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Coming into Fashion: A Century of

PHOTOGRAPHY

at Condé Nast AT N O R T O N

MUSEUM OF ART, W E S T PA L M B E A C H

+ Taos The

Society

of ARTISTS AT T H E M E N N E L L O

MUSEUM OF A M E R I C A N A R T, ORLANDO

OCTOBER/ DECEMBER 2014

The Paintings of JOHN MELLENCAMP AT M U S E U M

O F A R T– D E L A N D

& ReTooled: Highlights from the HECHINGER COLLECTION AT T H E

APPLETON M U S E U M O F A R T, OCALA


CONTENTS October/December

2014

Vo l . 5 , N o . 3

RIGHT: MILES ALDRIDGE, VOGUE ITALIA, SEPTEMBER 2002, © MILES ALDRIDGE ON THE COVER : JOHN RAWLINGS, AMERICAN VOGUE, MARCH 1943, © 1943 CONDÉ NAST

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OCTOBER/ DECEMBER 2014

The Paintings of JOHN

Coming into Fashion: A Century of

MELLENCAMP

PHOTOGRAPHY

AT M U S E U M

at Condé Nast

O F A R T– D E L A N D

AT N O R T O N

&

MUSEUM OF ART, W E S T PA L M B E A C H

+ Taos

ReTooled: Highlights from the

The

Society

HECHINGER COLLECTION

of ARTISTS

AT T H E

AT T H E M E N N E L L O

APPLETON

MUSEUM OF

M U S E U M O F A R T,

A M E R I C A N A R T,

OCALA

ORLANDO

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38 West Palm Beach

COMING INTO FASHION: A CENTURY OF PHOTOGRAPHY AT CONDÉ NAST

Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach brings together a selection of rare photographs from the Condé Nast archives in New York, Paris, Milan, and London—the first project of this scope and magnitude to present early work by those who went on to become the biggest names in the history of fashion photography.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50 DeLand

60 Orlando

76 Tampa

86 Boca Raton

JOHN MELLENCAMP

OF ARTISTS

BODY & FORM

TERRESTRIAL

THE PAINTINGS OF

A multi-talented singersongwriter, actor and humanitarian, John Mellencamp is also an accomplished painter. His artwork is the focus of a new exhibition at Museum of Art– DeLand.

THE TAOS SOCIETY

The Mennello Museum of American Art brings to light an enchanting tale of serendipity and the unique charm and beauty of life in the American West.

RUTH BERNHARD:

The dramatic use of light and sensual abstract impressions of the human form are elegantly portrayed in a survey of work at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts.

BRYAN DRURY: VISIONS

An impressive series of hyper-realistic works that challenge the conventions of traditional portraiture will be featured in a new solo exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): JOHN MELLENCAMP, WHY ARE U ANGRY?, 2013; E. MARTIN HENNINGS, UNTITLED

98 Ocala

(RIDING THROUGH THE SAGE

FROM THE HECHINGER COLLECTION

GIFT OF MIRIAM S. HURFORD, 1984;

AND CEDAR), COLLECTION OF THE

RETOOLED: HIGHLIGHTS RIGHT: F.L. WALL, SUMMER TOOL, 1983. PHOTO COURTESY OF EDWARD OWENS.

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART,

Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida presents an engaging look at the unexpected subject of tools with pun, wit, and wonder. OnV

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RUTH BERNHARD, IN THE WAVE, 1945, COURTESY OF FLORA ZBAR; BRYAN DRURY, TRACEY, 2012, COURTESY OF THE DEAN PROJECT GALLERY, MIAMI, FL.

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CONTENTS 2014

October/Dectember

Vo l u m e

5,

No. 3

7

COMMENTARY

8

MUSE

The Baker Museum, Artist-Naples presents an eye-popping survey of work by teacher, civil rights feminist, and anti-war activist, Corita Kent.

Fa s h i o n

120

ICONS OF STYLE

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville celebrates the creative genius of fashion’s makers, models, and media. Retro Style

122

FUTURE RETRO

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Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland offers a rare glimpse into the creative process behind American car design.

Museum exhibitions

Fo r m

34

124

CALENDAR

GALLERY

JIM MILLER: ELEGANT WADERS

A selection of gallery exhibitions and special holiday events.

PICTURED: jim miller, Turkey I, C-print on Endura Metallic paper, 20 x 16”

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Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee presents a stunning selection of photographs that capture the natural splendor of Florida’s shallow-water birds.

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INTO THE FOLD

Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville honors Japan’s leading ceramicists who are among the most innovative and experimental practitioners of contemporary Japanese art.


Fine Arts Fine Cuisine Fine Accommodations

Experience the meaning of

F

ine

The Paintings of John Mellencamp Oct. 10 - Dec. 28

MUSEUM of ART - DeLAND

Athens Theater The Miracle Worker Oct. 3 - 19, 2014; Some Enchanted Evening Favorite Songs from Rodgers & Hammerstein Nov. 14 - 21, 2014; and Irving Berlin’s White Christmas Dec. 5 - 21, 2014 Museum of Art - DeLand The Paintings of John Mellencamp Oct. 10 - Dec. 28, 2014 O, Appalachia: Artists of the Southern Mountains From the Collection of Ramona & Millard Lampell; Chen Chi: Watercolors; and Samuel Blatt Collection Ask about Group Tours & Rates. Now through Jan. 4, 2015 Dally in the Alley is an American Bistro where old fashion values meet hospitality. Each creative plate is perfected with seasonal ingredients from local farms that promise to satisfy your palate and nourish your senses. Artisan Downtown is a boutique hotel experience situated in the heart of vibrant Downtown DeLand. The hotel also has the elegant Sinatra’s Ristorante Downtown and offers a spacious rooftop banquet hall with balcony seating for special functions and celebrations.

E X P E R I E N C E T H E F I N E R T H I N G S I N D E L A N D, F LO R I D A AthensDeLand.com 386.736.1500 I MoArtDeLand.org 386.734.4371 DallyintheAlleyBistro.com 386.279.0161 I ArtisanDowntown.com 386.873.4675


DECEMBER 4-7 2014 W h er e t h e A rt Worl d M eets. . . Art Basel takes place at the Miami Beach Convention Center (MBCC), conveniently located a short walk from South Beach’s many hotels and shoreline. Here the leading galleries from North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Africa present historical works from the masters of Modern and contemporary art, as well as newly created pieces by emerging stars. For all the information you need to plan your visit to Art Basel, Miami Beach, including the show’s hours, ticket purchase and how to book one of the many exhibition tours, visit: https://www.artbasel.com/en/Miami-Beach/For-Visitors/Useful-Information


C O M M E N T A R Y OUR NEW FALL EDITION WILL SEDUCE YOU.

Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at CondÊ Nast (on pg. 38) presents an opportunity to rediscover the work of the world’s most renowned fashion photographers at the dawn of their careers. Provocative and hauntingly alluring, The Paintings of John Mellencamp (on pg. 50) reflects upon the intimate life experiences and passions of a rock and roll icon. The Taos Society of Artists (on pg. 60) brings the American West to life with its breathtaking landscapes and unique rural charm. Dramatic and sensual, Ruth Bernhard: Body & Form (on pg. 76) celebrates light, life and the female form. Have we got your attention? All this and more ahead... Diane McEnaney Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com

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on iew M A G A Z I N E

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney

Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb

Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Contact Us:

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com www.onviewmagazine.com


MUSE

Someday is Now: The Art of

Corita Kent O n v i e w through

at

01.04.15

T H E B A K E R M U S E U M , A rt i s – N a p l e s h t t p : / / a r t i s n a p l e s . o rg

“S

OMEDAY IS NOW”

is the first full-scale survey of more than 30 years of work by Corita Kent (Sister Mary Corita). A teacher, a civil rights feminist and anti-war activist, Corita—as she is commonly referred to—was one of the most popular American graphic artists of the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout her rich and varied career, she made thousands of posters, murals, and signature serigraphs that combine her passions for faith and Opposite: Corita Kent (Sister Mary Corita), courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.


Corita Kent’s art reflects her spirituality, her commitment to social justice, her hope for peace, and her delight in the world that takes place all around us. OnV

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MUSE

politics. Reflecting larger questions and concerns of the 1960s, her images remain iconic symbols of that turbulent time. Corita’s earnest, collaborative approach to art-making—combining faith, politics, and teaching with messages of acceptance and hope—continues to be a potent influence for many artists working today. Born on November 20, 1918, in Fort Dodge, Iowa, Corita spent her formative years as Frances Elizabeth Kent. In 1936, she joined the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles, taking the name Sister Mary Corita. While attending the University of Southern California, where she studied art history, Corita began teaching art at the Immaculate Heart College (IHC), a Catholic liberal arts women’s college in Hollywood, California, run by the Immaculate Heart Sisters of Los Angeles.

handle with care, 1967, serigraph, 23 x 35”, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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At IHC, she developed her own version of Pop art, mixing bright, bold imagery with provocative texts pulled from a range of secular and religious sources, including street signs, scripture, poetry, philosophy, advertising, and pop song lyrics. She used printmaking as a populist medium to communicate with the world, and her avant-garde designs appeared widely as billboards, book jackets, illustrations, and posters. Together with her students, Corita sought out revelation in the everyday, exploring grocery stores, car dealerships, and the streets of Hollywood for inspiration. As Corita’s friend, theologian Harvey Cox, noted, “Like a priest, a shaman, a magician, she could pass her hands over the commonest of the everyday, the superficial, the oh-so-ordinary, and make it a vehicle of the luminous, the only, and the hope filled.”

come alive, 1967, serigraph, 13 x 23”, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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Above: E eye love, 1968, serigraph, 22 x 23”, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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MUSE MUSE Corita was a demanding and inspirational teacher. Seeing herself as a bridge between her students and other artists, she strove to impart the theory of how art was changing in response to changes in the world. She saw art not as separate from humanity, but as an integral part of it. Although the school received national accolades for its educational system, the Sisters at IHC were condemned by their male superiors within the Church. In May 1965, the cardinal archbishop of Los Angeles accused IHC and the Sisters themselves for their implementation of the ideas sanctioned by Vatican II. At least two of his accusations centered around IHC’s famous Art Department: “Why do you permit the use of modern art to portray religious subjects?” and “Do you know that the Christmas cards designed by your art department and the sisters are an affront to me and a scandal to the archdiocese?” He saw Corita’s art as sacrilegious and used her work and teachings as examples when condemning the Sisters for their activities. In response to the constant accusations, the Sisters wrote a declaration for their vision of their future in 1967. The

Top to bottom: for emergency use soft shoulder, 1966, serigraph, 29-3/4 x 36”; mary does laugh, 1964, serigraph 29-3/4 x 39-1/4.” Images courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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M however measured, 1968, serigraph, 23 x 23�, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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MUSE MUSE prologue stated “women around the world, young and old, are playing decisive roles in public life, changing their world, developing new lifestyles...American religious women want to be in the mainstream of this new, potentially fruitful, and inevitable bid for self-determination.” But the pressure from the archbishop continued and in 1970, four hundred Immaculate Heart Sisters of Los Angeles surrendered their vows and reformed as the Immaculate Heart Community. Now they were free to promote their vision of liberation, no longer restricted by male-dominated rules and regulations. Two years before the formation of the Immaculate Heart Community, Corita surrendered her own vows when she went to pursue her career as a full-time artist in Boston, Massachusetts. Even before she left the order, she had been receiving various assignments from outside the Immaculate Heart College art department, including commissions to design book jackets, magazine covers, and advertisements. While in Boston, she received steady work. In 1971, Corita was asked by Boston Gas to design a mural for one of their 150-foot high gas tanks located in Dorchester “to capture, in her unique style, the

Top to bottom: highly prized, 1967, serigraph, 29-7/8 x 36-1/8”; all nations shall come, 1955, serigraph, 18 x 23.” Images courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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Above: Corita with Student, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles; Opposite page (bottom left): Corita’s Love stamp, 1985. More than 700 million stamps were sold.

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MUSE MUSE spirit of Greater Boston as well as Boston Gas, its employees, and its product... [It was believed] her use of vibrant colors, unrestricted movement and imagination [would] accomplish this.” In 1981, the United States Postal Service (USPS) asked Corita to design the third stamp in the famous Love Stamp series. To Corita, her 22-cent Love Stamp (released April, 1985) expressed “good will and harmony that could exist among all peoples.” Throughout her life and up until the day she died on September 18, 1986, Corita remained dedicated to creating art to engage people with the spirituality and joy of everyday life. The Baker Museum’s installation of Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent, will feature 185 works on paper and includes two films by Bailys Glascok, a generous collection of ephemera as well as a booklet with the transcriptions of all works on view. The exhibition is curated by Ian Berry, Dayton Director of The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, and Michael Duncan, independent curator and art critic, in collaboration with the Corita Art Center, Los Angeles, the largest collection of Corita’s work for exhibitions and for sale. The exhibition is made possible with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and Friends of the Tang. On View

Top right: Corita Kent proudly shows off her Rainbow Swash design in front of the Boston Gas tank it will eventually be painted on; Originally created in 1971, the Rainbow Swash was transferred to its present location in 1992 when the original tank was torn down.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

The Freedom of Gesture

AVON PARK

SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture

www.bocamuseum.org

Thru 12.05.14

Bryan Drury: Terrestrial Visions

11.09.14–01.11.15

Polk State College Art Faculty: David Woods & Holly Scoggins

www.bocamuseum.org

Margaret Ross Tolbert

www.mofac.org Thru 12.05.14

Exhibition www.bocamuseum.org

11.09.14–01.11.15

www.mofac.org

Tribute to an American Painter: Robert Butler—Wildlife and Landscape Artist www.mofac.org 12.10.14–01.23.15

Aquiferious:

(See story on pg. 86.)

Thru 10.18.14 BOCA RATON

Boca Raton Museum of Art Thru 10.18.14

Boca Raton Museum Artists’ Guild Biennial

63rd Annual All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition

Elliott Erwitt Photography www.bocamuseum.org 11.09.14–01.11.15

Thru 10.25.14

Shizuka Yokomizo: Forever (and again)

Roberto Matta:

www.bocamuseum.org

www.bocamuseum.org

Image from Elliott Erwitt Photography at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Elliot Erwitt, Santa Monica, California, 1955, © Elliott Erwitt/MAGNUM PHOTOS

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 6 }

Boca Raton continued...

11.09.14–01.11.15

of the Qing Dynasty

Theresa Bernstein: A Century in Art

www.lowemuseum.org

www.bocamuseum.org

11.08.14–01.11.15

CORAL GABLES

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Art in Real Life: Traditional African Art from the Lowe Art Museum

11.08.14–01.11.15

Dale Chihuly

Transformative Visions: Works by Haitian Artists from the Permanent Collection

12.06.14–05.31.15

Satyendra Pakhalé

10.18.14–11.23.14

ArtLab @ The Lowe: Conquest and Coexistence: The Cultural Synthesis of Spanish Colonial Art

Phillip Stearns

www.lowemuseum.org

Thru 11.22.14

www.coralspringsmuseum.org Thru 11.22.14

Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Kurt Knobelsdorf: The Way I See It

www.lowemuseum.org

12.06.14–05.31.15

www.fairchildgarden.org

Thru 04.26.15

www.lowemuseum.org

CORAL

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

SPRINGS

Coral Springs Museum of Art

Thru 11.22.14

Wilma Siegel: Conversations with Veterans

Thru 10.17.14

Karolina Sobeca

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org 12.06.14–12.27.14

www.fairchildgarden.org

Kirsten Swanson Bowen: Because I Said So

Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Thru 10.19.14

12.06.14–02.21.15

China’s Last Empire: The Art and Culture

Sergey Fedotov: Abstract Paintings www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Image from Dale Chihuly at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables: Dale Chihuly, Niijima Floats, 2005, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 6 }

DAYTONA

DELRAY

BEACH

BEACH

Museum of Arts & Sciences

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Thru winter 2014

Contemporary Paintings from the MOAS Collection

Thru 01.18.15

and Modern Photographs from the Syracuse University Art Collection

www.moas.org

Southeast Museum of Photography 10.10.14–02.15.15

Alejandro Almaraz: Portraits of Power

www.smponline.org

www.moartdeland.org

Japanese Design for the Senses: Beauty, Form and Function

(See story on pg. 50.)

www.morikami.org

of John Mellencamp

Thru 01.04.15

Chen Chi: Watercolors

Thru 12.14.14

www.smponline.org 10.10.14–02.15.15

Judith Fox: Sea of Dreams www.smponline.org Thru 12.14.14

Pure Photography: Pictorial

The Growth of a www.moartdeland.org Collection: Part I Thru 01.04.15 www.smponline.org O, Appalachia: Artists of the Southern MounDELAND tains—From the Museum of Collection of Art–DeLand, Ramona Love Florida Lampell & 10.10.14–12.28.14 Millard Lampell The Paintings www.moartdeland.org

DUNEDIN

Dunedin Fine Art Center Thru 10.19.14

Homegrown II www.dfac.org Thru 10.19.14

Land of the Lost www.dfac.org Thru 10.19.14

Plants Illustrated:

Image from Judith Fox: Sea of Dreams at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Judith Fox, Untitled, from the series: Secret Kingdom, dye coupler laser jet print, 32 x 48”

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{ P g. 4 o f 1 6 }

Dunedin continued...

Today’s Botanical Drawings

10.30.14–12.23.14

Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South

Gifted!

www.moafl.org

www.dfac.org

(See story in the July-September 2014 issue on pg. 94.)

www.dfac.org

Thru 12.23.14

Living Matter(s): Invitational exhibit of artists who embrace the LIVING www.dfac.org

Martin Z. Margulies Collection www.moafl.org

10.12.14–02.01.15

Café Dolly: Picabia, Schnabel, Willumsen

(See story on pg. 124.)

Southwest Florida Museum of History

Thru 11.30.14

Emperor’s Thru 01.03.15 River: Sons of the Sun: China’s Grand The Highwaymen Canal— www.swflmuseumofhistory.com Philipp Scholz Rittermann www.harn.ufl.edu

GAINESVILLE

Thru 12.23.14

www.dfac.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

FORT MYERS

www.moafl.org

Lost Worlds Incognita

Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection

11.02.14–03.22.15

American Scene Photography:

Harn Museum of Art

Thru 01.04.15

Eleven: The John Erickson Museum of Art 10 Year Retrospective

10.07.14–07.15.16

Into the Fold:

FORT

www.harn.ufl.edu

LAUDERDALE

NSU Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale

Thru 01.04.15

solo:: together / 50th Annual UF Art Faculty Exhibition

Thru 10.12.14

When the

Image from Living Matter(s): Invitational exhibit of artists who embrace the LIVING at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Bonnie Seeman (bowl), image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center

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{ P g. 5 o f 1 6 }

Gainesville continued...

www.harn.ufl.edu

Thru 11.02.14

Thru 06.07.15

A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art

Patterns Past and Present: Arts of Panama www.harn.ufl.edu Thru 07.26.15

Art, Technology and the Natural World www.harn.ufl.edu

www.mocajacksonville.org Thru 11.02.14

11.15.14–01.18.15

Sri Prahba: Outpost

yardbird records pop-up record store installation curated by Michael Dean

Thru 11.02.14

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.artandculturecenter.org HOLLYWOOD

11.15.14–01.18.15

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Annie Buckley: The People’s Tarot www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 11.02.14

Echos Myron (Group Show)

11.15.14–01.18.15

www.artandculturecenter.org Thru 11.02.14

Bhakti Baxter: Returning What Was Borrowed

Art + Design Faculty Exhibition www.mocajacksonville.org

Thru 10.26.14 11.22.14–03.01.15

Dave Muller: Rock ‘n’ Old www.artandculturecenter.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

11.15.14–01.18.15

www.artandculturecenter.org

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

11.18.14–01.18.15

Project Atrium: Caroline Lathan-Stiefel/ Wider Than the Sky

www.artandculturecenter.org

Monica Uszerowicz: It’s Okay to Cry

JACKSONVILLE

Juxtaposition: Works by Larry Wilson & Laurie Hitzig

Project Atrium: Angela Strassheim

Image from Art, Technology and the Natural World at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Sergio Vega, Feeding the Crocodilian Brain, 2014, lent by the artist

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{ P g. 6 o f 1 6 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Thru 11.30.14

Express Your #Selfie: Art with a Heart in Healthcare

Fashion in the Cummer’s Permanent Collection

ation of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art

www.cummer.org

www.mocajacksonville.org Thru 10.19.14 Thru 01.04.15

Get Real: New American Painting + Jason John Studio Experience www.mocajacksonville.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti www.cummer.org

Florsheim www.polkmuseumofart.org Thru 12.06.14

Future Retro: Drawings from the Great Age of American Automobiles

www.cummer.org 11.25.14–11.29.15

www.polkmuseumofart.org

British Watercolors

(See story on pg. 122.)

www.cummer.org

Thru 12.13.14

Working Title: A Faculty Exhibition

11.01.14–10.04.15

The Sculptures of Chaim Gross

LAKELAND

www.cummer.org

Polk Museum of Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Thru 11.02.14

Thru 10.12.14

12.13.14–03.14.15

A Commemor-

Remembering

Revival: Paintings by Gabrielle Wu Lee

10.17.14–01.04.15

Icons of Style: Makers, Models, and Image

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.cummer.org

(See story on pg. 120.)

12.13.14–03.14.15

10.17.14–02.01.15

Her Ethereal Self: Portraits by Kathy Sosa

Best Dressed: Clothing and

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Image from Revival: Paintings by Gabrielle Wu Lee at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Gabrielle Wu Lee, O Sole Mio! Vires, Artes, Mores—To My Sunshine State, 1988, oil on five canvas panels (relief), 66 x 108”, collection of the Polk Museum of Art, 1988.7

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 6 }

Bass Museum of Art

MAITLAND

Art & History Museums, Maitland

12.04.14–03.29.15

10.10.14–01.04.15

www.bassmuseum.org

One Way: Peter Marino

A&H Artistin-Residence TWO: Leigh Tarrentino

Thru 01.11.15

GOLD www.bassmuseum.org

(See story in the JulySeptember 2014 issue on pg. 132.)

www.artandhistory.org

Cicero Greathouse

Landscapes: Paintings by Larry Leach

www.artandhistory.org

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

10.10.14–01.04.15

MIAMI

ArtCenter/ South Florida 10.08.14–11.02.14

Foosaner Art Museum

Carol Brown Goldberg: Recent Sculpture

Adler Guerrier, Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova, Frances Trombly

Thru 10.12.14

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

www.artcentersf.org

Imagining Reality: Kathleen Elliot and Huguette Despault May

The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

Thru 11.02.14

Thru 01.04.15

MELBOURNE

10.18.14–01.04.15

Embellished: A Celebration of Wearable Art

On Location: Dimensions Variable—Nellie Appleby, Allison Matherly, Cristina Lei Rodriguez

Luminous

http://textiles.fit.edu

www.artcentersf.org

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Thru 12.13.14

Jewish Museum of Florida 11.04.14–03.08.15

The Chosen: Selected Works from Florida Jewish Art Collectors http://jmof.fiu.edu

MDC Museum of Art + Design Thru 11.14.14

Work/Work: New Works by

Image from One Way: Peter Marino at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Jean-Michel Othoniel, Black Rosaries, 2014, mirroed blown glass, glass beads, and metal, 220 x 191 x 9 7/8”, ed 1/1, courtesy the artist. Photo by Philippe Chancel

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued...

MDC/NWSA Faculty www.mdcmoad.org

Pérez Art Museum Miami 10.09.14–03.01.15

Geoffrey Farmer: Let’s Make the Water Turn Black

Dorothy: Celebrating the Vogel Gift

Thru 01.18.15

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

Transition and Revival

Project Gallery: Leonor Antunes

http://thefrost.fiu.edu 10.01.14–01.11.15

12.02.14–03.28.15

Thru 01.25.15

Project Gallery: Mario Garcia Torres

Adler Guerrier: Formulating a Plot

Koizumi Kishio— Remember+ing Tokyo

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 01.11.15

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

10.01.14–01.04.15

www.pamm.org

Project Gallery: Nicole Cherubini

Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

Thru 10.12.14

(See story in the JulySeptember 2014 issue on pg. 68.)

10.09.14–04.05.15

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska

25 Sq. Inches: The Faces of the Permanent Collection

10.01.14–10.26.15

Papua New Guinea: Gogodala Art and Identity,

http://thefrost.fiu.edu Thru 10.19.14

www.pamm.org

Crossroads of the Dystopia: Leonel Matheu

11.14.14–10.04.15

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Project Gallery: Gary Simmons

Thru 10.19.14

Thru 11.16.14

Kept at Bay: Art on Guantánamo

To Herb and

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

www.pamm.org

Image from Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Beatriz Milhazes, Dancing, 2007, acrylic on canvas, 97 x 137”, collection of the artist

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued...

War in Visual Culture

Thru 10.19.14

Marisa Tellería: Still

www.wolfsonian.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu NAPLES

Thru 10.19.14

Simon Ma: Heart. Water . Ink World Tour Exhibition 2014— Tribute to Mr. 11.08.14–01.04.15 Xu Beihong http://thefrost.fiu.edu A Global Exchange: Geometric Abstraction Thru 10.19.14 Stadtluft Macht Since 1950 Frei (Urban http://thefrost.fiu.edu Air Makes You Free): Jacek 11.08.14–01.18.15 Kolasinski, Wang Qingsong: Roberto Rovira ADinfinitum & Orlando http://thefrost.fiu.edu Garcia

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center 10.13.14–11.06.14

International University Koizumi Kishio:

The Naples Art Association Faculty Biennial 2014

Remembering

www.naplesart.org

10.01.14–01.11.15

Tokyo www.wolfsonian.org Thru 11.11.14 BUMMER:

An installation curated by Todd Oldham

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 12.2014

www.wolfsonian.org

11.08.14–12.07.15

Deep Blue by Javier Velasco http://thefrost.fiu.edu

11.11.14–04.05.15

The Wolfsonian– Florida

Myth and Machine: The First World

Gaby Grobo: Horizonte infinito http://thefrost.fiu.edu

10.13.14–11.16.14

SWFL Fine Craft Guild’s Ride the Color Wheel www.naplesart.org 11.22.14–01.05.15

My Life: Artists Reveal Themselves in Their Work www.naplesart.org

Image from Koizumi Kishio: Remembering Tokyo at The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami: KOIZUMI, Kishio, Sengakuji in the snow, 1932

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 6 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Baker Museum, Artis—Naples

Thru 01.04.15

11.22.14–02.07.15

Someday is Now:

Thru 10.25.14

Corita Kent

100 Years

http://artisnaples.org

Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography

of American

(See story on pg. 8.)

www.atlanticcenter

The Art of

10.25.14–02.01.15

Recent Acquisitions to the Appleton Collection

forthearts.org

Abstraction http://artisnaples.org

Septmber 2014 issue on pg. 82.)

www.appletonmuseum.org

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

OCALA

American

Atlantic Center for the Arts

Appleton Museum of Art

Drawings from

Thru 11.15.14

Thru 10.19.14

the Brooklyn

11.08.14–02.01.15

Icons & Idols: A Photographer’s Chronicle of the Arts, 1960-1995 (Selected works)

Outside The Box: Installation Exhibition by Florida Artists [2014 Biennial]

Exploring

www.atlanticcenter

www.appletonmuseum.org

America: Western,

forthearts.org

(See story in the July-

10.25.14–01.18.15 Fine Lines:

Museum http://artisnaples.org

Thru 11.02.14

A Creative Life: Gladys Shafran Kashdin www.appletonmuseum.org 11.08.14–01.04.15

Retooled: Highlights from the Hechinger Collection

Wildlife and

www.appletonmuseum.org

Contemporary

(See story on pg. 98.)

Art from the National

ORLANDO

Museum

Stone-hollow

Orange County Regional History Center

Collection

Thru 11.30.14

http://artisnaples.org

Gone with the

of Wildlife Art and the

Image from Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: handle with care, 1967, serigraph, 23 x 35”, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College and Corita Art Center, Los Angeles.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 6 }

Orlando continued...

Wind: Reel to Real

PALM BEACH

The Society of the Four Arts

www.thehistorycenter.org

(See story in the July-September 2014 issue on pg. 50.)

12.06.14–01.11.15

ToulouseLautrec and La Vie Moderne: Paris 1880-1910

Coming soon... 02.07.15–05.03.15

And Still We Rise: Race, Culture & Visual Conversations www.thehistorycenter.org

www.fourarts.org

PANAMA CITY

American Art

Thru 10.26.14

10.03.14–01.04.15

Between Dreams and Reality: Beau Wild, Fay Samimi and Titane Laurent

Orlando Museum of Art

George Catlin’s American Buffalo

Thru 01.04.15

www.mennellomuseum.com

David Rathman: Stand By Your Accidents www.omart.org Thru 01.04.15

Lamar Peterson: Suburbia Sublime www.omart.org

The Mennello Museum of

10.03.14–01.04.15

The Taos Society of Artists

www.ormondartmuseum.org

www.mennellomuseum.com

11.07.14–12.30.14

(See story on pg. 60.)

Metal and Money in a Material World: Mathew Littekin, and Mark Chew

ORMOND BEACH

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida 10.24.14–11.22.14

26th Annual Faces and Facets Photography Exhibit www.vacnwf.org

PENSACOLA

Pensacola Museum of Art 10.03.14–01.04.15

Guild Hall:

Image from And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations coming soon to the Orange County Regional History Center, Orlando: Laura R. Gadson, Mammy’s Golden Legacy, 2012. Materials: Cotton fabric, acrylic paint, buttons, beads, cotton batting. Techniques: Applique, embroidery, hand painting machine quilting.

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{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 6 }

Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

An Adventure in the Arts— Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Guild Hall Museum www.pensacolamuseum.org 10.17.14–11.29.14

Kim Howes Zabbia: Creativity vs. Fear www.pensacolamuseum.org

The Alice in Wonderland Series

Fall Show

www.pensacolamuseum.org

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

The Cultural Center 11.02.14–11.25.14

Jacksonville Watercolor Society

SARASOTA

www.ccpvb.org

The John and Mable Ringling Thru 11.07.14 Fusion: Ann Kemp Museum of Art & Denise Murphy 10.24.14–01.11.15 www.ccpvb.org Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish 12.04.14–12.26.14 Small Objects American Home, Exhibition/ 1492–1898 Annual Holiday www.ringling.org Art Sale Thru 10.26.14

www.ccpvb.org

Thomas Chimes from the Permanent Collection

Thru 10.18.14

Works on Paper: Selections from the PMA Permanent Collection

www.ringling.org 11.07.14–03.29.15

De Vos Banners

www.pensacolamuseum.org

www.ringling.org 10.24.14–01.03.15

Pat Regan: Roots & Remembrance

Thru 12.07.14

12.06.14–01.31.15

Bandits, Beauties and Beggars: The Etchings of Salvator Rosa

Stefani Joseph:

www.ringling.org

www.pensacolamuseum.org

Image from Fusion: Ann Kemp & Denise Murphy at The Cultural Center, Ponte Vedra Beach: Ann Kemp, Shutters, © 2014 Ann Kemp Photography. All rights reserved.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 6 }

Sarasota continued...

The Dalí Museum

Thru 12.07.14

Danny Lyon: The Bikeriders

11.08.14–02.16.15

www.ringling.org

Picasso / Dali, Dali / Picasso

12.19.14–03.22.15

www.thedali.org

Expressive Bodies: Works from the Ringling Permanent Collection

TALLAHASSEE

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

www.ringling.org

10.10.14–11.16.14

ST. AUGUSTINE

ST. PETERSBURG

Beth Lipman: Precarious Possessions

Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

An Invitiational Exhibition Organized by the Autism Institute

www.ringling.org

Thru 10.18.14

10.11.14–01.18.15

www.mofa.fsu.edu

Thru 02.28.15

Courtney Asztalos: Jamie Wyeth’s Bourbon Street Portraits of www.flagler.edu/crispellert Rudolf Nureyev

Thru 02.01.15

Seeing the Unseen: Photographic and Video Works by Famous Living Chinese Artists www.ringling.org

10.10.14–11.16.14

www.fine-arts.org

FSU Veterans Past, Present & Future

Hand, Voice and Vision: Artists’ Books from Women’s Studio Workshop

Thru 11.09.14

www.mofa.fsu.edu

www.flagler.edu/crispellert

www.fine-arts.org

Thru 10.18.14

Building the Panama Canal: Photographs by Ernest Hallen

10.17.14–11.23.14

Birds of the Enlightenment: Predecessors &

Image from Danny Lyon: The Bikeriders at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Danny Lyon, Memorial Day Run, Milwaukee, 1966; silver gelatin print, gift of Sally Strauss and Andrew Tomback, 2012. Photo courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery and Magnum Photos.

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{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 6 }

Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Rivals of John James Audubon

Thru 12.28.14

www.fmopa.org

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Sosabravo, Homenaje al Aduanero Rousseau, 2001

www.mofa.fsu.edu

(See story on pg. 76.)

Thru 12.12.14

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Ruth Bernhard: Body and Form

10.17.14–11.23.14

Elegant Waders: Photographs of Florida’s Shallow-water Birds by Jim Miller

Tampa Museum of Art 10.11.14–01.11.15

Renoir to Chagall: Paris and the Allure of Color

Art & Antiques Fair

Poseidon and the Sea: Myth, Cult and Daily Life

www.mofa.fsu.edu

www.tampamuseum.org

12.04.14–12.06.14

Disappearing Landscape: Janos Enyedi www.spcollege.edu/museum 10.12.14–01.04.15

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

Uncertain Landscape: Victoria Block and Alain Salesse

10.01.14-10.31.14

www.spcollege.edu/museum

TARPON

Thru 11.30.14

10.12.14–01.04.15

www.ira.usf.edu

www.tampamuseum.org

www.mofa.fsu.edu

(See story on pg. 110.)

Making Sense: Rochelle Feinstein, Deborah Grant, Iva Gueorguieva, Dona Nelson

SPRINGS

Alberto 11.01.14-11.30.14

Kenneth Noland, The Meeting

TAMPA

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.spcollege.edu/museum

10.04.14–03.29.15

Elger Esser: Combray

Chaim Gross: Works from the Collection

www.fmopa.org

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Thru 11.30.14

Image from Making Sense: Rochelle Feinstein, Deborah Grant, Iva Gueorguieva, Dona Nelson at University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Dona Nelson, Shoe Painting, 2011, acrylic and muslin on canvas 59 x 56” (double-sided painting on light gray painted stand), courtesy of the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York, NY. Photos: Will Lytch/Graphicstudio

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 5 o f 1 6 }

Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

12.01.14-01.04.15

American Art

David Anderson, Artist in Search of Imagery, 1989

www.ansg.org

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Sea Rising: A Survey of South Florida Artists

Armory Art Center Thru 10.18.14

12.01.14–02.28.15

Dance Tampa Bay: Photography by Tom Kramer

www.armoryart.org 10.18.14–11.10.14

Everglades and Yellowstone— People and Place

www.spcollege.edu/museum

www.armoryart.org

VERO BEACH

Vero Beach Museum of Art Thru 01.04.15

Carol Brown Goldberg: Recent Works www.verobeachmuseum.org Thru 01.04.15

Kinetic Sculpture: the Poetics of Movement www.verobeachmuseum.org

10.18.14–02.01.15

of Alexander the Great

Restoring the Spirit: Celebrating Haitian Art

www.ansg.org

www.verobeachmuseum.org

11.05.14–03.01.15

W. PALM BEACH

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens 10.22.14–11.23.14

In the Footsteps

10.18.14–11.10.14

National League of American Pen Women (Boca Branch)

Natural Balance: www.armoryart.org The Sculpture of Jerzy Kedziora 10.25.14–12.06.14 www.ansg.org Zammy Migdal/ Gudrun Kemsa Lausberg 12.23.14–02.08.15 Patricia Nix: Contemporary An Icon of www.armoryart.org

Image from Everglades and Yellowstone—People and Place at Armory Art Center, West Palm Beach: Steve Horan, Crimes Against Nature (detail), image courtesy of Armory Art Center

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{ P g. 1 6 o f 1 6 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

12.06.14–01.10.15

125 Years: Women of Vision, National Association of Women Artists, Inc.

on pg. 134.)

Condé Nast

10.02.14–01.11.15

(See story on pg. 38.)

The Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers

12.02.14–03.29.15

www.norton.org

www.armoryart.org 11.06.14–02.15.15 12.13.14–01.10.15

Michael Burges/ Lausberg Contemporary

Master Prints: Durer to Matisse

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Recognition of Art by Women (RAW), featuring Sculptor Klara Kristalova

Thru 01.04.15

www.norton.org

cfam.rollins.edu

12.23.14–04.05.15

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Fractured Narratives: a strategy to engage

www.norton.org

www.armoryart.org

11.20.14–02.15.15

Norton Museum of Art

Coming Into Fashion: A Century of Photography at

Thru 10.26.14

WINTER PARK

www.norton.org

Pastures Green: The British Passion for Landscape

Thru 11.16.14

Nature’s Design: The Art of Car­olyn Cohen and Redenta Soprano

www.norton.org

PLAY! www.norton.org Thru 10.26.14

Wheels and Heels: The Big Noise Around Little Toys

www.polasek.org 11.25.14–04.12.15

Large Birds of Florida: The Art of John Costin

www.norton.org

(See story in the JulySeptember 2014 issue

www.polasek.org O n V iew

Image from The Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Image courtesy of Norton Museum of Art

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MIAMI

Gallery: Zadok Gallery www.zadokgallery.com

Exhibition: LUCAS DAVIDSON: AGITATIONS

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

ON VIEW Thru 10.10.14

Davidson’s unique process of filming the separation of photographic emulsion from its paper backing interrogates the materiality of photography and the fragility of the human form, which is his consistent subject. BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

Exhibition: Manuel Cancel: Everglades & Echoes ON VIEW 10.02.14–11.13.14

“Working on (the Everglades Series), I realized that the paintings related also to places I have seen in Argentina, Uruguay, Spain and France...One big world made of water, floating plants and trees—with all the mystery of it...” Above (left to right): Lucas Davidson, The thin veneer of identity, 2014, C-type print, 49-3/16 x 39-5/16”, edition 3 + 1 a.p., courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery; Manuel Cancel, Everglades IV, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 25.59 x 39.37”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

MIAMI

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: Charlie Cummings Gallery

www.holdenluntz.com

www.claylink.com

Exhibition: Full Color Spectrum

Exhibition: CLAY & PAPER

ON VIEW THRU 11.15.14

ON VIEW

A survey of classic & contemporary color photography, this exhibition is an exploration of the individual views of how color plays a significant component in the various photographers’ image making.

11.01.14–11.30.14

This group exhibition features works in clay and paper. Among the artists represented is award winning Scottish ceramicist, Wendy Kershaw, who creates narrative illustrations on porcelain.

SARASOTA

Gallery: State of the Arts Gallery www.sarasotafineart.com

Exhibition: If These Walls Could Talk ON VIEW 10.01.14–12.01.14

State of the Arts Gallery’s newest exhibition features a figurative collection that makes a statement about the power of the human collective.

Clockwise from top: Michael Massaia, Transmogrify & The Passing of Things - Batman, 2014, archival pigment photograph on Baryta paper, 20 x 16”, image size 19-7/8 x 13-1/4”, signed and editioned # 1/10 on recto., courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Wendy Kershaw, Maud with gold rose, courtesy of the artist and Charlie Cummings Gallery; Brian Miller, Ensemble, 40 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and State of the Arts Gallery

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H O L I D A Y

G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

ORLANDO

Venue: Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Exhibition: Festival of Trees ON VIEW 11.15.14–11.23.14

The Orlando Museum of Art will become a vibrant wonderland of holiday elegance with designer decorated trees, wreaths and gingerbread creations—all for sale!

OCALA

Venue: Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Exhibition: A Dickens Christmas: Urban Family Holiday Collection ON VIEW 11.15.14–01.04.15

The Appleton’s lobby and first floor galleries will be filled with decorated trees, miniature villages, nutcracker soldiers and countless items collected over the years by Dr. Paul and Joyce Urban. This page (top to bottom): Image courtesy of Orlando Museum of Art; Image courtesy of Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida

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H O L I D A Y

G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

DUNEDIN

Venue: Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Exhibition: GIFTED! ON VIEW 10.30.14–12.23.14 NEW SMYRNA BEACH

DFAC puts on its holiday finest for this annual invitational exhibition, this year entitled, GIFTED! Each year, this highly-anticipated event brings together the best art from around the country, with a gift-giving perspective in mind.

Venue: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: SMALL THINGS CONSIDERED 2014


WEST PALM BEACH

Venue: Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

ON VIEW

www.ansg.org

12.06.14–12.27.14

Small Things Considered is Arts on Douglas’s premier year-end art exhibition. The exhibit and holiday sale features original small-scale art work in a range of media, including painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, and photography.

Exhibition: 8th Annual Festival of Trees ON VIEW 12.06.14–12.13.14

The Festival of Trees is one of the finest holiday events in the Palm Beaches. Experience the magic of the gardens with over 25 spectacularly decorated Americana-themed trees, featuring highlights from our 50 states.

Clockwise from top left: Image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center; Image courtesy of Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; Image courtesy of Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

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Coming into

FASHI A CENTURY

of

PHOTOGRAPHY


ION at

CONDÉ NAST

O n

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11.20.14 -02.15.15 NORTON MUSEUM of ART w w w . n o r t o n . o r g OnV

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S


S

Coming into Fashion

eductive, provocative, eccentric, and powerful— fashion photography experiments between commerce and creativity, mainstream and sub-culture, industry and art. More than just purely commissioned work and aesthetic documentation, it not only records the Zeitgeist, individual longings and society’s dreams, it also influences, stimulates and encourages imitation. Incorporating some 150 images created by 80 of the world’s most renowned fashion photographers, Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach presents Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast, on view from November 20, 2014, through February 15, 2015. The exhibition brings together a selection of rare

Previous spread:

photographs and original magazines from the Condé

Miles Aldridge,

Nast archives in New York, Paris, Milan, and London,

© Miles Aldridge

Vogue Italia, September 2002,

and is the first project of this scope and magnitude to

Opposite page:

present early work by those who went on to become the

John Rawlings,

biggest names in the history of fashion photography.

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Coming into Fashion “Coming into Fashion simultaneously charts the history of photography as well as the history of fashion. It is a privileged look at how photographic trends and cultural evolution came to the service of one another,” said the Norton’s William and Sarah Ross Soter cura-

the sculptural creations of fashion into a graphic vocabulary that was both appropriate and specific to the printed page. The way in which the Norton’s installation of the exhibition has been designed will make this correlation readily apparent to our audiences.”

An outstanding glimpse of a constellation of luminaries, legends, and stars— the list of photographers included in this treasury is truly breathtaking. tor of photography, Tim Wride. “One of the fascinating aspects of the show is the dexterity and creativity that photographers have shown as they transformed

Right: Edward Steichen, American Vogue, December 1923, © 1923 Condé Nast Opposite: Constantin Joffé, American Vogue, September 1945, © 1945 Condé Nast

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The discovery of most of the biggest names in fashion photography can rightly be credited to the legendary publisher, Condé Nast, as so many photographers’ careers were launched on the pages of his magazines—predominantly in his flagship, Vogue. During the past 100 years, the publishing house has celebrated the world of fashion in all its spectacular incarnations. The first photographer hired by the company in 1914, was Baron Adolphe de Meyer, followed in later decades by such luminaries as

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Deborah Turbeville, American Vogue, May 1975, Š 1975 CondÊ Nast


Coming into Fashion Edward Steichen, Man Ray, George Hoyningen-Huene, Horst P. Horst, Cecil Beaton and Erwin Blumenfeld. Since his earliest days as a publisher, Condé Nast was a gifted talent scout. By surrounding himself with great artists, he placed Vogue, in addition to his other magazines—most notably Vanity Fair and Glamour, as well as the foreign editions of Vogue—at the forefront of the photographic avant-garde. The Condé Nast studios in New York, Paris, and London were laboratories of creativity, employing artists eager to capture and show off the gems of haute couture. Alexander Liberman, hired as Vogue’s art director in the early 1940s, kept pace with his talented imagemakers. Such photographers as Irving Penn, William Klein, Helmut Newton, and David Bailey were brought on board, and as with their predecessors from the inter-war period, their careers took shape and blossomed, thanks to Condé Nast’s innovative and groundbreaking publications. This great tradition has carried through to present times. In New York, Paris, OnV

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Coming into Fashion London, or Milan, Deborah Turbeville, Bruce Weber, Peter Lindbergh, Ellen Von Unwerth, Corinne Day, Mario Testino, Steven Meisel, Nick Knight, Tim Walker, Miles Aldridge, Sølve Sundsbø or Willy Vanderperre—to name a few—have likewise made their marks not only in fashion magazines but in the history of photography. For this exhibition, photography historian and curator, Nathalie Herschdorfer, was allowed unprecedented access to the Condé Nast archives in New York, Paris, and Milan. Throughout the exhibit, she offers a selection of original photos as well as the pages of the magazines in which they were published, thus giving the viewer an outstanding glimpse of a constellation of luminaries, legends, and stars—the list of photographers included in this treasury is truly breathtaking. Visitors to the show will have the opportunity to rediscover the work of these amazing image-makers at the dawn of their careers. Coming into Fashion highlights the ties between the photographers who, from one

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Sebastian Kim, Teen Vogue, January 2011, Š Sebastian Kim


Coming into Fashion glossy page to the next, have shaped the identity and history of Vogue. The dialogue flows in the most natural of fashions between the elegant interiors of Baron de Meyer and Henry Clarke, the narrative staging of Cecil Beaton and Deborah Turbeville, the snaps of Norman Parkinson and William Klein, the visual experiments of Erwin Blumenfeld and Paolo Roversi, the surrealist games of Man Ray, John Rawlings, and Guy Bourdin, the glorified bodies of Horst P. Horst, Herb Ritts, and Albert Watson, and the portraits of models by Irving Penn, Peter Lindbergh, and Corinne Day. Contemporary films outlining the possible future of fashion photography will be shown during the exhibition. Special programming will also accompany the exhibit along with a fully-illustrated catalog featuring articles by Herschdorfer, and experts, Sylvie Lécallier and Olivier Saillard, and an interview with Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia, with a preface by Todd Brandow and biographies of the photographers by Corinne Currat. Visit www.norton.org for more details. O n V iew O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Above: The fully-illustrated catalog, Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast, will accompany the exhibition. Opposite: Coffin Clifford, Vogue, June 1949, © 1949 Condé Nast.

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The Paintings of John Mellencamp

John Mellencamp is a Grammy® winner, co-founder of Farm Aid, and the creator of a catalog of songs that launched the Americana movement in roots-oriented music. The multitalented singer-songwriter, actor and humanitarian is also an accomplished painter, and his artwork is the focus of a new exhibition at Museum of Art–DeLand. The Paintings of John Mellencamp, which opens on October 10, 2014, includes approximately 50 works of oil and mixed-media paintings showcasing recent works of art by the rock & roll icon never before exhibited at other institutions. The show will be Mellencamp’s first major art museum exhibition in Florida. The Tennessee State Museum in Nashville presented Mellencamp’s first museum exhibition in 2012 and Ohio’s Butler Institute of American Art showcased Mellencamp’s paintings earlier this year. “For more than 30 years, I have been an ardent admirer of John Mellencamp, the heartland rock and populist champion of the people,” said Lois Riggins-

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The Paintings of John Mellencamp

Opposite: Slate, 2013, oil on canvas, 54 x 72”. Below: Self with Green Background, 1993, oil on canvas, 28 x 25”. Photos by Kevin Montague.

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Ezzell, Executive Director of the Tennessee State Museum. “More recently, I’ve become a serious devotee of John Mellencamp, the extraordinarily talented artist.” Mellencamp’s interest in painting began early on in his life but was superseded in the 1980s by his skyrocketing musical career, which includes hit songs like I Need A Lover, Hurts So Good, and Jack & Diane. He is the recipient of Billboard’s Century Award, ASCAP Foundation’s Champion Award, The Woody Guthrie Award, the Americana Music Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Songwriting, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2008. Yet throughout his life, the legendary musician has continued to paint as a means of self-exploration and expression. These paintings may have remained a private “hobby” for the artist had it not been for friend and fellow painter, Bob Dylan, who persuaded Mellencamp to consider showing the work in public. Visitors to Museum of Art–DeLand will have a unique opportunity to view this exceptional soulsearching exhibition.

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Mellencamp’s unbridled creativity enables him to aesthetically express hard-hitting truthful messages with distinctive perception. “Mellencamp’s subject matter is of human existence, painted as simply, starkly, and fully as he himself experienced it,” said Museum of Art–DeLand CEO, George Bolge. “Art is not merely something he uses to clarify his position or to give point to his vision of life, it’s the very substance of who he is and what he wants to say.” “Mellencamp paints handsomely grotesque portraits in oil that are as solemn and stirring as his hit songs are catchy and inspirational,” noted art writer, Doug McClemont, in a review of Mellencamp’s work. “They depict existential scenes and human beings ridden with the angst of the everyday. There are no smiles on the faces of Mellencamp’s painted figures. His sad clowns, ex-girlfriends, creative heroes, imagined outliers, and hillbilly singers are often endowed with oversize hands and facial features, and always with deadpan, proud stares.” Mellencamp’s portraiture has evolved to a personal style that some critics describe as

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The Paintings of John Mellencamp similar to the dark and shadowy paintings of the German Expressionists, including Otto Dix and Max Beckmann. They involve expressiveness by means of exaggeration and distortion of line and color, in favor of a simplified style intended to carry an emotional impact. According to Mellencamp, “German painting remains the basic foundation for what I do, same as folk music is the foundation of my songs. Discovering Beckmann, to me, was like discovering Woody Guthrie or Bob Dylan.” Mellencamp understands the inequality of modern society. His realism is inseparable from his philosophical concerns— he provokes so that people will ask questions about the world around them. His liberal politics are just as evident in many of the paintings. He is the kind of artist that doesn’t sweep the dark side of life under the rug but who pulls the rug back to see what lies hidden underneath, and then tosses it aside to get to the business of clean-

ing it up. “I have a lot of opinions,” said Mellencamp, “This is what I think and you don’t have to agree with me.” “Mellencamp doesn’t wince at grappling with issues of his heart, whether autobiographical or political,” wrote Hilarie M. Sheets, contributing editor for ARTnews and The New York Times, in the 2013-published catalogue, The Paintings of John Mellencamp. “He often paints in a free, more graffiti-like style, layering text and pictographic images on canvases evocative of the frenetic street-art energy of work by Jean-Michel Basquiat.” Born October 7, 1951, Mellencamp grew up in Seymour Indiana, the descendant of German immigrants. His late mother loved to paint landscapes and flowers, and her son fell in love with both art and music at an early age. Mellencamp first went to New York in 1974 with the intention of studying painting at The Art Students League, should his music-career aspi-

American Boy and Girl, 2013, oil on canvas, 34 x 38”. Photo by Joseph P. Rudinec. On loan from private collection.

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The Paintings of John Mellencamp rations not pan out. “Then the damnedest thing happened,” he said. “I got a record deal.” Several years later, he took a break from performing and joined the Art Students League, where he received his first formal training with portrait painter, David Leffel, who taught him the technique of painting dark to light in the manner of Rembrandt and other old masters. “It’s as big a rule as ‘you can’t put the roof on the house until you have the foundation,’” added Mellencamp, who also studied with Jan Royce from the Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis. He honed his skills by his own self-education in art history as well, visiting museums across Europe and America while on tour, and studying a broad spectrum of artists and the mechanics of their work. He is also inspired by the signs and billboards he sees during his travels. For Mellencamp, the songwriting and the painting are very closely knitted together. He will often pick up his guitar

or start a canvas without premeditation and see what suggests itself to him. “Everything is a possible song. Everything is a possible painting.” Mellencamp has also exhibited his work at Gerald Peters Gallery in Santa Fe, Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis, and The Triangle Gallery in Los Angeles. In 1998, Harper Collins published Paintings and Reflections, an overview of the artist’s earlier work. Following the DeLand showing, the exhibition will travel to the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, GA, and will be on view from January 11-April 12, 2015. Mellencamp will return to the Sunshine State for a concert tour stop in Orlando at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on March 22, 2015. Bringing the weight of personal history to both his music and art, Mellencamp always returns home to Indiana, where he still resides—a testament to the power of place and authenticity that permeates his works. O n V iew

Why Are U Angry?, 2013, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 48”. Photo by Kevin Montague.

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W. Herbert Dunton (1878-1936) worked as a ranch hand in his youth. He studied at Cowles Art School in Boston, MA, and briefly at the Art Students League of New York. In 1912, Dunton opened his summer studio in Taos. He worked as an illustrator for popular magazines such as Harper’s and Scribner’s, sketching the West in the summer and composing his illustrations to order in the winter. He settled permanently in Taos in 1921, to avoid the pressure of illustration deadlines. A picturesque character familiarly known as “Buck,” he was one of the most popular of the Taos painters. He wrote Painters of Taos for American Magazine of Art in 1922, emphasizing the advantages of light, color, and Indian life. He also created book jackets for Western classics. W. Herbert Dunton, Deer Hunters’ Camp, ca. 1926, oil on canvas. Collection of the Rockwell Museum of Western Art. Gift of Mrs. George J. Openhym. Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12”


The Taos Society of Artists

The Mennello Museum of American Art concludes its Art of the American West series with the October 3, 2014 opening of The

Taos Society of Artists, an original exhibition curated

by the Museum’s executive director, Frank Holt. The exhibition, which also coincides with the presentation

of George Catlin’s American Buffalo, on loan from the

Smithsonian American Art Museum, brings the American West to light in an enchanting tale of serendipity,

and the beauty and artistic promise of a small, remote village nestled in the valley of northern New Mexico.

Founding members of the Taos Society of Artists (l to r): B.G. Phillips, W.H. Dunton, J.H. Sharp, O.E. Berninghaus, E.I. Couse, and E.L. Blumenschein, 1915, courtesy The Couse Foundation.

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The art and history of the Western states is a passion for Holt, and he decided to mark the museum’s 15th anniversary with a series of complementary exhibits devoted to the

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Art of the American West. A former resident of west Texas, Holt has a fascination with what he calls “one of the more cohesive US artists’ colonies formed at the beginning of the

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20th century, and the only one in that area.” From 1915-1927, the group attracted 12 members—11 men and one woman—by invitation only. The artists had

a common purpose but came from different places. They all found the Taos area an inspiring place to paint—perhaps because of the altitude and wide-open spaces of the high desert region with its sage-dotted plains and the vast peaks of its mountains with forests of pines, aspens, cottonwoods, wild flowers, and wildlife... or perhaps the earth colored adobes that characterize the Taos style...or the piercingly blue and startlingly clear Taos sky with magnificent sunsets that drape the Rio Grande Gorge with splendid clouds of ember reds, glowing oranges, vivid violet, deep pale blues, and a vast array of silver and gray hues. They painted there for a couple of years and then began traveling to exhibit in cities such as Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York. The shows were very successful, almost selling out some years. “America responded to the work because it was truly original,” said Holt. The artistic culture of Taos spans centuries, however the

E. Martin Hennings (1886-1956) was born in Pennsgrove, NJ. Early in his childhood, the family moved to Chicago, where he became intensely interested in painting. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago before starting his career as commercial artist. Disillusioned with pure illustration, he left Chicago to study in Munich from 1912-1914 under Franz Von Stuck, the developer of Jegendstil, the German equivalent of Art Nouveau. The outbreak of WWI forced Hennings’ return to Chicago and in 1917, Carter Harrison, a wealthy patron and former Mayor of Chicago, and Oscar Mayer, Harrison’s partner, offered to sponsor a trip for Hennings to visit and paint in Taos. Three years later, Hennings became a full-time resident of Taos. His admiration for the Taos Indians and his love of the southwestern landscape are evident in his strongly patterned and light-filled canvases. E. Martin Hennings, Homeward Bound, 1933-1934, oil on canvas. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Transfer from the US Department of Labor.


The Taos Society of Artists

Catherine C. Critcher (1868-1964) was born in Westmoreland County, VA, and became the first and only female member of the Taos Society of Artists. She studied at Cooper Union in New York City and the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC. She spent many years in Paris, where she attended the Académie Julian, and then founded the Cours Critcher painting school, where she showed much administrative ability as well as painting talent. She returned to the US in 1909, and became an instructor at the Corcoran School of Art. In 1923, she founded The Critcher School of Painting and Applied Arts in Washington, DC, and served as director until 1940, when she decided to devote herself full time to painting. She first went to Taos in 1920 and in 1924, was unanimously voted into the all-male Taos Society of Artists. Catherine C. Critcher, Indian Drummer, oil on canvas. On loan from Gerald Tracey Gallery. (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12” Peters

establishment of the community as an art colony was due to the adventurous nature of several painters who came to Taos and became enchanted by the unique cultures, breathtaking landscapes, and seemingly unspoiled way of life. Joseph Henry Sharp, a Cincinnati artist who had decided to make the painting of American Indians his life’s work, made a trip to New Mexico during the summer of 1893. Taos particularly impressed him. When he studied art in Paris the following two years, he told others about New Mexico. Two colleagues, Ernest L. Blumenschein and Bert Geer Phillips, took his advice and decided to explore the area during a painting trip which was to take them to Mexico. In September 1898, when Blumenschein and Phillips were traveling from Colorado to Mexico, their wagon wheel broke 20 miles outside of Taos, NM. Phillips won the flip of the coin and got to take the wheel into town for repair. Upon his return with


E. Irving Couse (1866-1936) was probably the most famous of The Society’s members during the early 20th century. He won most every award given by the major national art competitions, and many critics of the day considered him the finest “Indian painter” in America. Consistent with the tastes of the time, Couse’s paintings are also the most romanticized representations of Native Americans to issue from The Society. Born in Saginaw, MI, Couse knew from childhood that he wanted to be an artist. He began his formal art training at the Chicago Art

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Institute. In 1883, he went to Paris to the Académie Julian. Couse and his wife, Virginia, first came to Taos in 1901. He was a great artist and astute businessman, achieving fame and financial success, especially while living in Taos. E. Irving Couse, Flute Player, ca. 1930, oil on canvas. On loan from the Orlando Museum of Art. Bequest of the Mrs. Merrill J. (Ann F.) Gross Estate. Photo by Raymond Martinot.

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The Taos Society of Artists

Oscar E. Berninghaus (1874-1952) made Taos his summer home after a chance week-long visit to the isolated New Mexico village in 1899. The 25-year-old St. Louis native was already a skilled illustrator by that time but would enter the St. Louis School of Fine Arts the following year. His formal training was brief, and Berninghaus essentially taught himself how to bring the landscape and people of Taos to the canvas. Berninghaus was one of the six founders of the Taos Society of Artists in 1915, and settled there permanently in 1925. He achieved national acclaim for his masterful depictions of Southwest Indians within their natural environment. Although less romantic than many of his contemporaries, Berninghaus remained true to a vision of preserving the Indian lifestyle with paint and brush. Oscar E. Berninghaus, Braves of Taos Mountains, no date, oil on canvas. On loan from The Butler Institute of Tracey (detail), American Art. 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12”

the repaired wheel, they decided that the village would be a great place to stay and paint. Blumenschein described his first sights of Taos, “The month was September and the fertile valley a beautiful sight and inspiration for those who ply the brush for happiness. The primitive people of this out-of-the-way region were harvesting their crops by sunlight and by moonlight. Brown people they were, both Mexicans and Indians, happy people with happy children in a garden spot protected by mountains.” Two months later, Blumen-


Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953) was born in Bridgeport, OH, and is regarded as the “father of the Taos Art Colony.” He was the first to visit Taos, sent on commission by Harper’s Weekly in 1893. Even as a child, Sharp had been fascinated with Native Americans and started his career in the West painting highly accurate Indian portraits. Sharp purchased his Taos studio in 1909 and made a permanent move to Taos in 1912. Though he executed many fine landscape and stilllife paintings, Sharp is best

schein returned to New York City while Phillips remained in Taos. The two artists began writing to each other about the possibility of an art colony in Taos. Blumenschein talked about the beauty and artistic promise of northern New Mexico to a wide circle of friends and acquaintances both in New York and Paris. They envisioned an art colony founded on the model of the

French Barbizon painters who, starting in the 1830s, took up summer quarters in the small village of Barbizon to paint directly from the landscape. As a result of their enthusiasm, the Taos Society of Artists became the first art colony west of the Mississippi. Founded in 1915 by Joseph Henry Sharp, Bert Geer Phillips, W. Herbert Dunton, Ernest L. Blumenschein, Oscar E. Bern-

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known for rendering Native figures in local settings, sometimes as expansive as a plaza full of pueblo dancers but often as intimate as a single figure at fireside. Sharp’s romantic, firelight scenes are now considered the signature works of The Society. Joseph Henry Sharp, Aspens in Hondo Cañon Near Twining, no date, oil on board. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Gift of the R.D. Erwin Estate, 1993.

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Julius Rolshoven (1858-1930) came from a wealthy family in Detroit. He studied at the Cooper Union Academy in New York, the Academie of Düsseldorf in Germany, the Royal Academy of Munich, and the Académie Julian in Paris, where he also taught. He returned to the US at the beginning of World War I. A visit to the exhibits in the New Mexico building at the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego convinced him to journey to Santa Fe, where he started painting portraits of the local Indians and set up a studio. His bold brushwork and masterful use of pastels, combined with his painting style of academic tradition, produced paintings that are highly desirable and hard to find. His work is in collections of the Smithsonian Institution, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Portrait Gallery, the New Mexico Museum of Art, and the Detroit Institute of Arts. Julius Rolshoven, Indian Dancer, oil on panel. Signed lower left: NEW MEXICO/J. ROLSHOVEN. On loan from Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12” Gerald Peters Gallery.

The Taos Society of Artists


Bert Geer Phillips (1868-1956) attended the Art Students League of New York and the National Academy of Design before moving to Paris to continue his studies at Académie Julian. He was one of the earliest artists to settle in Taos, and one of the original six members of the Taos Society of Artists. Upon establishing his home in Taos, Phillips developed a particularly strong interest in Indian subject matter. He was very close to the Indians of the Taos area and made their concerns his own. He was instrumental in obtaining a government prohibition

inghaus, and E. Irving Couse, it proved to be a place where they could receive inspiration from the landscape, the Pueblo Indians, the Hispanic community—and the wonderful sky and light. Turn-of-the-century Taos was a small, remote village of Hispanic farm families located next to the centuries old Taos Indian Pueblo. It took some measure of courage for these first artists to move to a town with few Anglo resi-

dents, few tourists, no galleries, and no local market for their art. The local artists of Taos were Hispanic santeros who painted and sculpted images of the Catholic saints for themselves, their neighbors, and their churches. Members of The Taos Society of Artists were an anomaly in such a place. But the landscape, people, and pace of life in this high desert town fired their creativity and provided the inspiration they needed to

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against prospecting on the Taos Indians sacred mountain. Phillips’ deep respect and admiration for the Indian and his way of life led to a never-ending effort to capture the vital spirit of these people on canvas. He idealized his figures, which reflected his romantic vision of the great pure land of the Southwest. Bert Geer Phillips, Indian Firelight, oil on artist board, signed lower right: Phillips. Courtesy of Zaplin Lampert Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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The Taos Society of Artists

Kenneth Adams (1897-1966) was a Taos realist figure and landscape painter, muralist, and lithographer. He began his art education at the age of 16, studying under G.M. Stone in Topeka, KS. After serving in the Army as a private in World War I, he became a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1919, he went on to attend the Art Students League of New York and from 1921 to 1923, he studied in France and Italy, painting landscapes that were exhibited in Topeka. In 1924, Adams moved to

achieve their individual artistic goals. Their work met with consistent critical acclaim and gushing press coverage in every major city where the Society sent its annual traveling exhibitions. Before the disbanding of the group in 1927, the original members would be joined by Walter Ufer, W. Victor Higgins, Julius Rolshoven, Martin Hennings, Catherine C. Critcher, and Kenneth Adams. The end of The Society did not mean the end of the Taos art colony. All of the members, except Critcher, continued to live and work in Taos for the rest of their lives. The images they created, frequently of American Indians in

Taos. He became the youngest and last member of the Taos Society of Artists, and perhaps the most dedicated modernist of them all. He was also one of the most emotionally connected to the Taos Indians. In 1929, he began teaching at the University of New Mexico in Taos. Kenneth Adams, Taos Indian, 1965, lithograph, Edition 1/15. Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12� Private Collection.

By the mid-1920 enjoyed national of the major nati making most of rather than The


W. Victor Higgins (1884-1949) was born in Shelbyville, IN. He left home at the age of 15 to study painting in Chicago, eventually enrolling at the Art Institute there. He then traveled abroad to continue his studies in the great salons of Europe from 1911 to 1913. Upon his return to the US, Higgins’ friend and patron, Chicago Mayor, Carter H. Harrison, arranged for the artist’s first trip to New Mexico in 1914. The trip was a life-changing experience and introduced the artist to an authentic American style he had been looking for. It was love at first sight, and Higgins spent the next 35 years

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of his life painting the Taos countryside and its peoples. Many critics believe Higgins to be the strongest painter of the artists who worked in Taos during this time. W. Victor Higgins, Winter Fields (Pinion Trees), ca. 1930s, oil on canvas. On loan from Gerald Peters Gallery.

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The Taos Society of Artists

Walter Ufer (1876-1936) was born in Louisville, KY. He received his education in Germany at the Royal Academy in Dresden. In 1900, he moved to Chicago and worked as a graphic designer before returning to Europe in 1911 to continue his studies. Upon his return to Chicago, he exhibited his paintings to great praise, and was awarded a travel opportunity to New Mexico as a guest of the Santa Fe Railroad. Taos captured Ufer’s imagination and by 1917, he was an active member of the Taos Society of Artists. His paintings of Taos Indians achieved great notoriety. Ufer saw the New Mexico Indian as an example of a people who had been vanquished by civilization. He depicted the Indian with great detail. His bold, confident use of thickly applied paint was intensified by the vibrant color and sharp contrasting light of Taos. Walter Ufer, The White Pack, oil on canvas. On loan from Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12” Gerald Peters Gallery.

traditional garb, northern New Mexico Hispanos and old-timer Anglo-Americans as well as landscapes, came to define the first decades of the art colony. Together they helped inform the increasingly aware public of the sights and sounds to be found in the area. Their works would be shown in tours that would travel to the major American art markets in Chicago, Cleveland, and New York. By the mid-1920s, most members of The Society enjoyed national reputations, had won many of the major national competitions, and were making most of their sales through galleries rather than The Society’s own exhibitions.  Their works would help build the tourist industry. The Atcheson, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroads would build new tracks into the West. The railroad published 300,000 yearly calendars featuring the work of many of the artists. Fred Harvey would build hotels with restaurants to cater to the increasing crowds of visitors. Tour companies


would take groups from Santa Fe into the high desert to visit the pueblos. Today, The Taos Society of Artists remains one of the best known artists groups in the history of American art. Their paintings are included in major museum collections and featured in exhibits in many parts of the country. “Working on an exhibit by the group has always been on my ‘wish list.’ After many letters, phone calls, visits with gallery owners and museum professionals, it is with a great deal of personal pleasure to bring these paintings, drawings, and works on paper to the Central Florida community,” said Holt. “I can only hope that through the visit, many new fans for the work may be created.” Approximately 40 pieces by all 12 original artists will be on display through January 4, 2015, including paintings, drawings, prints and works on paper. A catalog for the exhibition will also accompany the show. O n V iew O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Ernest L. Blumenschein (1874-1960) was born in Pittsburgh, PA, and studied at the Cincinnati Art Academy, and the Art Students League of New York before enrolling at the Académie Julian in Paris, where he became acquainted with Bert Phillips and J. H. Sharp. Upon his return from Paris in 1896, Blumenschein worked as an illustrator in New York. After an assignment that took him to Arizona and New Mexico, Blumenschein went west with Phillips in 1898. A broken wagon wheel landed the artists in Taos, where he would eventually settle permanently in 1919. A supporter of Post-Impressionism, Blumenschein’s own style is marked by the use of deep, rich colors and a strict sense of spatial geometry and rhythm. Ernest L. Blumenschein, The Burro, 1929, oil on canvas. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Bequest of Henry Ward Ranger through the National Academy of Design.

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Tampa’s FLORIDA MUSEUM of PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS, presents...

ruth bernhard

Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12”


body

form & ON VIEW THROUGH

12.28.14

www.fmopa.org Ruth Bernhard, In the Wave, 1945, courtesy of Flora Zbar.

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ruth bernhard:

body & form

regarded as

one of the greatest photographers of the female nude, Ruth Bernhard’s images are praised for their elegant study of the female form, displayed in exquisitely printed traditional gelatin silver photographs. Through the dramatic use of light and abstraction of the body, she has created images of unique expression, beyond eroticism or fantasy. In addition, Bernhard’s still lifes portray a clear recognition of form and sensuality in objects and spaces apart from the body. Often surrealist, though sharply focused, Bernhard’s photography demonstrates masterful artistry in darkroom printing. In a stunning new exhibition hosted by the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa, Ruth Bernhard: Body and Form presents more than 30 photographs, including the artist’s legendary nudes and still lifes. OnV

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Above: Steven J. Gelberg, Ruth Bernhard (with flower), 1998. Opposite: At the Pool, 1971. Images courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery.

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“light

is my inspiration. It is as cant, it caresses the essenti acknowledge as the energy upon which

“What is remarkable about Ruth Bernhard’s black and white photography is the artistic innovation in capturing the dynamic power of light,” says the Florida Museum of Pho-

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tographic Arts’ director, Zora Carrier. Among the highlights from the exhibition are some of Bernhard’s most famous photographs, including In the

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vital as the model herself. Profoundly signifiial superlative curves and lines. Light I all life on this planet depends.” —R u t h B e r n h a r d

Box, Horizontal, 1962, which portrays a sleeping woman stretched sensuously in a rectangular box—wearing only a headband. Bernhard is well associated

with the history of Northern California’s wealth of eminent photographers, including Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Dorothea Lange and Minor

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In the Box, Horizontal, 1962, from the Collection of the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts.

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White. In a career spanning more than seven decades, she has created an imposing body of work. Distinguished by their exquisite use of light, her images have been internationally recognized and acclaimed by her peers. Ansel Adams hailed her as “the greatest photographer of the nude.” “Each time I make a photograph I celebrate the life I love, and the beauty I know, and the happiness I have experienced. All my photographs are made like that—responding to my intuition,” Bernhard once said. “After all these years, I am still motivated by the radiance that

ruth bernhard:

light creates when it transforms an object into something magical. What the eye sees is an illusion of what is real. The black-and-white image is yet another transformation. What exactly exists, we may never know.” Ruth Bernhard was born on October 14, 1905, in Werder, Germany, near Berlin. The daughter of legendary graphic artist and type designer, Lucian Bernhard, Ruth moved from her native Germany to New York at the age of twenty-one. There, her artistic life blossomed among the designers and artists of the new

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body & form

Opposite: Two Leaves, 1952. Below: Kitten with Guitar, ca. 1951. Images courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery.

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ruth bernhard:

modernist movement who inhabited the vibrant cultural center that was New York in the ’30s. A 1935 encounter in California with photographer, Edward Weston, led to her passion for photography as an artistic medium, and thus began her unending commitment to the making of exquisitely perfected photographs. Bernhard’s photography began appearing in print in the early 1930s, and in the June 1939 issue of U.S. Camera, she was the “American Aces” cover story. By that time, she had produced work on many subjects: children, shells, animals, dolls, still lifes, and nudes.

body & form

Opposite: Angelwing, 1943, courtesy of Scott Nichols Gallery. Below: Hand in Sand, 1946, courtesy of David Hall.

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Her first photograph of the nude was in 1934, but she did not begin concentrating on the genre until the 1950s and ’60s. She worked for decades in a male-dominated field before her own achievements were appreciated. At a time when women were rarely acknowledged in photography, she carved out her own trademark style. Bernhard was a pioneer, photographing the nude long before contemporary society accepted freedom of expression about the naked body. This individuality, combined with great wisdom, has attracted generations of devoted students. For over forty years, she enjoyed a distinguished career as a revered workshop teacher and lecturer. During her lifetime, she had more than 200 exhibitions around the world, and innumerable books have reproduced her images. Ruth Bernhard lived a full life that spanned more than a century. She died on December 18, 2006, at the age of 101. Her passionate exploration of the magic of light and form continues to be an inspiration to generations of artists and viewers alike. O n V iew


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11.09.14 – 01.12.15 at BOCA RATON

Tracey (detail), 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12”. Courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL.


MUSEUM of ART • www.bocamuseum.org

Terrestrial Visions

B R Y A N D R U R Y:

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BRYAN DRURY:

Terrestrial Visions

A

Opposite: Tracey, 2012, oil on wood, 9 x 12”. Below: Bryan Drury at work. Images courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL .

AN IMPRESSIVE SERIES OF HYPER-

realistic portraits will be featured in a new

solo exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum

of Art, on view November 9, 2014 through January 11, 2015. Bryan Drury: Terrestrial

Visions presents a survey of oil paintings from 2008 to the present by the New York-based artist who finds inspiration in challenging the conventions of traditional portraiture. OnV

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Drury challenges the noble and aggrandizing BRYAN DRURY:

Terrestrial Visions

Above (and opposite): Jann (and detail), 2011, oil on wood, 18 x 24”. Images courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL.

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Drury exploits the oil-paint medium to meticulously render the topography and organic quality of the sitters’ flesh. In his work, every pore, wrinkle, and hair follicle is exposed— g a z i n e

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his skillful use of light and shadow highlights the contours of the sitters’ faces, while subtle glossy backgrounds further accentuate the tactile nature of the skin and hair. Drury’s

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aspects associated with traditional portraiture.

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work portrays his subjects so exactingly that one might mistakenly suspect the works to be of highly detailed photographic origin. The painstaking artistry reveals itself upon closer inspection. “I have always sought to emulate and call upon the academic techniques fostered by old master realist painters,” said Drury. “I believe that the human figure is the best source for conveying the general and subliminal aspects of human emotion. I feel that there has been a resurgence of figurative art within the art world today.

BRYAN DRURY:

As a figurative painter, my goal is to apply those techniques in ways that express my perceptions of contemporary culture.” In his portraits, Drury does not acquiesce to expectations of flattery. Instead, he uses the power of oil paint to describe the flaws of his sitters as precisely as possible. He exposes the disconnect between the corporeality of the body and the abstraction of identity, which exists across cultures, religions, and societies. Set against solid backgrounds, his subjects seem separated from the outside world, and their

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Terrestrial Visions

Opposite (and below): Karen Berg, Kabbalah (and detail), 2013, oil on wood, 12 x 16”. Images courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL.

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BRYAN DRURY:

lifeless artificiality imbues the works with a sense of isolation. Overtly descriptive, the portraits unmask the suppressed animal qualities of humans and challenge the noble and aggrandizing aspects associated with traditional portraiture. “I feel the most addictive influences of our culture leave the individual with a false sense of identity through material gain and in turn, a lack of connectedness within society and nature,” Drury explained. “In the end, the individual becomes dependent upon the very system that leaves him

Terrestrial Visions

Opposite (and below): Bhaktivedanta Vishnu Swami, Hindu (and detail), 2014, oil on wood, 9 x 12”, private collection. Images courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL.

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feeling empty and abstracted.” “Bryan Drury’s superbly accomplished application of paint to canvas (without preparatory sketches), classic imagery, and representation of psychological as well as physical state are stunning and an almost singular combination to find in today’s art world,” said Marisa Pascucci, Curator of Collections, Boca Raton Museum of Art. Born in 1980 in Salt Lake City, Utah, Drury relocated to New York in 2001. He received an MFA Cum Laude from the New York Acad-


emy of Art in 2007 and his BFA from The Cooper Union School of Art in 2005. Drury has exhibited and received awards throughout the US and Europe. Among his recent accomplishments, The American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, selected him for their highly prestigious annual Invitational Exhibition 2011. The artist was featured in the April 2011 issue of The Art Economist magazine’s Artist To Watch section. Drury’s paintings were also included in the exhibition, Now WHAT?, at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach—the curators from the Norton Museum proclaimed his piece, Ali, as one of the twenty most engaging works exhibited during Art Basel Miami in December 2010. TIME magazine commissioned the artist for the portrait of Pope Francis for the annual Person of the Year 2014 issue. Most notably, the artist was reviewed by Ken Johnson for The New York Times’ Art in Review, February 2012. In describing Drury’s Portraits exhibition at DEAN PROJECT gallery in Miami, FL, Johnson wrote: “There is a reptilian feeling about these

BRYAN DRURY:

people. It seems pretty clear that Mr. Drury means to portray the souls of a certain species of coldhearted rich folks. In that sense they have an amusing topicality. But there is a strangeness about them that exceeds mere caricature. They might be extraterrestrial beings who have donned human disguises in their mission to take over planet Earth.” On View

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Terrestrial Visions

Opposite (and below): Pope Francis, TIME magazine, 2013, pencil and charcoal on paper, 18 x 24”. Images courtesy of the DEAN PROJECT gallery, Miami, FL.

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TOO

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HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE H

On View

11.08.14 – 01.04.15

APPLETON MUSEUM of ART , Ocala


OOL

ED

HECHINGER COLLECTION

F.L. Wall, Summer Tool, 1983, oak. Photo courtesy of Edward Owens.

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ReTOOLED

Repurposed,

Reframed,

Reimagined... Groundbreaking 20th century

Lucas Samaras, Brush, 1968,

silk screen relief.

Photo courtesy of Joel Breger.

artists illuminate the overlooked subject of tools with pun, wit and wonder. Ocala’s Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida presents an engaging and thought-provoking look at this unexpected focus of inspiration through more than 40 imaginative paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and photographs. Curated by Jared Packard-Winkler and organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington DC, ReTooled: Highlights from the Hechinger Collection will be on view from November 8, 2014 through January 4, 2015. OnV

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ReTOOLED ReTooled celebrates the prevalence of tools in our lives with art that magically transforms utilitarian objects into fanciful works that speak of beauty, insight, and wit. Providing a dynamic entry point into the rich themes, materials, and processes of 20th century art, the exhibition profiles 28 visionary artists from the Hechinger Collection, including major artists such as Arman, Richard Estes, Howard Finster, Red Grooms, Jacob

Tools embody the “can-do” spirit that defines America and the quest to improve our quality of life.

Richard Estes, Nass Linoleum, 1972, screen print. Photo courtesy of Edward Owens.

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Lawrence, Fernand Léger, and H.C. Westermann; photographers Berenice Abbott and Walker Evans; as well as pop artists Jim Dine, Claes Oldenburg, and James Rosenquist. Some of the artists represent tools with reverence to accentuate their purity of design. Others transform and distort c om

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ReTOOLED tools to highlight their tragic obsolescence in a technological age. But all of the works remind us that tools embody the “can-do” spirit that defines America and the quest to improve our quality of life. The show consists of four sections: Objects of Beauty; Material Illusions; Instruments of Satire; and Tools: An Extension of Self.

Walker Evans, Wrench, 1955, gelatin silver print. Photo courtesy of Edward Owens.

Objects of Beauty John Hechinger’s quest to amass a preeminent art collection unifying the theme of tools rested on a notion that everyday instruments could be objects of beauty. In portraying these objects with a tone of reverence, the artists separate object from function, producing works that meditate on tools’ distilled purity of design. By photographing a mundane tool in Wrench (1955), Walker Evans encourages the viewer to appreciate the beauty of line and economy of form.

Material Illusions In this section, artists modify

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October/December 2014

Hugh R. Butt, The Long Road to Usefulness, 1989, painted steel and hardware. Photo courtesy of Joel Breger.


and distort everyday tools to question their functionality. By reimaging a tool in a material that renders it useless, the artist questions how we interact with that object. A vignette of an oakfashioned lawnmower in F.L. Wall’s Summer Tool (1983), (shown on pgs. 98-99), takes on a cynical tone as the tool reduces each unique blade of grass to a uniform height—perhaps a commentary on how products of industrialization simultaneously unify and standardize. Each carefully fabricated work in this section contrasts their mass-produced counterparts that lie dusty in our garages.

By reimaging a tool in a material that renders it useless, the artist questions how we interact with that object. Instruments of Satire While some work, artists play. The artists in this section repurpose, reframe, and redefine tools by injecting a dose of irreverent humor OnV

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ReTOOLED

into an otherwise work-driven world. Claes Oldenburg playfully heroizes a mundane object in the portrait Threeway plug (1965) by imbuing an overlooked item with a larger-than-life status. These works remind us of the joy and sense of play that defines creation.

Tools: An Extension of Self Tools have the capacity to actualize dreams. They embody the “can-do� spirit that defines America and symbolize our unalterable quest to improve our quality of life. The artists in this section illustrate how tools are an extension of ourselves, both as individuals and as a society. Jacob Lawrence astutely observes how tools shape identity by defining profesLeft: Claes Oldenburg, Three Way Plug, 1965, offset lithograph and airbrush. Photo courtesy of Joel Breger. Right: Roger Shimomura, Rinse Cycle, 1988, acrylic on canvas. Photo courtesy of Joel Breger.


ReTOOLED sions in Carpenters (1977). Tools do the work that our fragile bodies cannot. Becoming surrogate limbs, tools compensate for our weaknesses and facilitate our greatest achievements. These artists are keenly aware of how tools represent human nature.

Opposite: Jacob Lawrence, Carpenters, 1977, lithograph. Right: Phyllis Yes, Paint Can with Brush, 1981, mixed media with paint. Photos courtesy of Joel Breger.

ReTooled was organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC, from Tools as Art: The Hechinger Collection, gift of John and June Hechinger.

John Hechinger John Hechinger’s father founded the Hechinger Hardware store in 1911, but it was John, along with his brotherin-law, who grew the store into a renowned chain throughout


the Mid-Atlantic region. John is often credited as one of the major figures in the transformation of the neighborhood hardware store to the “do-ityourself” home improvement business. A fourth generation Washingtonian, community patron, and activist, Hechinger

century art. ReTooled is a dynamic exhibition with a compelling mission: to celebrate an overlooked subject by engaging audiences with wildly creative and thought-provoking works that highlight formative trends of 20th century art. O n V iew

“ReTooled engages viewers with wildly creative and thoughtprovoking works that highlight formative trends of 20th century art. was appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to be the first chairman of the DC City Council. He used his position to advocate for civil rights and diverse neighborhoods. In the 1980s, John Hechinger’s booming chain of hardware stores led him to purchase a new company headquarters. He found the offices to be efficient, but sterile. The barren space sparked an initiative to beautify the headquarters, which launched Hechinger’s acquisition of a tool-inspired collection of diverse 20th O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

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On view 10.17.14 –11.23.14 at Florida State Uni

E

Jim Miller

legant

PHOTOGRAPHS of FLORIDA

Flamingo I, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 20 x 30”

w w w. m o f


iversity MUSEUM of FINE ARTS , Tallahassee

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Jim Miller:

Elegant Waders

W Why are birds beautiful? Why are the forms, colors, rhythms, and patterns that often serve to attract other birds so compelling to people? A new exhibition at the Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee presents a stunning survey of photographs focusing on the particular aspects of birds and their behavior that create a strong emotional response. Elegant Waders: Photographs of Florida’s Shallow-water Birds will be on view from October 17 through November 23, 2014. The exhibition, which also coincides with MoFA’s presentation of Birds of the Enlightenment: Predecessors


Above: Flamingo II, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 30 x 20”. Left: Egret II, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 30 x 20”.

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Jim Miller:

Elegant Waders

& Rivals of John James Audubon, captures the splendor of these creatures, offering bird lovers and nature aficionados alike a breathtaking view of nature at work. Relying on techniques like extreme close-up, tight cropping, vivid color, simple composition, and plain backgrounds, the images reveal birds as most people never see them. The artist behind this remarkable work is Jim Miller, PhD, a senior level consultant in archaeology, historic preservation, and heritage planning, who also served as State Archaeologist of Florida for two decades. The photography and videography of birds in their habitats followed his experience in cultural resource management—and he continues to work in both fields. “These photographs reflect my lifelong interest in Florida and its amazing environments and creatures. As an archaeologist, I have had the good fortune to study and work in many


Above: White Pelican III, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 30 x 20”. Left: Turkey I, C-print on Endura Metallic paper, 20 x 16”.

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natural Florida landscapes and to consider how people and the environment have interacted over thousands of years. These photographs are my way of sharing some of the feelings and emotion that natural Florida evokes.” For Miller, presenting birds so directly is especially powerful. “First, the bird becomes an individual being rather than a distant object; eye contact is established, and as the image is created, bird and human consider each other consciously.

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Jim Miller:

Elegant Waders

Left: Great Blue Heron IV, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 20 x 30”. Below: Reddish Egret I, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 20 x 30”.

Second, the exquisite biological form that is the result of millions of years of evolution is intimately revealed. In the bill, the wing, the foot, the plumage, the elegance of form follows the necessity of function.” Aesthetically, the photographs explore the boundary between representation and abstraction. As they present

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more detail, they become less the birds we know. Their forms, colors, spaces, textures, and rhythms work strongly together as abstract designs. Beginning in early 2003, Miller began to explore the possibilities of close-up bird

photography and eventually found a combination of location, equipment, processing and printing that resulted in unusually strong images. In less than a year, his photographs were accepted in a number of juried and unjuried shows,

Above: Spoonbill III, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 30 x 20”. Right: Spoonbill II, C-print on Endura Metallic paper under acrylic, 30 x 20”.

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Jim Miller:

Elegant Waders

resulting in awards as well as sales. They are now available through Signature Art Gallery in Tallahassee and Newbill Collection By the Sea in Seaside, FL, or by contacting jim@jimmiller.com. On View


SPOTLIGHT

THE CREATIVE GENIUS OF

{ FA S H I O N }

I

Exhibition:

Icons of Style: Fashion Makers, Models, and Images On view 10.17. 14–01. 04. 15 at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville www.cummermuseum.org

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fashion designers, models, celebrities, and media is celebrated in a stunning new show at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville. Drawing on the MFA-Boston’s rich collection of costumes, illustrations, and fashion photographs, Icons of Style examines the process of creating iconic style—from the designer’s original concepts, to the collaboration with the models and muses who exemplify the designer’s style, to the media that reinterpret and disseminate those looks to the world. Organized into three sections, the exhibit first visits the role of the designer in creating iconic fashions and includes garments created for the catwalk by Alexander McQueen, Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel, Helmut Lang, Christian Lacroix, Olivier Theyskens for Rochas, John Galliano for Dior, and Rodarte. Next, the focus turns to the collaboration between designers and personalities in the political and film worlds. Highlights 2014


S P O T L I G H T

include a Yuki dress designed ence. Featured works by major for Princess Diana, an Arnold illustrators and photographers Scaasi gown made for Barbara of the 20th century include Bush, and evening dresses worn Herb Ritts, Edward Steichen, by film stars Kirsten Dunst, Cate Patrick Demarchelier, RichBlanchett, Winona ard Avedon, and “Icons of Style” Ryder, Barbra StreiIrving Penn. celebrates sand, Kristen Davis, Viewers will the interconnected have a rare opporand Kate Capshaw as they walked the tunity to witness roles of “red carpet.” firsthand the richfashion’s makers, The final section ness of design, permodels & media. addresses the art of sona, and image fashion illustration and pho- through the creations of these tography, and the artfulness visionaries who moved beyond of the fashion media in pro- the everyday into new artistic jecting innovative and unique territory, and changed the landimages to a worldwide audi- scape of fashion. O n V iew

Above: Arnold Scaasi, Evening dress*, fall 1958, silk plain/satin weave. opposite page: Arnold Scaasi, Dress*, spring 1982, tulle with applied felt. this page (left to right): 1. Arnold Scaasi, Dress, fall 1982, silk plain weave, Gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, and Daria Petrilli-Eckert; 2. Arnold Scaasi, Dress*, Canary Soprano, spring 1988, silk plain weave, Ostrich feathers, tulle. *Gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, & Daria Petrilli-Eckert.


RETRO STYLE {AUTOMOBILE

DESIGN}

Exhibition:

Future Retro: Drawings from the Great Age of American Automobiles On view thru 12. 06. 14 at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland www.polkmuseumofart.org

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ever felt the allure of the great American automobile, a delightful exhibition currently on view at Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland is a “must see.” Future Retro showcases the beauty and ingenuity of American automotive design during the decades following World War II, a landmark period in car styling. Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the show is comprised of more than 100 drawings from the collection of Frederick A. Sharf, and offers a rare glimpse into the creative process at some of America’s premier car companies. In an eclectic mix of illustrations ranging from preliminary sketches to fully rendered works intended for presentation to car company executives, some of the drawings articulate concepts that would later be incorporated into specific models, while others represent futuristic ideas that were curtailed before making it past the drawing board. A number of drawings examine the acute specifications of automotive design, including the inte2014


R E T R O

S T Y L E

rior elements of the automobile, the significance of sophisticated innovative updates, and features design in the manufacturing of like fins, rims, and lights. cars became paramount. Dating from an era when speed The evolution slowed during and power were increasingly im- war times but in the years folportant factors in automotive lowing World War II, the Amersales, these drawings reference ican Dream took shape. A vithe emerging technologies that sion of prosperity emerged that influenced postwar car design, included the perfect family, a like airplanes and modern home, and “Future Retro” rockets, and presthe ownership of a ent a vision of the offers a rare glimpse vehicle. This was future, rooted firmthe new American into the creative ly in an era past. way of life; it preprocess behind Automotive de- American car design. sented an opportusign began as a simnity, and a thirsty ple evolution from the horse market, for automotive manand carriage. Initially a form ufacturers. The influence of a and function proposition, de- war era, a glimpse to the fusign started to change as a result ture, and a desire for sophisof the 1925 Art Deco fair in Par- ticated design permeated, and is. The importance of style took in-house designers turned out hold in the consciousness of the illustrations as artistic as they buying public, and by the 1940s, were functional. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. peter wozina, oldsmobile proposal, 1958; 2. wayne kady, gullwing car concept drawing, ca. 1960.

this page (clockwise from above): 1. homer lagassey, refrigerated truck proposal, 1960; 2. Richard Arbib, Cyclar Mark IV “Mopod” Vehicle Proposal, 1979; 3. jerry brochstein, malibu sports coupe proposal, 1959. all works are on loan from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection. Photographs © 2014 MFA, Boston.


FORM

AMONG THE MOST INNO-

vative and experimental practitioners of contemporary Japanese art, the ceramicists featured in this new exhibition organized by the Harn Museum of Art have explored the wide and fascinating range of expressive possibilities offered by clay and glazes. The exhibition features both artists whose work is inspired by traditional themes and those who work in—or are influenced by aspects of—the avant-garde. Tensions between form and functionality, traditional and modern, national and international, are often evident across works in the exhibit and within individual works. Groupings of objects suggest particular elements associated with the medium’s development, including tea vessels,

CERAMICS}

{ JA PA N E S E

Exhibition:

Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection On view 10.07. 14–07. 15. 16 at the Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville www.harn.ufl.edu

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master potter pioneers such as Hamada Shōji, Kiatoji Rosanjin, Yamada Hikaru, and Kazuo Yagi; and contemporary leaders such as Nakaigawa Yuki, Katsumata Chieko, Hoshino Kayoko, and Akiyama Yo. The instalbiomorphic forms, geometric lations offer the opportunity to design, monumental and sculp- not only see significant examtural art, and works that exem- ples by these major artists, but plify the ceramic movements in to also reflect on their dynamic Japan known as Mingei (folk art- relationship to tradition. and artisan crafts-inInto the Fold “Into the Fold” spired ceramics) and draws exclusively honors a ceramic Sōdeisha (“Crawlfrom the Carol and ing Through Mud Jeffrey Horvitz Colculture of lection. Guest JapAssociation” that asextraordinary anese art curator, pired to more avantrichness Tomoko Nagakugarde and abstract and diversity. ra, joined the Harn’s ceramics). Thirty-five artists will be rep- Jason Steuber and Allysa Peyton resented, including many of Ja- to create the installation and bipan’s greatest living cerami- lingual gallery guide accompacists. Among them are historical nying the exhibition. O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. ISEZAKI Jun , Bizen Rectangular Vase, 2004, unglazed stoneware, 20-1/2 x 10-3/8 x 7-3/8”; 2. KOIKE Shoko , White Shell, 2012, glazed stoneware, 13-3/8 x 19-5/8 x 19-5/8”.

this page (clockwise from above): 1. KATSUMATA C hieko , Akoda Pumpkin, 2013, sanded glazed stoneware, 15-3/4 x 17-1/3 x 15-1/3”; 2. FUTAMURA Yoshimi , Vasque Bleu, 2010, stoneware and porcelain, 13-3/4 x 17-3/4”; 3. FUKUMOTO Fuku , Moonlight, 2009, porcelain, 9-1/4 x 15-1/4 x 15-1/2”; 4. HOSHINO Kayoko , Unglazed Bowl with Silver Glaze, 2009, 7-1/2 x 12-3/4 x 10-5/8”. all works on loan from the collection of Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz. Photography by Randy Batista.


Feed your kids the Arts. Studies have shown that involvement in the arts helps kids increase test scores and promotes academic achievement. For 10 Simple Ways to get more art into your child’s life, visit AmericansForTheArts.org.

On View 10-12.2014  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum and gallery exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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