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CONTENTS October/December

2015

Vo l . 6 , N o . 3

RIGHT: STEPHEN SHORE, ST. SABAS MONASTERY, JUDEAN DESERT, 2009; © STEPHEN SHORE. ON THE COVER: FROM NORTON MUSEUM OF ART’S EXHIBITION, THIS PLACE: ISRAEL THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY’S LENS; FRÉDÉRIC BRENNER, THE WEINFELD FAMILY (DETAIL), 2009,© FRÉDÉRIC BRENNER, COURTESY HOWARD

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GREENBERG GALLERY.

on iew FLORIDA

OCTOBER/ DECEMBER 2015

34 West Palm Beach

THIS PLACE: ISRAEL THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY’S LENS

INSIDE...

T his Place : ISRAEL

Through PHOTOGRAPHY’s LENS

AT N O R T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , W E S T PA L M B E A C H

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Norton Museum of Art is the first US venue to present this unique exhibition which explores the complexity of Israel and the West Bank, as place and metaphor, through the eyes of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers who spent months creating a portrait of a country so well known, yet so little understood.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

44 Orlando

56 Daytona Beach

70 Dunedin

82 Pensacola

Orlando Museum of Art showcases the fresh and provocative work of both leading and emerging artists who refer literally or conceptually to design objects of the midcentury.

HORENSTEIN:

FLORIDA WILD

MASTER ARTIST OF

METAMODERN

HENRY

ANIMALIA

CARLTON WARD JR.:

A new exhibition opening at Southeast Museum of Photography presents an elegant and engaging display of aquatic and terrestrial creatures.

Dunedin Fine Art Center’s presentation of award-winning conservation photography brings new attention to a statewide vision to keep Florida wild.

MUCHA:

ART NOUVEAU

A selection of lush and intricately designed works by Alphonse Mucha will be on exhibit at the Pensacola Museum of Art.

96 Tallahassee FREDERICK WHITMAN

GLASIER: CIRCUS PHOTOGRAPHS

RIGHT: FREDERICK WHITMAN GLASIER, PETE MARDO, 1923; FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART, THE STATE ART MUSEUM OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY.

FSU Museum of Fine Arts presents a collection of intimate portraits exploring the public and private personalities of some of the greatest circus entertainers of the Barnum & Bailey and other major circuses during the turn of the 20th century in America. OnV

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TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): CONRAD BAKKER, UNTITLED PROJECT: EAMES ARMCHAIR ROCKER (+ WALDEN), 2012; HENRY HORENSTEIN, WHITECHEEKED SPIDER MONKEY— ATELES MARGINATUS; Carlton Ward Jr., Ogeechee Tupelo; Alphonse Mucha, Salon des Cent, 1897, Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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CONTENTS October/December

2015

Vo l u m e

6,

No.

6

COMMENTARY

FOCUS

The Indestructible Lee Miller at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale.

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SPOTLIGHT

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XTO + J-C: Christo and JeanneClaude Featuring Works from the Bequest of David C. Copley at Tampa Museum of Art.

MUSE

Backstage Pass: Baron Wolman and the Early Years of Rolling Stone at Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, Ocala.

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PORTRAIT

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CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions.

FOREVER YOUNG: A RETROSPECTIVE

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery exhibitions and artists.

Internationally acclaimed pop artist, Russell Young, is best known for his iconic, larger-than-life, diamond dust screenprints inspired by history and pop culture. His new exhibition at Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland will be a working retrospective.

PICTURED: russell young, Marilyn Glamour, 2010, from the Collection of Polk museum of art.

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Mary Whyte: A Portrait of Us at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando.

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FORM

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick ® at Vero Beach Museum of Art.


Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

Printing Ancient Pottery in 3-D Etruscan Ceramics from Cetamura del Chianti October 16-November 15, 2015

Dr. Nancy de Grummond, Curator, with 3-D printing by Windham Graves of the Facility for Arts Research Touch Tours available / Braille labeling

FREDERICK WHITMAN

G L A S I E R CIRCUS PHOTOGRAPHS w w w. M o FA . f s u . e d u October 16-November 22, 2015

Frederick Whitman Glasier, Gertrude Dewar, Brockton Fair, Massachusetts, c. 1908. Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art.

Visit Tallahassee...and while on campus, visit the student performers at the Flying High Circus, Florida State University


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Fall into Art

M A G A Z I N E

We are delighted to introduce a new season of shows opening this fall at fine art venues across the state of Florida—and we hope you’ll be inspired to visit one coming to a town near you! Our fall edition cover previews an intriguing exhibition, This Place (on pg. 34), revealing Israel and the West Bank through the eyes of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers. MetaModern (on pg. 44), showcases the fresh and provocative work of both leading and emerging artists who challenge the basic premises of modernist design; Animalia (on pg. 56) and Florida Wild (on pg. 70) present two distinct and stunning explorations of animal and landscape portraiture; Mucha: Master Artist of Art Nouveau (on pg. 82) celebrates the organic and ornate linear design of an icon of the Art Nouveau period; Whitman Glasier: Circus Photographs (on pg. 96) reveals an intimate portrait of circus and sideshow performers during the turn of the 20th century; and Forever Young (on pg. 106) examines American counter-culture through iconic screenprint images by pop artist, Russell Young. A fall feast, indeed...enjoy!

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

V

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

on iew FLORIDA

Paul Atwood

OCTOBER/ DECEMBER 2015

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb

INSIDE...

T his Place : ISRAEL

Through PHOTOGRAPHY’s LENS

AT N O R T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , W E S T PA L M B E A C H

Contact Editorial

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com Advertising

advertising.onviewmagazine@gmail.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com

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CONT EN T • D ES I GN I N TER PRETI VE EXHIB IT D ESIGN • Exhibition design, development, production & writing

• Construction administration

Driven by content, passionate about design, and sensitive to the visitor’s learning experience. We take stories from the past, lessons from nature

• Interactive media

and the facts of science and create intelligent designs and compelling experiences for visitors at museums, visitors centers and along the trail.

781.37 8.1484

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TWI TT ER

WEB SI T E

EMAIL


I MUSE

MMORTALIZED BY WRITERS,

filmmakers, and musicians from Stephen King to Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show, the cover of Rolling Stone magazine has embodied generations of popular culture. For artists, the cover is a coveted career achievement, and for many readers, it represents a fantasy realm of the rock-n-roll lifestyle. In the 1960s and ’70s, Rolling Stone provided a national voice to the counter-culture movement and gave readers unprecedented access to musicians before the days of personal branding. Backstage Pass: Baron Wolman and the Early Years of Rolling Stone explores Frank Zappa (1940-1993), May 1968 (exhibition print 2014), Behind his Laurel Canyon home, Los Angeles, CA, archival ink jet print, 10-3/8 x 16”, courtesy Iconic Images / Baron Wolman Archive. Photo © Baron Wolman.


Above: Ike and Tina Turner with the Ikettes, 1967 (exhibition print 2014), San Francisco, CA, archival ink jet print, 10-1/2 x 16”, courtesy Iconic Images / Baron Wolman Archive. Photo © Baron Wolman. Below: Frank Zappa, Rolling Stone Cover #14, July 20, 1968, paper and ink, 11-1/4 x 8-3/4”, courtesy of Rolling Stone LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission.

how the lens of one artist’s camera captured and helped define one of the most important eras in rock-n-roll history. As chief photographer for Rolling Stone from 1967 to 1970, Baron Wolman pioneered a new genre of iconic rock photography. Backstage Pass allows viewers to experience how the photographers and editors of Rolling Stone guided the creation of the “rock star” persona, from concert, to cover, to icon. Contextualized in 35 framed photographs, contact sheets, and original magazine covers, Backstage Pass presents an intimate view of a crucial period of cultural transformation in American history. Audiences will go “backstage” to see how photographic coverage of events such as Woodstock and The OnV

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Day on the Green have contributed to our collective cultural memory. Feeding the heightened political and cultural climate of the time, featured artists Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Frank Zappa came to represent generational ideals through music, words, and visual imagery. Taking an unobtrusive approach with his subjects, Wolman’s techniques resulted in photographs and eventually magazine covers that capture a rawness and emotion of the artists and a generation. Together, Backstage Pass encourages our understanding of how images become iconic symbols of American history. “Baron’s [photographs] are set apart for me because of the consistent humanity in his pictures,” said Tony Lane, former art director of Rolling Stone. “Whether it is in a studio portrait, a backstage document, or an on-stage performance shot, Baron’s subjects seem to embody the essence of themselves.” “I always explain that I was photographing the music, not really hearing it,” wrote Wolman in Every Picture Tells a Story: Baron Wolman, The Rolling Stone Years (Omnibus Press, 2011). “There was a whole technique to doing that—since you can’t capture the sound of the music itself in a still photo, you try to shoot the process of the musician making the music, try to isolate a peak moment of the music being made, try to communicate the ecstasy of somebody playing, singing, performing.” Above: Mick Jagger, Rolling Stone Cover #49, December 27, 1969, paper and ink, 11-1/4 x 8-3/4” courtesy of Rolling Stone LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission. Opposite: Mick Jagger cover shot selection (b. 1943), 1969 (exhibition print 2014), archival ink jet print, 7-1/2 x 5”, courtesy Iconic Images / Baron Wolman Archive. Photo © Baron Wolman.

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“It’s an incredible treat for those that grew up in the era of musical revolution or those that followed in their parents’ footsteps,” wrote Kelly Kempf in The Delaware County Daily Times. “Wolman is a genius in his craft, managing to capture the feelings of a single moment, the passion of Jimi Hendrix during a live performance or the thoughtful expression of Johnny Cash after a show. Viewers have the opportunity to get an unfettered look at backstage, studio, and home-based photographs of some of the greatest musicians of the 20th century, while reading about firsthand accounts of Wolman’s intimidation at meeting a Beatle (George Harrison)...as well as the story that put Wolman on the map—the marijuana drug bust of The Grateful Dead and the fear he faced at gunpoint while attempting a group photo on the front steps of their San Francisco home.” Visitors can also study the contact sheets of Frank Zappa, Jerry Garcia, Tina Turner, Jimi Hendrix, and Mick Jagger reproduced in the exhibition, and compare the sheets to the final selected images used for the magazine covers. Backstage Pass is curated by Ben Ahlvers, gallery director at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, Kansas. “Throughout this exhibition there are many moments that Baron Wolman has recorded with his camera that provide an unfiltered glimpse of the most influential musicians of the 20th century,” wrote Ahlvers. “The skill needed to Above: Jerry Garcia, Rolling Stone Cover #40, August 23, 1969, paper and ink, 11-1/4 x 8-3/4”, courtesy of Rolling Stone LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission. Opposite: Jerry Garcia contact sheet (1942-1995), 1969 (exhibition print 2014), archival ink jet print, 16 x 13”, courtesy Iconic Images / Baron Wolman Archive. Photo © Baron Wolman.

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anticipate these moments before they pass through the viewfinder is rare, yet Baron Wolman has this gift. He captured the feelings and attitudes of youth during a period in American history that will forever be tied to the sounds of rock and roll.” On November 19, 2015, as part of the exhibition programming for Backstage Pass, classic rock cover band, Saratoga, will perform hits from musicians and artists featured in the exhibition. Drinks will be served and a photo booth will be on hand where guests can have fun taking their photos with a “rock star” cutout. The Appleton will be giving away tickets to the event on WIND-FM two weeks prior to the show. For details, call 352-291-4455. O n V iew

Above: Jimi Hendrix contact sheet detail (1942-1970), 1968 (exhibition print 2014), archival ink jet print, 15-7/8 x 12-1/4”, courtesy Iconic Images / Baron Wolman Archive. Photo © Baron Wolman. Opposite: Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stone Cover #26, February 1, 1969, paper and ink, 11-1/4 x 8-3/4”, courtesy of Rolling Stone LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted by Permission.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

Lowe Art Museum,

BOCA RATON

University of Miami

Boca Raton

www.lowemuseum.org

Museum of Art

10.23.15–01.17.16

www.bocamuseum.org

The Portrait Transformed: Drawings & Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud

11.02.15–01.31.16

Dames: Portraits by Norman Sunshine Thru 01.10.16

Izhar Patkin: You Tell Us What to Do

10.30.15–01.31.16

+

Liliane Tomasko: Mother-Matrix-Matter

Samuel Rothbort: Memories of the Shtetl

Thru 04.10.16

+

ArtLab @ The Lowe— GER•MANIA!

Stih & Schnock: Rosie Won the War

+

The Neighbor Next Door

+

CORAL GABLES Fairchild Tropical

Veil of Memory, Prologue: Botanic Garden The Last Supper www.fairchildgarden.org

12.01.15–05.31.16

Art at Fairchild—Works by world-renowned contemporary Latin American artists

CORAL SPRINGS Coral Springs Museum of Art

Image from Dames: Portraits by Norman Sunshine at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Norman Sunshine, Martha, Giclée print on rag paper, 57 x 42”, courtesy of the artist.

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Coral Springs continued...

www.coralspringsmuseum.org Thru 11.21.15

John Bowen

+

Recent Acquisitions from the Permanent Collection

+

Renzo

+

Melinda Trucks 12.05.15–12.24.15

Tom De Vita

Sculptures from the MOAS Collection

On Assignment: Robert Snow – At Sea with OCEARCH

Southeast Museum of Photography

www.smponline.org Thru 02.28.16

Thru 12.18.15

Faces from the Past: Portraits from the MOAS Collection

Second Nature: A Survey of Photographs by Brad Temkin

+

D e LAND Museum of Art– DeLand, Florida

www.moartdeland.org 10.16.15–01.10.16

John James Audubon: A Selection of Prints from the MOAS Collection

Two Points on a Plane: Paintings by Charles Hinman

10.16.15–02.07.16

ANIMALIA: Henry Horenstein (See story on pg. 56.)

+

10.30.15–01.03.16

Sandro Chia

12.05.15–02.27.16

Sandra Muss 10.30.15–10.30.16

Sculptures by David Hayes

DAYTONA BEACH Museum of

DELRAY BEACH

Arts & Sciences

www.moas.org

Cornell Museum

Thru Fall 2015

of Art, Delray

Contemporary Paintings from the MOAS Collection

Beach Center for the Arts

DelrayArts.org

+

Thru 10.18.15

Forms of Fancy:

REIMAGINED

Image from Two Points on a Plane: Paintings by Charles Hinman at Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida: Charles Hinman, Danburite, 2013, painted shaped canvas.

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Delray Beach continued... 10.29.15–01.03.16

Thru 01.10.16

EXXPECTATIONS

Pablo Picasso: Painted Ceramics and Works on Paper, 1931-71

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.morikami.org

Thru 02.04.16

10.09.15–01.31.16

War Horses: Helhesten and the Danish Avant-Garde During World War II

Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani

+

Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066

GAINESVILLE Harn Museum of Art

DUNEDIN

www.harn.ufl.edu

Dunedin

Opening 10.27.15

Fine Art Center

Thru 12.23.15

www.nsuartmuseum.org

www.dfac.org

Beauty & the Beasts

10.04.15–02.12.16

+

Thru 10.18.15

Call of the WILD

The Indestructible Lee Miller

Carlton Ward Jr: Florida Wild

+

Linda Adele Goodine: Beeline Highway 11.06.15–12.23.15

All Decked Out

(See story on pg. 118.)

Thru 11.01.15

10.25.15–01.10.16

A Sense of Place: African Interiors

(See story on pg. 70.)

FORT LAUDERDALE

+

NSU Art Museum /

Mighty, Mighty

Fort Lauderdale

Dancing in the Moonlight: Zara Masks of Burkina Faso

Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television

Thru 11.29.15

NEXUS: Experimental Photography in Florida

Image from Beauty & the Beasts at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Magda Gluszek, Keeping It Together, 2012, stoneware, glaze, fabric, wire, ribbon, 15 x 15 x 15”.

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Gainesville continued... Thru 01.03.16

Conversations: A 25th Anniversary Exhibition

Oliver Wasow: Studio Portraits

+

Santiago Rubino: Light Out of Darkness

11.14.15–02.21.16

The Cummer

Project Atrium: Ian Johnston

Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org Thru 11.22.15

10.09.15–01.02.16

Avery Lawrence: Happy Everybody

Culture Center

Museum of

12.01.15–01.17.16

Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise

of Hollywood

Contemporary Art

www.artandculturecenter.org

Jacksonville

2015 Art Ventures Grant Recipients

Thru 10.25.15

Thru 11.01.15

www.mocajacksonville.org

Seventh All-Media Juried Biennial

Thru 10.25.15

Thru 01.24.16

Project Atrium: Joelle Dietrick/ Cargomobilities

Smoke and Mirrors: Sculpture and the Imaginary

HOLLYWOOD Art and

+

#acchfocus : Instagram contest winners exhibition

JACKSONVILLE

Reflections: Perspectives on the St. Johns River (See story in the April/June 2015 issue on pg. 120.)

11.14.15–01.24.16

Opening 11.07.15

Gustavo Oviendo: The New Past

David Hayes: The Sentinel Series

Michael Namkung: Levitation and Gravitas

Opening 11.24.15

+

+

Rockwell Kent: The Shakespeare Portfolio

Nina Surel: Sailing to Byzantium

Thru 11.29.15

+

British Watercolors

Image from Project Atrium: Joelle Dietrick/Cargomobilities at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Joelle Dietrick, Sherwin’s Wall (Jacksonville), 2011, house paint on wall, 10 x 20 feet.

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The Kasten Collection

LAKELAND

Property Donor

Maitland

www.artandhistory.org

+

Polk Museum

Thru 12.13.15

10.02.15–11.08.15

The Art of Networks II

of Art

Other Destinations

11.14.15–01.10.16

10.10.15–12.05.15

12.12.15–03.26.16

Celebrating A&H’s Artist-in-Residence Program

An American in Venice: James McNeill Whistler and His Legacy

Matter Makes Space: Michiko Fujii Fowler

11.13.15–01.03.16

The Visionary Works of the Reverend Howard Finster

12.12.15–03.27.16

Contemporary and Historic Landscapes

11.21.15–01.10.16

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Russell Young–Forever Young: A Retrospective

Thru 11.01.15

the unPainting

(See story on pg. 106.) 11.07.15–01.24.16

Androids

MAITLAND

Li Domínguez Fong MELBOURNE

The Ruth Funk

Foosaner

Center for

Art Museum

Textile Arts

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

http://textiles.fit.edu

Thru 12.06.15

Art & History

Thru 11.08.15

Thru 12.12.15

Destinations in Paintings:

Museums,

Evan Roth // Intellectual

Light and Shadow:

Image from Destinations in Paintings: The Kasten Collection at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Louis Aston Knight, Path Along a River, ca. 1920, oil on canvas, from the Alex & Barbara Kasten Collection.

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Melbourne continued...

Contemporary Fiber Art by Hye Shin

Thru 11.08.15

Institute of

10.10.15–01.31.16

Documenting Memory

Contemporary Art,

Bass Museum

10.08.15–01.17.16

CINTAS Foundation Fellow Finalist Exhibition + Award Announcement

of Art

Shannon Ebner: A Public Character

Thru 10.18.15

Miami

www.icamiami.org MIAMI ArtCenter/

www.bassmuseum.org

South Florida

10.13.15–11.15.15

www.artcentersf.org

Rachel Harrison

10.02.15–11.08.15

Nadie atraviesa la región sin ensuciarse / Regina José Galindo PolkMuseumOnViewSeasonHalf.pdf 1

Alex Bag

Walls Turned Sideways are Bridges: William Cordova and Luis Gispert

MDC Museum of

Opening 11.06.15

Art + Design

Childhood Memories from the Other Side of

12.01.15–01.31.16

12.01.15–01.10.16

Sylvie Fleury– U.S. Premiere 9/14/2015 Performance 4:07:04 PM

www.mdcmoad.org


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Miami continued...

the Water, Photographs by Eduardo Del Valle Thru 11.08.15

Robert Huff 47 Years

+

Untitled (3for8)— Robert Thiele 12.02.15–03.27.16

Steven and William Ladd: Mary Queen of the Universe Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

The School of the Forest/ 11.19.15–02.21.16 Miami Campus Nari Ward: Sun Splashed + Poetics of Relation

www.mocanomi.org Thru 11.02.15

10.22.15–01.17.16

Beijing Booster: The Art of Peter Wayne Lewis

Project Gallery: Jeff Wall

Pérez Art

Thru 11.01.15

Museum Miami

Project Gallery: Gary Simmons

www.pamm.org

September 2015 issue on pg. 50.)

12.01.15–08.21.16

Thru 02.21.16

Project Gallery: Sheela Gowda

Project Gallery: Bik Van der Pol

Thru 12.13.15

The Patricia

Project Gallery: Nicolas Lobo

& Phillip Frost Art Museum

thefrost.fiu.edu

10.15.15–03.06.16

Firelei Báez: Bloodlines

11.05.15–04.24.16

Thru 10.18.15

Carlos Alfonzo: Clay Works and Painted Ceramics

Marjetica Potrč:

(See story in the July/

Thru 01.03.16

10.10.15–01.03.16

No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting...

Walls of Color: The Murals of Hans Hofmann

+

Image from Nari Ward: Sun Splashed at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Nari Ward, Iron Heavens, 1995, oven pans, ironed cotton, and burnt wooden bats, 140 x 148 x 48”, image courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Hong Kong.

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Miami continued...

Weird, Wild and Wonderful: The Second New York Botanical Garden Triennial Exhibition

www.wolfsonian.org 10.16.15–02.28.16

Philodendron: From Pan-Latin Exotic to American Modern

11.21.15–01.10.16

Ramon Espantaleon: The Temptation

Artis—Naples

Naples Art

artisnaples.org

Association at

Thru 11.03.15

The von Liebig

Through the Lens: Selections from the Photography Collection

Art Center

www.naplesart.org

Thru 11.01.15

Jim Couper: There are No Other Everglades in the World

The Baker Museum,

NAPLES

Opening 11.13.15

Thru 10.26.15

Margin of Errors

Your Choice 2015 11.07.15–03.06.16

Thru 11.15.15

11.14.15–01.09.16

Promoting the Good Life: Recent Acquisitions

Call Up the Figure

Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: Fashioning the ’70s

+

Face the Possibilities

+

Dressed and Undressed: Selections from the Permanent Collection

11.21.15–02.21.16

Carola Bravo: Blurred Borders Thru 12.13.15

Rufina Santana: Cartographies of the Sea

Thru 11.08.15

Carlos Estevez: Celestial Traveler

Weegee by Weegee: Photographs from the Jean Pigozzi Collection

The Wolfsonian–

11.25.15–03.30.16

FIU

Paco Pomet

Thru 01.03.16

Image from Call Up the Figure at Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center: Rainer Lagemann, Dancer, stainless steel, 58 x 34 x 12”, edition of 9.

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . . Thru 01.31.16

Celebrating 15 Years of Collecting

NEW SMYRNA BEACH Atlantic Center for the Arts

www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org Thru 11.14.15

University of Central Florida Flying Horse Editions: The Art of Collaboration

Guild of Realism...

11.14.15–01.03.16

(See story in the

A Dickens Christmas: The Urban Family Holiday Collection

100 Years of Hannibal Square: Historic and Contemporary Photographs of West Winter Park Exhibition

A Fine Timber: Wood and Transformation in Our Time

Orlando

July/September 2015 12.01.15–02.06.16

issue on pg. 34.)

Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography

+

+

Toast to the Arts: Works by the Ocala Art Group

Museum of Art

www.omart.org

OCALA

11.07.15–01.10.16

Backstage Pass: Museum of Art Baron Wolman www.appletonmuseum.org and the Early Years Thru 11.01.15 of Rolling Stone Masterworks from (See story on the International pg. 8.) Appleton

ORLANDO Orange County Regional History

Thru 11.01.15

BAM! It’s a Picture Book: The Art behind Graphic Novels

Center

www.thehistorycenter.org

11.14.15–11.22.15

10.17.15–02.21.16

Festival of Trees:

Image from Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism at the Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala: K. Henderson, PB&J #2, oil on linen, 24 x 36”.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 4 }

Orlando continued...

Presented by Council of 101

www.mennellomuseum.com

Thru 11.15.15

www.flaglermuseum.us

10.16.15–01.03.16

Joseph Weinzettle: Landscapes Over Time

10.13.15–01.03.16

Thru 12.06.15

Mary Whyte: Portrait of Us

MetaModern

(See story on pg. 122.)

The Malcolm Fraser Collection: Celebrating 70 Years

(See story on pg. 44.) Thru 01.03.16

Harold Garde: MidCentury to this Century

11.28.15–01.10.16

ORMOND BEACH

With a Wink and a Nod: Cartoonists of the Gilded Age The Society of the Four Arts

www.fourarts.org

Ormond

PALM BEACH

Memorial The Mennello

Art Museum

The Henry

Museum of

& Gardens

Morrison Flagler

American Art

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Museum

11.21.15–01.10.16

An Eye for Opulence: Charleston through the Lens of the Rivers Collection

November 14, 2015-January 3, 2o16

Eric Serritella

Chuck Sharbaugh

Bahk Seon Ghi


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 4 }

PENSACOLA Pensacola Museum of Art

www.pensacolamuseum.org Thru 10.17.15

Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast 10.23.15–01.02.16

Mucha: Master Artist of Art Nouveau (Selected Works from the Rowe Collection) (See story on pg. 82.)

11.20.15–01.02.16

Life Forms

SARASOTA The John and

Thru 11.07.15

Lincoln: Inspiration through the Ages

VEDRA BEACH

Collection in Context: Women Creating

Back and Forth: Thinking in Paint

Mable Ringling

PONTE

11.13.15–02.27.16

Thru 10.25.15

Museum of Art

12.04/15–02.29.16

www.ringling.org

Glittering Grandeur: Spectacles Under the Big Top

10.09.15–01.10.16

Royal Taste: The Art of Princely Courts in Fifteenth-Century China

The Cultural Center

www.ccpvb.org Thru 11.14.15

Thru 10.23.15

Thru 12.06.15

Visions: Through Paintings, Poetry and Prose

David Engdahl & Mary Williamson: From Nature

10.16.15–10.18.15

The Ringling International Arts Festival

Paul Rudolph: The Guest Houses

Image from Back and Forth: Thinking in Paint at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Carrie Ann Baade, Bad Government, 2015, oil on linen, 48 x 36”.

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C A L E N D A R

ST. AUGUSTINE

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 4 }

Thru 01.03.16

Escher at the Dalí

Crisp-Ellert Art Museum,

Thru Spring 2016

Flagler College

Dalí Revealed: Candid Moments from the Artist’s Life

www.flagler.edu/crispellert 10.02.15–11.28.15

Edgar Endress: Finding Baroque

ST. PETERSBURG

TALLAHASSEE Florida State University Museum

Museum of Fine

of Fine Arts

Arts, St. Petersburg

www.mofa.fsu.edu

www.fine-arts.org

Thru 10.11.15

10.17.15–01.24.16

Tanzania: Life Around Rock Art

Marks Made: Prints by American Women Artists from the 1960s to the Present

10.16.15–11.15.15

Carrie Schneider: Reading Women

Printing Ancient Pottery in 3-D: Etruscan Ceramics from Cetamura del Chianti

Thru 03.13.16

10.16.15–11.22.15

11.07.15–01.11.16

50 Artworks for 50 Years Fredrick Whitman Glasier: Circus The Dalí Museum Photographs www.thedali.org

(See story on pg. 96.)

Image from Marks Made: Prints by American Women Artists from the 1960s to the Present at Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Betty Woodman (American, born 1930), Greek Pots Visit Edo, 2002, color woodcut, lithograph, and chine collé on paper, published by Shark’s Ink. Museum Purchase with funds donated by Martha and Jim Sweeny, ©Betty Woodman, 2002/Photo courtesy of the artist and Shark’s Ink, Lyons, Colorado; MFA Photograph: Thomas U. Gessler.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 4 }

TAMPA Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.fmopa.org 10.02.15–12.28.15

Hotel Room Portraits: Richard Renaldi & Seth Boyd 10.02.15–11.31.15

Vaivén: Six Visual Journeys back and forth between Spain and the U.S.

University

11.15.15–02.07.16

of South Florida

Ralph Wickiser: A Retrospective

Contemporary Thru 12.28.15

Art Museum

Marvels of the Reef: An Exhibition of Underwater Photography

www.ira.usf.edu

A Family Affair

W. PALM

Vero Beach

TARPON

Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

SPRINGS

Thru 01.03.16

Leepa-Rattner

XTO + J-C: Christo and Jeanne-Claude featuring works from the bequest of David C. Copley

Museum of Art

(See story on pg. 120.)

Shadows of History: Photographs of the Civil War

VERO BEACH

Thru 12.12.15

Museum of Art Tampa

+

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Ann Norton

10.17.15–01.17.16

Sculpture Gardens

Folk Art from the Morris Museum of Art

www.ansg.org 12.04.15–12.16.15

Festival of Trees

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Thru 01.03.16

Thru 11.01.15

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick®

Fla. Watercolor Society: 44th Annual Exhibition

BEACH

(See story on pg. 124.)

Thru 02.08.16

Patricia Nix: An Icon of American Art

Image from Vaivén: Six Visual Journeys back and forth between Spain and the U.S. at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Carla Tramullas, image courtesy of the artist and Florida Museum of Photographic Arts.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 4 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Armory Art Center

+

www.armoryart.org

Palm Beach Collects: Clay & Ceramics

10.03.15–10.31.15

The Artists of Art Salon: A Collective Dialogue

Norton Museum of Art

Thru 10.24.15

www.norton.org

2+3: The Artists’ Organization— The Human Image

10.15.15–01.17.16

This Place: Israel Through Photography’s Lens

Photographing the Black Panthers

Selections from the Permanent Collection

Thru 01.03.16

+

Going Places: Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection

Enduring Documents: Photography from the Permanent Collection

(See story in the July/September 2015 issue on pg. 8.)

(See story on pg. 34.) 10.31.15–11.24.15

Women in the Visual Arts—Artistic Visions 1 11.07.15–11.28.15

Charles Parness, I Yi I

12.10.15–03.20.16

Tiny: Streetwise Revisited— Photographs by Mary Ellen Mark

+

Fashionable Portraits in Europe

+

WINTER

Jess T. Dugan: Every breath we drew

PARK Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

The Albin Polasek

cfam.rollins.edu

Museum &

11.07.15–12.05.15

Thru 01.17.16

Thru 01.03.16

Sculpture Gardens

Faceted: Aspects of Contemporary Jewelry

The Summer of ’68:

Conversations:

www.polasek.org Thru 11.29.15

Art Leg­ends of Orange County: The Art of Hal McIn­tosh

12.12.15–01.02.16

Ceramic Mind Field: Contemporary Clay & Ceramics

12.07.15–04.17.16

12.12.15–01.09.16

Sight Unseen: Touch­able Sculp­ture

Jane Ehrlich: Recent Paintings

O n V iew

Image from This Place: Israel Through Photography’s Lens at Norton Museum of Art, W. Palm Beach: Wendy Ewald, Untitled (photograph by Aviad), 2013; © Wendy Ewald.

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ORLANDO

Gallery: LG Art Gallery http://lgartgallery.com

Artist: JOHN DOMINIQUE IN THE LAST PART OF

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

his life, John Dominique became a living treasure of California art. “This is landscape painting at its’ best— paintings with both a sense of place to delight the eye,” wrote Charlotte Berney about Dominique’s paintings.

SARASOTA

Gallery: Palm Avenue Fine Art www.palmavenuefineart.com

Artist: Joseph McGurl “AS A REALIST, I WORK IN A SPHERE WHICH MUST FUNCTION ON

several different levels simultaneously. The most obvious level is the subjective; I paint landscapes. However, reality as we can experience it and the ultimate reality that permeates time and space is my true subject.” — J. McGurl Above (left to right): John Dominique (1893-1994), Creek Near Santa Barbara, oil on canvas, 30 x 38”, courtesy of LG Art Gallery; Joseph McGurl, Symmetries of Nature, oil on board, 20 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Palm Avenue Fine Art.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

NAPLES

NAPLES

Gallery: Mary Martin Gallery of Fine Art

Gallery: Galerie du Soleil galerie-du-soleil.com

www.marymartinart.com

Artist: PATRICK ANTONELLE

Grand Opening Show: 11.06.15

MANHATTAN ARTS

magazine called Patrick “the foremost impressionist painter of our century.” Also dubbed the “American Renoir,” his tendency to transform the prosaic urban scene into something infinitely romantic is evident in his work.

COMING THIS FALL TO

5th Avenue South in Naples— Mary Martin Gallery of Fine Art is a “Masterpiece Collection” Gallery, presenting unique creative work in a variety of media. Artist: Steven Kenny STEVEN KENNY’S OIL

paintings are technically reminiscent of the Old Masters, while depicting a contemporary blending of the human figure with elements from nature. During his 31-year artistic career, his paintings have been exhibited worldwide, garnered many awards, and can be found in private, corporate, and museum collections. Above left (top to bottom): Steven Kenny, The Ribbons, 2015, oil on canvas, 40 x 28” and The Wall, 2015, oil on canvas, 36 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Mary Martin Gallery of Fine Art. Above right: Patrick Antonelle, October Day, oil on canvas, 18 x 14”, courtesy of the artist and Galerie du Soleil.

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Above: Rosalind Solomon, Jerusalem, 2011; © Rosalind Solomon. Right: Josef Koudelka, Al ‘Eizariya (Bethany), East Jerusalem; The Palestinian suburb of Al ‘Eizariya is now divided from East Jerusalem by the Wall. ©Josef Koudelka / Magnum Photos.

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I Previous pages: Frédéric Brenner, The Weinfeld Family, 2009; © Frédéric Brenner, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery.

THIS PLACE: Israel Through Photography’s Lens

NTRIGUING. INSIGHTFUL. IMPASSIONED. This Place: Israel Through Photography’s Lens explores the complexity of Israel and the West Bank, as place and metaphor, through the eyes of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers who spent months creating a portrait of a country so well known, yet so little understood. Their highly individualized works combine to create not a single, monolithic vision, but rather a diverse and fragmented portrait, alive to all the rifts and paradoxes of this important and much contested space. Initiated by photographer, Frédéric Brenner, This Place employs photography to ask essential questions about culture, society, and the inner lives of individuals. The Norton Museum of Art in W. Palm Beach is the first US venue to present this unique exhibition, which opens October 15, 2015, and runs through January 17, 2016.


THIS PLACE: Israel Through Photography’s Lens

Norton Museum of Art is the first US venue to host This Place, an international photo exhibition about Israel. This Place unveils twelve contemporary photographic vantage points upon Israel and the West Bank, created primarily between 2009 and 2012. The photographers represented in the exhibition are Frédéric Brenner (France), Wendy Ewald (US), Martin Kollar (Slovakia), Josef Koudelka

Above: Wendy Ewald, Untitled (photograph by Aviad), 2013; © Wendy Ewald. Right: Frédéric Brenner, The Aslan Levi Family, 2010; © Frédéric Brenner, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery.

(Czech Republic), Jungjin Lee (S. Korea), Gilles Peress (France), Fazal Sheikh (US), Stephen Shore (US), Rosalind Fox Solomon (US), Thomas Struth (Germany), Jeff Wall (Canada), and Nick Waplington (UK). Together, they act as a heterogeneous narrative of a conflicted, paradoxical and


deeply resonant place, drawn from the combination of these individual photographic sensibilities and approaches. The conception of This Place began for its initiator, Frédéric Brenner, in 2005. Brenner, who has been photographing Jewish communities around the world since 1981, was driven by a desire to facilitate a visual counter-argument to the prevailing, often polarized, rep-

resentations of Israel and the West Bank in both national and international news media. When Brenner decided to invite a group of the finest photographers in the world to spend time in Israel and the West Bank to create their own portraits of the place, some were intrigued and others were wary of being used for political gain, or were not interested. But Brenner ultimately convinced

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Stephen Shore, Hebron, 2011; © Stephen Shore

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Above: Stephen Shore, St. Sabas Monastery, Judean Desert, 2009; © Stephen Shore. Right: Fazal Sheikh, from the Desert Bloom series, 10/9/2011; Description: Earthworks in preparation for the planting of the JNF Ambassador Forest on the site of the erased homesteads of the Abu Jaber and Abu-Freich families, al-Arakib, the Negev; © Fazal Sheikh.

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THIS PLACE: Israel Through Photography’s Lens

For project initiator, Frédéric Brenner, This Place was an opportunity to recontextualize Israel as a place and a metaphor. 11 men and women to accept his invitation to see a land more complicated than headlines suggest. At the same time, he convinced funders to contribute several millions of dollars. The result is an unprecedented international, creative initiative that, according Brenner, is similar to the US Farm Security Administration of the 1930s, which

commissioned artists who used photography to explore culture and society. Once the photographers defined their individual projects, Brenner arranged their residencies and provided them with all the necessary resources to complete their work—each spent around six months in Israel over a four-year period.

Brenner organized a two-week informal think tank for the photographers on their arrival, with trips and meetings with Israelis, like philosopher, Moshe Halbertal; Bedouin expert, Clinton Bailey; and feminist and peace activist, Leah Shakdiel. He also arranged for each visiting photographer to have a Hebrewspeaking assistant, selected from the Bezalel Academy. For all the photographers, Brenner says, the program was “a profound transformative experience.” Their styles, formats, and areas of interests varied greatly, and Brenner suggests that their art looks far beyond political perspectives. Rather, it’s about exploring the human condition. Brenner now continues to lead the project in its Nick Waplington, © Nick Waplington


THIS PLACE: Israel Through Photography’s Lens final phase, the public dissemination of the artwork through exhibitions, publications, live programs, and an ambitious digital initiative. “Whilst on the one hand acknowledging and paying heed to the region’s ongoing conflicts, This Place also asks that we look beyond this—that we widen and multiply our lens,” said the exhibition’s curator, Charlotte Cotton. From the outset, Brenner acknowledged to himself that no single vantage point—including his own—could speak of the complexity of this historic and contested place and its shaping of contemporary lives; to begin to comprehend the radical dissonance of this place would

Above and left: Martin Kollar; © Martin Kollar.


require a multiplicity of practices and perspectives. “When what is at stake is sharing the origin,” said Brenner, “it seems to me necessary to gather a large spectrum of individuals whose origins, passions, and paradoxical and contradictory perspectives could help us

grasp the unbearable complexity of this place and its voices.” The result is This Place. Frédéric Brenner is scheduled to present a lecture at 6:30 pm on Oct. 15, during Art After Dark. A comprehensive catalog will also accompany the exhibition. O n V iew

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m

MetaModern

MODERNIST DESIGN, THAT RADICAL AND

iconoclastic break with the past, is now itself a thing of the

past. Perhaps sufficiently so that over the last few years, artists have been treating modernist designs as icons them-

selves, and incorporating them into their own work. Using classic elements in new configurations, artists from across the world are making original works of art that comment on the

Previous spread:

claims of the past in light of the complexities of the present.

Edgar Orlaineta, Charles

These recombinations and modifications result in an entirely

Chromed paint, steel,

unique mix: a meta-modernism in which the original source is changed, self-referential, abstracted. Museum of Art through December 6, 2015, showcases the fresh and provocative work of both leading and emerging artists who refer literally or conceptually to design objects of i e w

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turned pine and walnut, 26-1/2 x 21 x 20-1/2”, © Edgar Orlaineta.

MetaModern, a new exhibition on view at Orlando

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Opposite: Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, Bird in Space (silver carbon), 2013; Carbon fiber, kevlar, epoxy, steel, 110 x 22 x 22-1/2”, © Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle.

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MetaModern

Fernanda Fragateiro, MR10 Double Chair after Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich, 2009; Polished stainless steel, Guttermann silk thread, 94-1/2 x 31-1/2 x 15-7/8�, Š Fernanda Fragateiro.

the mid-century. It is a testament to their enduring power that these objects now catalyze a generation of artists too young to have experienced modernism firsthand, to return to them in a spirit of critique and homage. The notion of modernism had its genesis in Europe during an intense decade of experimentation at the Bauhaus, beginning in 1919.

Function and utility were the school’s ethos while the hallmarks were the use of modern materials and manufacturing methods, honesty in the facture of form, and an embrace of abstraction over symbolism. World War II shifted the activity to this side of the ocean, as European practitioners, including Walter Gropius, Erich Mendelsohn, Ludwig


Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, and Rudolph Schindler, emigrated to the United States. These innovators formed the faculties of American architectural schools, most notably at Harvard University and the Illinois Institute of Technology. Modernism was held as truth by the generations of students they trained. Emerging in the 1960s and

’70s, these young designers felt they had arrived at a place beyond style. Modernism was the pure and true mode in which to design everything from typography to furniture to architecture. When architects, those removed by several generations from the birth of modernism, came to maturity as designers—Frank Gehry, Charles Moore, Ettore Sott-

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Right: Conrad Bakker, Untitled Project: eBay (ding), 2014; Series of nine paintings, oil on wood panels, 5-1/2 x 7 x 3/4” each, © Conrad Bakker. Below: Conrad Bakker, Untitled Project: EAMES ARMCHAIR ROCKER (+ WALDEN), 2012; Oil on carved maple, 28 x 25 x 28”, © Conrad Bakker.

sass, Robert Stern, and Robert Venturi—they challenged all that modernism had embraced. Their vocabulary included fanciful embellishment, applied color, decorative patterning, and references to historical styles. Now, over 90 years after the revolution at the Bauhaus, modernism has sparked a passion in designers and collectors. The prices of signature objects of the classic modernist era are soaring, and its buildings—such as the TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport—are being restored and valued as historical monuments.


Organized by Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, and curated by Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c2-curatorsquared, MetaModern features video, sculpture and works on paper by 19 international artists that include Conrad Bakker, Boym Partners, Kendell Carter, Jordi Colomer, William Cordova, Elmgreen and Dragset, Fernanda Fra-

gateiro, Terence Gower, Olga Koumoundouros, Jill Magid, Inigo ManglanoOvalle, Dorit Margreiter, Josiah G. McElheny, Edgar Orlaineta, Gabriel Sierra, Simon Starling, Clarissa Tossin, Barbara Visser, and James Welling. The artists represented in MetaModern, most of whom were born in the 1960s, question the reverence accorded to classic modernism. Too young to

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Edgar Orlaineta, Mรกscaras (Chipote, Ciruela Tela, Girard, Noguchi, Beso, Eames), 2013; Mixed media on bent plywood, 43 x 50 x 12 centimeters, or 43 x 50 x 6 centimeters each.

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Dorit Margreiter, 10104 Angelo View Drive, 2004; Video stills, 16 mm, loop, silent, © Dorit Margreiter.

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have grown up eating their breakfast cereal from a Russel Wright spoon while seated in an Eames molded chair, these artists appropriate the language of the modernist movement critically, using it to interrogate the meaning of style and

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its relationship to history. Their work challenges the tenets of modernism headon. Some of them recast iconic forms in materials that inherently question the precepts of the originals— Terence Gower in papiermâché, and Conrad Bak-

2015


ing and reorienting these expressions of utility and simplicity, overturn their original impetus. Questioning the endurance of the meanings of these icons, Simon Starling’s, Barbara Visser’s, and Elmgreen & Dragset’s strategies are to present designs that were conceived as pristine and timeless as if they were worn and tired, and Bakker’s paintings explore this from another angle, through eBay. Jordi Colomer’s videoed performances pit a runner’s endurance against the endurance of the icon’s message. Constantin Boym marries two divergent ethos, high modernism and Sears. Brian Jungen embellishes iconic designs with crafty and incongruous accretions. Olga Koumoundouros’s constructions defy the ker in rough painted wood. Others—Edgar Orlaineta, Gabriel Sierra, Kendell Carter, and Fernanda Fragateiro—take touchstone designs of the era by designers such as Charles and Ray Eames or Mies van der Rohe, and, by manipulat-

MetaModern

Clarissa Tossin, White Marble Everyday, 2009; 2-channel HD video, © Clarissa Tossin.


MetaModern

basic premises of modernism, questioning its call for clarity, honesty, and permanence. In film, Dorit Margreiter and Josiah McElheny demonstrate how modern design has become an eloquent storyteller, rather than a formal enterprise eschewing anecdotal content. James Welling and Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle shift contexts and orienta-

tions—formal and conceptual. Jill Magid introduces questions around reproduction, and Clarissa Tossin, in elegiac video, presents

the futility of modernism’s promises. Often ironic and witty, the works in this exhibition offer a thoughtful critique

Edgar Orlaineta, Narcissus, 2002; Chairs (Eames LCW for Herman Miller, reproduction), steel cable, 24 x 58 x 20”, © Edgar Orlaineta.


of innumerable issues that extend across the fields of design and history. An illustrated catalogue published by the Krannert

Art Museum and distributed by the University of Washington Press accompanies the OMA’s presentation of MetaModern and

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explores the questions and issues raised by the exhibition from a number of points of view. Curators outline their premises and readings of the works in the exhibition. Seeing contemporary art and design as reflective and prescient of developments in the surrounding culture, they discuss the strategies embraced by the artists. O n V iew

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R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA

Animalia ,

a new exhibition opening October 16, 2015, at Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach, presents an elegant and engaging collection of the best of noted photographer Henry Horenstein’s images of aquatic and terrestrial creatures. Described variously as evocative, mysterious, romantic, surprising, and weird, Horenstein’s abstract images allow the viewer see otherwise familiar animals in a new and different light. The exhibition runs through February 7, 2016. The rich sepia-toned prints that comprise Animalia represent Horenstein’s distinct exploration of animal portraiture. Drawing on elements of his strong documentary background, Horenstein offers no cuddly, sentimental moments. Instead, deconstructing his subjects into ambiguous fragments of skin, scales and hair, Horenstein challenges our anticipated ways

of seeing, inviting us to pause, look closely, and think about what is in front of us. In doing so, he engages our curiosity and draws us into careful consideration of his subjects. By encouraging the viewer to really look, Horenstein’s abstracted images become more truly representative than traditional animal photographs.  In her introduction to Animalia, Elisabeth Werby, executive

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Previous spread: White-cheeked Spider Monkey— Ateles marginatus. Left: Sea Pen Coral– Cnidaria anthozoa alcyonaria. All images © Henry Horenstein.

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R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA director of the Harvard Museum of Natural History, wrote: “Horenstein’s creatures are decontextualized. They appear without the backdrop of the natural landscape, outside even the artificial world of the zoo or aquarium, and devoid of their true color. As a consequence,

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the images are truly arresting; and in both a literal and a metaphorical sense, we see these animals as we have never seen them before. We notice details, and Horenstein focuses our vision on the unexpected: the foot of an elephant, the eye of an octopus, the hair on the back

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of a gibbon’s head, the pattern of feathers on a bird’s neck. He plays with scale: the rear end and tail of a rhinoceros occupy the entire picture frame. We see these as if through a magnifying glass. His pictures challenge us to look more closely, to ask questions and make con-

nections. We think about form and function: the relationship between an elephant’s foot, a horse’s hoof, and our own toes. We ponder modes of sensing and communication: the signals that hold together a school of fish. Examining these photographs, we become scientists

and discoverers…The combination of the scientific and the metaphorical, the artistic and the analytical in these images is what accounts for their extraordinary power.” “Though most photographers are driven to find a new vision, even the best fail more

“Examining these photographs, we become scientists and discoverers.” —E. W erby , executive director , H arvard M useum of N atural H istory Domestic Pig—Sus scrofa domestica. Following spread: Brown Sea Nettles–Chrysaora fuscescens.


Above: Indian Peafowl—Pavo cristatus. Right: African Grey Parrot–Psittacua erithacus.

Henry Horenstein; Courtesy of the artist.

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often than they succeed,” said writer, Owen Edwards. “In [these images], Horenstein has succeeded to a dazzling degree, evading the abundant clichés of animal photography at every turn.” “I am a photographer, not a naturalist,” Horenstein wrote in his artist statement. “My teachers were legendary artists Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Minor White. What they taught me was the value of traditional artistic concerns, such as good composition, interesting light, and compelling sub-

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ject matter. The photographs shown here were made from 1995-2001. When I started this series, I was a bit insecure. So many great (and not so great) artists had tackled such subjects since the beginning of time. How could I add to this daunting history. One thing I did not want to do was simply document my animals, so I chose not to shoot in color and not to show their environment. Rather, I choose to look closely and abstractly—to see my subjects for their inherent beauty, oddness, mystery. For this, I shot

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R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA often with macro lenses, so I could get close, and worked with grainy, black-and-white films, printed in sepia, hoping to give them an old school, timeless feel. I worked in zoos and aquariums, not in the wild or underwater. This meant I could almost always find my subjects; they couldn’t get too far away. The other advantage was that I could isolate and freeze them in a constrained space, almost as though they were models, posing for me in a studio. Photographing animals is very different from photographing people. You can’t tell an elephant where to stand, and you can´t ask a skate to smile or a lizard to say “cheese.” Instead, you must be very patient and wait, hoping your subject will do what you want it to do, or maybe something else unexpected that might make a good picture. When animals do cooperate, you have to be ready, because most won’t stay in one position long. You have only a few seconds, and often less, to get your shot. As I watch and wait, I listen to other zoo visitors discuss the animals in human terms.

“I believe animals are their very own creatures, with unique, often surprising and altogether amazing characteristics.” —H. H orenstein


R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA


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R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA

Beluga Whale– Delphinapterus leucas. Inset: Texas Map Turtle– Graptemys versa.

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“Look at that,” they say. “He’s smiling at us.” Or, “Poor thing, she’s bored.” Or, “doesn’t that monkey look like Uncle Ike?” In some ways, animals do resemble humans, no doubt. After all, they are our forebearers. Still, I believe animals are their very own creatures, with unique, often surprising and altogether amazing characteristics. And that’s what I’ve tried to capture in these pictures.” Henry Horenstein has been a professional photographer, teacher, and author since the 1970s. He studied history at the University of Chicago and earned his BFA and MFA

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R o b e r t H o re n s t e i n : ANIMALIA

Above (left to right): Bullnose Ray–Myliobatis freminvillii; Cownose Ray—Rhinoptera bonasus.

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at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Horenstein’s work has been exhibited in galleries and museums both nationally and internationally, including the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, Washington, DC; the International Muse-

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um of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, NY; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photographs by Henry Horenstein can be found in many public and private collections, including the Library of Congress; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the High Museum of

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Art in Atlanta, GA. He has published over 30 books, including Black & White Photography: A Basic Manual, and Digital Photography: A Basic Manual, used by hundreds of thousands of college, university, high school, and art school students as their introduction to photography.

He has also published several monographs of his own work, including Show, Honky Tonk, Animalia, Humans, Racing Days, Close Relations, and many others. Horenstein currently lives in Boston and is a professor of photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. O n V iew

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Carlton Ward Jr. Portrait by Mac Stone.

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CARLTON WARD JR.: Florida Wild

Carlton Ward Jr. sees cultural heritage and the natural environment as two of society’s greatest yet most threatened resources. Each photograph is “a window of discovery, celebrating the little-known people, places, and wildlife that make up the Florida Wildlife Corridor,” wrote Carlton Ward Jr. “Subjects include ancient pine forests, deep river swamps, freshwater springs, surprising wildlife, mysterious ravines, wild rivers, and forgotten coastlines…in the millions of acres of ‘Florida Wild,’

where panthers still stalk deer through the forests and black bears forage among palmettos as old as bristlecone pines.” Carlton Ward Jr.’s work is exhibited widely and has appeared in such publications as Audubon, Smithsonian, Geo, Nature Conservancy, and National Geographic. With training in ecology and photojournalism, Carlton advocates combing art with science to


CARLTON WARD JR.: Florida Wild

Reef at Loggerhead Key. Coral reef rises close to the surface along the west side of Loggerhead Key. I had enjoyed exploring this area for three days while on assignment for The Nature Conservancy Magazine, amazed by the diversity but also frustrated by wind, waves, and clouds that made photographing difficult. Later, as I looked out over the Gulf, I saw that the wind was backing off and the water was calming. I raced the dinghy around the island, tied it to a mooring, and swam three hundred yards into a favorite place on the reef, just in time for the setting sun to color the lighthouse. A flash underwater helped light the reef.

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CARLTON WARD JR.: Florida Wild

Blue Crabs. Blue crabs fill a basket after Captain Gus Muench collected them from his traps in eastern Tampa Bay near his home on the Little Manatee River. The blue crab fishery depends on the health of Tampa Bay, which requires high quality fresh water flowing from the rivers into the estuary.

inspire hearts and minds. He sees cultural heritage and the natural environment as two of society’s greatest yet most threatened resources. Through his photographs, he aims to promote conservation of natural environments and cultural legacies. At home and abroad, he seeks stories where he can use photographs to make a difference. Carlton’s passion for nature was born from the Florida landscape, where eight generations of family history have anchored his perspective. He began his career with six expe-

ditions to the Congo rainforests of Gabon with the Smithsonian Institution, resulting in his award-winning book, The Edge of Africa, and exhibit with the United Nations in New York. For the book, Carlton spent eight months in the tropical rain forests of Gabon, documenting the unseen wonders of life at the edge of the African continent. He participated in five different multi-taxa bio-diversity research expeditions with the Smithsonian Institution—the most intensive bio-diversity research yet conducted for Gabon.


Beyond the value for scientific record, Carlton recognizes the power of photographs to influence public perceptions and inspire change. Using custom-made studio and camera techniques, he documented over 400 different species of living plants and animals—many of which he photographed for the first time, and several were new to science. Beyond the value for scientific record, Carlton recogniz-

es the power of photographs to influence public perceptions and inspire change. He seeks pictures that capture the essence of subjects in a way that will engage viewers and help carry the science-based messages to broader audiences. In 2004, Carlton founded the Legacy Institute for Nature and

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Bay Shrimper. A shrimp boat drags its nets toward the rising sun in St. Vincent Sound, near where Apalachicola Bay meets the Gulf of Mexico. The local economies of many coastal communities rely on the productivity of Gulf fisheries, which in turn, rely on healthy estuaries.

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Lake Russell Cypress. Large cypress trees stand along the edge of Lake Russell at The Nature Conservancy’s Disney Wilderness Preserve. Near suburban Kissimmee, this is one of the last undeveloped lakes in central Florida. Restoring water flow south from Lake Okeechobee into the Shark River Slough will allow rain falling in Lake Russell to trace a more natural course from these headwaters all the way south to Florida Bay.


CARLTON WARD JR.: Florida Wild

Culture (LINC), a non-profit organization for conservation communications. In 2014, LINC became Florida Wildlife Corridor, focusing its advocacy on the 2015 Glades to Gulf Expedition and on the statewide mission to “Keep Florida Wild.” While at home in the US, Carlton turns his attention toward Florida conservation issues and is engaged in a number of long-term projects aimed at celebrating the state’s vanishing natural heritage as OnV

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a tool for protecting it. He is a founding Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP) and in 2007, wrote Conservation Photography, the first thesis on the emerging field. His 2009 book, Florida Cowboys, won a silver medal in the Florida Book Awards and Popular Photography featured him for working to save vanishing America. View more of Carlton Ward Jr.’s work at: https://instagram. com/carltonward. O n V iew

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MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

Text by Stacy Kendall ALPHONSE MUCHA WAS

Alphonse Mucha, Le Mois Litteraire et Pittoresque, March 1899; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

one of the most significant artists of the era of modern art. Unlike many of his contemporaries, such as Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh, Mucha achieved international fame and success before his death. Born in 1860 in the central Euro-

pean town of IvanÄ?ice in Moravia, he was a man of humble origin, raised in a family of modest means. Early in life, Mucha’s father, a minor bureaucrat in the legal system, desired that his son would eventually enter the priesthood. However, throughout his youth, Mucha had always had a talent and passion for drawing, and after his exposure to fine art during his teenage years, he abandoned his religious path and developed a resolve to create art. In 1879, at the age of 19, Mucha moved to Vienna where he began taking drawing classes and started an apprenticeship as a scene painter for Kautski-Brioschi-Burghardt, a manufacturer of theatrical sets. Unfortunately, in 1881, his employer encountered financial difficulties and, as a result, Mucha wound up jobless. Without any prospects for work in Vienna, Mucha traveled to the small town of Mikulov, where his talents were recognized by a wealthy aristocrat, Count


Karl Khuen. The Count commissioned Mucha to restore portraits of his family and decorate the dining room of his castle in Hrušovany with murals. While working on this project, Mucha met the Count’s brother, Egon, an amateur artist who admired Mucha’s work and became his patron. In 1885, with the financial support of Count Egon, Mucha was able to attend the Munich Academy of Art. There, Mucha received his first academic training. Subsequently, in 1887, while still under the patronage of the Count, Mucha moved to Paris, where he studied at the Académie Julian and Académie Colarossi. Since Paris at this time was the great cultural center of the Western world, Mucha was able to observe the work of some of the most progressive artists of his generation and study avant-garde artistic theories and ideas. After arriving in Paris, Mucha received money in addition to the stipend he received from the Count by creating illustrations for minor magazines and jour-

nals. For the most part, his early illustrations were competent, but traditional and unremarkable for this time (Figure 1). One print (Figure 2) from this phase of his career, however, foreshadows his Art Nouveau style that would not fully emerge until years later. The background imagery in this composition depicts the mythological horse Pegasus mounted by a young boy who is framed by the moon. This arrangement, an idealized figure crowned by a curved object, was repeatedly used in many of his classic Art Nouveau designs. Pegasus reappears in some of his later prints as well. On the afternoon of Christmas Eve 1894, Mucha accepted a commission that would dramatically alter the rest of his life. The internationally renowned actress, Sarah Bernhardt, was about to star in the play Gismonda, opening in Paris. To advertise the play, a poster had been made, but the design of this work was rejected by Bernhardt. She demanded that a new poster be produced that would be ready

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MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

Figure 1: Alphonse Mucha, Le Petit Français illustré, July 7 1894; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

Figure 2: Alphonse Mucha, La Vie Populaire, August 14, 1890; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

by New Year’s Day. Mucha, being at the right spot at the right time, was asked to take on the task. For this poster, titled Gismonda (Figure 3), Mucha created a design that was strikingly original. The narrow, vertically elongated shape, extensive use of rich gold ink, and exotic Byzantine-inspired mosaic decoration used in the composition had never been seen before in the history of poster making. Bernhardt was so pleased with the outcome, she entered into an agreement to work exclusively with Mucha for the next six years. Because of the patronage of Sarah Bernhardt, Mucha was catapulted to the forefront of the Art Nouveau movement. As a result of the popularity of his work during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, any painting, sculpture, piece of jewelry, or print that imitated his designs were referred to as being in le style Mucha. Between 1895 and 1904, in addition to producing posters, Mucha was commissioned to create panneaux (decorative panels), cal-

Figure 3: Alphonse Mucha, Gismonda, 1895; Collection of Jack Rennert.

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endars, ornate menus, and covers and illustrations for books and periodicals. Some of the more notable publications for which he designed covers and illustrations were L’Image, L’Illustration, La Plume, L’Estampe Modern, Cocorico, Le Mois, Otčenάś, and Clio. Mucha also produced folios, such as Combinaisons ornementales and Documents décoratifs, con-

MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

and portrait painter, but his output of graphic art, which brought him great success in Paris, was minimal. This was not a result of lack of demand. Even in the United States le style Mucha was widely known and appreciated. His reduced production of graphic art occurred because Mucha desired to leave behind his career as a creator of commercial art and

Because of the patronage of Sarah Bernhardt, Mucha was catapulted to the forefront of the Art Nouveau movement. taining prints that served as instructional tools used to teach students and fellow artists how to work in le style Mucha. Additionally, he created stunning postcards. Although they were often based on designs he used for his larger prints, today his postcards are viewed as works of art in their own right and are highly valued. On March 5, 1904, Mucha departed for his first of several trips to the United States. While abroad he gained employment as a teacher

become a “serious artist,” an artist who depicts historical subject matter and works in traditional media. Mucha eventually achieved his goal because of the financial support of a wealthy American patron. With the assistance of the American millionaire, Charles R. Crane, Mucha began to work on his last great endeavor, the creation of The Slav Epic. For this project, Mucha painted twenty monumental panels that recorded events from Slav history. Mucha consid-

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Alphonse Mucha, Clio, 1900; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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Alphonse Mucha, Documents décoratifs, Folio Plate 60, 1902; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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ered The Slav Epic his life’s greatest work, and in 1928 he donated the paintings to the city of Prague. In 1903, before his first trip to the United States, Mucha met a young Czech woman, Maruška Chutilovά. Three years later, Alphonse and Maruška were married in Prague. The couple had

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two children, Jaroslava and Jiří, who were sometimes used as models in Mucha’s later work. Towards the end of his career, when the numerous 20th century modern movements, such as Die Brücke, Der Blaue Reiter, Art Deco, Futurism, Cubism, and Surrealism, began to develop, le style Mucha, unfortunately, was viewed as old fashioned by many of the younger artists. However, since his death in 1939, Mucha’s body of work, especially his graphic art, has been reevaluated, and as a result, his genius has been justly recognized by both artists and art historians. Today, he is viewed as a master artist not only in the field of commercial art, but in the realm of fine art as well. The period of history when Alphonse Mucha lived and worked was an explosive time of innovation, globalization, and shifts in culture and society. It was during this era, bookended by the Franco-Prussian War and the First World War, that the style known as Art Nouveau emerged. Meaning literally

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“new art” in French, Art Nouveau introduced specific deviations from established visual styles. While the translation of the phrase art nouveau is straightforward, the movement as a whole was in fact, complex. Depending on the region, the Art Nouveau style was expressed by artists in diverse ways. Art Nouveau was even referred to differently in the various countries where it developed. The designation “Art Nouveau,” which is most often used today, was first coined in Belgium. The label was popularized because it was used in the name of an important gallery in Paris, Maison de l’Art Nouveau, owned by the German art dealer, Siegfried Bing, who propagated this new style. Almost every area of art and architecture was included in the repertoire of Art Nouveau. Not only were paintings, sculptures, and buildings created in the style, but items that fall under the heading of the applied arts, such as furniture, ceramics, utilitarian glass objects, and textiles, were produced as well.

Flowing, organic lines in an asymmetrical composition, often coupled with large flat patterns of color, typify the look that was embodied by Mucha’s version of the Art Nouveau style. The sinuous lines and asymmetry found in Mucha’s work are characteristic of the earlier Rococo and Neo-Rococo styles, both of which had an impact on Art Nouveau artists in Belgium and France, especially in the design of furniture.

MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

Alphonse Mucha, Cocorico, February 1899; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.


The depiction of the female figure in a sensuous, idealized manner is another feature commonly found with Mucha’s style. Although Mucha would normally start a work by photographing models whom he had carefully posed in his studio, he would beautify these images when he transferred them from photograph to paper. An idealized female of this type appears in Mucha’s exhibition poster for Salon des Cent (Figure 4). A strikingly beautiful woman, nude from the waist up, seated and resting her head dreamily on her hand, while her voluminous, flowing hair cascades down her torso, is captured by Mucha. The elegant flowing lines, asymmetrically arranged imagery, and idealized female form with sensuously exposed flesh, is quintessentially Mucha. Another important factor that had an impact on Mucha was the philosophy of the artists aligned with the movement called Symbolism. The Symbolist movement, which included literature as well as art, was a manifestation of the 19th and

early 20th century preoccupation with spiritualism and the occult. Although Mucha never claimed to be a Symbolist, a number of his Art Nouveau prints have a distinct mystical appearance. For example, with his design for the magazine cover of the 1907 Christmas edition of The Burr McIntosh Monthly (Figure 5), he creates a scene in which a pagan spiritual ritual appears to be taking place rather than an important Christian event. On the cover, he shows a cloaked woman, dramatically illuminated by candlelight, with the fingers of her left hand splayed out and turned towards the front as if leading a séance. The combination of her arresting gaze, Mucha’s use of dramatic contrast of light and dark, and the bold star motif conveys to the viewer a sense of eerie mystery. There were a number of non-Western sources that influenced artists working in the Art Nouveau style, but none as profound as the art of Japan. Principally, it was the importation of Japanese woodblock prints by

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MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

Figure 4 (opposite): Alphonse Mucha, Salon des Cent, 1897; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe. Figure 5 (below): Alphonse Mucha, The Burr McIntosh Monthly, ca. 1907; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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Alphonse Mucha, Combinaisons ornementales, Folio Plate 59, March 1901; Collection of Patrick M. Rowe.

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artists like Utagawa Hiroshige and Katsushika Hokusai that made Art Nouveau artists, as well as the Impressionists and Postimpressionists, aware of eastern ideas. One of the most notable features of traditional Japanese prints that had a major impact on Art Nouveau artists was the modeling of images with flat planes of color. Since the time of the Italian Renaissance until the era of Art Nouveau, most artists in the West shaded images by using chiaroscuro; in other words, they modeled images by changing colors from light to dark. This process, developed by painters like Giotto, Masaccio, and Leonardo da Vinci, created a visual effect that made images appear threedimensional. The Japanese approach was something strikingly new to the Art Nouveau artists. In one of Mucha’s prints illustrating Anatole France’s book Clio (Figure 6), this two-dimensional Japanese process of modeling is used. Additionally, the flowing lines that border and clearly define Mucha’s images, as well as

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the overall asymmetry of the composition, are traits that originate with Japanese woodblock prints. Mucha’s inclusion of organic forms is a feature that stems both from the art of Japan and the Rococo style. Mucha’s women are rarely seen without the framework of a flower, leaf, or branch motif, which also make up many of his repeating decorative patterns. The incorporation of foreign elements, as well as the inclusion of features from a variety of historical European styles, is what makes Art Nouveau “New.” Unlike the earlier revivalist styles, such as Neoclassical, Neo-Gothic, Neo-Baroque, or Neo-Rococo, in which each movement’s ideas were derived from a single source, Art Nouveau was a complex movement where artists borrowed concepts from many different sources and used their creativity to establish an original style. “We are very excited to bring this exhibition to Pensacola Museum of Art,” said the Museum’s chief curator,

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MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau

Figure 6: Alphonse Mucha, Illustration from Clio, 1900; Collection from Patrick M. Rowe.

Mucha’s inclusion of organic forms is a feature that stems both from the art of Japan and the Rococo style. Alexis Leader.“I am appreciative to Dr. Rowe for making this exhibition possible.” In 1998, Dr. Rowe started taking a keen interest in 19th and early 20th century printmaking and began collecting original

prints by Alphonse Mucha. “MUCHA: Master Artist of Art Nouveau” was organized by PMA in collaboration with the Tampa Museum of Art, Boca Raton Museum of Art, and Collection of Jack Rennert, New York. O n V iew

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F re d e r i c k Whitman Glasier: CIRCUS PHOTOGRAPHS

“Glasier’s photographs are not only extraordinary historical documents of the circus during its heyday, they are ultimately about the people themselves.” —P eter K ayafas ,

Above: Frederick W. Glasier, (1866-1950), ca. 1927. Opposite: Miss May Lillie, 1908.

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exhibition co - curator

Glasier’s great strength was as a portraitist, and his photographs reveal an intimate connection with the circus and sideshow performers. “Glasier’s photographs are not only extraordinary historical documents of the circus during its heyday, they are ultimately about the people themselves,” said Peter Kayafas, co-curator of the exhibition and director of the Eakins Press Foundation. “His great talent and his unusual personal relationship with the practitioners of the circus yielded many intimate, revealing portraits, so that even 100 years later, we feel like we are in the presence of these amazing people.” The exhibition is arranged to chronologically illustrate the c om

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event of the circus coming to town. Lithographic promotional posters would vividly announce upcoming performances, with hyperbolic claims about the spectacular events soon to unfold. Examples of these posters are juxtaposed with Glasier’s photographs that document the arrival of the circus, from the excitement of parades that would take over small towns, to the setup of the massive big top tent, which could hold more than 12,000 people. Glasier photographed circus performers captured in the midst of their acts such as the Deike Sisters, a gymnastic family known for “contortional cleverness and muscular control in artistic bending.” He also captured a split-second moment in 2015


F re d e r i c k Whitman Glasier: CIRCUS PHOTOGRAPHS

This page (top to bottom): The Deike Sisters*, ca. 1910; Chief Iron Tail, ca. 1914. Opposite:

Mademoiselle Octavia, Snake Charmer, ca. 1901. *Image not included in exhibition.

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a trapeze aerial act by the Flying Banvards in the photograph, Maude Banvard, The Catch, Brockton Fair (1907). “He was travelling a lot with the artists and thus could build this wonderful relationship,” said Deborah W. Walk, Tibbals curator at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and co-curator of the exhibition. “He had this intimate look that not everyone was able to capture.” A 1914 portrait of Chief Iron Tail, a star of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, captured the strength and dignity of the last survivor of the Battles of Little Big Horn and Wounded Knee. His photograph of Madec om

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moiselle Octavia (ca. 1901), known as the “Yankee Snake Charmer,” has a sensual aspect as snakes writhe over Octavia’s form-fitting, sleeveless outfit. Charmion, Strong Woman (1904), is a bold image of a partially disrobed circus star whose muscular poses challenge ideas of feminine beauty and physical strength. Pete Mardo (1923), is a portrait of Peter Guckeyson, who ran away from home and joined the circus to become a traditional white-faced clown under the name Pete Mardo. Frederick W. Glasier was born on March 5, 1866, in Adams, MA, to parents Henry and Lucy Ann Glasier.

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F re d e r i c k Whitman Glasier: CIRCUS PHOTOGRAPHS

Opposite: Mademoiselle Scheel with Lions, ca. 1905. The Frederick Whitman Glasier: Circus Photographs exhibition is loaned by the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, under the administration of Florida State University. This traveling exhibition was co-curated by Peter Kayafas and Deborah W. Walk in 2008 from the holdings of The Ringling. The companion volume, Circus: The Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier won the AAM 2009 Frances SmythRavenel Prize for Excellence in Publication Design.

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starting his career in photography, Glasier worked as a town clerk and textile designer in his hometown. By 1890, Glasier moved to Brockton, MA, and later opened the Glasier Art Studio and Museum. From his residence, Glasier worked, exhibited his photographs, and sold copies of his prints. By 1900, Glasier took publicity photographs for major circuses and Wild West shows. He had traveled out West and was greatly influenced by William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody. Performers had their photographs taken by Glasier, which they later sold to their fans. While Glasier took scenic shots of the circus and portraits of circus performers for commercial sale, he also documented the daily life of the traveling circus and Wild West show. Glasier also gave public lectures on his photographs to increase his income. The talks that Glasier gave were lantern slide lectures that used his photographs—hand tinted by his wife. These lectures were designed around his photoc om

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graphs of Native Americans, the circus, and the history of the Pilgrims. Glasier used three 8 x10” King view cameras to which he added a Thornton-Pickard focal plane shutter with a speed up to 1/3,000th of a second (just a little longer than today’s camera flash speed and quicker than it takes to blink your eyes!). Glasier also used a Coerz Celor lens on a 5x7” Graflex with an accordion-line pleated focusing hood, as well as a postcard Kodak camera. With all this equipment, Glasier is said to be a master of the “action shot,” capturing an image of an object or person in motion. After over fifty years as a professional photographer, Glasier retired and spent his time wood carving, or “whittling” as he called it. He died on July 28, 1950, in Brockton, and was buried in his hometown of Adams, MA. According to Kayafas, Glasier should be regarded not only as a gifted circus photographer, but also among the greats of American photography. O n V iew 2015


R

FOREVER YOUNG: A Retrospective

RUSSELL YOUNG’s exploration

of American counter-culture represents a journey that bares witness to both the excess and ambition that has helped shape the “American Dream”—a brooding and sometimes brutal celebration of the characters and events that glamorize and chastise in equal measure. Whether through direct visual reference or by title, Young’s work sets out to both assert and challenge our Marlon Brando (Bike), 2009; Acrylic paint, enamel and diamond dust on linen.

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Marilyn Crying Triptych, 2011; Acrylic paint, enamel and diamond dust on linen.

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Young’s upcoming exhibition, Forever Young, which opens December 12, 2015 at Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland, will be a working retrospective, including works from his various series. An internationally acclaimed pop artist, Young is best known for his compelling larger-than-life screenprint images from history and popular culture. His work owes much to the American Pop artists of the ’70s and ’80s. Much of his subject matter is a throwback to these decades, however, unlike the American Pop artists who heralded the age of the “instant celebrity,” Young ruminates on what celebrity means to the famous. “Russell Young’s work takes on the delusions we have as a culture obsessed with sensationalism,” said Adam Justice, Polk Museum’s curator of art. “Unlike Warhol who celebrated the superficial and elevated the mundane, Young dismantles the presumed positivity c om

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of what we consider popular culture and introduces the cold and tragic realization that the camera cannot capture everything; media only proves to provoke and feed our misinformed perceptions.” In addition to recognition for his iconic images, Young is noted for his use of diamond dust. He began using the technique in 2007, pressing the crystals into the enamel of his prints. No two diamond dust pieces are exactly alike as the crystals are applied individually to each work. His Marilyn 2015


“We should all start to live before we get too old. Fear is stupid. So are regrets.” — M a r i ly n M o n r o e Monroe diamond dust pieces continue to reach new highs at public auction—his works have graced the auction block at Sotheby’s, Christie’s, and Phillips de Pury in both the US and the UK. “I consider his signature use of diamond dust as a tactile depiction of the veil that exists between us as viewers, as consumers of popular culture, and those who are products of popular culture, OnV

or those who are consumed,” said Justice. “We are influenced by what the diamond dust represents: luxury, riches, and notoriety. But what exists beyond that veil, the printed portraits of celebrities and historical figures, is something very different; something much less tangible and far from glamorous; something more human.” Born in 1959 “into the cold, wet isolation of Northi e w

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Below (left to right): Buster-Jangle; Crossroads; Redwing; Tumbler-Snapper; and Wigwam from the series Dreamland, California, 2015; Oil and pigments on linen.

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ern England,” Russell Young spent his first few months in foster care before being adopted by Ken and Lesley Young. As a child, he considered his world to be dark. He disliked school and often skipped class. He enjoyed punk music and watching soccer matches. He also developed a fascination with American culture and was drawn to the quintessential “American Dream,” which he thought represented freedom and possibility. Young eventually devel-

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oped an interest in photography and studied photography, film, and graphic design at the Chester Art College. He continued his education at Exeter Art College before moving to London, where he met photographer, Christos Raftopoulos, who offered him a job as his assistant. Raftopoulos also encouraged Russell to branch out on his own and in 1986, Young’s professional career took off with an assignment to shoot George Michael for the album cover of Michael’s

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Left: Russell Young demonstrates his unique, hands-on screen-printing style.

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Faith. His photographs were well-received and he began landing work for magazines and record companies. Young traveled to America and photographed such celebrities as Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Bjork, Paul Newman, and Diana Ross. He then transitioned into television and directed over 100 music videos during the glory days of MTV. In 1992, while his career as a photographer and music video director was flourishing, Russell moved to Hollywood where he met and married actress, Finola Hughes. The couple eventually moved to New York City where Young began to concentrate on art and devote himself to painting. He rented a studio in Brooklyn and began work on his Pig Portraits series, which depicted celebrities through

police mug shots. The series included screenprints of Sid Vicious, Jane Fonda, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Steve McQueen. These pieces were, and continue to be, recognized as uniquely “Russell Young.” The works “attacked the nature of photography, portraiture, and the prickly nature of celebrity itself,” said the artist. While the idea to create “anti-celebrity” portraits was probably a reaction to his former career, they turned

FOREVER YOUNG: A Retrospective

Opposite: Sid Vicious (Yellow), 2007, from the series Pig Portraits; Acrylic paint screenprint on canvas. Below (left to right): Apsaroke Chief, 2010, and Siksika Chief, 2010; Acrylic paint, enamel and diamond dust on linen.

Young’s Pig Portraits “attacked the nature of photography, portraiture, and the prickly nature of celebrity itself.” OnV

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Above: Ali Quad, 2011; Acrylic paint, enamel and diamond dust on linen.

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out to be even more beautiful and iconic. First shown in 2003, they proved a critical success and were exhibited in London and the US. Several series followed Pig Portraits, including Fame + Shame, Rebel Rebel, Shoplifters of the World Unite, Dirty Pretty Things, Bankrobber, American Envy, and Only Anarchists are Pretty. Young’s work has risen to become broadly recognizable among collectors, curators, and international auction houses alike. The artist has described his work as a sort of soundtrack to his life, loves, experiences, and influences. His method of working is to “search, c om

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destroy, and create.” He likes to get his hands dirty in the process of his art, “I like the paint, dirt, blood, sweat, tears, and mess of handpulling paintings in enamel,” Young said. “Screenprinting has a magic that is instant and unique.” His straightforward process and hard-edged imagery are balanced by a keen eye and compositional awareness. His larger-than-life silkscreen images are as compelling and glamorous as the movie stars and musicians who comprise his subject matter. Many of the images coopted for Young’s work come directly from estates 2015


Paris, Berlin, Tokyo, Singapore, New York, Miami, and Los Angeles. His silkscreen paintings have acquired a huge and illustrious fan base, which includes Abby Rosen, David Hockney, Balthazar Getty (of the Getty Museum), Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, David Bowie, and President Barack Obama. O n V iew

FOREVER YOUNG: A Retrospective

Below: American Confessional (detail), 2015; Indigo pigment on raw fiberglass.

and foundations which have granted him permission because of his high regard in the entertainment industry. Young also obtains images from newspaper cuttings, e-bay, long correspondence with police departments throughout the world, and even from celebrities themselves. By combining distinctive images with his creative technique, all of Russell’s work says “Young.” Based on the California coast and in Brooklyn, NY, Russell Young is considered to be one of the most collected and sought after artists of our time. His work has been shown in London, …


FOCUS {LEE

IN THIS NEW EXHIBITION,

MILLER}

Exhibition:

The Indestructible Lee Miller On view 10. 04. 15-02.12.16 at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale www.nsuartmuseum.org

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the remarkable life and work of preeminent artist, Lee Miller, is explored from multiple perspectives: as the favored model of leading photographers such as Edward Steichen and Arnold Genthe during the 1920s; as the assistant, collaborator, and muse of surrealist artist, Man Ray, in the 1930s; and as a pioneering fine art, fashion, and combat photographer. Featuring more than 90 works, the exhibition reveals how her experience as a model for Vogue and for Man Ray influenced her photographic work. Lee Miller was born in Poughkeepsie, NY, in 1907. Her father, an amateur photographer, introduced her to photography and she modeled for him throughout her childhood. At the age of 19, Miller was crossing a New York City street when Conde Nast, the celebrated publisher, rescued her from oncoming traffic. This chance meeting led to the launch of Miller’s career as a fashion model and on the cover of Nast’s magazine, Vogue. In 1929, Miller moved to Paris to study photography with 2015


F O C U S

Man Ray. First as teacher and student, and later as lovers, their relationship was a key source of mutual and sustained inspiration, resulting in some of the most powerful work of each artist’s career. Through Man Ray, Miller came in contact with a circle of surrealists. She adopted their iconography and their strategies of altering pictorial motifs. The exhibition’s title references Man Ray’s sculpture of a metronome featuring Lee Miller’s eye that he titled Indestructible Object. In 1938, Miller moved to London to work as a fashion pho-

tographer for British Vogue. She also began capturing on film the ravages caused by German air raids in London during the Blitz. In 1942, Miller became accredited as a war photographer and moved across Europe at the front line with American troops. Her images of the London Blitz, liberation of Paris, and Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps were among the most powerful photographs of World War II. Profoundly affected by her experiences during the war and after it, Miller returned to England, married, and ceased taking photographs. O n V iew

opposite page: man ray and lee miller, Neck (Portrait of Lee Miller), ca. 1930. © man ray estate and Lee Miller Archives, England. All rights reserved. this page (top to bottom): 1. Lee Miller, Scharnhorst Boy, 1945, Modern exhibition digital print. © Lee Miller Archives, England 2015. All rights reserved. 2. Lee Miller, SS Guard in Canal, 1945, Vintage gelatin silver print. © Lee Miller Archives, England 2015. All rights reserved.


SPOTLIGHT {CHRISTO

AND

JEANNE-CLAUDE}

Exhibition:

XTO + J-C: Christo and Jeanne-Claude Featuring Works from the Bequest of David C. Copley On view through 01.03.16 at Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

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TA M PA M U S E U M O F A RT

is hosting the exhibition XTO +J-C: Christo and JeanneClaude Featuring Works from the Bequest of David C. Copley, as part of its new fall season programming. As the Museum’s new executive director, Michael Tomor, stated, “Christo and Jeanne-Claude, known for their temporal beautiful installations that always disappear from the natural landscape as a condition of the project, are remarkably documented in the most extraordinary, handsomely executed works on paper and photographs on view in the Farish, Ferman and Sullivan Galleries. We are thrilled to bring these works to the Tampa Bay community.”


S P O T L I G H T

Christo is best known for the monumental projects he and his late wife and collaborator, Jeanne-Claude, accomplished over nearly four decades. These include the 24.5 mile-long Running Fence in California’s Sonoma and Marin Counties (1976), the Wrapped Reichstag (Project for Berlin) (1995), and the epic-scale crowd pleaser,

The Gates (2005), which comprised 7,053 fabric banners that spanned the walkways of New York’s Central Park. XTO+J-C presents the artist’s important Wrapped Package (1960) alongside many drawings and collages related to his early wrapped objects—chairs, road signs, motorcycles, and other commonplace items that disrupt our relationship to the everyday through their concealment. The exhibition also includes Christo’s large-scale Store Front (1965–66) and a related series of Show Windows from the early ’70s, which signal an expansion of the artist’s sculptural practice to a new environmental realm. Taken together, this exhibition features more than 50 works by Christo, and also highlights recent gifts from The David C. Copley Foundation and the artist himself, in recognition of Copley’s patronage and support of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego over the years. The late David C. Copley was the most prolific collector of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s work in the US. O n V iew

opposite page: Christo, Wrapped Portrait of Jeanne-Claude, 1963. oil on canvas portrait painted by Christo Javacheff, Wrapped with polyethylene and rope by Christo. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of David C. Copley Foundation. © CHRISTO 1963. Photo: Christian Baur.

this page (clockwise from top left): 1. Christo, Jeanne-Claude, Wrapped Reichstag (Project for Berlin), 1991. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of David C. Copley Foundation. ©CHRISTO 1991. Photo: André Grossmann. 2. Christo, Package, 1960. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of the artist. © CHRISTO 1960. Photo: Eeva-Inkeri. 3. Christo, Jeanne-Claude, Running Fence, Sonoma and Marin Counties, california, 1972-1976. photo: Wolfgang Volz. © CHRISTO 1976.


PORTRAIT {MARY

WHYTE}

I N M A RY W H Y T E ’ S N E W

Exhibition:

Mary Whyte: A Portrait of Us On view 10. 16. 15-01.03.16 at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando www.mennellomuseum.com

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exhibition at The Mennello Museum of American Art, the spirit of our country is presented in the artist’s provocative watercolors of everyday people. Using broad washes of vibrant watercolor coupled with focused areas of intricate detail, Whyte brings to life the expression, perseverance and character of a nation’s citizenry. From Whyte’s paintings of her African-American neighbors in South Carolina to her depictions of weathered farmers and laborers of the Midwest, the artist tells American stories that are contemporary, candid and often moving. Mary Whyte: A Portrait of Us is the final exhibition in The Mennello Museum’s yearlong Storytellers of the South: 2015


P O R T R A I T

Voices of Women series of exhibitions. When Whyte’s paintings are exhibited together, the viewer is offered a rare glimpse into the artist’s private world. Here are the folks Whyte has met along the way and has gotten to know. The result is the feeling that we have ventured into a family reunion, and are surrounded by

faces that feel familiar to us. We are drawn in, and become witness not only to our universal commonality, but also to the life and work of an accomplished artist. Whyte’s paintings have earned international recognition and are held in numerous private, corporate, and museum collections. She is the author of several books, including Working South, Down Bohicket Road and Painting Portraits and Figures in Watercolor. In 2013, the biography of her life and work, More Than a Likeness: The Enduring Art of Mary Whyte by Martha Severens, was published by University of South Carolina Press. O n V iew

opposite page: mary whyte, photo: Jack Alterman. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. Sweet Potatoes,* 2012, watercolor on paper. 2. Graffiti,* 2008, watercolor on paper. 3. Armistice, 2014, watercolor on paper, on loan from the artist. *on loan from Coleman Fine Art: www.colemanfineart.com special events: The Mennello Museum will host an opening reception with Mary Whyte on Friday, October 16, 2015, from 6-8 pm. the artist will also lead tours through her exhibition on October 17, 2015 at 11 aM and 3:30 pm.


FORM { NAT H A N

T H I S FA L L , V I S I T O R S T O

Vero Beach Museum of Art will discover Nathan Sawaya’s unique, custom, three-dimensional sculptures created from LEGO® bricks. One of CNN’s Top Ten “Must-See Global Exhibitions,” The Art of the Brick® is unlike any other LEGO-based exhibition traveling within the US. Sawaya’s show is the first to focus exclusively on the use of LEGO bricks as an art medium, showcasing the artist’s ability to transform these common building bricks into whimsical creations. “These works are very personal to me, since they reflect my growth as an artist as I strove to discover my creative identity,” said Sawaya. The artist’s stated goal is to “engage the

S AWAYA }

Exhibition:

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick® On view through 01.03.16 at Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

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child in all of us while simultaneously illuminating sophisticated and complex concepts.” Unlike art media that have to be explained to visitors, LEGO bricks are familiar to nearly everyone, regardless of whether they have children at home. Versions of The Art of the Brick have traveled to a wide variety of museums throughout the country, from Massachusetts to California—not all of them exclusively devoted to art. For example, the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, one of the nation’s premiere science museums, hosted the show earlier

in 2015. While Sawaya’s exhibition is on view in Vero Beach, a different version of the show will be shown at the Powerhouse Museum of Art, Sydney—one of Australia’s major art museums. Previously a corporate lawyer in New York, Sawaya was the first artist to conceive of LEGO toys as an art medium. His sculptural creations are constructed from countless individual LEGO pieces, and have become increasingly complex since he began making them in 2002. Sawaya believes that “art is not optional,” and hopes that his work will help make art a priority in our schools and homes. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Nathan Sawaya poses with his work, Grasp. 2. Green by Nathan Sawaya, plastic bricks, 70 x 27 x 15”. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. Puddle by Nathan Sawaya, plastic bricks, 22 x 43 x 15”. 2. Dog by Nathan Sawaya, plastic bricks, 29 x 30 x 35”. 3. Balancing by Nathan Sawaya, plastic bricks, 45 x 15 x 15”. 4. Yellow by Nathan Sawaya, plastic bricks, 28 x 35 x 19”. all Photos courtesy of brickartist.com.


On View 10-12.2015  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum and gallery exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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