissioned to enlivUniversity www.moafl.org

Demons, gods, ghosts and beasts are the subjects of this midcareer retrospective of the work of Panamanian-based artist, Isabel De Obaldía, who explores the art of ancient cultures.

en all four sides of the Museum’s structure.

Gifts from the Freundlich Collection Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Among the selected highlights in this exhibit are numerous drawings from artists’ sketchbooks that relate to larger finished works such as paintings, sculpture, prints or mural projects. Artists represented include Milton Avery, George Bellows, Robert Gwathmey, Childe Hassam, Leon Kroll, Gaston Lachaise, Raphael Soyer and Marguerite Zorach.

GAINESVILLE

Thru 2013

Thru 06.03.12

Wall Paintings: Installations by

A Singular Vision: Recent

Thru 05.27.12

Sebastião Salgado: World Witness Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Considered one of the most highly recognized photojournalists in the world, Salgado focuses on people who are politically, economically and culturally excluded from the promise of global development. In this exhibition, Salgado documents famine in Africa and manual labor around the world. Thru 12.31.11

Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists Harn Museum of Art

1. Isabel De Obaldía, Blue Idol (Idolo azul), 2008, sand cast glass, 17 x 8 x 5”, Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art, NY 2. Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, wall mural for Museum breezeway, courtesy of Museum of Art/Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University 3. Kenneth Hayes Miller, Leaving the Shop, n.d., lithograph from the collection of Dr. August and L. Tommie Freundlich

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Gainesville continued...

www.harn.ufl.edu

Soaring Voices demonstrates the shift in Japanese society toward individual women artists becoming recognized in an artistic realm traditionally held by men. This exhibit features 87 works by

artandculturecenter.org

This US premiere of a first-of-its-kind exhibition features hundreds of images of vernacular photography found online by artists John D. Monteith and Oliver Wasow. From the bizarre to the sublime, these anonymously sourced labor-intensive drawamateur photographs ings on paper. provide a fascinating view of AmeriThru 01.29.12 can culture through the new frontier of social media.

www.harn.ufl.edu

Open Engagement represents 25 international artists who explore, recreate and imagine the nuances of love and war across time and place. HOLLYWOOD

25 exceptional women artists who reflect Japan’s rich and innovative ceramic culture. Thru 08.2012

presents a site-specific installation of his

Thru 01.29.12

Artist Unknown/ The Free World Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Open Engagement: Strategies in Art, Love and War
 Harn Museum of Art

Thru 01.29.12

Freddy Jouwayed: Forks in the Wave Function Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Miami based artist, Freddy Jouwayed,

Giannina Coppiano Dwin: Nothing We Call Our Own Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

1. Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 03-III, 2003, stoneware and glass, photo ©Taku Saiki 2. Sergio Vega, Tropical Rococo (detail), 2002, RC print, Museum Purchase, funds provided by the Caroline Julier and James G. Richardson Acquisition Fund 3. Photograph from the exhibition Artist Unknown/The Free World “pairings”, anonymous images collected by John D. Monteith and Oliver Wasow 4. Freddy Jouwayed, Sensesinfission, 2011, pigment pen, marker and acrylic on paper 5. Giannina Coppiano Dwin, Untitled (Bra), 2009, sugar

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Ecuadorian native, Giannina Coppiano Dwin, expresses in her work a desire to transform simple materials into symbols of life’s basic needs. For her exhibition Nothing We Call Our Own, Dwin presents a site specific installation, performance and photography. JACKSONVILLE Thru 01.08.12

Larry Clark: The Tulsa Series Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

A harrowing account of the aimless drug use, violence and sex activities of Clark’s circle of friends is depicted in this searing photo documentary.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso and Roy Lichtenstein.

www.mocajacksonville.org

Taken in 3 protracted series between 1963 and 1971, the Tulsa photographs combine the documentary style and narrative sequencing of a Life magazine photo essay with startling intimacy and emotional intensity. Thru 03.11.12

Project Atrium: Gustavo Godoy

Known for his unconventional and large sculptures, this Los Angeles-based artist creates interactive constructions made of plexiglass, plywood and wall polish, simultaneously playful and replete with art historical references.

Thru 01.08.12

Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso GonzalezFalla Collection of Photography Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

01.28-04.08.12

ReFocus: Art of the ’60s Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

www.mocajacksonville.org

The Sondra Gilman www.mocajacksonville.org Collection presents This is the first of a a selection of modern 3-part series examin- and contemporary ing contemporary art photographs by such in the 1960s,’70s, celebrated figures and ’80s. Featured as Eugène Atget, artists for the ’60s Alfred Stieglitz and installation include Edward Weston.

1. Larry Clark, Dead 1970, 1970, courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, NY 2. Gustavo Godoy, Fast-formal Object: Big Blue, 2010, mixed media construction, 18 x 32 x 19’ 3. William Eggeleston, Memphis (Tricycle), ca. 1969-70, dye transfer print

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Thru 01.09.12

Thru 12.31.11

One in Three: Let’s Solve Our Dropout Crisis The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org Thru 01.08.12

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

In the 1930s, Eugene Savage became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and depicted them in paintings and works on paper—each presents Seminole traditions in a manner reminiscent of Art Deco and Surrealist dreamscapes. (See story in the October/ November 2011 issue on pg. 62.)

Serving as an anchor for several campaign initiatives spreading awareness of the dropout crisis, this exhibition features photographs by Jacksonville artist, Ingrid Damiani, chronicling the compelling challenges and successes of local students.

Thru 12.31.11

Re-opening of the Tudor Room The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

More than 3 years

www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer has unveiled a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnishings, a fireplace and a selection of art from the Cummers’ home, to recreate the domestic sphere in which their collection was originally displayed.

of planning and research have culminated in a new reinstallation of The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain, recognized as the most important collection of Meissen in the US.

1. Eugene Savage, Orchid Trail, 1935, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 13” 2. Photograph by Ingrid Damiani 3. Interior of Cummer Home (detail), ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives 4. Tea Caddy from the Queen Marie of Hanover Coffee and Tea Service, ca. 1730, porcelain with painted decoration Johann Gregorius Höroldt, 4-1/3”

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Polk Museum of Art

12.17.11-03.24.12

Hunt Slonem: An Expressive Nature Polk Museum of Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

In conjunction with its annual Red, White & The Blues celebrawww.polkmuseumofart.org tion, Polk Museum As a youth in Hawaii, of Art pays homage Slonem developed to the cool color by www.polkmuseumofart.org an early affinity for www.polkmuseumofart.org displaying works Garcia-Roig trannature, especially the Through Lange’s pho- from its Permanent scends the typical various species of tography, we witness a Collection wherein definition of a landfusion of intimacy and blue is a major comscape painter. Her curiosity. In Mexico ponent. style oscillates bereveals slivers of her tween realism and experiences with the MAITLAND abstraction, combincountry’s culture. ing brushwork with 12.09.11-02.26.12 thick globs of color, Thru 01.21.12 Borders of forced directly onto tropical birds living on The Blues Paradise: The the canvas. (See story the island. These natuNew World in the August/Sepral forms ultimately in the Eyes of tember 2011 issue became the subjects Explorers on pg. 116.) for his art. Maitland Art “EN PLEIN” SIGHT: Paintings by Lilian Garcia-Roig Polk Museum of Art

Center Thru 12.10.11

www.artandhistory.org

Imagined and exaggerated portrayals of the Americas are presented through maps, etch-

Jessica Lange: In Mexico Polk Museum of Art

1. Lilian Garcia-Roig, Rapid Waters, 2010, oil on canvas 2. Hunt Slonem, Lories, 2011, oil on canvas, 60 x 70” 3. Jessica Lange, Mexico, ed. 2/20, 2008, silver gelatin print, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Robert and Malena Puterbaugh 4. Margaret Ross Tolbert, Juniper Springs, 1993, oil on canvas, 72 x 48”, Polk Museum of Art Purchase Award: 1993 All-Florida Biennial

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Maitland continued...

ings, engravings and lithographs from the 17th through 19th centuries, depicting tales of mysterious, lost paradises and fantastic

Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

Velasquez’s work combines imagery, text and assemblage in a sophisticated network of juxtapositions. Both poetic and sublime, his art is a series of monologues and dialogues on life and death. MELBOURNE

creatures from evolving primitive worlds.

01.13-03.18.12

Thru 01.22.12

Dialogue: Camilo Velasquez

Fear and Folly: The Visionary Prints of Francisco Goya and Federico Castellon Foosaner Art Museum

human condition with the insight and truthfulness found in these images, which include Castellon’s lithographs for Edgar Allen Poe’s The Masque of the Red Death and Goya’s etchings from Los Disparates (or The Proverbs).

Explore the Museum’s extensive and diverse Permanent Collection, which includes prints and drawings from the Ernst Oppler archive, Chase Art Deco objects from the Enrique and AnaMaria Conill Mendoza Collection of American Industrial Design, and works by important 20th century women artists, includ-

Thru 01.08.2012

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Many artists have been drawn to things dark and fantastic, but few have probed the

Treasures Revealed: Selections from the Permanent Collection Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

ing Alice Aycock, Miriam Schapiro and Louise Nevelson. Thru 12.17.11

Interwoven: Contemporary

1. J. Trentsensky (After Jacques le Moyne de Morgues, French (ca. 1533–1588), Floridaners of 1500, ca.1825 (le Moyne original ca.1564), lithograph on paper, on loan from the Museum of Arts and Sciences, gift of Kenneth Worcester Dow and Mary Mohan Dow 2. Camilo Velasquez, image courtesy of Art & History Museums, Maitland 3. Federico Castellon, Stop Him and Strip Him I Say, 1968, lithograph/collection of the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Director’s Fund Purchase, 1969 4. Ernst Oppler, Untitled (Dance of Bacchantes), ca. 1900, oil on canvas, 18 x 14-5/8”, gift of Susan Wood, Permanent Collection, Foosaner Art Museum, Florida Institute of Technology

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Textile Art by Alejandrina Cué, Andrea Donnelly and Jennifer Glass Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts at FIT

ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

This show is based in structure, form and mark-making— all three artists work within made and found forms, conceiving possibilities that allow for reworking, acknowl-

http://textiles.fit.edu

Interwoven showcases the work of 3 contemporary fabric artists whose visual imagery exploits the inherent quality of fabric materials to portray both the fragility and depth of the human psyche.

MIAMI Thru 01.01.12

Center of Attention ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Center of Attention presents a group show highlighting ArtCenter resident artists. 01.07-02.19.12

Potential Amendments: Jenny Brillhart, Vincent Hemphill and Moira Holohan

edged errors, purpose and process. 12.01.11-03.04.12

sel Miami Beach 2011. Wurm combines various art forms into a unique personal view of the everyday world. Drawing on history, humor and philosophy, he creates light-hearted artworks with, at times, serious messages. (See story on pg. 102.) Thru 02.12.12

Portrait of a Young Man: Laurent Grasso

Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business makes its debut during Art Ba-

1. Alejandrina Cué, Restauradora de Sueños, 2011, textile collage with oil paint 2. Lissette Schaeffler, By the Hour, photographic print, 2011 3. Jenny Brillhart, NH Storage, oil on panel, 34 x 38”, 2009 4. Erwin Wurm, Little Big Earth House, 2003/2005,
silverplated bronze, 7-7/8 x 13-3/8 x 9-7/8”, courtesy of the artist; Xavier Hufkens, Brussels; Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg and Paris; and Lehmann Maupin, NY 5. Laurent Grasso, 1610 (detail), 2011, neon tubes, transformer, edition of 5 & 2 A.P., 98-7/16 x 137-13/16”, courtesy of Sean Kelly Gallery, NY

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spired by Beethoven’s convalescence and death in 1827. The title, Schneebett (Snowbed), is from a poem by Holocaust survivor, Paul Celan—a meditation on death.

Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Grasso juxtaposes historical works from the Permanent Collection with his own series of paintings, sculptures, videos and neons to form unexpected connections that become reflections on the past, from a contemporary viewpoint.

tions of race, gender and class, made in direct response to the social upheavals of the 1960s.

01.15-02.26.12

Dana Schutz: If the Face Had Wheels

visual style characterized by vibrant color and raw and tactile brushwork. Thru 03.18.12

Focus Gallery: Marcel Duchamp Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

This is a rare opportunity for audiences to experience the seminal French artist’s work Thru 01.01.12 Thru 01.01.12 firsthand. Among the American Anchor Gallery: works presented is People, Black Enrique MAM’s edition of De Light: Faith Martinez Celaya ou par Marcel DuchRinggold’s Miami Art amp ou Rrose Sélavy Paintings of Museum Miami Art (Boîte-en-valise) [From the 1960s www.miamiartmuseum.org Museum or by Marcel Duchamp Miami Art Schneebett is a twowww.miamiartmuseum.org or Rrose Sélavy Museum room installation inSchutz combines fan- (Box in a Suitcase)]. www.miamiartmuseum.org tasy and reality, and The works presented humor and horror, in this exhibition to create figurative represent an unprecpaintings that abound edented artistic explowith expressionist enration of the intersecergy and a distinctive 1. Faith Ringgold, American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960’s 2. Enrique Martinez Celaya,
Schneebett (Snow-bed), 2003-4,
installation (detail),
dimensions variable,
collection Miami Art Museum, promised gift of Dieter & Si Rosenkranz 3. Dana Schutz, Swimming, Smoking, Crying, 2009,oil on canvas, collection Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS, gift of Marti & Tony Oppenheimer & the Oppenheimer Brothers Foundation, photo courtesy of the artist & Zach Feuer, NY 4. De ou par Marcel Duchamp our Rrose Sélavy (Boîte-en-valise), Series D, 1941/1961, ed. 1/30, collection Miami Art Museum, Museum Purchase with funds from Lang Baumgarten & Mimi Floback & Sally Ashton Story in memory of Jon Ashton, photo: Sid Hoeltzell, ©2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris / Succession Marcel Duchamp

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The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Color on Color presents works by different Thru 02.19.12 artists in which the Mark Handforth: use of color is not used Rolling Stop as a representation, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Thru 01.15.12

www.mocanomi.org

Mark Handforth was the first Miami artist to receive a solo show at MOCA, North Miami in March 1996. He has since achieved major international recognition and has become an important role model for Miami artists. (See story in the October/ November 2011 issue on pg. 104.) Thru 02.19.12

Color on Color

metric Abstraction to a new level of expression, incorporating sound and movement of lines and colors.

but as the essence of the artwork.

Modern Meals: Remaking American Foods from Farm to Kitchen The Patricia & Phillip Frost

Modern Meals explores how technology and design remade the places where food was produced, sold, cooked and eaten, from the turn of the century into the post-1945 period. Posters, prints and advertisements as well as objects such as toasters, cookware and tableware are on display. Thru 01.08.12

Magdalena Fernández: 2iPM009 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

The Florida Artist Series: Humberto Calzada—The Fire Next Time The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 01.08.12

In her video installation, 2iPM009, Fernández brings Geo-

Cuban-American artist, Humberto Calzada, presents an exhibition

1. Mark Handforth,
Rolling Stop, 2008,
aluminum, vinyl and acrylic,
96 x 96”, courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise 2. Karina Peisjovich, Color Making Machine (Eight-Movement Suite), 2010, light projection, installation view at Theories at Recoleta Cultural Center, courtesy of MACBA 3. Magdalena Fernández, 2iPM009, 2009, video installation with sound, dimensions variable, digital animation: Marcelo D’Orazio, sound effects, corporal percussion: courtesy Perpetuum Jazzile, installation view at Periférico Caracas, 2011, photographer: Ángela Bonadies, courtesy of the artist and Faría+Fábregas Galería, Caracas 4. Poster, Corn. The Food of the Nation, 1918, designed by Lloyd Harrison (dates unknown), published by the US Food Administration, commercial color lithograph, The Wolfsonian–FIU, gift of Henry S. Hacker

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The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

International University www.wolfsonian.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

of recent works on the idea of “fire”— the fire of war, the fire of light and the fire of passion and emotions—with its metaphorical properties that are both destructive and regenerative. Thru 12.04.11

Tirzo Martha: Afro-Victimize

The Frost Art Museum hosts a video installation by Tirzo Martha, who recently participated in the 1st international Triennial Bernar Venet—many of the Caribbean in the of which have never Dominican Republic. before been presented to the public. Thru 03.18.12

Tour de France/ Florida: Contemporary Artists from France in Florida’s Private Collections The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Thru 08.2012

Manifest and Mundane: Scenes of Modern America from the Wolfsonian Collection

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This exhibition features paintings by French artists Christian Boltanski, Sophie Calle, Annette Messager and

Witness how artists manifested in their work the most profound and the most mundane aspects of American life through this display of more than 50 American paintings, sculptures and fine art prints from the 1920s to the ’40s. Thru 01.2012

Statistically Speaking: The Graphic Expression of Data The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

The Wolfsonian– Florida

Statistically Speaking highlights eye-catching statistical graphics from the first half of the 20th century

1. Humberto Calzada, Untitled, 2011, from the exhibition The Fire Next Time, acrylic on canvas, 47x 47”, courtesy of the artist 2. Tirzo Martha, Afro victimize, 
 video, 2009, site specific performed at
“Licht Aan Zee”, Kunsthall 52, Den Helder, The Netherlands 3. Christian Boltanski, Untitled (Reserve), 1989, clothes, black and white photographs and lights, 111 x 64 x 7”, ©Christian Boltanski / ADAGP, Paris, courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection 4. Torvalt Arnt Hoyer, Barn, 1938, produced for Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration, Illinois, oil on board, The Wolfsonian–FIU, Miami Beach, Florida, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection, photo: Silvia Ros

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in The Wolfsonian’s rare book and special collections library. The works in this exhibition were vehicles for the ambitions of Portuguese imperialists, soviet propagandists

International University www.wolfsonian.org

Jungle Sweat, Roseate is a video piece and installation by artist, Naomi Fisher, which tells the fantastical story of a female character’s experiences after stumbling upon Vizcaya from

and American New Dealers.

This exhibition examines the changing political, economic and cultural contexts in which French design is created and disseminated. Approximately 150 objects on display include furniture, industrial design and craft created by some of the most celebrated French designers of the depths of the the past and present. mangroves.

Thru 03.26.12

Thru 01.16.12

Liberty, Equality and Fraternity: French Design for Living The Wolfsonian– Florida

Jungle Sweat, Roseate by Naomi Fisher Vizcaya Museum & Gardens www.vizcayamuseum.org

NAPLES 12.17.11-01.15.12

Lithography from Galerie Mourlot, New York

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

The Naples Art Association hosts this exhibition showcasing signed lithograph prints and vintage posters by Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró and Pablo Picasso. 01.28-02.27.12

The Art of Tommy Simpson

1. Portfolio plate, Average Monthly Wages in Various Branches of Industry, from The Struggle for Five Years in Four, ca. 1934, 
published by State Publishing House of Fine Arts, Moscow, 7-1/2 x 9”, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection 2. Martin Szekely, chaise lounge, Pi, 1984, Galerie Néotù, Paris (producer), steel, aluminum paint, leather, foam, Centre national des arts plastiques, France, ©Martin Szekely/CNAP/photo: Jean Tholance/Les Arts décoratifs, Paris 3. Naomi Fisher, Production Still from Jungle Sweat, Roseate, 2011,
courtesy Vizcaya Museum and Gardens and Naomi Fisher,
 ©Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, Miami, Florida, all rights reserved 4. Joan Miró, Salon de Mai, 1966, lithographic poster, 26.5 x 19.5”, courtesy of Galerie Mourlot, NY

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Simpson is an “imaginist” who has worked in nearly every medium, including woodworking, painting, printmaking, clay, woodcarving, bookmaking, jewelry and

even prose. (See story on pg. 106.) Thru 01.15.12

Edgar Degas: The Private Impressionist— Works on Paper by the Artist and His Circle

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The evolution of Studio Glass is traced in this delightful exhibition, which includes a wide assortment of exquisite work from the leading American glass artists of the past half century, including Marvin Lipofsky, Dale Chihuly and many

This captivating exhibition of 90 rare works by French master, Edgar Degas, includes drawings, prints, photographs, etchings, a sculpture and a letter, in addition to works on paper by artists in Degas’ circle, includothers. (See story on ing Mary Cassatt, Paul pg. 44.) Cézanne and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Thru 06.30.12 12.15.11-04.01.12

Evolution/ Revolution Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

An exciting new selec-

tion of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection are on display, representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century. 01.14-04.29.12

Louise Nevelson Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This insightful exhibition features a remarkable variety of works from throughout Nevelson’s prolific career, ranging from massive wall pieces to more intimate wood sculptures.

1. Tommy Simpson, Bonhomie, 2010, mixed woods bench, 26 x 39 x 15”, photo: Brad Stanton 2. Edgar Degas, Before the Race, ca. 1895, color lithograph (collaboration with the printer Auguste Clot), image courtesy of Landau Traveling Exhibitions 3. Leah Wingfield, Chance Meeting = Love, 2010, cast glass, 17 x 17.5 x 4”,
courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI 4. Arthur B. Davies, Facades, oil on canvas, 23 x 28”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, Museum Purchase

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

12.06.11-03.25.12

Manolo Valdés Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This stunning retrospective features a variety of paintings and sculpture that demonstrate the range and singular talent of internationally renowned

This new installation reflects the colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico and includes works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Miguel Covarrubias and José Clement Orozco. 01.24-04.15.12

Spanish master, Manolo Valdés.

Prendergast to Pollock Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Thru 06.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Featured in this survey are key works from some of the most important artists of the first half of the 20th century, including Maurice Prendergast, Mark Rothko, Arthur Dove, Ashile Gorky, Jackson displayed in the MuPollock and more. seum. Thru 06.30.12

Thru 12.30.11

Selections from The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art Permanent Collection Naples Museum of Art

Steve Tobin’s Natural History Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

Throughout the season, the Museum will feature rotating exhibitions of selections from the Permanent Collection, including new and recent acquisitions and art never before

www.thephil.org

Tobin, has transformed the wonders of nature into monumental sculptures in bronze, steel, glass and ceram-

1. Manolo Valdés, Retrato de una Dama con Collar, 2009, mixed media on canvas, 76.8 x 70.9”, ©Manolo Valdés, courtesy Marlborough Gallery, NY 2. Pedro Friedeberg, Cualquier Lado Por Arriba (Any Side Up), 1975, acrylic on board mounted on wood, 29 x 29”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of Harry Pollak, ©Pedro Friedeberg 3. Jackson Pollock, No. 34, 1949, enamel on paper mounted on masonite, 22 x 30”,
Edward W. Root Bequest, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art, Utica, NY, 
Photo: Williamstown Art Conservation Laboratory,
©2011 Pollock-Krasner Foundation /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 4. Alfred Eisenstaedt, Premiere at La Scala, Milan (detail), gelatin silver print, 25-1/2 x 21”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, bequest of Herbert & Ruth Abramson 5. Steve Tobin, Steelroot series, Untitled, 2010, steel

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

ics. (See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 42.)

Stage and Screen Appleton Museum of Art

OCALA

Thru 06.30.12

South: American Art from the Collection of James Fuller

www.appletonmuseum.org

This exhibition showcases an extensive collection of the screen legend’s performance clothes, which include stage and film costumes spanning Hepburn’s 6-decade career as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes. (See story in

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The Mouse House is a treasure trove of intimate-sized works from some of the giants of 20th century art. This delightful exhibition recreates the environment of Hirshhorn’s art-packed home in Washington, known as “The Mouse House.”

01.21-03.11.12

For the Love of the Sea: Watercolors of Philip Steel Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Steel’s paintings reflect a lifelong love of the sea and the people whose lives are affected by it.

Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Presented are more than 30 works of art depicting views of southern landscapes and interiors as created by some of America’s most important artists. ORLANDO

the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 86.)

Thru 01.22.12

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for

12.03.11-01.15.12

Scenes from the

Thru 04.29.12

The Serious Art of Make-Believe Orange County Regional History Center

1. Installation view of The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection exhibition 2. Philip Steel, Light In A Storm 3. Katharine Hepburn, publicity photograph 4. Jessie Conklin, Louisiana Cabin

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Topographies is the largest retrospective of work by artist, Barbara Sorensen, who is known for her largescale installations. Her sculptures serve as references to geological forms and the conceptual notion of

www.omart.org

Enjoy a rare opportunity to peek inside the creative genius behind the theme-park entertainment experience. Discover how imaginary worlds of unique characters, objects, and environments start with the art and design revealed in this exhibition of detailed the vessel. (See story drawings, architectural on pg. 68.) plans, set designs, props and costumes. Thru 01.01.12 01.07-04.01.12

Barbara Sorensen: Topographies Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Eight from Florida The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Eight from Florida features items from

American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

the Museum’s Collection or The City of Orlando’s Collection. Included are works by Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Jose Bedia, Margaret Tolbert, Sandy Winters, Dan Gunderson, Leslie Neuman and John Chamberlain. 01.20-03.18.12

Style & Grace: The Michael and Marilyn Mennello Collection The Mennello Museum of

This exhibit features paintings portraying women in many varied settings—in the garden, at repose, lighting Chinese lanterns and attending an outdoor musical concert. Works created by George Bellows, John White Alexander, and

Milton Avery are on display. 01.06-03.18.12

William H. Johnson: An American Modern

1. Terra Queen’s bike from the 2005 Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Orlando Resort 2. Barbara Sorensen, Shield de Pyrenees W4-07, 33 x 30 x 4”, stoneware & stones, 2007 3. Dan Gunderson, Toys Are Us, mixed media 4. Lila Cabot Perry, The Japanese Children, ca. 1900, oil on canvas, from the collection of Michael Mennello

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Orlando continued...

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Women of the Uncommon Cloth presents the fiber work of California’s Patricia Montgomery, Minnesota’s Eun-Kyung Suh and

The Mennello Museum of American Art

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

During the 1950s, Andy Warhol became one of New York’s most successful and prolific illustrators for magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar. This exhibition presents some of his finest contributions to the publication, reproduced as

www.flaglermuseum.us

www.mennellomuseum.com

One of the most important African American artists of the 20th century, William H. Johnson produced a body of work that focused on biblical themes, Harlem’s energy and his Southern roots.

New York’s Christina Massey. PALM BEACH

12.03.11-01.15.12

Andy Warhol, The Bazaar Years 1951-1964 The Society of the Four Arts

01.31-04.22.12

ORMOND BEACH 12.09.11-01.15.12

Women of the Uncommon Cloth

A New Light on Tiffany features more than 50 Tiffany lamps, windows, mosaics, enamels and ceramics designed by Clara Driscoll as well as numerous objects made under her direction by the “Tiffany Girls.”

A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls

www.fourarts.org

they were originally published. 12.03.11-01.15.12

The Art of the Illustration, Original Works of Howard Chandler Christy and J.C. Leyendecker The Society of the Four Arts

1. William H. Johnson, Aunt Alice, 1944, oil on compressed cardboard, courtesy Morgan State University 2. Christina Massey, from her Business and Pleasure series (#14) 3. Wisteria lamp, designed by Clara Driscoll, ca. 1901, 18-1/2” diam., New-York Historical Society, gift of Dr. Egon Neustadt 4. Andy Warhol, Fabricology;
Harper’s Bazaar, July 1960

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Pa l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

kimonos explores the history, styles and symbolism of the traditional Japanese garment.

www.fourarts.org

Some of the most esteemed American artists of the 20th century have included illustrators. Two of the best are Howard Chandler Christy and J.C. Leyendecker, whose art for Hearst Magazines www.pensacola

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

Manton’s photography explores the daily lives of homeless individuals and families in moments of rest, reflection, joy and sorrow. Thru 02.12.12

PENSACOLA Thru 12.30.11

E. J. Manton: 3 Hots and a Cot Pensacola Museum of Art

Thru 01.16.12

Josef Albers: Color The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

12.09.11-12.29.11

museumofart.org

and newspapers is on display.

SARASOTA

Woven and Wrapped: Kimonos, Clothing and Culture from Early 20th Century Japan Pensacola Museum of Art

Small Objects Exhibition The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

This holiday exhibition includes works from over 30 artists— all less than 12 x 12” in dimension and all available for sale.

www.ringling.org

This installation of Albers’ work is comprised of color studies which reflect his investigations into how colors interact with and alter one another when placed together. Thru 01.29.12

The Amazing American Circus Poster:

www.pensacola museumofart.org

A wide sampling of

1. J.C. Leyendecker, Thanksgiving. Sailor watching grandmother baste the holiday turkey.
From The American Weekly cover, November 18, 1945,
oil on canvas, signed 2. E. J. Manton, Off to Play 3. Laire, Okefenokee, Ga., 2011 4. Josef Albers, Homage to the Square, screen print, gift of Mrs. Robert Feitz, in memory of her husband

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Sarasota continued...

The Strobridge Lithographing Company The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Treasures from the Fondation Gandur pour l’Art Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

The Amazing American Circus Poster showcases 80 boldly bombastic posters advertising the feature attractions and performers of the Big Top, while providing a portrait of the American circus in its Golden Age. (See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 124.)

Thru 01.08.12

Century Photographs of Egypt Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.fine-arts.org

Zimoun: Sculpting Sound The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Utilizing motors, wires, cardboard boxes, cotton balls and ventilators, Zimoun builds architecturallyminded platforms of sound through mechanized kinetic sculptures. (See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 120.) ST. PETERSBURG

Mummy cases and sacred works, tomb and temple reliefs, papyrus fragments, alabaster vessels and rare objects comprised of precious www.fine-arts.org stones make this one This exhibition presents photographs of Egypt created during the 19th century, a period of great archaeological exploration and worldwide fascination with the rediscovered ancient culture. of the most dramatic shows ever presented at the MFA.

12.17.11-04.29.12

Thru 04.10.12

Ancient Egypt— Art and Magic:

Forever in a Moment: 19th

Thru 12.04.11

Story and Symbol: Dutch and Flemish Paintings from the Collection of Dr. Gordon and Adele Gilbert

1. The Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, Stobridge Lithographing Company, courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 2. 49 prepared vibration motors/Untitled Sound Objects, Pe Lang + Zimoun 2008 3. Lid from an Anthropoid Sarcophagus (detail),
wood, gessoed and painted,
Dynasty XXI-XXII, 1080-720 BC,
image ©Sandra Pointet 4. Antonio Beato, Travelers at the Great Pyramids (detail), ca.1870,
Albumen print,
gift of Dr. Robert L. and Chitranee Drapkin from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 7 o f 3 2 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

Work of Dianora Niccolini

www.fmopa.org

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The more than 30 paintings in this exhibition are striking and rich in the history of 16th and 17th century northern Europe, encompassing biblical stories, mythological subjects, portraits, landscapes and still lifes. TAMPA

Spanning a career that began in 1965, Lee’s images of celebrities, war, landscapes and Americana have appeared in Life, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Vogue and

01.19-03.12.12

Tampa: A Town With a Past Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

FMoPA worked closely with the Tampa Bay History Center on this very special historic tour of the City of Tampa, which includes Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

numerous other publications.

Thru 01.08.12

Thru 01.08.12

Bud Lee’s America

Celebration of the Body: The

In her photographic studies of the body, Niccolini reveals the subtle connections between the naked body and nature, the natural person and our universe. She invites us to look upon the body with total acceptance and reverence, in all its natural splendor.

vintage photographs of notable people and significant architecture. Thru 01.08.12

No Limits: Janet Biggs

1. Michiel Jansz. van Mierevelt, Double Portrait of a Husband and Wife with Tulip, Bulb, and Shells, 1609,
oil on panel,
collection of Dr. Gordon and Adele Gilbert 2. Bud Lee, Clint Eastwood 3. Dianora Niccolini, Untitled, 1982, ©Dianora Niccolini, courtesy of the artist 4. Image courtesy of the Tampa Bay History Center

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Tampa Museum of Art

the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

Contemporary Art Museum

www.verobeachmuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

Video artist, Janet Biggs, has explored the relationships between athleticism and human ambition, individualism and community, and free will and control. Her work has focused on sports and natural environments ranging from a pool with synchronized swimmers to the vast expanse of the High Arctic. (See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 102.) Thru 03.04.12

Realism: Selections from

Sculpture by Robert F. Lyon Vero Beach Museum of Art

Realism juxtaposes stellar examples of the Photo-Realist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural installations by www.ira.usf.edu

leading contemporary artists. Thru 12.10.11

The Talent Show explores the competing desires of notoriety and privacy, and the evolving relationship between artists and audiences in our culture of reality television and Web-based social media. VERO BEACH

The Talent Show University of South Florida

Thru 12.31.11

Against the Grain: Wood

Robert Lyon creates innovative sculpture in turned wood, utilizing form and color to express beauty, fragility, memory and our connection to the earth. (See story in the Oc-

tober/November 2011 issue on pg. 106.) Thru 01.08.12

Inspired by Nature: Celebrating the Beauty and Complexity of Trees Vero Beach Museum of Art

1. Janet Biggs, Fade to White, 2010, still images from the single channel video, courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC 2. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies 3. David Lamelas, Limit of a Projection I, 1967, theater spotlight in darkened room, dimensions variable, collection Walker Art Center, T.B. Walker Acquisition Fund, 2009 4. Robert F. Lyon, Double Taille, 2009, poplar, pencils and graphite, 11-3/4 x 24 x 7�, collection of the artist

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Visitors to this exhibit can enjoy the beauty and complexity of arboreal forms in the work of James Balog, Clyde Butcher, Jennifer Steinkamp and

Charles Burchfield, among others.

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Geller’s outdoor sculpture, Woozy Blossom, is a 16-foot-tall this exhibition features tree form that spouts five Andrew Wyeth a foggy mist from paintings alongside its branches, invitthe influenced work of ing viewers to interneke Beaumont and contemporary master act with the playful, Thomas Ostenberg. watercolorists Stephen unexpected masses of Scott Young, Ray moist air. WEST PALM Ellis, Dean Mitchell, BEACH William Matthews and Thru 12.31.11 Alan Shuptrine. Sculpture from 01.04-01.29.12

Thru 01.15.12

01.07-04.29.12

In the Tradition of Wyeth: Contemporary Watercolor Masters Vero Beach Museum of Art

Matthew Geller: Woozy Blossom

the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

A variety of sculptural styles are presented, including welded sculpture by David Hayes, John Henry and Lyman Kipp, kinetic sculpture by Jerome Kirk and bronze work by Han-

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Focusing on watercolor paintings that unify realism with emotional expression,

Ironworkers: Balance, Form, Finality—The Photographs of Dennis O’Kain Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

1. Clyde Butcher, Loxahatchee River #1, 1991, gelatin silver print, 34 x 54”, gift of the artist 2. Andrew Wyeth,The Wales Farm, 1967, watercolor on paper, 22 x 29-1/2”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Athena Society 3. Matthew Gellar, Woozy Blossom (Platanus nebulosus), 2010, steel, water, copper, pump, 16 x 8 x 8’, courtesy of the Katonah Art Museum, Katonah,NY 4. Lyman Kipp, E, 1979, painted aluminum, 84 x 30 x 48”, gift of Janet and Clark Daugherty 5. Dennis O’Kain,
Iron Workers #1, 1980-90,
gelatin print, 30 x 30”

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.ansg.org

Dennis O’Kain will exhibit works from his Iron Worker Series created from 1980-1990.

12.16.11-04.06.12

01.18-05.27.12

Curved: Herbert Mehler Sculptures

Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

For this exhibit, the Museum commissioned Lipman to create a large-scale glass construction which will be installed in the center of the

12.16.11-01.21.12

A Spectacle of Wings: Rosalie Winward Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

The inspiration for Mehler’s artwork comes from organic, natural matter. His sculptures serve as A Spectacle of Wings a play between light is a selection of wild- fluid shapes and the life photographs by seemingly insuraward winning phomountable weight of tographer and natural- the metal. It is this ist, Rosalie Winard, ambivalence between whose black and white the natural and the photos of wetlands man-made that makes birds are both beautiMehler’s works so ful and informative. captivating.

Museum’s European galleries, to be displayed in the context of Old Master works— the inspiration for the installation. (See story on pg. 55.)

12.15.11-03.11.12

Cocktail Culture Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Decorative arts, photography, fashionable cocktail attire and accessories by major designers are included in this first-of-its-kind, exhibition, which explores the social ritual of drinking and entertainment through the lens of fashion and design. (See story on pg. 78.) Thru 03.04.12

Jenny Saville Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

1. Rosalie Winward, image from Wild Birds of the American Wetlands, courtesy of the artist and Armory Art Center 2. Herbert Mehler, WV718 & 765 (2006, 2010) 3. Beth Lipman, One and Others 4. Larry Salk, Summer Cocktail Party with English Butler, 1961,
watercolor, gouache, ink on paper,
gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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{ P g. 3 1 o f 3 2 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

This selective exhibition of canvases and drawings, dating from 1999-2011, brings Saville’s mature work together for the first time.

01.18-05.27.12

Studio Glass: Works from the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Thru 01.01.12

Recent Acquisitions: Photography Norton Museum of Art

Dramatic works by internationally recog-

www.norton.org

Live demonstrations of hot glassmaking techniques, handson workshops and glassblowing performances will be conducted by the world’s premiere mobile “hotshop.” Thru 02.19.12

www.norton.org

Featured are significant works by a younger generation of photographers with fresh insight into the use of the camera.

Roadshow Norton Museum of Art

nized artists, Dale Chihuly, William Morris and Toots Zynsky, will be featured alongside other outstanding examples of contemporary studio glass. (See story on pg. 44.) 01.18-03.25.12

The Corning Museum of Glass Hot Glass

The Emperor’s Orders: Designs from the Qianlong Imperial Workshop (1736-1796)
 Norton Museum of Art

lector in 18th century China, the Qianlong Emperor. WINTER PARK

www.norton.org

Objects in various media, including painting, jade, ceramic, glass and metalwork, are on display—all created for the greatest art col-

Thru 01.15.12

A Room of One’s Own: Women Artists from the Permanent Collection

1. Naomi Leshem, Ofir, Israel, 2009,
chromogenic print,
©Naomi Leshem, courtesy Andrea Meislin Gallery, NY 2. Dale Chihuly, Green Macchia with Lemon Yellow Lip Wrap, 1994,
blown glass, 23 x 38”,
purchase acquired through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Adler, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sterling 3. Portrait of the Imperial Guard Uksiltu/Keshiki Batu Luwuke Shier (detail), the 29th of 100 portraits of Meritorious Officers participating in the East-Turkestan campaign (1755-1759),
ink on silk, Qianglong seal, dated 1760 with honorific calligraphy in Manchu and Chinese by Liu Tong xun (1700-1773), 60 x 38”,
Private Collection 4. Faith Ringgold,
Tar Beach 2, 1993,
#10/10, woodcut,
12 x 11”, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum,
Faith Ringgold ©1993

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{ P g. 3 2 o f 3 2 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

This show provides an overview of the important art historical contributions women have made, featuring paintings by Grandma Moses, prints by Georgia O’Keeffe and sculpture by Anna H. Huntington. Thru 01.15.12

Kim Russo: Family Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

Kim Russo addresses contemporary social

concerns in offbeat imagery culled from the Internet and combined into technically brilliant watercolor renderings.

accentuate Fontenot’s highly intentional sense of playfulness in his work. 01.17-04.15.12

Artful Strings –  Four Centuries of Harp Making The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Thru 01.08.12

www.polasek.org

Thru 01.08.12

Darker Shades of Red: Soviet Propaganda from the Cold War The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

American, European The Very Queer as well as ancient Portraits of African, Asian and Heyd Fontenot Egyptian harps are Cornell Fine presented, along with Arts Museum at an interactive, handsRollins College on installation and live www.polasek.org www.rollins.edu/cfam musical performances. Darker Shades of Red In his quirky likenessprovides a rare opes, Fontenot emphaportunity to revisit sizes the expressive the Cold War period features of his subthrough striking postjects—absurdly large er graphics and Soviet heads, visual puns with ephemera from the erotic innuendoes and mid-1940s to 1990. the occasional goat, On View

1. Kim Russo, Family (Kitchen), 2011, watercolor and graphite, 23” x 28-1/2” 2. Heyd Fontenot, Yellow Panorama (detail), 2007, oil on canvas, 75 x 22” 3. Image courtesy of The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, photo: Douglas Nesbitt 4. A. Dobrov, The Borders of the Soviet Union are Sacred and Inviolate, 1969

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Karen Lynne Gallery www.karenlynne gallery.com

G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

Artist: JIM SPERBER “I PAINT BECAUSE

I have always enjoyed making things, preferably things of my own invention. Creation is one of life’s greatest rewards. Making art, writing music, planting a seed or starting a family— all provide the creator with something unique, spiritually lifting and hopefully timeless.”

MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts www.dlfinearts.com

Artist: Xawery Wolski WOLSKI CONTINUES his experimentations with terracotta, bronze, steel, seeds and natural fibers, searching for ways to meld them organically, while infusing them with a spiritual, complex and introspective energy. From left: Jim Sperber, Ebe, mixed media, 24 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Karen Lynne Gallery; Xawery Wolski, Globos installation, 2010, alpaca, metal wire, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts

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{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

ST. PETERSBURG

Gallery: Mindy Solomon Gallery www.mindysolomon.com

Artist: Sungyee Kim

IN HER DENSELY

layered paintings, Kim N A P L E S enacts the coexistence of Gallery: material presence and il- Trudy Labell lusion, reflecting the in- Fine Art herent connectedness of microcosm and macrocosm. www.trudylabellfineart.com Artist: HYOIN KIM

MIAMI

Gallery: Fredric Snitzer Gallery

“MY WORK FOCUSES ON

modern influences on traditional Korean fashion. By combining life size metal screen sulptures of traditional women’s clothing with minature castings of toys, jeans, dresses and shoes, I am representing the cultural clash between Western modernization and traditional fashion.”

www.snitzer.com

Artists: Cristina Lei Rodriguez RODRIGUEZ ENTICES the viewer with pieces that are both familiar and surprisingly incongruous. With forms often adorned with precious objects, alongside everyday objects, the artist balances the natural and industrial, the feminine and masculine.

Clockwise from top left: Sungyee Kim, Meditation 18, 2010, 30 x 30”, sumi ink and mixed media on panel, courtesy of the artist and Mindy Solomon Gallery; Hyoin Kim, Mesh Dress, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Cristina Lei Rodriguez, Excavation, 2011, paper, plaster, paint, epoxy, plastic, wood, rope and selected objects, 28 x 31 x 58”, unique, courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

Artist: MELINDA HACKETT HACKETT’S PAINTINGS

reference the world of nature rather than depict it literally. “One of my purposes in making paintings is to transport the viewer to a necessarily foreign place, where nature can be experienced without knowing it fully, and where reality is communicated through the senses.”

MIAMI

Gallery: Dorsch Gallery www.dorschgallery.com

Artist: Elisabeth Condon

“THE MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES AND TIME-LAPSE

compositions of traditional Chinese scrolls make perfect sense in a landscape defined by movement, frequent travel and global culture. I adapt them in my paintings of fictional landscapes....Sketches I’ve made on my travels form a vocabulary of trees, pavilions, explosions, webs and stripes that appear and reappear within fields of translucent color, approaching form as peripheral. The imagery, palette and climate of where each painting is made evolve a unique pictorial logic so that making a painting becomes like taking a trip.”

From left: Melinda Hackett, Bumbleberry (detail), 2009, oil on canvas, 54 x 42”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Elisabeth Condon, Double Fragment, 2010, acrylic on linen, 44.5 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and Dorsch Gallery

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{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art

Gallery: Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art

www.etrafineart.com

www.cjazzart.com

Artist: Andrea Dasha Reich

“IF YOU LOOK DEEP

into my work, you can see how I try to pull you, like a hypnotic wheel, into the layers that I create. Each is a small slice of the pieces of the world, people, and life that I was so fortunate to brush my hand over.” MIAMI

Gallery: Giovanni Rossi Fine Arts www.giovannirossifineart.com

Artist: Andreas Reimann

Artist: RORY MACARTHUR MACARTHUR’S

psychedelic creations seem to tease magic from thin air, making work that floats and pulsates as if supplied by an unseen force— each piece exacting a kind of visual dance with illusionistic qualities of surface and paint.

REIMANN’S TECH-

nique evolved from classic painting, more and more into a mixed media creation, with the usage of silk screening as a major part. He produces multi-layered works, with refined hidden details, creating illusion and even reversed sense.

Clockwise from top: Andrea Dasha Reich, Dansko, 2011, mixed media/resin, 54 x 54”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art; Rory MacArthur, Orbital, 72 x 70 x 7”, styrofoam, aquaresin, enamel, acrylic, courtesy of the artist and Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art; Andreas Reimann, Painted Geisha I, courtesy of the artist and Giovanni Rossi Fine Arts

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A Opposite page (left to right): Kreg Kallenberger,

Quartz Mountain Crevasse,

2010, 13 x 32 x 7”, courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI;

Dale Chihuly, Mineral Violet Macchia with Sky Blue Lip Wrap, 1992, blown glass, 20 x 32”,

purchase acquired through the generosity of Mr. & Mrs.

Frederick Adler, Mr. & Mrs.

Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Sterling, courtesy of the Norton Museum of Art

50

th

me

A N N I V E R S A R Y

STUD T H E Y E A R 2 0 1 2 marks the 50th anniversary

of the development of the Studio Glass Movement in America. To celebrate this milestone and recognize the work of talented American artists, a number of glass demonstrations, lectures and exhibitions will take place in museums, galleries, art centers, universities, and other venues across the country, throughout the year. Historically speaking, glass was seldom used as a medium for expression, like painting and

Above: David Bennett, Handstand with Bent Leg, 2011, blown glass and bronze, 56 x 24 x 24”, courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI


A

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS...

erican EVOLUTION/REVOLUTION: 50 YEARS

STUDIO GLASS: WORKS FROM THE

OF AMERICAN STUDIO GLASS

MUSEUM COLLECTION

Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art

Norton Museum of Art

Page 47

Page 53

DIO GLASS sculpture. When it was, artists had to rely on the skilled glassworkers in factories to execute their glass designs for them. The American Studio Glass movement, which began in 1962 with two glass workshops held at the Toledo Museum of Art, changed all that. The workshops were taught by Harvey K. Littleton, who, along with scientist Dominick Labino, introduced a small furnace built for glassworking. For the first time, individual artists had the ability to work in independent OnV

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studios, to make glass alone and unaided, without the necessity of a factory environment. Using small furnaces containing 50-150 pounds of glass, artists are now creatively producing glass as a mainstream art form, alongside painting and sculpture. Some of Littleton’s students, including renowned artists, Dale Chihuly and Marvin Lipofsky, have played seminal roles in raising the awareness of studio glass around the world.

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50th Anniversary of

American Studio Glass:

EVOLUTION / REVOLUTION

Above: Marvin Lipofsky, Chico Group II 2004-5 #4 (Sea Grass), 13 x 14 x 13”, blown at Cal State University: Chico, CA, with help from Robert Herhusky and student team, photography by M. Lee Fatherree; Opposite page: Toots Zynsky, Avvincente, 2010, 13-1/2 x 19 x 12-1/4”. Images courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI


Exhibition

Evolution/Revolution: 5 0 Y E A R S O F A M E R I C A N S T U D I O G L A S S
 On view December 15th through April 1st at the Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art w ww.thephil.org THE STUDIO GLASS MOVEMENT TRANS-

formed glassmaking from a craft to an art form and continues to forge new and exciting directions. The evolution of studio glass is traced in this delightful exhibition of sparkling and, very often, surprising creations. Glass takes the form of bowls and vessels, along with sculpture of intricate shape, texture and subject matter, ­from abstract to figurative. The exhibition, organized in conjunction with Habatat OnV

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Galleries in Michigan, showcases a wide assortment of exquisite work from the leading American glass artists of the past half century, including Marvin Lipofsky, Dale Chihuly and many others. Evolution/Revolution also features a special presentation from the founding fathers of the Studio Glass movement, Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino, as well as an illustrated history of studio glass.

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50th Anniversary of

American Studio Glass:

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Left: David Huchthausen, Eye of the Storm, 2011, 10 x 10 x 10�, cold worked and assembled glass

Right: Stephen Powell, Cherry Stretch Vertigo, 2010, blown glass and murrini, 48 x 19 x 10� Images courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI


Left (top to bottom): Leah Wingfield, Chance Meeting = Love, 2010, cast glass, 17 x 17.5 x 4” Jose Chardiet, Mystic, 2006, blown, hot sculpted and cast glass, and wood, 25.5 x 15.5 x 5”

Right: Richard Jolley, Still Life #4, 29 x 19 x 16”, cast and hot worked glass Images courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI


50th Anniversary of

American Studio Glass:

EVOLUTION / REVOLUTION

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50th Anniversary of

American Studio Glass: STUDIO GLASS

Left: Dale Chihuly, Green Macchia with Lemon Yellow Lip Wrap (detail), 1994, blown glass, 23 x 38�, purchase acquired through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Adler, Mr. and Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sterling Opposite page: Toots Zynsky, Blue Horses Chaos, 1993, Filet-de-verre (fused and thermoformed color glass threads), 6-3/4 x 10 x 9�, gift of Dale and Doug Anderson Images courtesy of the Norton Museum of Art


Exhibition

Studio Glass: WORKS FROM THE MUSEUM COLLECTION On view January 18th through May 27th at the Norton Museum of Art w ww.norton.org THE GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY OF AMER-

ican glass art is the perfect opportunity to showcase the Norton Museum’s exquisite glass collection. Works by internationally recognized artists Dale Chihuly, William Morris and Toots Zynsky will be featured alongside other outstanding examples of contemporary studio glass. Working in a variety of styles, these artists address themes such as nature and abstraction, and create pieces that are nothing less than dramatic in scale and form. Coinciding with the opening of Studio Glass OnV

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will be the display of an extravagant, large-scale glass construction created by contemporary artist, Beth Lipman. Inspired by the Museum’s collection of Old Master still life paintings, the piece will be installed in the center of the Museum’s European galleries. The Beth Lipman installation will be accompanied by a 10-week visit from the Corning Museum of Glass Hot Glass Roadshow—a mobile “hotshop” housed in a 28-foot-long trailer—with live demonstrations, hands-on-workshops and glassblowing performances.

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Left: Richard Marquis, Teapot Goblet, not dated, glass and murrine elements, 10”, gift of Charles R. Bronfman Images courtesy of the Norton Museum of Art

Right: Beth Lipman, One and Others, from Beth Lipman: A Still Life. This site-specific installation for the Norton Museum of Art is a composite “portrait” of the Museum, an early settler to Palm Beach, Richard Hone, and the artist. The work includes pineapple flowers, leaves and fruit, gazing balls from David Teniers the Younger’s The Interior of a Nobleman’s Gallery and multiple floral swags referring to Daniel Seghers’s A Garland of Pink Roses, a Tulip, a Pink Carnation, Narcissi and Other Flowers with Blue Bows, as well as numerous other objects found in the Museum’s Permanent Collection paintings. The entire composition balances atop a casket that is custom fitted to the artist’s dimensions.


50th Anniversary of

American Studio Glass: STUDIO GLASS

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JANUARY 18th – MARCH 18th at the BOCA RAT

Martin S

CLOS Above (Left to right): Frankie Velilla, 2001, C-Print; Matthew Havemann, 2001, C-Print; Eminy, 2007, C-Print


TON MUSEUM OF ART • www.bocamuseum.org

Schoeller:

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“I

Martin Schoeller:

CLOSE UP

“IN A CLOSE-UP, THE IMPACT STEMS

solely from the static subject’s expression or apparent lack thereof, so the

viewer is challenged to read a face

without the benefit of the environmental cues we naturally use to form our interpersonal reactions.”

—M artin S choeller

I N TH E EX H I B I TI O N C L O S E U P,

at the Boca Raton Museum of Art,

Martin Schoeller’s magnetic, straightforward portraits explore the depths of the human face. The world’s most

famous visages merge with the unknown in a succession of stripped-

Above: Martin Schoeller, photo courtesy of Martin Schoeller Opposite: Paris Hilton, 2008, C-Print All images ©Martin Schoeller, courtesy of the artist, Ace Gallery and August Agency Close Up is organized and circulated by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions, Pasedena, California

down, hyper-close portraits that tempt the viewer to look again and again. OnV

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“A photographic close-up is perhaps the

Martin Schoeller:

For more than a decade, Schoeller has been making close-up portraits of the most recognizable faces of our time, as well as of ordinary people living private lives. Close Up presents 48 arresting largeformat color images—many

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of which are Schoeller’s most famous celebrity portraits. The images challenge the viewer to question topics such as self-representation, celebrity, photographic honesty, as well as the impressive explanatory power of portrait

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e purest form of portraiture.”—M. Schoeller

photography. Furthermore, the subjects portrayed provoke the observer to compare the individuals’ appearance, as communicated through the media, with the viewer’s own impressions and experiences. Hollywood stars includOnV

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ing Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett; politicians such as Barack Obama and Bill Clinton; sports icons Kobe Bryant and Andre Agassi; pop-idols like Chris Rock and even itgirl, Paris Hilton, show that Ma

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Above (Left to right): Bill Murray, 2010, C-Print; Shaun White, 2008, C-Print; Jane Lynch, 2010, C-Print

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Martin Schoeller: CLOSE UP

they are not afraid of “opening up” for Schoeller and his camera. Through his portraits, Schoeller achieves a unity of expression that brings out the personality and individuality of each of his subjects. It is in these images that the truth within his subjects, their surface and inner expressions, is most clearly revealed. A native of Germany, Schoeller’s career evolved

the elements that have to come together—subjects, lighting, production, weather, styling, location—gave me an insight into what it takes to be a portrait photographer,” he said. In 1999 Schoeller was named one of three contracted photographers at The New Yorker magazine. While he continues to shoot for The New Yorker and other major publications, he has also pursued his own

“The greatest challenge in taking these images lies in the attempt to arrest the subtle moment that flickers between expressions.” —M. Schoeller

Opposite: Mickey Rourke, 2005, C-Print

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from unassuming beginnings. After high school, a friend urged him to apply to photography school. Of 800 applicants, he was one of just 40 students accepted. After graduation, Schoeller moved to New York City to pursue a photography career. From 1993 to 1996, he worked as an assistant to Annie Leibovitz. “Watching her deal with all of g a z i n e

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photographic interests. Schoeller’s work is deeply influenced by the photography of German minimalists Bernd and Hilla Becher, who inspired him to take a series of pictures, to build a platform that allows one to compare. His close-up style emphasizes the facial features of his subjects, challenging the viewer to identify a n u a ry

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“I aim to record the instant the subject is not th

Martin Schoeller:

the qualities that either distinguish individuals or link them together, raising the question: What is the very nature of the categories we use to compare and contrast? Large, close-up portraits are Schoeller’s signature style.

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Over the years, he has photographed dozens of celebrities and politicians in this intimate format. “It’s a reflection maybe of my personality that I feel comfortable being close to somebody,” he said. “I always felt that it really was

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hinking about being photographed.” —M. Schoeller

the most essential part about a person, stripping away the clothes, stripping away any backgrounds, really focusing in on that person.” For Schoeller, it’s not about making people look good or look bad. “I just think I’m trying to OnV

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take real portraits, what portraits should be like, showing a person for who they are and what they look like without retouching, without tricky lighting, without distortion, without crazy wide angle lenses, without any cheap Ma

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Above (Left to right): Toowi, 2007 C-Print; Piipaio, 2007, C-Print; Bahaio, 2007, C-Print

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Martin Schoeller: CLOSE UP

tricks—just straight up honest portraits.” Schoeller uses a medium format camera that takes roll film and he shoots his subjects from a distance of about four to five feet away with a fairly long lens, to avoid distortion. He uses Kino Flos, a type of lighting system used mainly in the film industry, ideal for very shallow and narrow depth of field, which helps to bring

of the best-known portrait photographers of the younger generation. His work has appeared in Rolling Stone, GQ, Esquire, Vogue, Interview, W and The New York Times Magazine, in addition to The New Yorker, where he remains on contract. He is represented for fine art by Hasted Kraeutler Gallery in New York, Ace Gallery in Los Angeles and Cam-

“I try to get my focus right so the eyes and the lips are the focal point... Everything else becomes secondary.”—M. Schoeller

Opposite (Clockwise from top left): Masino, 2005, C-Print; Jackson, 2005, C-Print; Mzee Mwapo, 2005, C-Print; Thomas, 2005, C-Print

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out his subjects’ eyes and lips. “Most of the expression in a person’s face is all about the eyes and the lips,” Schoeller explained. “I try to get my focus right so the eyes and the lips are the focus. Everything falls away so quickly because of the shallow depth of field. Everything else becomes secondary.” Schoeller has gained worldwide recognition and is one g a z i n e

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era Work in Germany. His portraits are exhibited and collected internationally, appearing in solo exhibitions as well as the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery in London and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Schoeller’s commercial clients include Nike, Citibank, Goldman Sachs, BBDO and Saatchi & Saatchi. On View a n u a ry

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BARBARA SORENSE On view

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01.07-04.01.12

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at the O R L A


E N: T O P O G R A P H I E S

ANDO MUSEUM OF ART

w w w. o m a r t . o r g

Topographies Installation, 2010, Museum of Florida Art; Boat Installation, 16’ x 16’ x 2’ overall, stoneware and stones; Foothills II Installation, 1’ x 7’ x 7’ overall, stoneware, video and sound


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T

Barbara Sorensen: Topographies

THE ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART’S

latest exhibition series, Made in Florida,

features the exemplary work of Floridabased or inspired artists, offering visitors a

perspective on how Florida’s unique environment and culture have helped to shape

the work of many artists around the world. The series opens January 7th with Topographies—the largest retrospective ever of the nationally recognized

sculptor, Barbara Sorensen, who is known for her large-scale installations which reference geological forms and the conceptual notion of the “vessel.” Her work

portrays vastly different environments, explored further through extensive travel to some of the world’s most dynamic landscapes. Inspired by these rugged and remote settings, Sorensen’s sculptural forms take the viewer on a topographical expedition. Transitioning from her original works in clay, Sorensen recently turned her energies to large-scale environmental vessels constructed of metals and resins, as well as new, experimental mixed-media prints and two-dimensional works. Often interconnected and chromatically bold, Sorensen’s works emerge from and focus on her sense of the relationships OnV

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between human and landscape. “...my sculptures are about the figure, the landscape and how these relate to each other in the environment,” the artist states. “My work ranges from geologic scale totems to small decorative ceramic chests that speak of energy, transformation and the volcanic movement of the earth.” “Sorensen’s sculpture celMa

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Above: Shield de Pyrenees W4-07, 2007, 33 x 30 x 4”, stoneware and stones Opposite: Chalice W1-08, 2008, 30 x 25 x 14”, stoneware, stones and gold leaf All images ©Barbara Sorensen

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Barbara Sorensen: Topographies

Right: Dunes Installation, approx. 7 x 7 x 1.5’, resin, rope and wood Opposite: Nymph II, approx. 3.5 x 2 x 1’ + 9” base, stoneware

Above: Entrada de Pyrenees PA1-00, 22 x 22”, Monotype

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ebrates the earth’s terrain by replicating its processes, characteristics and imagery,” noted curator, Barbara Bloemink. “By learning the language and visual vocabulary of the earth’s geology and processes, Sorensen’s work metaphorically reminds us of the globe’s wild, natural beauty and brings it to our visual consciousness.”

 Sorensen discovered clay, an ideal medium for her interest in textural plasticity, as an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin. After completing her degree there, Sorensen went on to work with mentors Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner, Don Reitz, Rudy Autio and others who were pushing the medium

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in fresh, sculptural directions. Today, in her Snowmass Village, CO, and Winter Park, FL, studios, she continues to evolve and expand her concerns in the series of works that explore her enduring interests: the natural environment and conceptual notions of the vessel. According to art critic, Eleanor Heartney, “Sorensen’s ultimate subject is growth and change. Characteristics of both the physical world that surrounds us and the interior landscape we carry inside, movement and energy are the essence of life. Sorensen’s works breathe with this truth and, in turn, convey it to us.” Topographies completes a two-year tour which began at

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Barbara Sorensen: Topographies

Left: Fragment W75-02, front view, 13 x 19 x 10”, stoneware, stones, gold leaf and metal Opposite: Pyramid W42-02, 23 x 17 x 3”, stoneware and stones

the Museum of Florida Art in DeLand, and traveled to the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art in Tarpon Springs. It features a survey of the last 20 years of her work, with a concentration on resin and metal installations. It also includes Sorensen’s collaboration with composer, Stella Sung, and videographer, David Hiser, to create a sitespecific sound/video/sculptural installation that relates to her work and the environment. A second collaboration is with the Orlando Ballet Company in a performance “Art and Dance: A Pas de Deux,” featuring the Orlando Ballet dancers, choreographed by Eric Yow. A comprehensive catalogue with essays by Eleanor Heartney and Barbara Bloemink accompany the exhibition. OnV

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Sorensen’s work is in numerous museum, corporate and private collections. Her work has been showcased at the Aspen Art Museum; Mennello Museum of American Art in Orlando; San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, TX; Houston Center for Contemporary Craft; University of WisconsinMadison; and the Museum of Fine Arts in St Petersburg. Her recent one-person shows have been at Kouros Gallery in New York, 212 Gallery in Aspen, Elaine Baker Gallery in Boca Raton, Millenia Gallery in Orlando, Museum of Florida Art and Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art. In a brief interview with On View, Barbara discussed the process and inspiration behind her work... Ma

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Above: Barbara Sorensen, courtesy of the artist

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Barbara Sorensen: Topographies

O N V I E W I N T E RV I E W :

BARBARA SORENSEN OV: When did you first become interested in exploring geological forms and the concept of the “vessel”? BS: The notion of the vessel has been at the essence of my work since I began studying art, back in the ’60s, at the University of Wisconsin. It was while throwing clay on the wheel during my first ceramics class, working with my teacher and mentor, Don Reitz, that the vessel emerged. It has since played an integral part in most of my series. I realized that geological formations could be an influence on my ceramics while traveling in Colorado in the late ’70s—this is when I started using the stones I picked up while hiking in the mountains, with the clay. Soon I was interpreting the geological landscape to change and expand the vessel and gradu-

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ally, the geological influences became more important to me—the vessel, in the more literal sense, became diminished. As I began to explore materials beyond clay, surface and form became predominant in my work. OV: What environments have you found particularly inspirational to your work? BS: While Colorado has been the biggest influence, I have scrambled up the limestone rocks of Snow Canyon in Utah, meandered amongst the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon and felt the monumental significance of the Grand Canyon. I also trekked to Milford Sound in New Zealand, snorkeled amongst the coral reefs of the British Virgin Islands and hiked the Pyrenees in Spain. All of these travels have left a mark on my work.

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OV: What do you consider to be most important when designing a new piece? BS: I have an overall idea of the piece, inspired by a sense of the landscape that I have recently experienced. With a few brief sketches, I begin making and molding the clay or bending the aluminum. The piece develops in the studio as I work. I like using new materials and developing a new vocabulary with them. OV: What part of your creative process do you find most enjoyable? BS: I love to make the parts, build the piece and add layers of clay or metal. The most exciting part of the process is when all the finished parts are brought together into an installation. OV: How do you see your

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work evolving in the future? BS: My latest inspiration is my new installation featured in the Topographies exhibit, Speloethems, which are vessel forms constructed with new materials. I am looking forward to exploring and developing this series further. My wire-like Dwelling series provides ways for me to discover new combinations and installation possibilities. Also, my new edition of moveable paper sculptures, which I recently completed with the Flying Horse Editions, has opened up some new ways of

looking at my existing series. I am fascinated with exploring the vessel thru new materials. OV: What do you hope viewers will take away from this exhibition? BS: I hope the viewer will be reminded of the environmentally rich planet that we live on, which provides us with such precious materials as metal, stone and clay. I hope they will be inspired by my work and take care to pass it on to future generations. O n V iew

Pictured: Barbara Sorensen with Dwellings V Installation, 2010, 9 x 12.5 x 6’ overall, aluminum


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D e c e m b e r 15, 2011 through M a r c h 11, 2012 at the NORTON MUSEUM o f ART , W est P alm B each www.norton.org

ocktail

ture

Left: Barbara Mullen, Blowing Kiss, New York, ca. 1958, reinterpreted 1994, courtesy of Lillian Bassman


E

ELAN AND CHEMISTRY FIZZ

together in this intoxicating look at the development and influence of a

decades-long cultural phenomenon—

the “cocktail hour.” This chronological survey, presented by the Norton

Museum of Art, is the first multi-disci-

plinary exhibition to explore the social ritual of drinking and entertainment

through the lens of fashion and design. On display are more than 150 ob-

jects, assembled by curator, Michelle Tolini Finamore, dating from the 1920s to the present day. From eye-catching

cocktail dresses and jewelry, to ele-

gantly designed barware and novelty items, Cocktail Culture is a sparkling mix of fantasy and pleasure. 80

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Larry Salk, courtesy of


COCKTAIL Culture

Summer Cocktail Party with English Butler, 1961, watercolor, gouache, ink, Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


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“The cocktail party is almost a purely American conception where, during the hours between afternoon and evening, fashion and culture collide,” says Finamore. “For more than 80 years, it has been a fascinating reflection of history and culture, from shifting customs to changing roles in society.” Cocktail Culture is like an elegant party that indulges its guests with time to contemplate each ravishing item. One could almost hear the ice swirling in the silver martini shaker, the flick of a bejeweled cigarette lighter, or the swish of a cocktail dress. Like a bracing libation, the exhibition melds some of the cultural forces that shaped America over eight decades. Seeded and reflected in the clothing, cocktails and related accoutrements are echoes back to the days of Prohibition, World War II and period-specific artistic movements that underscore changing social mores. “Drinking really played a role in how people interacted,” Finamore explains. “Even in the 1920s, when drinking was forbidden, the cocktail hour OnV

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was glamorized in films that starred screen sirens such as Joan Crawford, as ‘the Flapper,’ who exuded youth, energy and exuberance.” The end of Prohibition detonated a whole new genre in fashion and in the way people socialized—the “proper” cocktail hour emerged, where women wore cocktail attire and sported accessories, like cocktail rings and cigarette holders. In the 1930s, architecture was translated into lifestyle objects from barware to cosmetic cases, and by the 1950s, etiquette books addressed Ma

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COCKTAIL Culture

Opposite: Jeanne Lanvin, Woman’s evening ensemble in two parts, French, winter 1935-36, House of Lanvin, French, founded in 1890, silk plain-weave crepe, trimmed with gilded leather, overall: 50-9/16”, gift of Miss Lucy T. Aldrich, Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Below: Elsa Schiaparelli, Woman’s jewelry suite in four pieces (necklace), American, 1950s, silver-colored metal and colored glass “gems”, 17 x 2”, gift of Susan B. Kaplan, Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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cocktail hour protocol. The cocktail itself, emerged as a major beverage category replete with a myriad of recipes. “Even today,” adds Finamore, “who could argue the impact made by the signature cosmopolitan on the hit TV series Sex & The City, and the ‘girls-only’ cocktail hour?” From the Jazz Age flappers of the 1920s, to fans of the “little black dress” epitomized by Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffanys, to the sleek and sexy disco queens of the 1970s, this exhibition presents a veritable walk-through history of fash-

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ion, via cocktail attire. Garments by legendary designers such as Cristobal Balenciaga, Christian Dior, Alexander McQueen, Jeanne Lanvin, Scaasi, Yves Saint Laurent, Valentino and Pierre Cardin, in addition to accessories by Tiffany & Co, Judith Leiber, Van Cleef and Arpels, and Kenneth Jay Lane are all on display. Imagery of the cocktail hour also plays an important role in the exhibition, and photographs by Irving Penn, Lillian Bassman and Gosta Peterson as well as fashion illustrations by Kenneth Paul Block help recreate the party atmosphere of their respective eras. The show also features items that are uniquely connected to Palm Beach’s cocktail culture. A black silk taffeta 1950s dress by long-time Palm Beach resident and respected custom dressmaker, Philip Hulitar, is a stunning example of the “New Look” silhouette and the typical cocktail dress of the period. It is paired with a diamond-encrusted enameled cigarette holder, retailed by Tiffany & Company. Two 1960s fashion illustrations

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by Fred Greenhill for Saks Fifth Avenue are wonderfully evocative images of rooftop cocktail parties of the decade, and the 1970s is represented by a draped, midnight-blue jersey dress by London-based designer, Yuki, who presented his collection at the prominent Worth Avenue retailer, Martha, in 1976. Additional highlights include objects and accessories that were specifically created for use during the cocktail hour. Items such as a Tiffany & Co. sterling silver cocktail set originally designed for the 1939 World’s Fair, a Van Cleef and Arpels blue enamel and jade compact, and a variety of pieces from the iconic Stork Club, including a whimsical top-hat-andcanes champagne bucket from the 1930s, help recreate the exhibition’s nightclub atmosphere. “Fashion has really come into its own as being appreciated as an art form,” says Norton Museum Director, Hope Alswang. “The public understands that style is a mirror to the movements of society. Like paintings and photographs, it too has a voice. We OnV

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Above: Kenneth Paul Block, Cocktail Caper; gift of Kenneth Paul Block, made possible with the generous assistance of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf; Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Left: Ormond Gigli, Girls in the Windows, 1960, color coupler photograph, printed later, Private Collection, courtesy of Holden Luntz Gallery

have had tremendous response to exhibits such as Rare Bird of Fashion: The Irreverent Iris Apfel, and Fabulous Fakes: The Jewelry of Kenneth Jay Lane, and we are thrilled to present Cocktail Culture.” The party runs through mid-March, so slip on your favorite party dress and head over to The Norton...Cheers! On View 2011/J

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W Women ,

Windows and the Word :

DIVERGING PERSPECTIVES ON I S L A M I C A R T

on view through a p r i l

22, 2012

LOWE ART MUSEUM, university of miami

www. lowemuseum . org

Above: Africa, Hausa people (Nigeria), Islamic Manuscript and Case, 19th to 20th century, ink and colors on paper, leather and dye, 7-1/4 x 5-1/8 x 1-7/8”, gift of The May Department Stores Company Left: Aphrodite Désirée Navab, I Am Not a Persian Painting, 2000-2001, gelatin silver print, 18-5/8 x 14-7/8”, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbaum, © 2001 Aphrodite Désirée Navab A RT L A B @ T H E L O W E S E R I E S I S S P O N S O R E D B Y S T E L L A M . H O L M E S

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Women, Windows and the Word

S

SPANNING THREE CONTI-

nents and over a millennium

in time, Islamic art defies easy definition. Great political changes and the number of

Muslims living outside of traditional Islamic lands only add

to the complexity and dyna-

mism of the field of Islamic art. Scholars and students still seek synthetic understandings

of this field, but such gener90

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Left: In this image from the I Am Not a Persian Painting series, contemporary artist, Aphrodite Désirée Navab, shows the Persian/Iranian Woman in connection to society. Here Navab explores the different dimensions between the foreground and the background in a sort of “connected disconnection” between the woman and society, and the woman and viewer. Through her work, Navab reveals what she calls “hybrid identities”—in this case, a woman caught between East and West. According to Navab, “… culturally hybrid persons are usually caught in the crossfire of prejudices. For Iranians living in the West, the demonization of the ‘other’ becomes a daily negation of the ‘self.’” With her use of the camera, Navab attempts to disrupt stereotypes and preconceptions to unveil the veiled woman. —Chantal Krivopisk Aphrodite Désirée Navab, I Am Not a Persian Painting II, 2000-2001, gelatin silver print, 14-1/4 x 18-5/8”, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbaum, ©2001 Aphrodite Désirée Navab


Women, Windows and the Word

alizing definitions tend to simplify more than illuminate. This exhibition does not attempt to define Islamic art as a totality. Instead, it provides visitors the opportunity to gain vistas into Islamic art by contemplating it through three distinct but intertwining themes: women, Western views of the Islamic world and the importance of the word. Students enrolled in ArtLab @ The Lowe (ARH 511) selected the themes for the exhibition, determined the works of art that would be represented, researched objects, wrote didactic texts and designed the exhibition space. The image that greets viewers at the beginning of the exhibition, Lalla Essaydi’s Converging Territories #30, was chosen because it evocatively addresses all three themes. It is an image by a Muslim woman of Muslim women, so a female is both subject and object of the work. Essaydi challenges Western stereotypes of the veiled and enclosed Muslim woman by appropriating symbols imposed on women and making them powerful markers of female

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Left: This image, from Lalla Essaydi’s Converging Territories series, shows four Muslim females, ranging from adults to children, standing in a confined area, covered in textiles adorned with text. To shoot the series, Essaydi left the US and returned to her family’s abandoned home in Morocco—to the room where the men in her family confined women for days at a time, when they disobeyed. The image highlights the concept of space in Islamic culture, where women occupy private spaces in the realm of domesticity while men engage publicly. Essaydi further addresses the issue of gender by inscribing the textiles with her own writings. She employs calligraphy, a male tradition at the core of Islamic art, but paints the words in henna, a female tradition. The writing integrates rather than rejects the “veil” as an integral element in the identity of Islamic women and engages viewers in a more complex understanding of the meanings behind the veil. —Megan Besecker Lalla Essaydi, Converging Territories #30, 2004, chromogenic color print, 20 x 24”, Museum purchase through funds from Richard Essaydi O n Vand i eShelly w MBermont, a g a z ©2004 i n e . Lalla c om • D

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Women, Windows and the Word

identity. The women and the children in the photograph are all enveloped in cloth which is covered with the artist’s own writings. The traditional and esteemed format of the written word serves as a central means of expression for the artist.

Disrupting

Stereotypes the Veil

of

The first theme in the exhibition addresses the ways in which Muslim women are portrayed in modern and contemporary art. These images encompass a number of dichotomies or binaries—masculine/feminine, public/private, tradition/modernity and home/exile. Women’s bodies and spaces are defined in particular ways—covered and confined—but available to the viewer of the images. These works also juxtapose images of women and images by women. Several of the pieces were produced by female Muslim artists who redefine imagery like the veil and calligraphy, not as instruments of control, but as key manifesta-

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Left: British painter,

Below: Rodolphe Ernst was an Aus-

Valentine Cameron

trian artist who dedicated himself to

Prinsep, addressed his

painting Orientalist subjects. Ernst

fascination with the

traveled to Turkey and other Islamic

Middle East in his work.

lands in 1890, which greatly en-

In this image, he depicts

hanced his repertoire of subject mat-

a pale-skinned, red-

ter. In spite of his first-hand knowl-

haired woman covered

edge of the East, Ernst often fused a

in beautiful and exotic

variety of Islamic cultures into one.

silks, preparing to take

This eclectic mix is evident in The

a bath. This seemingly

Moor, where he displays an intricate-

naturalistic work

ly patterned Turkish rug and carved

of Orientalist painting

wooden window, or mashrabiya. The

contains a number of

use of patterns and designs found in

discordant elements.

Islamic artworks added credibility to

Identified as a “slave

the work by making it more “real” to

girl” in the painting’s

the viewer. Judging from his muscu-

title, this enslaved

lar physique, array of mismatched

“Western” woman clash-

clothing and lounging posture, this

es with her lavishly deco-

man was most likely not a noble, but

rated Eastern surround-

perhaps a servant or bodyguard, who

ings, symbolized by the

seems at odds with his elaborate and

intricate marble pilaster,

luxurious setting. —Mary Cristina Cole

Iznik tiles and religious inscription panel—creating a pastiche of stereotypical images. Embodying the Western contemporary interest in the romantic, exotic and erotic, Prinsep’s paintings perpetuate Victorian fantasies and stereotypes of Middle Eastern harems and defenseless women that were so popular with Western audiences.—Alanna Pugliese Valentine Cameron Prinsep, Slave Girl, ca. 1880, oil on canvas,

Rodolphe Ernst, The Moor, 1894, oil on panel,

35-1/2 x 27-1/2”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Radcliff

17-5/8 x 14-3/8”, gift of the estate of Homer S. Rhode


Women, Windows and the Word

tions of female identity in the contemporary Muslim world.

Viewing the East Through Western Windows

The images in this thematic unit were all created by Westerners and address Western perceptions of the East. While some of the artists traveled to the Middle East and visited Islamic countries, many did not—their artworks are imaginative constructions of the East. The concept of Orientalism refers to this type of construct where the East is defined by the West and the relations between the two are made to seem real and natural so as to emphasize the superiority of the West. These images are, therefore, representations of the East, glimpsed through Western windows—manifestations of observation and ethnographic study at times, and cultural stereotypes and fantasy at others.

Decorating the W ord , I lluminating the Image

The final theme of the exhibition examines the word and

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Left: The carved

Below: Along with wood, glass, ce-

stone window screen

ramics and textiles, metalwork was

or jali is typical of

one of the most important media

palaces and religious

used in Islamic art. The significance

structures created in

of decoration and pattern in Islamic

Mughal India. The

art is clearly seen on the exterior of

Mughals were a

this small Qur’an case, which pro-

Muslim dynasty that

tected the word of God contained in

controlled much of

the Qur’an manuscript while allow-

the Indian subconti-

ing the owner to keep the holy text

nent from the 16th

near. The main decorative elements

to the 19th century.

are the floral and vegetal motifs that

Exquisite stone trac-

outline the lid and the front section,

ery jalis were set into

which is inlaid with a triangular-

the walls of build-

shaped white stone and smaller

ings to allow cooling

teardrop shaped stones placed on

air to circulate while

the corners of the front of the case.

screening off the in-

Symmetry, order and repetition were

terior. These window

seen as means to symbolize the

sculptures are usually

presence of God in all things and

carved with delicate

the visual infinity created by pattern

floral designs derived

and symmetry parallels the cosmic

from nature and lat-

and constant power of Creation.

ticework in geometric

—Lesli M. Cuenca

forms. Jalis seamlessly combine practicality and beauty, as they provide privacy and a distinction of space while creating a beautiful and ever-changing play of light and pattern in both religious and secular architectural contexts. —Judy Von Tress-Pretto Morocco, Qur’an Case, 19th century, silver, India, Rajasthan, Jali [Window], 18th century,

copper alloy and white stone, 4-3/8 x 6 x 1-3/4”,

red sandstone, 23 x 18-5/8 x 1”, gift of Subhash Kapoor

gift of Ruth and Harvey Rosenwasser


Women, Windows and the Word

ornament, two central components of Islamic art that intertwine in a number of ways. Many Islamic texts were illustrated, and though Qur’an manuscripts contained no figural imagery (representations of humans or animals), they were lavishly decorated with floral and geometric patterns. Muslim artists decorated even the most mundane objects with pattern and color and elevated the status of these functional works by adding texts or inscriptions to them. The word in Islamic art could encompass the holy text of the Qur’an, but the high level of literacy in the Islamic world meant that other types of texts, literature, poetry, scientific works and biographies, circulated widely in a number of languages. In both religious and secular artworks, the word itself could become ornament and was accompanied by bright colors, rich textures and complex patterns that manifested the skill of the artist and the harmony and symmetry of the natural world. O n V iew

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Left: Naturalistic

Below: This page of the Qur’an

studies of flowers

displays text written in a cursive style

and animals became

known as naskhi. It was developed

popular during the reign

between the 10th and 11th centuries

of the Mughal leader,

and rapidly became the most com-

Jahangir (r. 1605-

mon writing style used throughout

1627). In the 16th and

the Islamic world. It is recognizable

17th centuries, many

by its elongated and supple forms,

European illustrated

elegant proportions and legibility.

manuscripts, books and

The Naskhi style of writing facili-

engravings circulated in

tated the reading of the Qur’an as

India, creating an inter-

well as its circulation. This particular

est in highly realistic

manuscript has very little decoration

depictions of nature.

however, making the text itself—the

In this study, the artist

Word of God—the central focus. This

depicted plants and

page contains verses 89-93 from

flowers in extraordinary

surah 9 (Surat al-Tawbah, the Repen-

detail, delineating veins

tance) and is the only chapter in the

on the petals and even

Qur’an that does not start with the

holes in the leaves,

classic formula of the Bismillah (“In

perhaps formed by the

the Name of God, the Merciful, the

insects on and around

Compassionate”). —Melyssa Haffaf

them. In Islam, gardens were designed and nurtured to symbolize Paradise. Many Islamic texts included descriptions of the beauties of Paradise, with its abundance of flowers, trees and water. Gardens were frequently included in mosques, madrasas, mausoleums and palace complexes, such as the Taj Mahal. —Lesli M. Cuenca West Asia, Manuscript Page from the Qur’an, India, Uttar Pradesh, Botanical Study with Insects, 18th century, gouache on paper,

11th century, ink, tempera and gilding on paper,

13 x 9-1/2”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gora Dutta, Acquisition Endowment Fund

14 x 11”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Marcus


RETROSPECTIVE { T H E O

W U J C I K }

Exhibition

Theo Wujcik: A Ten Year Retrospective, 2001-2011* On view January 13th-February 25th at the Bob Rauschenberg Gallery, Ft. Myers www.rauschenberggallery.com

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THEO WUJCIK IS MASTERFUL

at combining fragmented images of contemporary popular culture to create powerful works that convey a range of themes, iconography and experiences. “Always looking to broaden my range in dealing with both subject and content, I enlist an array of conceptual styles, which remain in a state of flux,” says Wujcik. “The dialogue of interest today may be superseded by a more pressing issue tomorrow, and I’m very keen on following this non scripted procedure.” While he does not embrace or reject any particular academically approved style, Wujcik has worked essentially under the umbrella of Pop Art—appropriating images from popular culture to create his own unique and dynamic visual narratives. Born in 1936 in Detroit, MI, Wujcik began his art career in 1958 at Detroit’s Center for Creative Studies. He completed his post-graduate work in lithography at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque in 1967, attaining the status of master printer.

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R E T R O S P E C T I V E

From 1968-1980, Wujcik Scholarship Grant, Florida Diworked exclusively with in- vision of Cultural Affairs Inditaglio, lithography and silver- vidual Artist Fellowship and a point drawing. He made his Fellowship Award from the Nafirst mark in the art world with tional Academy of Design, NY. a series of prints and drawings His works have been includthat portrayed artists who inter- ed in exhibitions at the Deested him—James Rosenquist, troit Institute of Arts, MI, and Roy Lichtenstein, David Hock- New York’s Whitney Museney and Robert Rauschenberg, um of American Art, Museum among others. of Modern Art and In 1970, Wujcik Brooklyn Museum accepted the posiof Art. In 2000, a 30 tion of Shop Manyear retrospective ager at Graphicof Wujcik’s works, studio, a researchdating from 1970 to based atelier on 2000, was co-curatthe campus of the ed by James RosenUniversity of South quist and MargaTHEO WUJCIK Florida. In 1972, he ret Miller, and precreates powerful was appointed to a miered at the Gulf images full-time teaching Coast Museum of INSPIRED BY position in the uniArt in Largo, FL. POP CULTURE. versity’s Fine Arts One of Florida’s Department, a post he held un- pre-eminent artists, Wujcik lives til his retirement as Professor and works in the heart of TamEmeritus, in 2003. pa’s historic Ybor City, where Theo Wujcik is the recipient his urban life and studio work is of two National Endowment seamlessly interwoven. He confor the Arts Fellowships, a Lou- tinues to paint full-time, pursuis Comfort Tiffany Foundation ing his lifelong investigation of Award, University of South popular culture in remarkable Florida Research and Creative and visually poetic ways. On View

opposite: Asians in my Soup, 2009, Acrylic on canvas, 92.5 x 67.5” above (top to bottom): 1.Honey Pot, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 102 x 78” 2. Cross Cultural, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 92 x 75” left: theo wujcik images courtesy of the artist, photography by Joe Traina * theo wujcik: a ten year retrospective, 2001-2011 is curated by barbara hill


FOCUS { E R W I N

BEAUTY BUSINESS MAKES

W U R M }

Exhibition

Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business* On view December 1st through March 4th, 2012 at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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its debut during Art Basel Miami Beach 2011 with art and sculptures by Vienna-based artist, Erwin Wurm. Drawing on history, humor and philosophy, Wurm creates light-hearted works which, at times, convey serious messages. “If you approach things with a sense of humor, people immediately assume you’re not to be taken seriously,” explained Wurm. “But I think truths about society and human existence can be approached in different ways. You don’t always have to be deadly serious. Sarcasm and humor can help you see things in a lighter vein.” A sculptural piece from Wurm’s Drinking Sculpture series asks the audience to participate in the work, which they happily do—it’s a bar! Viewers can open drawers and interact with it. Wurm also incorporates notions of warmth, security, fashion and the human form in a series of sweater sculptures, which transform our awareness of the forms into the present moment, free from historical references. Additionally, a new series of

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F O C U S

‘hoodie’ works pushes our per- in-between space where one ception of the human form. may hesitate between worlds. Born in 1954, Wurm trained The activity of dwelling is a conin Vienna in the 1970s—the hey- templative lingering—a way of day of conceptual art. He is prob- remaining in a space or location ably best known for his ongoing that is responsive to the nature series of One Minute Sculptures, of that particular place, open in which, with the help of an ev- to whatever happens to trigger eryday object and drawn instruc- one’s imagination, through assotions, members of the public turn ciation, fantasies, daydreams, dethemselves into temsires or memories. porary sculptures. Wurm’s multiWurm considers disciplinary works the search for space, have been shown at potential form and the Moscow Bienvolume the basic nial (2009); Ullens principles of sculpCenter of Contemture, around which porary Art, Beijing, his work revolves. China (2010); Kun“You DON’T Beauty Business is stmuseum Bonn ALWAYS have the artist’s first co(2010); Museum of to BE deadly hesive focus on the Modern Art, NY SERIOUS.” home or dwelling. In (2010); and 54th —E rwin W urm his art, Wurm conVenice Biennale, sistently realizes architecture’s Italy (2011). His works are highest aim as he creates works also held in collections of the whose extraordinary power lies Guggenheim Museum, NY; the not only in how deeply they Walker Art Center, Minneapomake us feel, but also in how they lis, MN; Museum Ludwig, Colet us see the complexity of our logne, Germany; Musée d’Art feelings in meaningful environ- Contemporain de Lyon, France; ments, which help us to dwell. and Centre Pompidou, Paris, Wurm defines a dwelling as an among others. O n V iew

opposite page: Untitled, 2011, wood, metal, glass Above: Architecture I (&) Architecture II, 2011, fabric, wood below: House I (&) House II, 2011, bronze IMAGES COURTESY THE ARTIST, BASS MUSEUM OF ART AND LEHMANN MAUPIN GALLERY, NY; Photography by German Guevara for E11EVEN productions left: ERWIN WURM

*produced in collaboration with Dallas Contemporary, Texas, and curated by Peter Doroshenko, Director/Dallas Contemporary, Texas.


PROFILE { G U E R R A

D E

L A

IN 2000, GUERRA DE LA PAZ

PA Z }

Exhibition

Barbed On view through December 31st at Praxis International Art, Wynwood Art District www.praxis-art.com

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began to take notice of anonymously littered garments that were being held captive by the barbed wire that topped endless miles of industrial fences throughout Miami’s urban landscape. “The wind breathes life into the entangled clothes that metaphorically struggle to free themselves from the clutches of their captors,” explained the artist. “As time lapses, rain weighs with burden and weakens while the sun rots and bleaches out their identity, fabric shreds and slowly decomposes—a painful analogy of tortured flesh.” Guerra de la Paz’s first encounter with one of these scenarios produced an ongoing series of works and the foundation for the exhibition Barbed—a tribute to man’s insatiable and resilient quest for freedom. The centerpiece of this thought-provoking exhibition is a single installation titled Unidentified—2011, which speaks to controlled attempts to physically and psychologically manipulate the masses through deceptive and abusive tactics. Notions of oppression are de-

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P R O F I L E

fined within mounds of cloth- vidual’s personality now are only ing, compressed, confined and residues of the essence they once contained within a chain-linked represented, histories in dregs of cubicle, crowned by barbed and scent, silent witnesses to lives razor wire. At a time of global that move swiftly between mass change, political, economic and consumption and disposability.” ecological turmoil, Unidentified Guerra de la Paz’s installaserves as an acknowledgement tions have gained internationand reminder that history often al recognition with shows at repeats itself. Saatchi Gallery, London; FonGuerra de la Paz dation Francès, is the composite Paris; Miami Art name that repreMuseum; Art Musents the creative seum of the Amerefforts of Cuban icas, Washington born Miami-based DC; Americas Soartists, Alain Guerciety, NY; Chicara and Neraldo de la go Cultural Center; Paz, who have been Southeast Center GUERRA and producing collaborDE LA PAZ have for Contemporary atively since 1996. Art, Winston, Sabeen producing Their work is based lem, NC; Art and collaboratively on a combination Culture Center of SINCE 1996. of traditional disciHollywood, FL; plines, experimentation with di- and Intersection: Intimacy and mension and the use of uncon- Spectacle / 12TH Prague Quaventional materials. drennial of Performance, DeAccess to an overabundance sign and Space, Czech Republic. of discarded clothing opened the While Guerra and de la Paz door for the artists to work pri- continue to evolve and travel marily with garments as visual the world, Little Haiti, with its metaphors in their work. “The vibrant culture, remains their relics that once defined an indi- creative home. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Unidentified (detail), 2011, found garments, chain-link fence, barbed wire and razor wire, 10 x 10 x 10’ 2. 7, from Barbed series, 2010, C-Print on archival acrylic glass, 30 x 40” Above (top to bottom): 1. 9, from Barbed series, 2010, C-Print on archival acrylic glass, 60 x 40” 2. 11, from Barbed series, 2010, C-Print on archival acrylic glass, 40 x 30” left: NERALDO DE LA PAZ (LEFT) AND alain Guerra, photo: Douglas Voisin images courtesy of the artist and praxis international art


CRAFT { T O M M Y

FOR OVER 30 YEARS,

S I M P S O N }

Exhibition

The Art of Tommy Simpson On view January 28th through February 27th at the Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

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Tommy Simpson’s artwork has transcended craftsmanship, fine art and whimsy. Exhibited by major museums throughout the country, Simpson is a trail blazer in the field of studio furniture. While his highly personalized style is firmly rooted in his exemplary skill as a furniture maker, studio furniture describes just one facet of his vast repertoire. Sculpture, furniture, paintings, ceramics, jewelry, prints, rugs and quilts are among his many creations— each a reflection of personal and cultural references. “The ultimate goal,” he says, “is to bring the artwork to life, so that the viewer can identify the human spirit behind the work, and experience its poetry.” Simpson received his MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan in 1964, and had his very first exhibition in New York City that same year. Drawing on childhood memories formed in an idyllic Midwestern home and neighborhood, populated with generations of doting relatives,

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C R A F T

Simpson’s work reflects the Distinction from the Furniture imaginings and joys of a care- Society, Asheville, NC. He has free life growing up during the exhibited at the Museum of Arts 1940s and ’50s. & Design, New York; DeCorSimpson is best known for dova Museum, Lincoln, MA; his mixed-media sculptures and The Wadsworth Athenaemade from carved, laminated or um, Hartford, CT; and has parwheel-turned wood combined ticipated in solo exhibitions at with found objects and vivid Gallery NAGA, Boston, MA; hand-brushed colors. He creates Leo Kaplan Modern, New York; some of his sculpLowe Art Gallery, ture for pure aesSyracuse, NY; Fullthetic appreciation, er Museum, Brockwhile other works ton, MA; and Lightserve a dual purpose house Center for the as both art and funcArts, Tequesta, FL. tional objects for the Simpson’s work home. His functionis represented in al sculptures include Tommy Simpson’s the collections of tables, chairs, lamps, the Museum of ARTWORK beds, cabinets and Fine Arts, Boston; transcends craftsladders. Whimsical the Museum of manship, fine art and complex, each Arts and Design, AND WHIMSY. piece tells a story. NY; the New BritSimpson is the recipient of ain Museum of American Art, numerous awards, including a New Britain, CT; and MatNEA Grant from the National tatuck Museum, Waterbury, Endowment for the Arts, Wash- CT. He has authored severington, DC; a Fellow Award al books, including Hand and from the American Craft Council Home (1994) and Two Looks to in New York; Master Craftsman Home (1999). Tommy Simpson Award from the Society of Con- lives and works in New Milnecticut Crafts; and an Award of ford, CT. O n V iew

opposite page: TREE OF LIFE, 2011, mixed woods chair, 45 x 35 x 21” above (top to bottom): 1. BRUNO’S BED, 2011, painted wood twin bed, 64 x 44 x 80” 2. SMITTEN MITTEN, circa 1995, painted and carved wood cabinet, 72.5 x 31 x 20” left: Tommy Simpson Photography by Douglas Foulke, ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST


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Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden presents the unveiling of new, large-­scale works by American artist, Will Ryman, as part of its highly acclaimed, annual visual art program— a celebration of art and culture.

Will Ryman: Desublimation of the Rose

12.01.11-05.31.12 at

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables www.fairchildgarden.org

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES EXHIBITION:

Will Ryman: Desublimation of the Rose On view 12.01.11-05.31.12

W WILL RYMAN IS RENOWNED

for his large-­s cale, figurative sculptures based on urban scenes and oversized flora. For this exhibition at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Ryman unveils a series of new works—his largest outdoor exhibition to date—consisting of three new monochrome rose sculptures in blue, yellow and red, each ranging from five to 30 feet in height. The sculptures, entitled Encore, Origin and Icon, respectively, are composed of painted stain-

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less steel, stainless steel mesh, fiberglass resin and nidacore. “I wanted to take an organic subject and change it into something that was obviously man-­made,” said Ryman. “It’s a comment on the commercialization of a natural object for consumption, which is something I wanted to explore with

this new monochrome series.” Additionally, Ryman has created several oversized petals that delicately float on the serene ponds and sit on the grassy areas, as if they had just fallen from the sky. Visitors can lounge on the oversized petals placed around the garden—a reflection of Ryman’s flair for

Left: Ladybug (detail), courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery Previous pages and below: Renderings of Icon (with Petals), 2011, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, ©WR Studio Inc./ photo by Kirkland Hyman, courtesy Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden


N VIEW DESTINATIO 11 2

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES EXHIBITION:

Will Ryman: Desublimation of the Rose the dramatic and absurdly wonderful. On a whimsical note, he has also placed several brass ants and bees high up in a number of trees, appearing as keen observers of the sculptures below. “Will’s work is a revelation. Roses symbolize pure beauty and elegance, therefore, the combination of the art’s symbolism, the beauty of the roses, and the stunning natural setting of Fairchild’s garden, form an artistic trifecta,” said Nannette Zapata, Fairchild’s Chief Operating Officer and Art Curator. Ryman’s sculptures recently adorned the malls of Park Avenue in Manhattan in the exhibition, The Roses, which opened in January 2011. Additional exhibitions of his work have included Tangled Up in You: Connecting, Coexisting, and Conceiving Identity (2008), at 21c Museum Foundation, OnV

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Louisville, Kentucky; Contemporary Figurative Sculpture (2010), at Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, New York; Sculpture: Selections from the collection of Martin Z. Margulies (2007), at Margulies Warehouse, Miami; Greater New York 2005, at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; Invitational Exhi-

bition of Visual Arts (2007), at The American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Reconfiguring the Body in American Art, 1820-足2009 (2009), at The National Academy of Design, New York; and The Shape of Things to Come (2009), at The Saatchi Gallery, London. He is currently represented by the Paul Kasmin Gallery.


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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES

The Garden

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ONE OF THE WORLD’S PRE-

eminent botanic gardens, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, in Coral Gables, features extensive collections of rare tropical plants, including palms, cycads, flowering trees, tropical fruit trees, vines and succulents. The 83-acre garden is among the region’s most popular visitor attractions, offering tours along with a variety of programs in environmental education, conservation and horticulture. Behind the seemingly natural beauty of Fairchild lies a carefully orchestrated blend of art and science. Documented botanical specimens

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Glade Lake, photo by Lorena Alban


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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES

The Garden provide valuable resources in science and education, while horticultural displays and the classic landscape design by William Lyman Phillips— a key member of Central Park’s Frederick Olmstead architectural group—offer visitors an unforgettable aesthetic experience. This is truly a unique and magical place where one can walk garden paths surrounded by the wonders and beauty of nature, view impressive art, talk to experts in horticulture, conservation and science, and also take classes on everything from photography to grafting. The Garden includes many collections and displays such as the Tropical Flower Garden, Spiny Forest of Madagascar, Rainforest, Vine Pergola, Victoria Amazonica Pool, Butterfly Garden, Palmetum, Tropical Fruit Pavilion, Conservatory, Bailey Palm Glade, Jewels of the Caribbean and the Keys Coastal Habitat—all OnV

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of these are brought together in a unified design that flows from one area to another. In addition to showcasing tremendous art exhibitions and concerts, Fairchild also hosts several delightfully tempting festivals throughout the year, including the International Mango Festival in July and the International Chocolate Festival in January—each featuring lectures, talks and classes given by local and global experts. Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden gets its name from one of the most famous plant explorers in history, David Fairchild (1869-1954). Fairchild was known for traveling the world in search of useful plants, but he was also Clockwise from top left: 1. Victoria amazonica (detail), 2. Lin Lougheed Spiny Forest of Madagascar 3. Ficus benjamina 4. Jade Vine (detail)


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an educator and a renowned scientist. At the age of 22, he created the Section of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction of the United States Department of Agriculture, and for the next 37 years, he traveled the world in search of plants of potential use to the American people. Fairchild visited every continent in the world (except Antarctica) and brought back hundreds of important plants, including mangos, alfalfa, nectarines, dates, cotton, bamboos and

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES

The Garden

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Left: Ampitheater Below: Royal Palm Lake


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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : FA I R C H I L D TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, CORAL GABLES

The Garden the flowering cherry trees that grace Washington DC. Fairchild retired to Miami in 1935 and joined a group of passionate plant collectors and growers, including retired accountant, Col. Robert H. Montgomery; environmentalist, Marjory Stoneman Douglas; County Commissioner, Charles Crandon; and landscape architect, William Lyman Phillips. This core group worked tirelessly to bring the idea of a one-of-akind botanic garden to life and, in 1938, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden opened its 83 acres to the public for the first time. We invite you to enjoy the wonder that is Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. With its beautiful paths, vistas and outstanding exhibits, the garden provides every visitor with an unforgettable experience. For additional information visit: www.fairchildgarden.org O n V iew OnV

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The Main Lawn All images courtesy of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

On View 12-01.2012  

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