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Icons of Style

AT T H E J O H N A N D M A B L E

RINGLING MUSEUM O F A R T , S A R A S O TA

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Private Spaces: Mexico Photographs by Les Slesnick AT M U S E U M O F A R T—

DELAND, FLORIDA

OCTOBER/DECEMBER 2013

Papiers à la Mode:

The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave AT T H E B A K E R M U S E U M , ARTIS–NAPLES

AND

Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft

and Design

AT M U S E U M O F A R T /

FORT LAUDERDALE


CONTENTS October/December

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2013

Vo l . 4 , N o . 3

on iew FLORIDA

Icons of Style

OCTOBER/DECEMBER 2013

RINGLING MUSEUM O F A R T , S A R A S O TA

+

Papiers à la Mode:

The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

AT T H E J O H N A N D M A B L E

AT T H E B A K E R M U S E U M , ARTIS–NAPLES

Private Spaces: Mexico

AND

66 Sarasota

Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary

Photographs

by Les Slesnick

Art, Craft

and Design

AT M U S E U M O F A R T /

AT M U S E U M O F A R T—

FORT LAUDERDALE

DELAND, FLORIDA

ICONS OF STYLE

ON THE COVER:

The Ringling Museum of Art is hosting a stunning exhibition of costumes, illustrations, and fashion photographs celebrating the interconnected roles of fashion’s makers, models, and media.

WOMAN’S EVENING DRESS IN TWO PARTS, OLIVIER THEYSKENS FOR HOUSE OF ROCHAS, FRENCH, SPRING/SUMMER 2005, HELEN AND ALICE COLBURN FUND

LEFT: WOMAN’S EVENING DRESS: KATISHA-SAN, JOHN GALLIANO FOR HOUSE OF CHRISTIAN DIOR, SPRING-SUMMER 2007, MUSEUM PURCHASE WITH FUNDS DONATED BY THE FASHION COUNCIL, MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS BOSTON

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

76 Naples

88 Fort Lauderdale 98 DeLand

110 Pensacola

À LA MODE

GRAIN

OF WAR

PAPIERS

Isabelle de Borchgrave’s luxurious period costumes come to life with her intricate painting and manipulation of paper in this exquisite show at The Baker Museum of Artis—Naples.

AGAINST THE

PRIVATE SPACES:

On view in this exhibition at Museum of Art/ Fort Lauderdale are examples of some of the most cutting-edge conceptual and technical trends in woodworking today.

Currently on display at Museum of Art– DeLand, FL, Private Spaces presents a selection of richly textured interior portraits by award-winning photographer, Les Slesnick.

MEXICO

THE DESIGN

Bold and dramatic in design, the World War I and World War II posters and flags featured in this historic show at Pensacola Museum of Art illustrate the powerful role art played in war efforts.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ISABELLE DE BORCHGRAVE, LA ROBE DE LA REINE MARIEANTOINETTE, 1776, CREATED IN SEPTEMBER 2001, PHOTO: © ANDREAS VON EINSIEDEL; JOSEPH WALSH, ENIGNUM SHELF, 2011, COURTESY OF JOSEPH WALSH RIGHT: A RENDERING OF THE NEW PÉREZ ART MUSEUM MIAMI AS VIEWED FROM BISCAYNE BAY, COURTESY OF PÉREZ ART MUSEUM MIAMI , © HERZOG & DE MEURON

STUDIO. PHOTO: ANDREW BRADLEY;

128 On View Destination:

LES SLESNICK, LA PUERTA VERDE

PÉREZ ART MUSEUM MIAMI (PAMM)

(THE GREEN DOOR) (DETAIL),

Opening this December, the new Pérez Art Museum Miami will transform Museum Park into a central destination on Miami’s cultural map.

…because somebody talked!

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2001, © LES SLESNICK; (detail), Wesley, 1944, United States Government Printing Office

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CONTENTS October/December

2013

Vo l u m e

4,

No.3

5 6

MUSE

The Museum of Fine Arts, FSU in Tallahassee celebrates the life and works of Gabrielle Wu Lee in a stunning retrospective.

HUMBERTO CASTRO: TRACING ANTILLES

Fo c u s

124

REBECCA NORRIS WEBB: MY DAKOTA

This new show at the Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach, portrays an intimate view of the West.

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CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

Spotlight

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GALLERY

Fo r m

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

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PICTURED: phyllida barlow, untitled: hanginglump, 2 (detail), 2012

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The Frost Art Museum in Miami has commissioned Humberto Castro to create a new multimedia site-specific installation.

COMMENTARY

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PHYLLIDA BARLOW: HOARD

Phyllida Barlow’s monumental installations at Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach fully transform the gallery space. .

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TRACEY EMIN: ANGEL WITHOUT YOU

MOCA, North Miami’s presentation of Angel Without You focuses on Tracey Emin’s most notable neon works.


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C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew M A G A Z I N E

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood

With the glitz and glam of the holiday season almost upon us, we’re kicking off our new edition in high style—Icons of Style, on pg. 66, celebrates the roles of fashion’s makers, models, and media with a rich collection of costumes, illustrations, and fashion photographs drawn from the MFA-Boston. The fashion theme continues, only with a twist, in Papiers à la Mode, on pg. 76, where Belgian artist and sculptor, Isabelle de Borchgrave, has turned her passion for painting and masterful manipulation of paper toward creating the illusion of haute couture. In addition, December 5th marks the arrival of Art Basel, Miami, and with it, a host of new shows, events and openings such as Miami Art Museum’s reopening as the new Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) in Museum Park. You can check out our preview in On View’s Destination section, starting on pg. 128. All this and much more ahead—Cheers!

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Sales Representative

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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MUSE

Gabrielle Wu Lee RETROSPECTIVE on view 10.18.13 – 11.24.13 at

MUSEUM

of

F I N E A RT S , F S U , T a l l a h a s s e e

w w w. m o f a . f s u . e d u This article contains material from the commemorative book, “Gabrielle Wu Lee,” produced by The Museum of Fine Arts. Excerpted texts written by Paul Z. Lee, Sharon Hartman, and Allys Palladino-Craig.

T

HE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

celebrates the life and works of Gabrielle Wu Lee in a stunning retrospective spanning the artist’s dynamic painting career. While the reproductions portrayed on the following pages may provide the figurative basis behind her abstracted images clearly, what is missing is the breadth of her surfaces worked and often turned ninety or one hundred and eighty degrees so that liquid paint flows in different directions and materials crystallize into patterns of hue and value.

Opposite: Hula Hula Dancers, 2004, oil on canvas, 48 x 40”, Private Collection. All works by Gabrielle Wu Lee. Photography by Jon Nalon of Tallahassee, Florida


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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

In her concept of “Dynamic Expressionism,” a term of her coinage, Gabrielle was never hampered. She could have worked toward fine draughtsmanship, had she chosen that path, but she chose ideas over figurative illusions. She aimed for forces of nature in transition instead of the photographic recording of her experiences. She had a reverence for tradition, calligraphy, Chinese painting and critical values, yet she possessed the modern urge to depart from convention and to invent her techniques

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MUSE

and her subject matter anew. Gabrielle’s Dynamic Expressionism is an art philosophy, an aesthetic and a brand new set of ideas—her ideas—and techniques rooted in the multi-layered soil of ancient to modern, oriental to occidental civilizations. To express the dynamics of emotion incarnated in her artworks, Gabrielle invented the concept of Dynamic Expressionism. Creative philosophy requires innovative methodology for implementation. Through imagination, practice and experimentation, through years of days and Left: Gabrielle Wu Lee, photo: Paul Z. Lee ; Above: Deep Blue Pacific, 2009, oil on canvas, 36 x 96”

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Dawn / Forest, Glorious Forest, 1991, oil on canvas, 63 x 42”

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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

nights of painstaking yet exciting efforts, through innumerable frustrations, successes and triumphs, Gabrielle developed skills, techniques and styles that were unique, advanced, integrated, and sophisticated to match and visualize her aesthetic theory. Her signature techniques include fluidic textures, diffusion of colors and color intensities, free usage and mixed usage of metallic paints, cursive calligraphy, purposeful dripping and splashing, hard edge merging with soft edge, explosive high contrast coexisting with soothing fading in and out, and innumerable other painterly actions. These techniques are quite revolutionary in oil painting history. However, Gabrielle felt ever more natural and comfortable in applying these new techniques to her paintings. For Gabrielle, to be creative and free was a requisite, not an option, and she always kept to the basic principle

Jade Beach, 1998, oil on canvas, 24 x 36�, Collection of Syauchen and Theodore Baker

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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

that form and technique should obey and serve substance and philosophy. Despite being small and frail, the past consequence of malnutrition and recurrences of rheumatic fever, Gabrielle studied, experimented with and worked avidly on every one of her paintings. For six months in preparation for a solo exhibition at University Center at Florida State University in 2006, she worked almost every evening from 8:00 pm until 3:00 am, then would sleep only briefly so that she could be at her full time job in database programming by 8:00 am the following morning. All her paintings were born of her passionate heart. Gabrielle was born and raised in a highly educated Catholic family in Shang-

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hai, China. Her rigorous education exposed her to the best of Asian as well as Western culture. Her father was a medical professor in physiology and pharmacology at the University of Aurora in Shanghai and Gabrielle also chose the medical profession. As a modern MD in China she understood the very essence of science, from physics to chemistry, from physiology to psychology, from surgery to statistics. After arriving in the United States as a graduate student, Gabrielle earned a Master of Fine Arts (MFA 1986) at Florida State University

Carlsbad Tempo, Southwest Travel Log Series (detail), 1984, enamel on canvas, 48 x 80�

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Womanhood / Glorious Female 3, 2005, oil on canvas, 58 x 40”

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Grand Finale / Glorious Female 4, 2005, oil on canvas, 58 x 40”

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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

from an Art Department that emphasizes the contemporary avant-garde. In her childhood, Gabrielle was encouraged to practice Chinese calligraphy and explore traditional Chinese painting. She later joined a classic Western-style art studio to learn drawing, watercolor and oil painting techniques. She took piano lessons, swimming lessons and played softball in high school and sang in her church choir. Her father took her to many art exhibitions in metropolitan Shanghai. In 1955, the Chinese communist government cracked down on the Catholic Church. Gabrielle, then a 20 year-old medical student, was imprisoned in

Wakulla Springs Myth, 1986, oil on four polygonal canvas panels (relief), 72 x 96 x 4�

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solitary confinement for a full year. Exhausting questioning sessions, meal and sleep deprivation, and refusing her requests for warm clothing in the winter were strategies used to force her, unsuccessfully, to fabricate a self-incriminating confession. After these abuses failed to get a confession, Gabrielle was vindicated and declared totally innocent of all accusations. She was reinstated in the medical college by a formal court procedure. However, her health was forever damaged. Finally in 1984, when Gabrielle was already in the United States, the Shanghai First Medical College reinstated her qualifications and issued her the official MD diploma.

Cardinals Among Oaks, 1988, oil on canvas, 43 x 61�

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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

Beach Sunset—Beach Chroma, 2004, oil on canvas, 48 x 32”

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Tracking with Surf, 2004, oil on canvas, 48 x 32”

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MUSE G a b r i e l l e Wu L e e

In the US, Gabrielle was able to travel with her husband, Dr. Paul Lee, and be closer to nature, to the diversified populations of America and to many other global cultures. The cities and natural sites she visited were visual input for Gabrielle’s fertile mind and the influences of travel informed her approach in the studio. In 1999, Gabrielle was invited to show her paintings at the Biennale International d’Arte Contemporanea di Firenze, Italia. Since that first invitation, every other year, Gabrielle was invited to show her artwork at the biannual exhibition, a total of seven exhibitions until 2011, the year after she died.

Sonata Pathétique in Memory of My Parents, 1983, oil on five canvas panels (relief), 72 x 92”

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A medical doctor and a professional artist, Gabrielle was also a computer programmer for the last 15 years of her life. Throughout her difficult but ultimately rewarding careers, first-hand explorations and experiences were incorporated into her oeuvre and–in every sense–made her studio the home of a true artist of the 21st century. The recipient of numerous honors and awards, Gabrielle has exhibited both nationally and abroad, including at the Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University, Tallahassee; Pensacola Museum of Art; Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland; Maitland Art Center; Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala; and the Biennale Internazionale Dell’Arte Contemporanea, Florence, Italy. O n V iew

Bonnie & Charley, 2004, oil on canvas, 48 x 60”

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

ited there and helped establish the city as an artistic center, tracing the colony’s formative years from approximately 1915 to 1940.

BOCA RATON Thru 11.17.13

Heightened Perspectives: Marilyn Bridges Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Marilyn Bridges obtains her unique perspective by photographing through the open doors of a singleengine plane, capturing identifiable details and revealing the larger complexity achieved from a bird’s eye view. 10.08.13–12.29.13

Nancy Davidson: Let’er Buck

CORAL GABLES

Boca Raton Museum of Art

10.08.13–12.29.13

Southwestern www.bocamuseum.org Allure: The Art Nancy Davidson of the Santa Fe brings feminist and Art Colony popular culture themes Boca Raton to the forefront through Museum of Art

colorful sculptures, photographs, videos, and sound in an exhibition devoted to an icon of American culture… the cowgirl.

12.01.13–05.31.14

Art at Fairchild: Hugo França Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Hugo França’s work Southwestern Allure will be showcased in considers the develthe 2013-2014 season opment of Santa Fe as of Design at Fairchild, an art colony through part of the annual Art the artists who visat Fairchild exhibiwww.bocamuseum.org

Image from Art at Fairchild: Hugo França at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables: Mene lounge chair in pequi wood, designed by Hugo Franca, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 2007, 87” L x 81” W x 30.5” H. Photograph by Tuca Reinés, courtesy of R 20th Century

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tions held in the Garden. Based in Brazil, França uses all natural materials to create functional and sustainable design pieces, often tables and seating. Each piece uses reclaimed wood from felled, burned or dead trees found in Brazil.

11.02.13–01.05.14

Thru 10.13.13

Beauty Beyond Nature: The Glass Art of Paul Stankard Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Pan American Modernism: Avant-Garde Art in Latin America and the United States Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.lowemuseum.org

Beauty Beyond Nature presents more than 60 Thru 04.27.14 of Paul Stankard’s inArtLab @ The tricately flame-worked Lowe: From still life sculptures Ancient Art to encased in clear crysModern Molas: tal from the Robert M. Recurring Themes Minkoff Collection.

www.lowemuseum.org

Pan American Modernism presents the rich visual dialogue between artworks produced by artists working in North, Central

and South America during the modern and postmodern eras. Thru 07.13.14

Terrestrial Paradises: Imagery from The Voyages of Captain James Cook Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Included in this historical exhibit are engravings featuring imagery from Cook’s voyages to the Pacific Islands and South America from 1768-1779.

in Indigenous Panamá Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

11.02.13–01.05.14

From ancient ceramics to contemporary paintings, this exhibition focuses on the art of Panama.

?#@*$%! the Mainstream: The Art of DIY Self Expression, Zines from Spe-

Image from Beauty Beyond Nature: The Glass Art of Paul Stankard at Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables: Paul Stankard, Honeybee Swarm Orb, 2011, blown glass with flameworked elements, TX.2011.2.6-Orb.49, Collection of The Robert M. Minkoff Foundation, Ltd.

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cial Collections, University of Miami Libraries Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

The Museum is hosting a solo exhibition featuring colored pencil drawings from Sandee Berman’s Americana Collection.

www.lowemuseum.org

Fanzines are self-published journals created by “fans” of anything from science fiction to bands to literary genres. Although first created in the early 20th century, they truly took off with the punk rock movement of the 1970s. CORAL SPRINGS

highly regarded for his stimulating paintings about the mysteries of life and love. He also creates bronze sculptures of the human form, which are augmented by natural and organic elements, fusing the figurative with the abstract.

11.23.13–03.15.14

Thru 11.09.13

Andre Desjardins Coral Springs Museum of Art

Breast Cancer Awareness Body Painting Project: A Fine Art & Photography Essay of Survivors

www.csmart.org

Andre Desjardins is

Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

This visually engaging exhibit includes images by Michael Colanero featuring breast cancer survivors who have had their bare torsos painted in the most ethereal ways by body painters, Keegan Hitchcock and Luci Ungerbuehler. Thru 11.09.13

Sandee Berman: Americana Collection

11.23.13–03.15.14

Snowflake Effect Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Snowflake Effect is a remembrance project and juried exhibition of two dimensional winter art by area artists. Thru 11.09.13

William Glackens as Illustrator Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Images from Breast Cancer Awareness Body Painting Project: A Fine Art & Photography Essay of Survivors at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Ribbon in the Sky, body painting by Keegan Hitchcock, photography and digital manipulation by Michael Colanero

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This exhibition features selected works by William Glackens (1870-1938), an Illustrator and an American Impressionist who is considered to be one of the most influential artists in the history of American Art and is best known for his paintings of street scenes and portrayals of daily life.

DAYTONA BEACH Opening 11.15.13

Great Impressions: The Intaglio Process Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

This fascinating exhibition of printed material includes

architectural studies, portraits and figural groups, landscapes, seascapes and city scenes, caricatures and natural history studies from the 17th through 20th centuries. Artists include Rembrandt, Piranesi, Audubon, Hogarth, Manet, Renoir and DalĂ­, the enfant terrible of surrealism.

Thru 11.17.13

Highwaymen: AfricanAmerican Folk Artists of Florida Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Artworks from the MOAS Collection and on loan from the Orange County Regional History Center


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comprise this exhibition of richly evocative and expressive landscapes, prized as part of the history of Florida’s landscape painting as well as for their recordings of Florida’s once pristine lands.

to-coast, Suau’s gritty black-and-white images shed light on the people and events that have shaped this nation since the new millennium alongside those that have been left to deal with the repercussions.

Featured in this show Opening 11.21.13 are works from the Napoleon: Empire Florida Art Collecand Heritage tion of Cici and HyMuseum of Arts att Brown, chosen & Sciences as an overview of www.moas.org the achievements by Napoleon: Empire and women artists. In each Heritage is a panoram- of the works is a piece ic exhibition examinof the wonder that is ing French art, culture the State of Florida. and life from the 1770s to the 1820s. 10.18.13–02.02.14

Women Painting Florida Museum of Arts & Sciences

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb: Violet Isle Southeast Museum of Photography

www.moas.org

www.smponline.org

Thru Fall 2013

This exhibition combines Alex Webb’s dramatic and graphic exploration of street life in Cuba, and Rebecca Norris Webb’s fascination with the unique, quixotic collections of animals she discovered there. Thru 12.15.13

Anthony Suau’s AMERICA: the last best country Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Traveling from coast-

10.18.13–02.02.14

Lee Dunkel: Lyonia–A Florida Upland Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Using traditional black-and-white film and gelatin silver printmaking methods, Lee Dunkel’s photographs poetically bring out the intricate patterns, textures, and shapes that compose Florida’s unique and fragile ecosystem.

Image from Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb: Violet Isle at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Rebecca Norris Webb, Havana, 2008, from the series, Violet Isle, dye coupler print, image size: 25.5 x 34.5” framed

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of sharecroppers, Magdalena Solé: plantations and the The Mississippi sound of the Blues.

state of South Dakota, a landscape dominated by space and silence Delta and solitude, by bruSoutheast 10.18.13–02.02.14 tal wind and extreme Museum of Rebecca Norris weather. My Dakota Photography Webb: My Dakota interweaves the artist’s www.smponline.org Southeast text and photographs Magdalena Solé’s Museum of and was selected as Mississippi Delta is a Photography one of the best photogphotographic explora- www.smponline.org raphy books of 2012 tion of the Delta com- In 2005, Rebecca by PDN, Photo-Eye, munities in the Deep Norris Webb set out to and Time. (See story South, evoking visions photograph her home on pg. 124.) Thru 12.15.13

MUSEUM OF ART - DELAND, FLORIDA EXHIBITIONS & RELATED EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING SEPT. 6/13 THRU JAN. 5/14 Forging an Identity: Contemporary Latin American Art Private Spaces - Mexico: Photography by Les Slesnick Mary Schimpff Webb: Artist/Jeweler Permanent Collection: New Acquisitions l

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Forging an Identity: Contemporary Latin American Art Museum of Art–Deland, Florida www.moartdeland.org

A focus on the historical and sociologi-

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Rated Triple F (Free Film Friday) Series: Oct. 4, 25, Nov. 15, Dec. 6, 7 - 8:30 p.m. l Multi-Media Presentation by UCF’s Dr. Luis Martínez-Fernández: 16 Threads in the Labyrinth of Cuban Culture Oct. 16, 6:30 - 8 p.m. l Lecture by Dr. Carol Damian, Professor of Art History and Director/Chief Curator of the Frost Art Museum Oct. 18, 5 - 6:30 p.m. l Gallery Talk by artist Les Slesnick Nov. 8, 5 - 6:30 p.m. l Poetry Slam: Voces Hispanas on Nov. 14, 7 - 9 p.m. Stetson University (LBC) Rinker Auditorium l Panel Discussion: American Dream – Immigration Nightmare Dec. 9, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Museum of Florida Art - DeLand, Florida 600 N. Woodland Blvd. DeLand MoArtDeLand.org I 386.734.4371 Funding for The Confluence of Cultures programming was provided, in part, through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council (FHC) with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views expressed during this programming do not necessarily represent those of the FHC or the NEH.

Musica Tradicional (Mariachi) l Margaritas, Mexican Craft Beer and Sangria l Mayan Grill Food Truck, Kermit’s Key Lime Pie l Outdoor Films Bombshell Body Art, Sugar Skulls l Prizes for Best Calaca & Frida Kahlo look-a-like A signature event to benefit educational programming at the Museum of Art - DeLand, Florida 600 N. Woodland Blvd. DeLand, Florida Tickets $65 All Inclusive MoArtDeLand.org I 386.734.4371


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cal influences of the expansive Spanish culture, this exhibition reveals the impact Latin American fine art and literature has when artists relocate to Florida, precipitating a “renaissance” among the indigenous local talent.

artists of international renown. DUNEDIN Thru 10.13.13

EnCircled Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org DELRAY BEACH

Thru 01.05.14

Private Spaces: Mexico Museum of Art–Deland, Florida www.moartdeland.org

Private Spaces: Mexico features the works of photographer, Les Slesnick. In his Private Spaces series, Slesnick documents the values of a culture as it is represented in the home and other interior spaces. (See story on pg. 98.)

10.08.13–02.23.14

Breaking Boundaries: Contemporary Street Fashion in Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Breaking Boundaries features some of the most popular and imaginative clothing styles made and worn on the streets of Japan today.

10.08.13–02.23.14

Contemporary Kogei Styles in Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

This exhibition brings together approximately 90 Kōgei-style artworks comprising ceramics, textiles, dolls, and works of metal, lacquer, wood, bamboo, and glass created by 40 of Japan’s most influential and leading Kōgei

Mandalas as universal symbols of the sacred circle can be found in all cultures dating back to the stone age. Created to define sacred space or as a tool to express, contain or regulate sacred energy, this exhibition gathers contemporary artists whose imagery or creative processes evoke that tradition. Thru 10.13.13

Saints Alive! Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Image from Private Spaces: Mexico at Museum of Art–Deland, Florida: Les Slesnick, Two Bicycles and Boy on Bed Watching TV, 1997, © Les Slesnick

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Dunedin continued...

Icons, illuminated pages, shrines, offerings and statuaries—artists declare (and depict) their private Saints in all reverence (or not) in this juried exhibition of works in various media. Thru 12.21.13

Spirited Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Religious folk art from the 19th century to present day, reflecting Guatemala’s ancient Mayan religion as influenced by centuries of superimposed Christianity, introduces us to Maximon (San Simon), Ajits Judas, Rey Pascual and other saints of this living culture.

WinterGarden Dunedin Fine Art Center

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

www.dfac.org

www.moafl.org

www.moafl.org

DFAC presents its annual national invitational showcase of fine art, craft + design.

Against the Grain features nearly 90 installations, sculptures, furniture and objects that explore some of the most cutting-edge conceptual and technical trends in woodworking today. (See story on pg. 88.)

Roman Vishniac is best known for his photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. This exhibition follows his accomplished career from the early 1920s through the 1950s, including recently discovered bodies of work.

11.02.13–12.23.13

FORT LAUDERDALE 10.12.13–01.20.14

Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design

10.19.13–01.04.14

Roman Vishniac Rediscovered

11.08.13–05.18.14

Spirit of CoBrA Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Spirit of Cobra focuses on the unique meeting of a group of young artists from

Image from Spirited at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Collection of Dr. Robert and Chitranee Drapkin

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

several European countries from 1948 to 1951, brought together by a desire to start over after the war and an interest in the legacy of the prewar avant-gardes, especially Surrealism. GAINESVILLE Thru 11.17.13

All the World’s a Frame Harn Museum of Art

characteristics, motives, repeated tropes and expectations embedded in their making. Thru 02.02.14

Bird Mothers and Feathered Serpents: Mythical Beings of Oceania and Ancient America Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

An influential book, The Photographer’s Eye, by John Szarkowski, former Director of Photography at MOMA, NY, is used as the framework from which to examine photographs from the Harn and other www.harn.ufl.edu local collections in Using objects from the terms of their formal Harn Museum’s Col-

lection, this show focuses on mythological beings in art from Oceania and Ancient America, using objects from the Harn Museum’s Collection.

ing radically different expressions of contemporary art and culture in novel and intriguing ways. Artists from Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States work at the intersection of ethics and aesthetics affirming notions of individual difference and communal coexistence. Thru 12.01.13 Joan Miró Harn Museum of Art

Thru 07.27.14

www.harn.ufl.edu

Cosmopolitan: Envisioning Global Communities Harn Museum of Art

Three large-scale bronze sculptures by Joan Miró are featured in this exhibit. One of Europe’s most important 20th century artists, Miró was known for his paintings as well as his whimsical, playful and surrealist sculptures.

www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highlights multiple ways of fostering community through art by link-

Image from All the World’s a Frame at the Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville: Kenneth Josephson, New York State (detail), 1970, gelatin silver print, museum purchase with additional funds from the NEA

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10.22.13–03.23.14

KONGO across the WATERS Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

KONGO across the WATERS celebrates Kongo influenced cultural traditions primarily in the southeastern United States, including Florida. Thru 10.13.13

travels in the late 19th selection of engravcentury. ings and woodcuts of herbal prints dating Thru 11.17.13 from the 16th to 18th Plants and centuries. Medicine: Art and Science in Botanical Prints Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This survey of works explores the topic of plants as medicinal treatment through a

Picturing Florida Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Picturing Florida features landscapes by Herman Herzog (1831-1932) and Frank Hamilton Taylor (1846-1927), two artists who captured scenes of Florida during their

different regions of India and surrounding areas during the 17th to 19th centuries. HOLLYWOOD

Thru 01.05.14

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting Harn Museum of Art

Charles LaBelle Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.artandculturecenter.org

11.08.13–01.12.14

This exhibition offers a Charles LaBelle glimpse into the richplayfully combines ness of painting from activities such as mapping, documenting, archiving and intervening into poignant, often humorous, ends that jar the viewer’s perception as themes of transience, loss, alienation and mortality become apparent in the work. Thru 10.27.13

Dana Lauren Goldstein: Black Eyes

Image from KONGO across the WATERS at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Woyo peoples, Banana, Lower Congo, DRC, Ndunga mask, early 20th century, collection RMCA Tervuren, EO.0.0.34579. Photo R. Asselberghs, RMCA Tervuren ©

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Johnny Laderer’s sitespecific installations incorporate reclaimed materials, both natural and artificial, to form a current landscape upon which the artist builds his visual narratives.

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Dana Lauren Goldstein is an American documentary-style photographer highly influenced by everyday life. She draws inspiration mainly from paintings, film, and music. Art and Thru 10.27.13

Francesco LoCastro: Advent Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

For this exhibition, LoCastro delves further into his Geometry series with a new body of mixed-media work and video animation. 11.08.13–01.12.14

Francie Bishop Good

Thru 10.27.13

This selection of new Culture Center works by Jessy Nite of Hollywood explores the end result www.artandculturecenter.org of repeated behaviors Francie Bishop Good’s through the artist’s photographs suspend signature lens of faded the contemplative mo- tropical dreams. The ments of women in the breadth of the collecflux of desire, affirma- tion is reflected in her tion, and responsibility. vibrant color palate and expertly crafted in Thru 10.27.13 an array of mediums. Jessy Nite: Behavioral Patterns Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 10.27.13

Johnny Laderer Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Peter Hammar: Zeitgeber Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

A “zeitgeber” is any outside stimulus that syncs the body’s internal clock with the 24-hour day and the 12-month year. Hammar’s multimedia works comment on the different chronologies at play in our life. 11.08.13–01.12.14

Sarah Michelle Rupert

Image from Francesco LoCastro: Advent at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Francesco LoCastro ,Transgenesis, 2013, acrylic, silkscreen, spray paint & layered epoxy resin on wood, 36 x 48 x 3”

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Working with photography, video, collage, drawing and design, Rupert’s work revolves around consumer, mass-communication and television culture in contemporary experience. JACKSONVILLE

aesthetic, and material boundaries of abstract painting. Abstraction over Time focuses on the artist’s stylistic evolutions while exploring the significance of abstraction as a vital 20th century postwar American Art.

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

Joseph D. Jachna’s photographs of the natural world balance respectful objectivity with a meditative, abstractionist aesthetic.

Enzo Torcoletti’s sculptures reflect a symbolic diversity of the human form. Working in stone, wood, and other materials, he completes each step of the process himself—from the design sketches to the finished casting.

Thru 10.20.13

Kept Time: Photographs by Joseph D. Jachna, 1958–2012

10.29.13–01.19.14

Mythos: From Concept to Creation

Thru 01.05.14

Thru 10.27.13

Abstraction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Project Atrium: Heather Cox Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Heather Cox explores the distillation of the human figure in her new project, Crush, where bodies that appear to have gone through an egg slicer

www.mocajacksonville.org

Over the course of his long career, Michael Goldberg reconceptualized the visual,

Image from Abstraction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Michael Goldberg, Summer House, 1958, Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; Gift of Seymour H Knox, Jr., 1958, © 1981 Michael Goldberg

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

are reassembled to create compelling and uncomfortable distortions of the figures.

Thru 10.20.13

La Florida The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

11.16.13–03.09.14

Project Atrium: Ingrid Calame— Tarred Over Cracks Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Ingrid Calame will complete a dramatic wall painting this fall at MOCA Jacksonville. Based on urban spills, stains, and graffiti marks painstakingly traced and rearranged in the artist’s studio, her works combine precise gestures with an equally focused use of color.

Thru 12.01.13

12.08.13–01.26.14

Reflections: Art with a Heart in Healthcare Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Unseen Images, Untold Stories: The Lives of LGBT Elders in Northeast Florida Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

www.mocajacksonville.org

Art with a Heart in Healthcare provides fine art experiences that enhance the healing process for its patients and their families. This installation presents works created by pediatric patients in collaboration with artists, volunteers and interns.

www.mocajacksonville.org

This exhibition raises awareness through story and portraiture about the unique challenges LGBT (Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) elders face, including human rights issues.

La Florida showcases this beautiful state through the centuries. Included as part of this installation are Florida landscapes by Winslow Homer, Herman Herzog, Martin Johnson Heade and Frederick Frieseke, among others. 10.19.13–01.05.14

Modern Dialect: American Paintings from the John and Susan Horseman Collection The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Image from Modern Dialect: American Paintings from the John and Susan Horseman Collection at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: August Biehle (1885-1979), Cleveland West Side, Hillside Houses, ca. 1914-1917, oil on board, Collection of John and Susan Horseman

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Modern Dialect reveals the scope of the American modernist aesthetic and the vision and integrity each of the more than 40 featured artists brought to the representation of the American experience.

11.26.13–02.16.14

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition is

designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows. It is one of only five known works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar and was declared the “most important discovery in early

German painting” by art historian, Colin Eisler, when it entered the collection in 1984. 10.29.13–07.08.14

The Prints of William Walmsley The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

10.17.13–05.25.14

Our Shared Past The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

This exhibition highlights the works of William Walmsley, an impressive printmaker who holds the record for the longest series of prints in the history of art. He is also the inventor of florescent lithography.

www.cummer.org

Our Shared Past came about when guest curator, Jefree Shalev, rediscovered a box of 8 mmm home movies from 1957 through 1968. Selecting 200 single frames from these movies, he then invited 32 local artists to create a new work of art, inspired by these moments.

LAKELAND Thru 11.09.13

A Silver Lining Polk Museum of Art

Image from The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Master of the Stötteritz Altar (German, active late 15th century), Mother of Sorrows, ca. 1480, oil on panel, 8.75 x 6.5”, gift of Mrs. Clifford G. Schultz in memory of Mr. Clifford G. Schultz, AG.1984.1.1

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North America, Europe and Asia, this second edition, reGeneration2, turns the spotlight on new, up-andcoming talents from 31 countries.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

This exhibition showcases PMoA’s collection of Georgian silver, which refers to the period of the consecutive reigns of four English kings: King George I (1714-1727); King George II (17271760); King George III (1760-1820); and King George IV (1820-1830).

12.14.13–03.08.14

geographically and photographically. 10.12.13–12.07.13

Paintings of the Space Age Polk Museum of Art

tration, suggested that artists be enlisted to document the historic effort to send the first human beings to the moon.

Stephen Knapp: New Light Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Stephen Knapp’s Have Lens Will lightpaintings are creTravel: 10.12.13–12.07.13 ated by using shards Photographs by www.polkmuseumofart.org reGeneration2: of fused glass, inTom Mack With help from the Tomorrow’s stalled perpendicular Polk Museum Smithsonian’s AfPhotographers to the wall’s surface, of Art filiations Program, Today to reflect beams of www.polkmuseumofart.org the Polk Museum of Polk Museum colored light into Tom Mack’s phoArt is exhibiting a of Art abstract compositions. tographs are like sampling of artworks www.polkmuseumofart.org These unique works accompanying illusproduced in the 1960s Following the sucare the intersection trations to his life’s after James Webb, cess of the 2005 book of painting, sculpture story. This selection administrator of the and exhibition, which and technology by of images represents National Aeronautics traveled to 10 difexploring color, light his adventures both and Space Adminisferent cities across and space. Thru 11.23.13

Image from Stephen Knapp: New Light at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Stephen Knapp, Into Morning, 2007-2011, © Stephen Knapp

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MAITLAND 10.11.13–12.29.13

Artist-InResidence ONE: Josette Urso Art & History Museums, Maitland

grounds of the A&H, working primarily in the gardens making oil paintings, watercolors and drawings in direct response to her immediate surroundings.

www.artandhistory.org

11.29.13–01.05.14

Nationally recognized artist, Josette Urso, spent six weeks living and working on the

Ex Libris Art & History Museums, Maitland

www.artandhistory.org

10.11.13–11.24.13

A&H Artist-in-Action, Dawn Rosendahl, transforms everyday books into lasting sculptures, resurrecting them as they become obsolete in this age of New Media. Working with books, like blocks of wood, Rosendahl alters them into stunning, surrealistic masterworks.

Heavy Metal Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

An exhibition by respected artist/educator, Rocky Bridges, features his abstract arrangements of painted metal and found remains.

Paintings of the Space Age

From the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

Camila Rodrigo Graña, Caro and Roxy Dancing, 2007, photography

Robert T. McCall, Apollo 8 Coming Home, oil, 3’ 3 7/8” x 4’

Polk Museum of Art presents

reGeneration 2 Tomorrow’s Photographers Today

An exhibition produced by the Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne, in collaboration with the Aperture Foundation, New York, with the support of Pro Helvetia

October 12-December 7, 2013 Presenting sponsor

Exhibition sponsors

800 East Palmetto Street, Lakeland, Florida 33801 · 863.688.7743 · www.PolkMuseumofArt.org


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www.artcentersf.org

MELBOURNE

This exhibition presents a collection of photographs, objects and videos that construct individual and collective stories, built upon scenes of the artists’ own and appropriated memories.

Thru 10.13.13

The Art of Conservation(ism): Works from the Permanent Collection Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

The Art of Conservation(ism) explores the idea of conservation from dual vantage points— from artists who produce work addressing environmental issues to the care museums take of their collections.

Frits Van Eeden’s current series of paintings was inspired by the iconic horse. Its form and musculature are scaffolding for Van Eeden’s experiments in color, form, and media.

10.19.13–01.19.14

10.19.13–01.19.14

The Horse: Paintings by Frits Van Eeden Foosaner Art Museum

Theodore Waddell: Far West Foosaner Art Museum

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

10.05.13–11.03.13

Theodore Waddell’s Western landscapes merge his love of painting and the Montana and Idaho plains where he lives and works as a cattle rancher.

On Location: Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

ArtCenter has invited Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art to exhibit MIAMI four artists: Robert 10.05.13–11.17.13 Huff, Kuhl & Leyton, Correspondences: Jorge Pantoja, David Amalia Caputo Rohn and Roberto and Marina Font Visani. Each artist exArtCenter/ plores varied manifesSouth Florida tations of masculinity.

Image from The Horse: Paintings by Frits Van Eeden at Foosaner Art Museum, Melbourne: Frits Van Eeden, Untitled, 2013, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 48”, courtesy the artist

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dia. Collishaw explores Eve Sussman/ dark and subversive Rufus Corporation subject matter, often Bass Museum dealing with issues that of Art are morally and politiwww.bassmuseum.org cally charged. This exhibition presents two major video 12.05.13–03.16.14 installations, including Piotr Ukla´nski: an entirely new explo- ESL ration of her noted Bass Museum film, Rape of the Sabine of Art Women, a contempowww.bassmuseum.org rary reinterpretation of Piotr Uklański will crethe eponymous Roman ate an expansive, imlegend, and 89 Secmersive installation, onds at Alcázar, a film including works of based on the Diego all media, which visiVelazquez’s enigmatic tors will literally “walk Las Meninas, 1656. into” and interact with. Thru 11.03.13

He will also use the historical collections of the Bass Museum of Art in his installation. 11.02.13–02.23.14

TIME Bass Museum of Art

out the duration of the show, and will include painting, photography, video, sculpture, performance, and objects of design. Thru 10.20.13

www.bassmuseum.org

TIME is an exhibition exploring individual interpretations of time, bridging the gap between historical collections and contemporary culture. The exhibition consists of a number of projects happening through-

Thru 10.13.13

Mat Collishaw Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Mat Collishaw’s wideranging practice includes sculpture, photography and new me-

Fryd on Fire by Carol Fryd Jewish Museum of Florida–FIU http://jmof.fiu.edu

Carol Fryd’s varied techniques combine digital art, collage, drawings, photography, objects, and paint to produce groundbreaking work, ranging from realism to abstract expressionism to portraiture, but it is the combination of bright, fiery colors that dominate the works in this show. Opening 12.04.13

Inaugural Exhibitions

Image from TIME at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Idris Kahn, A Magic... After Bach’s Cello Suites, 2006, 16 mm film transferred to DVD, 6 mintes, 30 seconds, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris

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Pérez Art Museum Miami

of Artificial Plants The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.pamm.org

The new PAMM (formerly Miami Art Museum) opens to the public on December 4, 2013. The new venue will host a diverse roster of exhibtions presented in the Museum’s inaugural exhibition lineup. (See story and new exhibition listings starting on pg. 128.) Thru 11.03.13

Knight Exhibition Series: Love of Technology Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

International artists look at the ideologies that bind human users and technological objects. Each draws

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

For this exhibition at The Frost Art Museum, Alberto Baraya presents a project inspired by Florida’s original native fauna.

upon the traditions of minimalism and conceptual art and brings them into the present. Combining seminal work from the 1970s with newly commissioned and site-specific work, the gallery itself becomes a platform for innovation.

The first American museum exhibition dedicated to the acclaimed British artist Tracey Emin, Angel without You explores how the artist’s neons have played an essential role in the development of her work. (See story on pg. 126.)

12.04.13–03.09.14

Thru 01.05.14

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Tracey Emin: Angel Without You Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Alberto Baraya: Naturalism/ Artificiality— Expeditions, and Research of the Herbarium

World’s fairs once were the height of thrilling spectacle, staging premiers of the newest products and technologies, filled

www.mocanomi.org

Thru 01.05.14

Crisis and Commerce: World’s Fairs of the 1930s The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Image from Tracey Emin: Angel without You at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Tracey Emin, Angel without You, 2013, ©Tracey Emin, courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin Gallery and White Cube

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with futuristic buildings, and forecasting an exciting world of tomorrow. Using The Wolfsonian’s vast collection of objects from world’s fairs, Crisis and Commerce explores tensions between these visions of innovation and plenty and the omnipresent signs of mounting

political and econom- as José Bedia, Carlos ic crisis. Alfonso, and Florencio Gelabert pres10.16.13–01.05.14 ent vast and poetic From Africa to interpretations of the the Americas world, the cosmos, The Patricia and the interrela& Phillip Frost tionship of man and Art Museum nature. http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Selected from the Frost’s African and Cuban collections, works by such artists

10.16.13–02.03.14

Humberto Castro: Tracing Antilles

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Cuban-American artist, Humberto Castro, executes an artistic journey across the Antilles in an ever transforming exhibition that conceptually circumnavigates the islands of the Caribbean. (See story on pg. 122.)


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Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

11.16.13–01.26.14

Things That Cannot be Seen Any Other Way: The Art of Manuel Mendive The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.naplesart.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Manuel Mendive Hoyo creates paintings, sculptures and objects that appropriate, transform and adapt the visual language of Africa as a means of conveying its rich mythology to a new audience, informed less about its ritual than about its aesthetics.

The Birth of Rome presents modern architectural and urban planning projects that cultivated the perception of a storied Italian nation rooted in a mythologized past. Opening 11.22.13

The Birth of Rome The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Rendering War: The Murals of A. G. Santagata The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

www.wolfsonian.org

www.wolfsonian.org

Opening 11.22.13

Rendering War focuses on Antonio Giuseppe Santagata’s large-scale studies for mural paintings created in the 1920s and 1930s, commemorating and celebrating Italian soldiers in the First World War.

Color is the main focus of this juried awards exhibition where Naples Art Association members show off its powerful impact. 11.23.13–01.18.14

Joan Brechin Sonnenberg: The Middle Point Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Joan Sonnenberg transcends media by 11.23.13–01.11.14 combining realism and Breaking abstraction. She is best Through with known for producing Color: Artists large-scale pastels Reveal the Power and mixed media of Color paintings of familiar NAPLES

Image from Things That Cannot be Seen Any Other Way: The Art of Manuel Mendive at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Manuel Mendive, Mito de la Creación (Myth of Creation), 1985, mixed media on heavy paper , 20 x 25.5”, Courtesy of Cernuda Arte

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

objects seen upclose or from a new vantage point. Thru 11.09.13

The Sixth Annual Non-Juried All Artist Members Show of Shows Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

This annual showcase features artwork in all media by Naples Art Association members.

in this exhibition was to create art incorporating written languages, symbols, numerals or other devices acting as references or used to communicate meaning and significance. Thru 12.19.14

An Ear for Music, an Eye for Art: The Ahmet Ertegün Collection The Baker Museum www.artisnaples.org

This exhibition presents modernist works amassed by the late Ahmet Ertegün, best known as the founder and president of Atlantic Records. Works by Werner Drewes, John Ferren, Vaclav Vytlacil, Dwinell Grant, Ilya Bolotowsky, Burgoyne Diller and Albert Swinden, are included. Thru 02.16.14

Connected and Disconnected:

The Sculpture of Hanneke Beaumont The Baker Museum www.artisnaples.org

This retrospective of Dutch sculptor Hanneke Beaumont’s work features her enigmatic bronze figures, a source of fascination and wonder since capturing international attention in the late 1990s. Thru 01.12.14

Papiers à la Mode: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave The Baker Museum

Thru 10.28.13

Words, Signs and Symbols Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

www.artisnaples.org

Featuring over 50 period costumes, kimonos, kaftans and

www.naplesart.org

The challenge for the artists who participated

Image from An Ear for Music, an Eye for Art: The Ahmet Ertegün Collection at The Baker Museum: Frederick J. Whiteman, Untitled, 1941, oil on canvas, 20 x 24”

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

other objects intricately crafted out of paper by Belgian artist and sculptor, Isabelle de Borchgrave, Papiers à la Mode offers a fresh look at fashion history from Elizabeth I to Coco Chanel. (See story on pg. 76.) NEW SMYRNA BEACH Thru 10.19.13

Kalina Winska: Clairvoyance Atlantic Center for the Arts

www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

10.21.13–11.23.13

11.02.13–12.14.13

Progeny: An Interactive Installation by Luke Aaron Clark and Bryce Hammond Atlantic Center for the Arts

Sabrina Small Atlantic Center for the Arts

www.atlanticcenter

www.atlanticcenter

forthearts.org

forthearts.org

Progeny consists of an architectural installation directed by sound and space, a film documentary, dance and music performances, and public education outreach programs.

The forms within Kalina Winska’s drawings allude to natural phenomena, living systems, and their formation on a micro and macro scale.

www.atlanticcenter

The ACA presents a selection of contemporary platinum prints from the collection of the Southeast Museum of Photography, featuring works by Kenro Izu, Craig Barber & José Miguel Ferreira. OCALA

forthearts.org

11.16.13–01.05.14

The images in Small’s work seem mysterious, even anthropomorphic, like creatures from a strange dream world objectified.

A Dickens’ Christmas Appleton Museum of Art

12.14.13–02.08.14

Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography Atlantic Center for the Arts

www.appletonmuseum.org

The Appleton presents a holiday display of miniature Charles Dickens-era villages, toy trains, Christmas trees, seasonal decorations and ornaments from the Urban Family Collection.

Image from Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, New Smyrna Beach: José Miguel Ferreira, Paisagem do Douro I, 2008, from the series, The Port Wine Route, platinum / palladium print, 14 x 11”

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Ocala continued...

This is the first public Age of Revolution exhibition of recently Appleton discovered artifacts Museum of Art from De Soto’s travels www.appletonmuseum.org through Marion CounThis exhibition, orgaty in August 1539. nized in collaboration with the 2013 Ocala 11.23.13–01.19.14 Civic Theater debut of Selections from Les Misérables, brings the Florida together works from Watercolor the Appleton’s 19th Society’s century collection with 42nd Annual others from the Samuel Exhibition P. Harn Museum of Appleton Art, Gainesville, and Museum of Art the Museum of Arts www.appletonmuseum.org and Sciences, Daytona The exhibition will Beach. present 35 of the best watercolors produced Thru 01.19.14

by artists from Florida Works from and around the country. Central Florida 11.02.13–01.05.14

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Appleton Museum of Art

Collections Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

A Passion for Collecting is an opportuwww.appletonmuseum.org nity to see over one This juried exhibit hundred exceptional features works by pieces owned by conmembers of the Ocala noisseurs in Central Art Group. Florida. The exhibition offers a chance for visitors to see and ORLANDO learn about art and Thru 10.27.13 decorative works from A Passion for around the world and Collecting: Art to refine their own and Decorative “collector’s eye.”

Thru 12.31.13

New World Treasures: Artifacts from Hernando De Soto’s Florida Expedition Appleton Museum of Art

11.16.13–11.24.13

Festival of Trees Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

The Council of 101 presents the 27th annual Festival of Trees. Each year the

www.appletonmuseum.org

Image from Selections from the Florida Watercolor Society’s 42nd Annual Exhibition at the Appleton Museum of Art: Image courtesy of the Appleton Museum of Art

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Orlando continued...

Orlando Museum of Art is transformed into a holiday wonderland with decadent decorations and displays. For information, call 407. 896.4231 x254 or e-mail: councilof 101@aol.com.

www.omart.org

Featured in this show is the work of Raúl Colón, a popular awardwinning artist who has illustrated more than 30 books for children. (See story in the July/September 2013 issue on pg. 126.)

Thru 11.03.13

Flipped Orlando: Panoramas by Roberto Bocci Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

OMA’s New Work: A Series of Bimonthly Exhibitions of Contemporary Art features Roberto Bocci, whose work has evolved from photography to linear and computer-driven interactive multimedia installations that include single channel videos and digital images. Flipped

Thru 01.05.14

Trevor Bell: Across the Gulf Stream—Paintings from Florida and Cornwall Orlando Museum of Art

Orlando explores his experience in the constructed environments of Orlando’s theme parks.

tion featuring Joelle Dietrick, who develops two-dimensional and timebased artworks that consider contem12.05.13–02.09.14 porary nomadism and www.omart.org Joelle Dietrick 21st-century power This exhibition inOrlando structures. cludes 25 large-scale Museum of Art abstract paintings by www.omart.org Thru 11.03.13 the noted British artOMA’s New Work: A Tall Tales and ist, Trevor Bell. His Series of Bimonthly Huge Hearts: paintings are charExhibitions of ConRaúl Colón acterized by shaped temporary Art conOrlando canvases painted with tinues with an exhibi- Museum of Art luminous atmospheric

Image from Trevor Bell: Across the Gulf Stream–Paintings from Florida and Cornwall at the Orlando Museum of Art: Trevor Bell, Gumburanjon, 1991, acrylic on canvas, 71 x 69”, Collection of Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

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Orlando continued...

tones and punctuated with bold strokes of contrasting color. Thru 01.05.14

Art and Artifacts of the Seminole: Selections from the Collection of I.S.K. Reeves V & Sara W. Reeves The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Art and Artifacts of the Seminole includes clothing, dolls, jewelry and photographs that tell the story of the Seminole Indians.

www.mennellomuseum.com

www.mennellomuseum.com

Thru 01.05.14

The permanent collection by selftaught artist, Earl Cunningham (18931977), is enhanced by paintings and artifacts that reflect Cunningham’s fascination with the Everglades and native tribes.

American artist, Eugene Francis Savage, created perhaps the most extensive painted record of the Florida Seminoles from the early 20th century. Capturing the natural rhythms of the Everglades, these works present a vision of Seminole life and seek to awaken the imagination and inspire the spirit. (See story in the July/ September 2013 issue on pg. 100.)

Never No More: Storter’s Southwest Florida The Mennello Museum of American Art

Thru 01.05.14

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings The Mennello Museum of American Art

www.mennellomuseum.com

This traveling exhibition is based on the memoirs of Rob Storter (1894-1987), a self-taught artist who sketched pictures of his rural lifestyle and environment. Thru 01.05.14

Southern Folk Masters The Mennello Museum of American Art

Thru 01.05.14

www.mennellomuseum.com

Earl Cunningham’s Everglades The Mennello Museum of American Art

Out of the permanent collection and beyond, this show presents a selection of works by legends in the folk art world.

Image from Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando: Eugene Savage, Scherzo, 1953, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 21 x 29.5”. Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings was organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville, FL. Image courtesy of the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.9

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ORMOND

PANAMA CITY

BEACH

Thru 10.19.13

25th Annual Faces & Facets Photo Exhibit Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

Thru 11.17.13

Rated G for Graphic: Comic books, Graphic Novels and Video Games Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Step into the world of sequential art and graphic media, featuring Marvel cover artist, Paolo Rivera; graphic novelist, James Greene; freelance comic artist, John Allison; and video game artists, Tammy and Tiffany Dao. PALM BEACH 11.23.13–01.10.14

Deco Japan:

www.vacnwf.org

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

The first exhibition held outside Tokyo dedicated to Japanese Art Deco, Deco Japan not only provides dramatic examples of the spectacular craftsmanship and sophisticated design long associated with Japan, it conveys the complex social and cultural tensions in Japan during the Taishô

and early Shôwa epochs (1912-1945). Opening 11.01.13

Illustrating Words The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

Featured in this grand opening exhibit of the Mary Alice Fortin Children’s Art Gallery is children’s author, Robert L. Forbes’ creative poetry combined with the highly imaginative illustration of artist, Ronald Searle.

The VAC presents the 25th annual Faces & Facets photography exhibit and competition. This national exhibition includes works from both professional as well as amateur artists. PENSACOLA Thru 11.07.13

David Warner: Mountain, Stream, Shore Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacolamuseumofart.org

Image from Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 at The Society of the Four Arts , Palm Beach: Tsuda Shinobu, Lion, ca. early 1930s, cast bronze 10-5/16 x 22-5/16 x 5-7/16”, courtesy of The Levenson Collection

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

David Warner paints landscapes as impressions of places and the feelings associated with those moments. The main characteristics of his paintings are an emphasis on color and abstract patterns.

on Saturday, July 20, 24 Hours in 2013. Chosen from Downtown more than 1,000 subPensacola missions, the selected Pensacola images showcase Museum of Art spontaneous moments, www.pensacolamuseumofart.org Pensacola icons, and The exhibition 24 the natural beauty of Hours in Downtown the region. Pensacola celebrates the diverse places, PONTE VEDRA 11.01.13–01.03.14 spaces, and people BEACH The Design of that make up this War: World War community—from the Thru 10.19.13 I and World community’s perspec- Grant Ward & War II Posters tive! The exhibition Gene Roberds: and Flags consists of photoFlorida—Wood Pensacola graphs taken between and Landscape Museum of Art noon on Friday, July The Cultural www.pensacolamuseumofart.org 19, 2013 and noon Center Through the posters and flags on display, The Design of War provides the contemporary viewer an understanding of the crucial role art played as part of the war efforts. (See story on pg. 110.) Thru 10.12.13

www.ccpvb.org

Works in wood and metal by Grant Ward are featured with landscape paintings by Gene Roberds. 10.25.13–11.15.13

Joyce Gabiou & Richard McRae The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Abstract collage and mixed media paintings by Joyce Gabiou are presented with figurative sculptures by Richard McRae. 12.05.13–12.28.13

Small Objects Exhibition The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Small objects take center stage in this new show at The Cultural Center.

Image from Grant Ward & Gene Roberds: Florida—Wood and Landscape at The Cultural Center, Ponte Vedra Beach: Gene Roberds, image courtesy of The Cultural Center

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purchased through The Ringling Historic Asolo Theater Box Office at 941.360.7399, 10am4pm daily. (See story in the July/September 2013 issue on pg. 120.)

SARASOTA 10.4.13–01.05.14

Icons of Style The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Drawing on the MFA Boston’s rich collection of costumes, fashion illustration, and photography, this exhibition explores the process of creating icons of style from design concept to runway and finished image. (See story on pg. 66.) 11.23.13–03.09.14

Optical Impulses The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Optical Impulses presents the art of pivotal artists who explore both the

11.18.13–03.23.14

phenomenal and psychological aspects of visual perception.

Lanka), including the natural beauty of its people and landscapes.

Thru 01.05.14

10.09.13–10.12.13

Picturing Ceylon The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Ringling International Arts Festival The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

Featured in this display are photographs from the late 19th century of some of the most picturesque aspects of Ceylon (now called Sri

www.ringling.org

This four-day festival showcases a variety of dance, music and theater. Tickets can be

The Philip and Nancy Kotler Glass Collection The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

This exhibition presents an overview of a recent gift of Studio Glass to The Ringling and includes works by Nicolas Africano, Silvia Levenson, Peter Hora, and Stanislav Libensky, among many others. 11.23.13–03.09.14

Unfamiliar Realities

Image from Optical Impulses at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Herbert Bayer, Chromatic Twist, 1970, Screen print, gift of Jerome Singer, 1979, MF79.22.6

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Sarasota continued...

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Unfamiliar Realities provides an opportunity for viewers to explore the ways in which photographers have exploited the particular characteristics of the medium to reframe, manipulate, or reimagine the world as captured by the lens. Thru 02.04.14

Wild West The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Thru 10.27.13

Witness to War: WWII Photographs from the Collections of Veterans The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Witness to War honors US veterans through a gripping visual account of WWII via the lenses of soldier-photographers who documented their first-hand experiences at war alongside signature images by

www.ringling.org

Wild West is an exhibition of original posters printed between 1890 and 1950 celebrating great Wild West shows from Buffalo Bill to the 101 Ranch.

well-known war photographers.

the art of chess and the people who play it.

ST. AUGUSTINE

ST. PETERSBURG

10.30.13–11.30.13

10.05.13–01.05.14

Lee Walton Plays The World (On His Phone) Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College

Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, the Social and the Political in African American Art Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.flagler.edu/crispellert

Artist Lee Walton will play 40 simultaneous games of chess with opponents from around www.fine-arts.org the world for this new Mixing Metaphors is project that explores composed of paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, sculptures and mixed media works by 36 artists. The exhibit explores visual metaphor through the artists’ varied experiences, visions and techniques. Body politics, race, class and gender are a

Image from Unfamiliar Realities at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Michael Kenna, Docking Poles, Venice, Italy, 1980, gelatin silver print, SN11310.149

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

few of the topics that surface in these works of art, which depict moments from the extraordinary to the mundane.

Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

TALLAHASSEE Thru 10.06.13

A Fortnight of Rembrandt Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

A unique, 60+ private collection of original etchings by the 17th century Dutch artist, Rembrandt van Rijn, is currently on view in this special exhibit that is free and open to the public. 12.05.13-12.07.13

Art & Antiques Fair

Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

Antiques, jewelry, enameled metals, ceramics, stained glass, and many handcrafted items are featured from members of the Artists’ League. 10.18.13–11.24.13

Gabrielle Wu Lee Retrospective Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

Gabrielle Wu Lee had a reverence for tradition, calligraphy, Chinese painting and critical values, yet she possessed the urge to depart from convention and invent her techniques and subject matter anew. This exhibition celebrates her painting career. (See story on pg. 6.) 10.11.13–11.17.13

New Acquisitions from the MoFA Collection

Included in this exhibition are works by Harriet Bell, Mark Messersmith, Joan Miró, Philip Pearlstein, Pablo Picasso, Robert Rauschenberg and others that have recently been gifted to the Museum collection. Thru 11.17.13

Pre-Columbian Works from the Carter Collection Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

MoFA is hosting an exhibition of PreColumbian artifacts drawn from the John and Mary Carter Collection.

Image from Gabrielle Wu Lee Retrospective at Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University, Tallahassee: Gabrielle Wu Lee, Midsummer Night’s Dream, 2004, oil on canvas, 48 x 60”

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TAMPA Thru 11.10.13

Frida and Friends: The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

A selection of 50 photographic portraits examines the great Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo, through the lens of the most renowned photographers of the 20th century. (See story in the July/ September 2013 issue on pg. 110.)

www.fmopa.org

Exposing the Self: brings together photographers who are interested in showing the intricacies of the mind and includes works by Susan Camp Crosby, Jerry Uelsmann, Sally Mann, Len Prince, Cindy Sherman, and Man Ray. 11.15.13–02.23.14

Gangsters, Cigars, and Pirates: A Photographic

History of Tampa 1879-1955 Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Featuring a comprehensive array of 52 www.fmopa.org works across varied This exhibition media by Jean (Hans) presents a historic Arp (French, born survey of works Germany, 1886– documenting Tampa’s 1966), Joan Miró unique past. (Spanish, 1893–1983), and Alexander Calder 10.05.13–01.19.14 (American, 1898– Arp, Calder, and 1976), this exhibition Miro: Modern highlights the work of Masters from the three modern masters, Albright-Knox who pushed color, Art Gallery line, and form beyond convention. 10.05.13–01.19.14

Fragile Waters Tampa Museum of Art

Thru 11.10.13

Exposing the Self: Photography and Surrealism Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.tampamuseum.org

Fragile Waters comprises 119 black-andwhite photographs by three iconic photographers and environmen-

Image from Exposing the Self: Photography and Surrealism at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Sally Mann, Landscape

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

talists—Ansel Adams, Ernest H. Brooks II, and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly. These artists communicate the beauty and vitality of water, focusing on nature and engaging the viewer in affirming the intrinsic aesthetic, emotional and essential life value of water.

www.spcollege.edu/museum

mysterious, mythical cruise liner, the Sea of Tranquility.

10.05.13–01.19.14

Sea of Tranquillity Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

The medium-length film, Sea of Tranquillity, by Brussels-based visual artist, Hans Op de Beeck, is a combination of live video recordings of actors and digitally-generated 3D environments in which the viewer makes a night-time visit to a

Thru 12.07.13

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

SubRosa examines the art and language of artists in response to social, political and environmental repression. Covering continents and cultures,

Clyde Butcher is best known for his large-format, black and white landscapes of Florida’s wilderness areas. This exhibition of 40 photographs and contextual panels demonstrates these artists share a de- Butcher’s commitsire to question domiment to save these nant political systems fragile environments and the prevalent status through awareness. quo, sometimes covertly and dangerously. 12.08.13–04.20.14 Works include video Dominique and sculpture installa- Labauvie: tions, painting, photog- Sculpture raphy, artist books and and Design graphic novels. Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

www.spcollege.edu/museum

TARPON SPRINGS 12.08.13–02.16.14

Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

French-born internationally renowned sculptor, Dominique Labauvie, works primarily in forged steel and creates large-scale sculptures.

Image from Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden at Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art, Tarpon Springs: Clyde Butcher, Loxahatchee River, #1 (detail), courtesy of the South Florida Museum, Bradenton, FL

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Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

the Mambo, and Tomás Marais: the colors of town Artist in Exile and country, this Leepa-Rattner exhibition offers Museum of Art Museum visitors an www.spcollege.edu/museum insider’s view This exhibition inof Cuba’s dynamcludes prints, works ic culture before the on paper, and paintCastro era. ings created by Cuban-American Thru 01.05.14 artist, Tomás Marais, Simply during his 45-year Beautiful: career. Marais is Photographs celebrated for his sur- from National realist style, vivid Geographic colors and personal, Vero Beach dream-like vision. Museum of Art Thru 11.24.13

Simply Beautiful: Photographs from National Geographic takes visitors on a visual journey through variations on the universal theme of beauty. Featuring the work of some of the most famous National Geographic photographers, the exhibition includes remarkable images from the Society’s impressive archive. (See story in the July/ September 2013 issue www.verobeachmuseum.org on pg. 78.)

VERO BEACH 10.19.13–02.02.14

Cuban Art and Identity: 1900 to 1950 Vero Beach Museum of Art

WEST PALM BEACH 12.07.13–12.14.13

7th Annual Festival of Trees Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

“The Wonder of Words” is this year’s theme for the beautifully decorated trees that will fill the Gardens. Highlights include a spectacular synchronized light and music show and guest performances by the talented music and dance groups of the Palm Beaches. For information, call 561.832.5328. Thru 11.09.13

Collaboration: African Diaspora Armory Art Center

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Echoing the rhythms of the Rhumba and

Image from Cuban Art and Identity: 1900 to 1950 at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Juan Gil Garcia, Naturaleza muerta con frutas, (Still Life with Fruit), 1932, oil on canvas, 13 x 16”, Cuban Foundation Collection, Museum of Arts and Sciences, Daytona Beach

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Alumni Exhibition Armory Art Center

www.armoryart.org

Armory Art Center hosts a Harlem Renaissance style art exhibition showcasing visual and literary artists of African Diaspora.

www.armoryart.org

Thru 10.19.13

Mark Cohen: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

This survey of work includes Mark Cohen’s recent series of large-scale abstract portraits of prominent contemporary and historical figures. 11.02.13–11.30.13

Norman Berman: Awe and Reverance Armory Art Center

This exhibition Local artist, Norm features recent Berman, presents photographs that a survey of recent represent an intimate works. Berman’s look into the relisubject matter ranges gious practices by from Judaic themes the New Zion and abstract works to Holiness Church’s pastoral landscapes. bishops, pastor, gospel singers, Thru 10.26.13 gospel band, and Red Morgan: congregation, located Witness— on the outskirts of Gospel by the Pahokee, Florida. www.armoryart.org

Cane Fields Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

12.21.13–02.01.14

You Are Here: DSOA Arts

Featured in this display will be a selection of works by visual arts alumni of the Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts (DSOA), from 1994-2013. Thru 10.20.13

Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Presented in conjunction with the Norton’s Block by Block LEGO® summer exhibition, and featuring works by Stuart Davis, An-

Image from Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum Collection at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Colin Campbell Cooper, Columbus Circle, New York, about 1923, oil on canvas, gift of Elsie and Marvin Dekelboum, 2005.57

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dreas Feininger, John Marin, Addison Mizner and Vic Muniz, Architecture in Detail celebrates the aesthetics and achievements of the man-made environment. 10.10.13–12.08.13

A Masterpiece Rediscovered: Claude-Joseph

leading 18th century French painter in Rome. Artworks from the same period www.norton.org by artists such as This exhibition foGiovanni Paolo Panicuses on the recent ni, Giovanni Battista gift of The Fishermen Piranesi, Bartolomeo (1746), a spectacular- Cavaceppi, Jan Frans ly beautiful painting van Bloeman and of an idyllic Roman Jean-Baptiste Lalcampagna scene by lemand will put The Claude-Joseph Vernet Fisherman (1714-1789), the in context. Vernet’s “The Fishermen” Norton Museum of Art

2013–2014 exhibitions mickalene thomas faux real / through august 2014 a masterpiece rediscovered: Vernet’s The Fishermen oct. 10 – dec. 8, 2013 new work/new directions: Recent Photo Acquisitions nov. 7, 2013 – jan. 12, 2014 l.a. stories: Videos from the West Coast nov. 7, 2013 – jan. 12, 2014 the four princely gentlemen: Chinese Flower Paintings nov. 14, 2013 – jan. 26, 2014 phyllida barlow: HOARD / dec. 3, 2013 – feb. 23, 2014 the polaroid years: Instant Photography and Experimentation dec. 19, 2013 – march 23, 2014 david webb: Society’s Jeweler / jan. 16 – april 13, 2014 to jane, love andy: Warhol’s First Superstar / feb. 2 – may 25, 2014 qing chic: Chinese Textiles / feb. 6 – may 4, 2014 industrial sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900–1940 / march 20 – june 22, 2014 right: Mickalene Thomas (American, born 1971), faux real (detail), 2013. Vinyl, enamel paint, contact paper, and oil stick. This is the third site specific installation generously supported by Vanessa and Anthony Beyer as part of their commitment to Contemporary Art at the Norton Museum. Photo Tom Brodigan.

www.norton.org

Thru 10.20.13

Block by Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Norton Museum of Art presents an exhibition of 10 landmark skyscrapers from around the world, each master-


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 7 o f 4 0 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

fully constructed with LEGO® toy building bricks by Dan Parker, LEGO Certified Professional. Ranging from four to nine feet in height, the architectural sculptures include One World Trade Center in New York, the Seattle Space Needle, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, and Taipei 101 in Taipei. (See story in the July/September 2013 issue on pg. 6.) 11.07.13–01.12.14

L.A. Stories: Videos from the West Coast Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

L.A. Stories brings together four artists whose work embraces and exploits the narrative potentials

11.07.13–01.12.14

New Work/ New Directions: Recent Photo Acquisitions Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

of video. Their works range from straightforward storytelling to the isolation of evocative narrativeladen moments that string together.

tographs to oil paintings to a miniature doll house, this exhibition presents a series of dwellings that only humans could have created. Featured artists inThru 10.17.13 clude Ansel Adams, Little Boxes: Norman Rockwell, Images of and Yinka Shonibare. Vernacular From densely popuArchitecture from lated suburban the Museum landscapes to scenes Collection of rural isolation, Norton the show captures Museum of Art the extremes of www.norton.org vernacular archiRanging from photecture.

The Norton’s recent acquisitions range from the 19th century motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge to recent large-scale narrative works by Canadian-based artists, The Sanchez Brothers. Included are significant works by artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eileen Cowin, Holly Roberts, and Sam Taylor-Wood. 12.03.13–02.23.14

Phyllida Barlow: HOARD

Image from L.A. Stories: Videos from the West Coast at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Julie Orser, Double Bind (Anna Moore), 2007

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C A L E N D A R

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Barlow’s sculptural practice centers on her attention to, and experimentation with, materials that are easily overlooked and most often found in the urban environment in which she lives. Cardboard, fabric, plywood, polystyrene, wire netting, scrim, and cement are among favored elements she manipulates to create her works. (See story on pg. 120.)

www.norton.org

This exhibition features the recently acquired album of ink paintings of orchids and bamboo by the Qing dynasty scholar, Qian Zai (1708-1793). 12.19.13–03.23.14

The Polaroid Years: Instant Photography

and Experimentation Norton Museum of Art

WINTER PARK Thru 12.08.13

www.norton.org

This survey exhibition brings together groundbreaking Polaroid pictures by 40 artists, spanning the period from the initial release of the SX-70 camera in 1972 until the present.

11.14.13–01.26.14

The Four Princely Gentlemen: Plum Blossoms, Orchids, Bamboo, and Chrysanthemums Norton Museum of Art

Albrecht Dürer to Claes Oldenburg: Collecting at the Cornell, 1990-2010 Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

In celebration of the Cornell’s 35th anniversary year, this exhibition showcases works purchased by the museum from designated funds during two decades at the turn of the 21st century. Master prints are shown side-byside with works by some of the 20th century’s bestknown artists.

Image from The Polaroid Years: Instant Photography and Experimentation at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Chuck Close, 5C (Self-Portrait), 1979, five large-format Polaroid Polacolor prints, 60-1/2 x 56-5/8”, The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, © Chuck Close

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C A L E N D A R

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Elizabeth Bishop’s poem, Questions of Travel, provides the focus for this installation. The works selected for display are the product of journeys, whether created by an American in Italy, a Cuban in St. Barts, or an Italian in Egypt.

Thru 12.08.13

Auktion 392: Reclaiming the Galerie Stern, Düsseldorf Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This presentation coincides with the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht (November 9–10, 1938). Focusing on the case of Max Stern’s Berlin gallery, the exhibition addresses the issues of Nazi looted art and the on-going restitution efforts through the courts in America and Europe of works forcibly sold at the instruction of the Nazi regime. Thru 12.08.13

Diana Beltran Herrera: Birds of Florida

Thru 12.08.13

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Herrera’s work seeks to explore the chillingly disengaged relationship between humans and nature in modern society. Using paper as her primary medium, she is able to present notions of temporality and change, emphasizing the process of

transformation that continuously occurs in nature as well as humankind. The exhibit includes eight sculptures, made completely of paper, featuring local bird species. Thru 12.08.13

Questions of Travel Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Studio Malick Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

As Mali gained independence from France in 1960, the youth culture of music, dancing and fashion exploded in this West African nation, and Malick Sidibé’s ubiquitous lens chronicled it all. Through the use of props, posing, and a deft attention to per-

Image from Studio Malick at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Malick Sidibé, Here is My Watch and My Ring, 1964, © Malick Sidibé, Gwinzegal / diChroma photography

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C A L E N D A R

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

sonality, he developed a distinct style and achieved international recognition. Thru 10.27.13

Awak­en­ing: The Art of Ursula Schwartz The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

11.05.13–04.13.14

www.polasek.org

The Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia: Icons from the 17th Century— Early 20th Century The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

The sacred images on view in this exhi­bi­ tion are of a kind once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes of Rus­sia, as well as its churches and pub­ lic shrines. They were seen as com­forters and pow­er­ful guardians.

www.polasek.org

Born in Nel­spruit, South Africa, Ursula Schwartz expresses her unique South African per­spec­tive through bold col­ ors, energetic brush strokes, inti­mate por­ traits, and fig­u­ra­tive work. Her paint­ings reflect the com­plex nature of mod­ern fem­i­nin­ity and por­ tray an ele­gant jux­ta­ po­si­tion of power and vul­ner­a­bil­ity.

Icons were the direct line from the real world to the spir­i­tual and appeared every­ where in pre-Soviet Russia. Opening 10.29.13

Lullaby and Goodnight— Children’s Literature from the Morse Collection The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

This exhibition focuses on three authors and illustrators noted for their pioneering contributions to children’s literature: Kate Greenaway (1846–1901), Mary Dow Brine (1836–1925), and Eulalie Osgood Grover (1873–1958). On View

Image from Awak­en­ing: The Art of Ursula Schwartz at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: Ursula Schwartz, image courtesy of The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

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NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Artist: RANDALL SMITH RANDALL SMITH’S

abstract geometric imagery is bold and full of emotion. Works of various media interest and influence his process, leading to new directions. Currently, his mixed-media works are comprised of acrylic and oil paint, and oil pastel on paper.

TALLAHASSEE

Gallery: City Hall Art Gallery­, managed by The Council on Culture and Arts (COCA) www.cocanet.org

Exhibition: The Back of Beyond: Artworks by Carrie Ann Baade, MANDEM & James Mazza ON VIEW THRU 11.04.13

Working in a wide range of media, subject matter, and conceptual approaches, these artists highlight the fine line between weird and wonderful. From left: Randall Smith, Untitled, mixed-media, 24 x 26”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; James Mazza, Ponds and Nostalgia, courtesy of the artist and The Council on Culture and Arts

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries

www.holdenluntz.com

www.virginiamiller.com

Artist: Karin Hillmer

Exhibition: THE SILENT SHOUT: VOICES IN CUBAN ABSTRACTION

PAINTER, PHOTOGRAPHER,

and above all, a storyteller, Karin Hillmer creates images ON VIEW 11.01.13 –03.2014 that are enigmatic, humorous, Curated by Janet Batet mysterious and original. Her work is shaped by a lifelong interest in and Rafael DiazCasas, philosophy, history, art, invention, music and science. this show includes works from the 1950s–2013 by Hugo Consuegra, Sandú ORLANDO Darié, Carlos Garcia, Luis Gallery: Enrique López, Raúl MarJai Gallery tínez, Pedro de Oraá, José www.jaigallery.net Rosabal, Loló Soldevilla, and José Angel Vincench. Artist: Jenny Risher JENNY’S FRESH STYLE

and natural sensibility has afforded her the opportunity to photograph for such illustrious clients as The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and Marie Claire.

Clockwise from top: Karin Hillmer, The time thief was not among those that denied the existence of time, archival pigment photograph, 2011, 21 x 21”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Carlos Garcia, Cinco Objectos Estelales, mixed media on canvas, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Jenny Risher, Checkers, courtesy of the artist and Jai Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

Exhibition: VOICES OF HOPE: CELEBRATING ROBERT INDIANA ON VIEW THRU 5.30.14

This show highlights Indiana’s iconic HOPE series, which has inspired a new generation of American identity, as his memorable LOVE piece had during the tumultuous 1960s.

MIAMI

Gallery: Dina Mitrani Gallery www.dinamitranigallery.com

Artist: Chuck Ramirez AS AN ARTIST AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER, CHUCK RAMIREZ

processed and deconstructed the media world in which he lived. His work employs visual and conceptual techniques found in contemporary advertising and package design. His large-scale photographic portraits and installations of banal objects are humorous, yet poignant metaphors for the transient nature of consumer culture and the frailty of life. From left: Robert Indiana, Star of HOPE, Red/Blue/White/Gold, 2013, silkscreen on canvas, 24 x 24 x 2”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Chuck Ramirez, The Fashionista, 2008, Lost and Found series, 20 x 16”, pigment print, edition 6, courtesy of Dina Mitrani Gallery, Miami, and Ruiz-Healy Art, San Antonio

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

SARASOTA

Gallery: Fredric Snitzer Gallery

Gallery: State of the Arts Gallery

www.snitzer.com

www.sarasota fineart.com

Artist: Timothy Buwalda

Exhibition: REFRESH 


TIMOTHY BUWALDA,

ON VIEW THRU 10.30.13

is known for his largescale oil paintings that combine the formal aspects of painting with conceptual imagery. Bordering abstraction and realism, Buwalda’s paintings are metaphorically themed.

Currently on view at the gallery is a group exhibition featuring a selection of works in a variety of media representing a broad range of exceptional talent.

MIAMI

Gallery: David Castillo Gallery www.davidcastillogallery.com

Exhibition: Melvin Martinez ON VIEW 10.10.13 –11.16.13

In a deluge of color and application that vibrates as if sonic, Melvin’s works occupy oil, acrylic, glitter, confetti and decorative craft materials beyond ontological loyalties.

Clockwise from top: Timothy Buwalda, The Birthplace, 2011, oil on canvas, 78 x 116.5”, courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery; George Snyder, SLT (Blue), courtesy of the artist and State of the Arts Gallery; Melvin Martinez, I hate pink again, 2013, mixed media on canvas and wood, 41 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and David Castillo Gallery

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SARASOTA’S

THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING M U S EUM OF ART PRESENTS...

ICONS

S

OF

ON VIEW

OCTOBER 4, 2013 — JANUARY 5, 2014 WWW. RINGLING.ORG

Woman’s evening dress in two parts, Olivier Theyskens for House of Rochas, French, Spring/Summer 2005, Helen and Alice Colburn Fund

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S

Style


I Icons of Style

This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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ICONS OF STYLE

celebrates the interconnected roles of fashion’s makers, models, and media. Drawing on the MFA-Boston’s rich collection of costumes, illustrations, and fashion photographs, the exhibition explores the process of creating iconic style—

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Left: Woman’s evening dress, John Galliano, worn by Cate Blanchett, French, 1999, gift of Judith Hurwitz Krupp. Below: Woman’s ensemble in two parts (blouse), Arnold Scaasi, worn by Barbra Streisand, American, 1969, Arnold Scaasi Collection, gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, and Daria Petrilli-Eckert


Icons of Style from the designer’s original concepts, to the collaboration with the models and muses who exemplify the designer’s style, and finally to the media that reinterpret and disseminate those looks to the world. Sarasota’s Ringling Museum of Art is currently the only US venue showcasing this incredible collection. The exhibition, which opens October 4, 2013, includes more than 30 dressed mannequins accompanied by 60 fashion illustrations and 42 fashion photographs. Organized into three thematic sections, Icons of Style: Fashion Makers, Models and Images reveals the richness of design, persona, and image:

The Art of the Fashion Designer Above: Woman’s ensemble in two parts (evening dress), Arnold Scaasi, worn by Helen Lee, Arnold Scaasi Collection, gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, and Daria Petrilli-Eckert. Opposite: Woman’s evening dress: Katisha-San, John Galliano for House of Christian Dior, Spring-Summer 2007, silk satin and faille embroidered with silk and crystals, Museum purchase with funds donated by the Fashion Council, Museum of Fine Arts Boston

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The first section of the exhibition highlights the role of the designer in creating iconic fashions—where they find inspiration and how they showcase their concepts through runway shows. Featured here 2013


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Icons of Style

Above left (top to bottom): Woman’s dress, Arnold Scaasi, American, Fall 1961, Museum purchase with funds donated by the Textile and Costume Society, Museum of Fine Arts Boston; Sketch book–Fall 1961, Arnold Scaasi, Arnold Scaasi Design Drawings–Museum purchase with funds donated by Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf. Above right (top to bottom): Woman’s ensemble in two parts (coat), Arnold Scaasi, American, Fall 1958, Arnold Scaasi Collection, gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, and Daria Petrilli-Eckert; Page from sketch book–Fall 1958, part 1, Arnold Scaasi, American, Fall 1958, Arnold Scaasi Design Drawings–Museum purchase with funds donated by Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf. Opposite: Woman’s ensemble in two parts (dress), Arnold Scaasi, American, Spring 1988, Arnold Scaasi Collection, gift of Arnold Scaasi, made possible through the generous support of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, anonymous donors, Penny and Jeff Vinik, Lynne and Mark Rickabaugh, Jane and Robert Burke, Carol Wall, Mrs. I. W. Colburn, Megan O’Block, Lorraine Bressler, and Daria Petrilli-Eckert

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are garments created for the catwalk by designers such as Alexander McQueen, Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel, Helmut Lang, Christian Lacroix, Olivier Theyskens for Rochas, John Galliano for Dior, and Rodarte.

Models and Muses Designers often work closely with clients to create iconic looks. They draw inspiration from celebrity personalities whose style embodies their unique fashion vision. Hollywood has always had a special relationship with fashion designers, and the annual Academy Awards celebration has become one of the premier international fashion events of the year. Focusing on the collaborations between designers and personalities in the political and film worlds, this section includes a Yuki dress designed for Princess Diana, an Arnold Scaasi gown made for Barbara Bush, as well as ten evening dresses worn


Icons of Style by film stars Kirsten Dunst, Cate Blanchett, Winona Ryder, Barbra Streisand, Kristen Davis, and Kate Capshaw as they walked the “red carpet” in Hollywood.

The Art of Fashion Illustration and Photography

Above: Le Coup de Vent–Tailleur de promenade de Doucet, plate IV from Gazette du Bon Ton, volume 2, no. 10*, H. Robert Dammy, illustrating design by Jacques Doucet, publisher: Librairie Centrale des Beaux-arts, French, August 1913, photomechanical lithograph with hand-applied color (pochoir). Opposite: De La Fumée–Robe de Madeleine Vionnet, plate 13 from Gazette du Bon Ton, volume 1, no. 2*, Thayaht, illustrating design by Madeleine Vionnet, Publisher: Librairie Centrale des Beaux-arts, French, March 1922, lithograph with handapplied color (pochoir)

*Transferred from the William Morris Hunt Memorial Library

This final section of the exhibition explores the artfulness of the fashion media in projecting innovative and unique images to a worldwide audience. Fashion illustrators and photographers not only capture fashion in print and on film, but also reinterpret it, creating highly original works of art in their own right. Icons of Style explores their role in making iconic images as demonstrated through the works of such major illustrators and photographers of the 20th century as Herb Ritts, Edward Steichen, Patrick Demarchelier, Richard Avedon, and Irving Penn, among others. O n V iew

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Papiers à la

MODE The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

ON VIEW THROUGH

01.12.2014 AT

THE BAKER MUSEUM, ARTIS—NAPLES

www.artisnaples.org

Isabelle de Borchgrave, DRESS À LA POLONAISE (detail), 18th c., courtesy of Créations Isabelle de Borchgrave sprl. Photo: © Alain Speltdoorn

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I

PAPIERS à la MODE: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

Inspired by the rich history of fashion represented in European paintings, famous costumes in museum collections, and designs of the grand couturiers, Belgian artist and sculptor, Isabelle de Borchgrave, has turned her passion for painting toward the recreation of elaborate costumes—crumpling, pleating, braiding, and painting the surface of simple rag paper to achieve the effect of textiles and create the illusion of haute couture. Featuring over 50 period costumes, kimonos, kaftans and other objects intricately crafted out of paper, Papiers à la Mode (Paper in Fashion), on view through January 12, 2014, at The Baker Museum in Naples, offers a fresh look at fashion history from Elizabeth I to Coco Chanel. Opposite: LA ROBE DE LA REINE MARIE-ANTOINETTE, 1776, paper dress of Marie-Antoinette dated in 1776, inspired by a print representing the Queen in a theatrical costume, created in September 2001. Photo: © Andreas von Einsiedel

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PAPIERS à la MODE: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

The New York Times has called Papiers à la Mode “pure delight,” and renowned French fashion designer, Hubert de Givenchy, once said of de Borchgrave, “Isabelle is one of a kind; with a single sheet of paper, she creates the most beautiful dresses, the finest costumes, or, simply, a chain of white roses...Whether it becomes a shoe, a hat or a few strings of pearls, [Isabelle plays] with paper as a virtuoso plays an instrument.”

Presenting a range of styles from the 16th to the early 20th century, de Borchgrave deftly crafts a world of splendor in trompe l’oeil. Cutting, gluing, and painting with imagination and exceptional mastery, she creates the illusion of lace, brocade, delicate silk, and sumptuous embroidery. The luxurious apparel of royalty, depicted in paintings and decorative arts, takes on an added dimension in the work

Above left (and right): GILET D’HOMME (and detail), 1760, men’s cardigan in paper, created in September 2001; Opposite: COSTUME DE PIERRE LE GRAND, Peter the Great dress based on ca. 1730 design, created in September–October 2001. Photos: © Andreas von Einsiedel

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PAPIERS à la MODE: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

of de Borchgrave. The costumes come to life with her intricate painting and manipulation of the paper. A painter by training and by passion, de Borchgrave turned her talent for trompe l’oeil to the paper sculptures that reinterpret and recreate almost 300 years of fashion. With fashion historian, Rita Brown, she created Papiers à la Mode, a collection of costumes in paper and paint that offers a fresh look at fashion history.

Her collections that followed included an immersive dive into the 19th century Venice-inspired line from Fortuny, a look at the famous figures of I Medici, and a study of the Ballet Russes, whose playful figures and saturated colors nod to her love of the Nabis movement. Isabelle de Borchgrave was born in Brussels, Belgium, in 1946. Since early childhood, she had a passion for drawing. She began her studies at age 14 at

Above left (and right): LA ROBE DE MADAME DE POMPADOUR (and detail), 1755, Madame de Pompadour paper dress inspired by a painting by Maurice Quentin de la Tour (1755), created in September 2001; ROBE DU SOIR WORTH, 1898, paper dress inspired by the French stylist Frédéric Worth, dated 1898, created in November 1997. Photos: © Andreas von Einsiedel

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PAPIERS à la MODE: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

the Centre des Arts Décoratifs, and later, at Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, where her days were filled with drawing still lifes and form models. De Borchgrave worked in advertising for less than a year after she had finished studying, and then made clothes for her friends before branching out into interior design. She later established her own studio, designing dresses, scarves, jewelry and accessories. In particular, de Borch-

grave specialized in designing fabrics. In de Borchgrave’s art, the starting point is almost always the same: sheets of paper one meter by one and a half meters (3.3 feet by 4.9 feet), which she sets to work on with her brushes and paints on an enormous linen-covered table in her studio in Brussels. “Her colors,” reported The New York Times, “are very much inspired by her travels: reds from the roses of Turkey, earth hues from Egypt,

Above (left and right): ROBE À LA FRANÇAISE (and detail), 1780, paper dress called “à la française” inspired by a dress from the Collection Kyoto Costume Institute, created in June 1998; Opposite: LA ROBE DE L’IMPÉRATRICE EUGÉNIE, 1855, paper dress of the Empress Eugénie inspired by the portrait of Madame Moitessier painted by Ingres in 1856, created in September 2001. Photos: © Andreas von Einsiedel

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PAPIERS à la MODE: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave

blues from Greece...de Borchgrave produces astonishing effects of scintillating color, weight, transparency and texture. Her renderings of diaphanous gauzes are especially astonishing.” De Borchgrave’s name is also readily associated with the world of design. By working together with Caspari, the potteries of Gien, Target, and Villeroy and Boch, Isabelle has turned her imagination into an art that’s accessible to anyone who

wants to bring festivity into their home. Painted fabrics and paper, dinner services, curtains, sheets, decor with a personal touch for parties and weddings—all this tells of the world in which she has always loved to move. Isabelle de Borchgrave’s work has been widely collected by major museums and private collectors worldwide. She is represented in the US by the Serge Sorokko Gallery. O n V iew

Above (left to right): Isabelle de Borchgrave’s studio in Brussels: Twice a month, the artist opens her studio to visitors, providing an opportunity to view the work being carried out by Isabelle and her team. Photo: © Jean-Pierre Gabriel; The artist: In a 40+ year career, de Borchgrave has never put to one side the thing that has always guided her in her life: painting; Opposite: CHAUSSURES XVIII ÈME SIÈCLE, 18th century paper shoes. Photos: © Andreas von Einsiedel

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My inspiration comes from period dresses, but they are subject to my poetic license. I’m really an artist; I sew with paint. I’m crazy about fabrics and bring them to life through paper. —I s a b e l l e

de

Borchgrave


AGAINST T W O O D

I N

C O N T E M P O R A R Y

On view 10.12.13–01.20.14 at MUSEUM of ART / FORT LAUDERDALE, Nova Southeastern University • www.moafl.org 00

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THE GRAIN A R T ,

C R A F T

A N D

D E S I G N

Wendell Castle, Ghost Rider, 2010, Bubinga wood with oil finish, 29-1/4 x 32 x 76-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Friedman Benda, New York. Photo: Jon Lam Photography OnV

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AGAINST THE GRAIN: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design

Featuring nearly 90 installations,

sculptures, furniture, and objects, Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design explores the most cutting-edge conceptual and technical trends in woodworking today. On view October 12, 2013 through January 20, 2014 at the Museum of Art /Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, the exhibition emphasizes the way artists, designers, and craftspeople have incorporated post-modernist approaches and strategies into woodworking. The exhibition engages ideas of mimicry, assemblage virtuosity and whimsy (with a serious purpose). The works, most of which have been created since 2000, challenge traditional applications of wood within the design and craft worlds, and exemplify the wide-ranging, frequently unexpected, approaches to the medium by contemporary artists and designers. Against the Grain is organized by the Muse-

um of Arts and Design, New York and curated by Lowery Stokes Sims, the Charles Bronfman International Curator at the Museum of Arts and Design, assisted by Elizabeth Edwards Kirrane, Assistant Curator at MAD. In an excerpt from her curatorial statement, Sims discusses the conceptual framework behind the exhibition: “Wood may be said to be a medium of basic function as well as a versatile creativity. In art, craft, and design, the working of wood comes to represent a number of expectations: the

Above: Willie Cole, Malcolm’s Chicken I, 2002, matches, brooms, wax, styrofoam, marbles, 26 x 20-1/2 x 34”, private collection, Birmingham, AL, courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York;

Opposite: Kcho, R.E.C. (Rectifying the Course), 2006, wood, Collection Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, acquired through the gifts of Mrs. S. B. Sneath, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Coleman and Mrs. Arthur P. Gustafson. Photo: © Kcho, courtesy Marlborough Gallery, New York


well-turned vessel; furniture and items of decor whose forms declare their functions; and sculptural forms that reveal the inherent qualities of the material. Since the dawn of modernism, at the beginning of the 20th century, those expectations have been challenged by individual creators, even as they have continued to be met. The modernist imperative of innovation positioned wood as a medium of virtuosity and functional elegance, while providing a direct experience of the material and its particular qualities.

Against the Grain demonstrates how various creators have used modernist expectations of wood as platforms from which to launch creative approaches that strain the protocols of woodworking. Vessel forms have been deconstructed, furniture has played with the relationship between function and form, and sculpture has co-opted the techniques and forms of woodturning and furniture. Additionally the exhibition demonstrates how the idea and look of wood has inspired creations in other materi-

Above: Ursula von Rydingsvard, Oddychąjaca, 2011, cedar, graphite, © Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy of Galerie Lelong, New York; Opposite: Laurel Roth, Food #3: Sheep, 2008, Vera wood, gold leaf, Swarovski crystal, 5 x 4-1/2 x 8-1/2”, courtesy of the artist, Schroeder Romero and Shredder Gallery, New York. Photo: Andy Diaz Hope

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AGAINST THE GRAIN: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design

“Against the Grain is a complete immersion into the seemingly limitless world of contemporary woodworking, an imaginative experience where function is subsumed by fantastical forms and textures.”– Holly Hotchner als that provide fresh thinking about the medium of wood.” The presentation features 57 artists and designers with new works by artists, Sarah Oppenheimer, Martin Puryear, Marc Andre Robinson and Alison Elizabeth Taylor; and

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by designers, Ian Spencer and Cairn Young from Yard Sale Project, and Joseph Walsh. Also included are recent works by influential sculptors, Ursula von Rydingsvard and Courtney Smith; installation artists, Gary Carsley and Francis Cape; designers, Maarten Baas,

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AGAINST THE GRAIN: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design

Sebastian Errazuriz, and Pablo Reinoso; and studio wood artists, Wendell Castle, Hunt Clark, Andrew Early, and Bud Latven; among many others. “Against the Grain is a complete immersion into the seemingly limitless world of contemporary woodworking, an imaginative experience where function is subsumed by fantastical forms and textures,” said Holly Hotchner, MAD’s former Director. “The creators featured in the exhibition exemplify the innovative practice that MAD is dedicated

to supporting and bringing to the fore. Their work defies clear categorization and draws together traditionally disparate themes, ideas, and techniques into stunning and surprising works of art.” The exhibition explores several thematic threads that encapsulate the breadth of creative production in wood. Many of the artists and designers are inspired by wood’s most natural state as trees, utilizing branches, logs, and planks, and creating works that draw upon the wood’s grains, textures, and patterns. Others

Above: Nina Bruun, Nest, 2010, birch, textile, foam cushion, 29-5/8 x 39-3/8 x 39-3/8”, courtesy of the artist. Photo: Adam Dyrvig Tatt Opposite: Ricky Swallow, Come Together, 2002, laminated jeutlong, courtesy of the artist; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London; Darren Knight, Sydney. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

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AGAINST THE GRAIN: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design


fuse a variety of wood elements together to create distinctly new visual forms, producing a more powerful experience than the individual parts might allow. Digital techniques have transformed woodworking, allowing creators to manipulate materials and produce illusions that were previously impossible. The use of wood as a material to convey political and social content, as well as humor and visual puns, has grown and been refined as artists experiment with the medium. Additionally, environmental issues are woven throughout the

exhibition as increased ecological consciousness is implicit in the work of all contemporary woodworkers. “Wood is a ubiquitous material and a medium of basic function as well as tremendous versatility. In the last several decades, artists have truly begun to test its creative boundaries, expressing and expanding wood’s aesthetic and conceptual possibilities,” says Sims. “The artists featured in Against the Grain represent the forward-thinking approach that has spurred the medium’s renaissance.” O n V iew

Above: Joseph Walsh, Enignum Shelf, 2011, olive ash wood, white oil, courtesy of Joseph Walsh Studio. Photo: Andrew Bradley Opposite: Floris Wubben, Tree Fungus Shelf, 2011, pollard willow, cast epoxy resin,

Collection of the Museum of Arts and Design, New York, gift of the artist. Photo: Studio Floris Wubben

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PRIVATE SPA

ME

photographs by

LES SLESNICK


CES :

XIC O on view thru

01.05.14

MUSEUM OF ART— DELAND, FLORIDA at

w w w.m oar t de l and.or g

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P

rivate Spaces: Mexico is the cre-

ation of award-winning photographer Les Slesnick, who is well known for his interior portrait work. His richly textured photographs present intimate glimpses into the lives of ordinary people,

Previous spread: Two Bicycles and Boy on Bed Watching TV (detail), 1997 Opposite: The Philco, 2003: “Unless you are in your 60s or 70s or older, you probably don’t remember the name Philco, but this console stereo stood as a trophy in an honored position within this home, and was the centerpiece of the living room—even though it no longer worked.” –L. Slesnick All images: © Les Slesnick

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and are meant to show the values of a culture as it is represented in the home and other interior spaces. The exhibition, currently on display at the Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida, through January 5, 2014, presents an up-close and personal impression of home environments where the space rather than the i e w

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occupant tells the story. The late art critic Philip E. Bishop, once wrote of the artist: “Les Slesnick possesses two monumental gifts—an impeccable eye for the color image, and a gift for gab that gains him access to people’s most intimate and revealing domestic spaces.” “People tend to display

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in their homes what they value most in life, whether it’s a gun collection or family photos and mementos,” said Slesnick. “An enormous amount of information about the people occupying these spaces can be gleaned by studying the contents, and seemingly unimportant details the inhabitants of the spaces have come to ignore all become critically important elements of my work. The result is often what has been called a ‘peopleless portrait’—much is learned about an individual without actually seeing him. It’s as if the person occupying the space just left the room, but left everything about himself behind, expecting to return momentarily.” Since 1987, Slesnick has placed major emphasis for his Private Spaces body of work

Right: Teresa Torres (Washing Dishes), 1997: “Teresa Torres and her husband Sebastin are a loving, and caring couple. Their son Alex, now in his early 30s, is physically and emotionally challenged, and even though he requires constant attention, his parents never lose patience with him. On one trip, I stood in their living room fumbling through my English to Spanish dictionary, and when Teresa realized I was trying to tell her what a remarkable mother she was, she broke into tears and hugged me.” –L. Slesnick

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Private Spaces: Mexico

Photographs by Les Slesnick

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Private Spaces: Mexico

Photographs by Les Slesnick

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“...seemingly unimportant details the inhabitants of the spaces have come to ignore all become critically important elements of my work.” —L. Slesnick on the Yucatecan cultures of Mexico. In the early 2000s, he expanded the scope of his long-running series to include small bodies of work produced in Cuba and Colombia. In 2005, he returned to working in the U.S. for the first time in 13 years, adding The Salina (Kansas) Project, The Courtland (Kansas) Project, and The Dunedin (Florida) Project OnV

to the Private Spaces series. Slesnick prefers to shoot only in small towns and discussions are currently underway for a fourth domestic small town project in southwest Kansas. “...it would be difficult to mistake a Slesnick photograph for someone else’s,” said David C. Swoyer, former assistant curator of exhibitions at the New Orleans Museum of i e w

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Above: Sra. Enriquez and Her Father, a Well Known Mexican Psychiatrist, 2004 Opposite: Sr. Rosel’s Hats, 1996: “Empty tequila bottles lined the floors along the walls of both rooms of Sr. Rosel’s modest home, but he was always gracious and always invited me in. He made hats and hammocks for a living.” –L. Slesnick

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Private Spaces: Mexico

Photographs by Les Slesnick Art. “His careful compositions are warmly built with color and humanity. One feels drawn into his images rather than shut out. Instead of designing formal monuments that can only be coldly viewed from afar, Slesnick, as a great architect would, meticulously structures images as places in which one can enter and participate in the realm of life.”  Slesnick first began photographing homes for his Private Spaces series in 1988 in rural England. His process is quite simple. He visits a town or region, spends time getting to know the people, asks if he can photograph inside their homes, and comes away with impressions that will linger on forever. “I send them copies of the photos, and they are so proud when they see them,” Slesnick said of his subjects. “The average Mexican, above all else, values God and family, which might explain to some extent why family photos are typically hung high on the wall. As one observer theorized, ‘the higher on the wall they are, the closer to God they are.’” OnV

Slesnick is a master technician who processes his own proofs and works in limited editions. First and foremost, he is concerned with the sheer beauty of his prints. “Whatever the subject, however luminous or evanescent the color, Slesnick’s prints work because they are so elegantly and precisely composed of systems of interi e w

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Above: Gabriella, 2002: “The amazing thing about Gabriella is what you don’t see. Her entire class, about 20 students, was teasing and taunting her the whole time I was photographing her, but she never permitted herself to be distracted by them. It was an amazing display of concentration from someone so young.” –L. Slesnick Opposite: La Puerta Verde (The Green Door), 2001

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locking lines and graceful architectonic forms,” art critic Laura Stewart once wrote of Slesnick. “Still, what strikes viewers first and most lastingly about Slesnick’s work is its sheer beauty—and that is how it should be.” Les Slesnick received his MFA in photography from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 1993. Among the many awards he has received for his work, Slesnick’s Mexico series won the gold medal in 1996 from the Royal Photographic Society. His work has been exhibited in solo OnV

and group shows throughout Florida and abroad, including the Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala; Dunedin Fine Art Center; and Orlando Museum of Art. Slesnick’s work is also held in numerous private and corporate collections in the U.S. and UK, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art; City of Orlando, Florida; and Central Florida Community College. Slesnick currently resides in Orlando, FL, with his wife, Ella. To view more of his work and to purchase prints, visit: www.privatespaces.org.

Private Spaces: Mexico

O n V iew

Red Telephone Redux, 2008

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Photographs by Les Slesnick

Above: The Barber and the Bandit, 1999: “...I thought that the fellow in the chair looked like every proverbial Mexican bandit I’d seen in movies or read about in books, especially with that mustache. He never objected to my taking the photos (and I took quite a few of him that day). He never smiled; he never parted his lips. He never said a word.” –L. Slesnick Opposite: Jesus and the

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On view 11.01.13 – 01.03.14 at PENSACOLA MUSEUM of ART

THE DESIGN OF

WAR

WORLD WAR I AND WORLD WAR II POSTERS AND FLAGS: Selected works from the Rowe Collection • www.pensacolamuseumofart.org

HHH Text by Christina Glover

WORLD WAR I AND WORLD WAR II WERE

the most significant and catastrophic events of the twentieth century. To commemorate the soldiers who took part in the two World Wars, the Pensacola Museum of Art presents The Design of War: World War I and World War II Posters and Flags. Dr. Patrick Rowe, art history professor at Pensacola State College and collector of nineteenth- and twentieth-century prints, organized this exhibition. The Design of War illustrates how visual media communicated messages that supported the war efforts and, in both conflicts, led to victory for the allies. The posters on display in the exhibition illustrate themes such as recruiting, fundraising drives, conservation of resources,

defense, victory, and the preservation of freedom. They document the messages that the government and private industry presented to both the American public and the troops, and they provide the contemporary viewer an understanding of the crucial role art played as part of the war efforts. The flags on display form an important and educational component of the exhibition. To the citizens and soldiers taking part in the wars, the design of a flag communicated a message and commonly evoked an emotional patriotic feeling. However, during peacetime, the symbolism of these flags and the deep sense of patriotism they created are often forgotten. With this exhibition, the significance of these flags to those who personally experienced the wars is made clear for the viewer.

Opposite: UNITED we are strong / UNITED we will win, Henry Koerner, 1943, United States Government Printing Office

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THE DESIGN OF WAR

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Posters in the exhibition reflect the stylistic features of Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, and other art movements. The Golden Age of posters began in the late nineteenth century and continued until the midtwentieth century. Master artists like Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jules ChĂŠret, and Alfonse Mucha raised this medium to the level of fine art. Many of the works in the exhibition are created in the traditional poster technique of color lithography. Other posters, mostly those dated after the 1930s, are made using a photomechanical process, a state-of-the-art printing technique at that time. The posters parallel contemporary styles in painting, and they are as much a part of the visual culture as their painted counterparts.

Posters in the exhibition reflect the stylistic features of Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, and other art movements. Posters were used as a form of communication because they were inexpensive to produce, they were easily accessible to the public, and they effectively conveyed a message. Their purpose was to visually persuade the audience– often to mobilize them into action (to enlist, to save resources, to work in an artillery factory, or to buy war bonds). Regardless of the theme, the posters were propaganda, which has been a function of visual media since its earliest history.

Above: Beat back the HUN with LIBERTY BONDS, Frederick Strothmann, 1918, United States Department of the Treasury, Publicity Bureau Opposite: Keep these off the U.S.A./Buy more LIBERTY BONDS, John Norton, 1918, Strobridge Litho Company, Cincinnati and New York

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHAEL PONGETTI AND CHRISTOPHER WHITE


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THE DESIGN OF WAR

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Complementing the posters in the exhibition are original World War I and World War II flags. The design of most war posters made in the United States depended on a direct connection between text and image. Patriotism was a driving force, as was fear of the enemy. The World War II poster You make it RIGHT... They’ll make it FIGHT created a link between the product in the factory and the weapon in the field. Images and text appear in red, white, and blue, almost as a detail of the American flag itself. The composition is divided in half; both sides (the home front and the front line) are presumably equal contributors to the war effort. As with many posters related to the theme of war production, it is dramatically suggested that the work of a sin-

gle individual in a factory will determine the nation’s victory or defeat in war. Complementing the posters are original World War I and World War II flags, some of which are shown in the posters themselves. A number of these are United States Navy signal flags, which indicated words and letters to other passing American vessels. As with traditional art forms, the flags served as visual cues to language. Other flags in the exhibition are United States service flags, also known as “son in service flags.” These were displayed in homes and towns, with a star representing each soldier who was either serving in the war (a blue star) or who had died in war (a gold star).

Above: United States Service Flag, 1942-1945 Opposite: You make it RIGHT... They’ll make it FIGHT, Bernard Perlin, 1942, United States War Production Board

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THE DESIGN OF WAR

Sometimes the subject of the posters consisted of only text that related a message in a direct, clear manner. Other times the subject was simply a depiction of an idealized, heroic soldier or factory worker and a short line of text relating a message that, at a glance, most Americans could easily understand. However, occasionally the patrons commissioning posters relied on the expert eye of talented artists and commercial illustrators to create bold and dramatic designs. For example, Abram Games’ World War II poster BLOOD DONORS are needed urgently to save these lives is a masterpiece in design. With his composition, color, text, and images are powerfully arranged to fully awaken the emotions of the public. Because of the originality of his compositions, today Games is recognized as one of the greatest graphic artists of the twentieth century. Some artists and illustrators had reputations that were established

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prior to the war. The most notable example was Norman Rockwell, a celebrated artist who contributed his work at no cost to the war effort. In 1942, Rockwell created his widely known series of paintings—the Four Freedoms. These paintings, which were based on a speech given by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941, were transposed into four posters. The paintings were sent to sixteen cities around the United States and raised $133 million dollars to support the war effort. Rockwell’s posters were used to encourage people to buy bonds for war production, and by the end of World War II, four million had been printed by the government. His work Freedom from Want emphasizes family and national values, as well as religious gratitude. It portrays an image (Thanksgiving Day dinner) with which most Americans could identify and relates a cause (national prosperity) for which all would be willing to fight.

Above: BLOOD DONORS are needed urgently to save these lives / THE ARMY BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE, Abram Games,

ca. 1942, published by Her Majesty’s Stationary Service for the Army Transfusion Service, printed by W. R. Royal and Son, Ltd., London Opposite: OURS...to fight for / FREEDOM FROM WANT, Norman Rockwell, 1943, United States Government Printing Office

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This exhibition reminds us of our job at home to support those who are fighting for us abroad. The World War II poster ...because somebody talked! shows the service flag of a deceased solider to make a strong but sentimental appeal to the viewer. A teary-eyed spaniel mourns the loss of his owner, due only to someone’s careless talk, and implicitly asks Americans to maintain secrecy about war-related information. In addition to the collection’s visual and historical appeal, this exhibition is intended to bring awareness to the present-day issues facing our most recent veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Pensacola Museum of Art has established a fund for donations that will support veterans wounded in action and their families. Just as the posters from the World Wars called attention to the troubles facing the troops, this exhibition reminds us of our job

at home to support those who are fighting for us abroad. Active-duty and retired military members and their families will be admitted into the museum for free during the run of the exhibition. A public opening reception will be held on November 8, 2013, in conjunction with Veterans Day. The exhibition will remain on view until January 3, 2014. “The combination of history, subject matter, and the aesthetic appeal of each poster and flag makes this exhibition special on its own, but especially to Pensacola’s large military community,” says Raven McBride, the Pensacola Museum of Art’s Deputy Director and Chief Curator. “We are honored to have Dr. Rowe’s collection, which represents such an important artistic legacy for the United States.” O n V iew

Above: REMEMBER THE GIRL BEHIND THE MAN BEHIND THE GUN / Y.W.C.A., M. B., ca. 1918, War Work Council Opposite: …because somebody talked!, Wesley, 1944, United States Government Printing Office

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FORM { P H Y L L I DA

PHYLLIDA BARLOW HAS

B A R L OW }

Exhibition

Phyllida Barlow: HOARD On view 12.03. 13–02. 23. 14 at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach www.norton.org

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been a seminal influence on British sculpture for the past 40+ years. She began making work in the mid-’60s, breaking away from earlier British sculpture exemplified by the formal abstractions of artists such as Anthony Caro. Inspired by Arte Povera and American sculptors like Eva Hesse, Barlow took on a broader and more experimental approach to the materials she manipulates. Her works consist of disparate substances such as concrete, felt, wooden pallets, polystyrene, and fabric. These materials are a reflection of the urban environment in which she works, and are often sourced directly from the streets. Since the beginning of her career, Barlow’s sculptures have been appreciated for their playful formalism and the relationship they have to the built environment—often inspired by objects that direct or impede our movement through space. Barriers, scaffolding, and security fences are reinterpreted into rough-hewn constructions with exuberantly painted surfaces. 2013


F O R M

Assembling her sculptures of experience.” quickly and intuitively, they beBorn in 1944 in Newcastlecome distant memories of ob- upon-Tyne, England, Barlow atjects rather than faithful recon- tended Chelsea School of Art, structions. Her work also takes and then the Slade School of on an ephemeral, contingent Fine Art, London, graduating quality as pieces assembled on in 1966. She went on to teach site will often be broken down at the Slade School of Fine Art after an exhibition and recycled for forty years, retiring in 2008. into future projects. Barlow has had solo exhibiBarlow’s works tions at numerous fully inhabit and venues abroad, intransform a given cluding the Henry architectural space. Moore Foundation, Wi t h i m p o s i n g Leeds, England and overwhelming (1995); Baltic Censcale, her installatre for Contempotions challenge and raryArt, Gateshead, parody the heroic Phyllida Barlow’s England (2004); monumentalism of sculptures capture BAWAG Contemher predecessors— porary, Vienna, the joyfulness, and capture the joyAustria (2010); and absurdity, and fulness, absurdity, the Kunstverein transience of life. and transience of Nürnberg, Germalife. “There’s something about ny (2011). She is also the recipwalking around sculpture that ient of the 2012 Aachen prize. has the possibility of being rePhyllida Barlow is the third flective, like walking through a artist selected for a Recognition landscape,” Barlow once said. of Art by Women (RAW) exhi“The largeness of sculpture has bition—and the first sculptor to that infinite possibility to make be included. The Norton is one one engage beyond just the ob- of the few institutions in the US ject itself and into other realms to exhibit her work. O n V iew

opposite : untitled: hanginglump, 2 (detail), 2012, polystyrene, wire netting, polyurethane expanding foam, fabric, bonding plaster, paint, sand, Dimensions variable above (top to bottom): 1. untitled: upturnedhouse, 2, 2012, Timber, plywood, cement, polystyrene, polyfiller, paint, varnish, 157-1/2 x 196-7/8 x 102-3/8” 2. untitled: tangledtwister (detail), 2013, Steel bracket, fabric, paper rope, spray adhesive, 96 x 72 x 72”; Photo: © Paul Crosby left: Phyllida Barlow; Photo: Thierry Bal images courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth


PROFILE { H U M B E RT O

H U M B E RT O C A S T R O

CA S T RO }

Exhibition

Humberto Castro: Tracing Antilles On view 10.16. 13– 02. 03. 14 at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami http://thefrost.fiu.edu

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executes an artistic journey across the Antilles in an ever transforming exhibition that conceptually circumnavigates the islands of the Caribbean. The Frost Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami commissioned the Cuban-born contemporary artist to create a new multimedia sitespecific installation entitled Tracing Antilles. The exhibition is the result of an artistic investigation of the historical events that have shaped the region’s cultures through colonization and emigration. A member of the daring 1980s generation of Cuban artists that includes José Bedia and Rubén Torres Llorca, Humberto Castro has been exhibiting and winning awards since 1978. He has participated in numerous juried and invitational exhibitions as well as solo shows throughout Europe, South America, and the US. His work has influenced subsequent generations of art-


P R O F I L E

ists within Cuba. mation and spiritual release. ViBorn in 1957, Castro gradu- sual elements related to ocean ated from the Academy of Fine travel and the movements of Arts San Alejandro and Institu- submerged figures play on the to Superior de Arte (ISA) in Ha- human experience of migration. vana. His visual works include For this project, Castro travpaintings, drawings, printmak- eled to Jamaica, Haiti and the ing, ceramics, sculpture and in- Dominican Republic, where stallation. In his early years, he he collected material to be inalso delved into performance corporated into mixed-media art, using it often as works for the ina vehicle for social stallation. He statcriticism. ed that “the purIn 1989, Castro pose of this travel emigrated to Paris, was to make real France, where he becontact with the iscame active in the lands and their popParisian intellectuulations in an effort al scene, holding ex- Humberto Castro’s to understand the hibitions and giving “Tracing Antilles” long-term effects conferences across is a revealing com- of colonialism.” Europe. In 1999, he Comprising the mentary on the moved to the US, new installation is history of migration where he currently a captivating blend and displacement. lives and works. of large-scale oil Castro’s works continue to paintings and bronze sculpexplore visual metaphors or fa- tures, found objects, traditionbles based on the concept of his- al crafts, photography and vidtoric immigration as the founda- eo—a revealing documentary tion for today’s society. Much of the historical and social comof his imagery portrays human plexity of the region in a visual bondage juxtaposed with wing- fusion of the past with the preslike forms, suggesting transfor- ent. O n V iew

opposite top (and bottom): Deconstruction, Reconstruction (and detail), 2013, Installation with earth, ceramic shards, videos and Taíno artifacts from the Alfredo Carrada Collection, Dimensions variable above: Bestiario Politico del Caribe/ Political Bestiary of the Caribbean, 2013, Oil and acrylic on canvas, 85 x 99” below: Saint Jacques, 2012, Mixed media on canvas with Haitian Vodou flag in vitrine, 47.5 x 61.75” left: humberto castro images courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries, Coral Gables, FL


FOCUS { R E B E C CA

N O R R I S

“IN 2005, I SET OUT TO

W E B B }

Exhibition

Rebecca Norris Webb: My Dakota On view 10.18.13–02.02.14 at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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photograph my home state of South Dakota, a sparsely populated frontier state on the Great Plains with more buffalo, pronghorn, coyotes, mule deer, ringnecked pheasants and prairie dogs than people. It’s a landscape dominated by space and silence and solitude, by brutal wind and extreme weather. I was trying to capture a more intimate and personal view of the West. I was trying to capture what all that space feels like to someone who grew up there. A year into the project, however, everything changed. One of my brothers died unexpectedly. All of a sudden, the project became fueled by a sense of urgency, specifically my own overwhelming restlessness, which was my initial and very visceral response to my brother’s death. For months, one of the few things that eased my unsettled heart was the landscape of South Dakota. It seemed all I could do was drive through the badlands and prairies and photograph. I began to wonder: Does loss have its own geography? 2013


F O C U S

By the end of [the] second Dakota Museum of Art, and at year, my original vision of My the Museum of Fine Arts, BosDakota had expanded well be- ton. Her work has appeared in yond the original borders of Time, The New Yorker, The New those intimate Western land- York Review of Books, Nationscapes to encompass also my car, al Geographic, and Le Monde the road, and my entire circu- magazine. She is currently comitous road trip, while grieving pleting two joint book projects for my brother. Looking again at with Alex Webb—Memory City the work now that My Dakota is (Radius Books), and On Street finally a book, I rePhotography and alize that I was phothe Poetic Image tographing this par(Aperture)—both ticularly dark time will be published in in my life in order the spring of 2014. to try to absorb it, Her previously to distill it, and, ulpublished works timately, to let it go. include three phoNot only did my tography books that Rebecca Norris first grief change explore the comWebb’s “My me, but making My plicated relationDakota” is an intiDakota changed ship between peomate and personal me as well, both as ple and the natural view of the West. a human being and world—The Glass as a bookmaker.”­ Between Us (2006), Violet Isle: A —Rebecca Norris Webb Duet of Photographs from Cuba (with Alex Webb) (2009), and Norris Webb’s photographs My Dakota (2012). My Dakota have been exhibited interna- interweaves her text and phototionally, including at the George graphs and was selected as one Eastman House Museum, Roch- of the best photography books of ester, NY; the Dahl Arts Cen- 2012 by PDN, Photo-Eye, and ter, Rapid City, SD; the North Time. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Blackbirds, from the series My Dakota, Dye Coupler Print, 20 x 24” 2. Badlands, from the series My Dakota, Dye Coupler Print, 20 x 24” above (top to bottom): 1. Storm Light, from the series My Dakota, Dye Coupler Print, 20 x 24” 2. Rearview Mirror, from the series My Dakota, Dye Coupler Print, 20 x 24” left: rebecca norris webb; photo: © Bill Jay images courtesy of the artist


SPOTLIGHT { T R AC E Y

M O C A , N O RT H M I A M I ’ S

E M I N }

Knight Exhibition Series

Tracey Emin: Angel Without You On view 12.04.13–03.09.14 at Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

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opening of Tracey Emin: Angel Without You is the first American museum exhibition dedicated to the acclaimed British artist, Tracey Emin. The show focuses on Emin’s works in neon, a crucial aspect of the artist’s practice that began with her iconic The Tracey Emin Museum (1995), which opens the exhibit. Curated by Bonnie Clearwater, Angel Without You comprises more than 60 works from the past two decades. MOCA was the first American museum to purchase one of Emin’s works when it acquired the seminal film, Why I Never Became a Dancer in 1998. This film—which features scenes from Emin’s childhood home in the British seaside resort town of Margate, replete with vintage neon signs—explores the story of Emin’s tumultuous adolescence and loss of innocence. Why I Never Became a Dancer (1995) will be included in the exhibition along with several of Emin’s most notable neon works. In conjunction with MOCA’s 2013


S P O T L I G H T

exhibition, Skira Rizzoli is pub- Part of Me’s Bleeding. Emin lishing a comprehensive book subsequently exhibited her infaon Emin’s neons, also titled mous installation, My Bed, at the Angel Without You. Tate Gallery, for which she was Born in London in 1963, shortlisted for the Turner Prize. Tracey Emin has become inter- In 2007, she was chosen to reprenationally recognized for the sent Great Britain at the Venblunt and revealing style that ice Biennale, becoming the secpervades her work. Drawing ond female artist to ever do so. from personal exIn January 2013, periences, Emin reQueen Elizabeth veals emotional sitII appointed Emin uations with brutal a Commander of honesty and humor the Most Excellent in a wide variety of Order of the British media, including Empire for her conpainting, drawing, tributions to the embroidery, neon, visual arts. Tracey Emin’s installation, sculp- work reveals emoIn addition to ture, and film. MOCA, North Mitional situations Emin studied ami’s collection, with brutal honesty printmaking at Emin’s work can be and humor. Maidstone College found in the Brookof Art, Kent, and continued her lyn Museum of Art, New York; studies at the Royal College of British Museum, London; Centre Art, London, where she earned Georges Pompidou, Paris; Mua Master’s degree in painting. seum of Contemporary Art, Los Emin’s first commercial gallery Angeles; Museum of ModernArt, exhibition was held at London’s New York; National Portrait GalWhite Cube Gallery in 1993. In lery, London; Saatchi Collection, 1999, Lehmann Maupin present- London; San Francisco Museum ed Tracey Emin’s first solo gal- of Art; and Tate Gallery, London; lery exhibition in the US, Every among others. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Angel without You, 2013 2. Sorry Flowers die, 1999 Pink neon, 59.06 x 59.06”, AP1, Edition of 3, 2 AP above: The Scream, 2002, Blue neon, 68.58 x 17.17”, AP2, Edition of 3, 2 AP images ©Tracey Emin, Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin Gallery and White Cube left: tracey emin, Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, © Nick Morrish


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Pérez Art Museum Miami Opening to the public in December 2013, the new Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) will transform Museum Park into a central destination on Miami’s cultural map. The new PAMM will serve one of the most diverse populations in one of the fastest growing regions in the country, where a unique confluence of Caribbean, North and South American cultures adds vibrancy and texture to the civic landscape. www.pamm.org

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I

IN DECEMBER 2013, Miami

Art Museum will reopen in downtown Miami’s Museum Park (formerly Bicentennial Park) as Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). The highly anticipated state-of-the-art facility will offer 200,000 square feet of programmable space for the display of works of art, educational activities, private events, relaxation and dining. In December 2011, Jorge M. Pérez, a longtime trustee and leading collector of Latin American art, made a landmark leadership gift of $40 million in cash and art to support the campaign for the creation of the new venue, and in recognition of his generosity and advocacy for the project, the Museum has been renamed Pérez Art Museum Miami. OnV

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Pictured: A rendering of the new Pérez Art Museum Miami as viewed from Biscayne Bay All images courtesy of Pérez Art Museum Miami , opening December 2013, © Herzog & de Meuron Inset: Construction is underway as the new PAMM draws closer to completion. Photo: Daniel Azoulay photography


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Designed by internationallyrenowned architects, Herzog & de Meuron, the new PAMM is highly responsive to the city’s climate and the needs of a young, rising art museum. Centrally located in downtown Miami, just across the bay from South Beach, and at the intersection of Miami-Dade County’s metropolitan centers, the three-story structure sits upon an elevated platform and below a canopy— both of which extend far beyond

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : P É R E Z A RT M U S E U M MIAMI

PAMM features sweeping views of Biscayne Bay, sprawling outdoor plazas with lush vegetation cascading from the Museum canopy’s overhang, and a variety of modern indoor spaces for business meetings, cocktail receptions, weddings, elegant brunches, dinner parties and more.

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the Museum’s walls—creating a shaded veranda with sweeping views of Biscayne Bay and lush vegetation cascading from the canopy’s overhang. Working with local and international landscape designers and horticulturists, the architects use this space to “bring the park into the museum” while keeping visitors comfortable and protected from the elements outdoors and contributing to the building’s green features—the Museum was designed to achieve Silver LEED (Leadership in Energy and Efficient Design) Certification, serving as a model for future growth in the downtown Miami area. The interior of the Museum

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Above and right: exhibit spaces Below: interstitial platforms between exhibit spaces

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is comprised of a series of distinct galleries and other public areas, connected by interstitial spaces displaying the permanent collection. Transparency on the first and third levels of the galleries reveal the public and semi-public functions within: the entry halls, auditorium, shop, and cafÊ on the first level, and the education center and staff offices on the third. An open-air parking garage is located beneath the Museum and surrounded by landscaping and terraces. The permanent collection


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An artist’s renderings show the indoor and outdoor dining spaces at the Pérez Art Museum Miami, which will be overseen by Philadelphia-based restaurateur and caterer, Stephen Starr.

galleries are located on the first and, principally, the second level, which also house extensive temporary exhibition galleries. While mainly oriented inward so as to focus on the art, the second floor galleries incorporate carefully placed windows to allow for natural light and views of the surrounding park and bay. The main gallery level of the new museum appears to hover between more transparent levels, all of which are shaded by the canopy above. The canopy’s overhang creates a series of outdoor spaces that bridge the museum, park, and city. The canopy is perforated to allow in light, and lush vegetation literally dangles among the columns, transforming the veranda into a multi-dimensional garden. The tropical plants enfolding the museum are integral to the experience. The design allows for multiple transitions, as visitors gradually move from the outside to the inside, hot to cold, humid to dry, and from the street or park to the art. A set of stairs the width of the Museum will link OnV

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Images courtesy of Pérez Art Museum Miami; © Herzog & de Meuron

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the building to the bay walk in Museum Park. Pérez Art Museum Miami’s new restaurant will be run under the guidance of Philadelphiabased restaurateur, Stephen Starr, whose company, Stephen STARR Events, is the exclusive catering company for major cultural institutions nationwide, including the New York Botanical Gardens, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the New-York Historical Society, and the Rubin Museum of Art in New York, among others. The combination of Starr’s inspired food and services and the Museum’s cutting-edge setting will likely make PAMM a truly sought out event space. “We really appreciate the artistic approach that Stephen Starr and his team take when creating culinary experiences,” said Leann Standish, deputy director for external affairs. “We have already received great interest from people looking for a venue for everything from waterfront weddings to film screenings and performances, and STARR Restaurants Catering Group will be the perfect partner to ensure magical event experiences for our clients and their guests.”


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The Inaugural Exhibitions Opening Dec. 4, 2013

T

THE DIVERSE ROSTER OF

exhibitions presented in the Museum’s inaugural exhibition lineup examines cultural and political identities, economic structures, and commodities generated by Miami’s diverse population and its position as a cross-cultural hub. Ranging from focused exhibitions to thematic presentations of the Museum’s permanent collection to major retrospectives and group exhibitions, PAMM’s upcoming projects serve as frames through which larger dialogues about recent history, migration, new cultural formations, and diverse ideologies can be structured. OnV

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EXHIBITION:

AMERICANA

Dec. 4, 2013–May 2015 PAMM’s collection will be displayed thematically within six Collection Galleries. Each space, developed in the form of a short essay, will offer a focused view on a particular issue or set of preoccupations that have engaged artists from the Americas since the mid-20th century. The specific pieces and themes will change as these galleries are periodically re-configured to showcase new acquisitions as well as the collection’s many other works—with a special emphasis on the presentation of works by artists currently living in Miami—augmented with artworks borrowed from outstanding local collections.

Alfredo Jaar, A Logo for America, 1987-95. Five cibachrome photographs mounted on Plexiglas. 12-3/16 x 20 inches. Edition 3 of 12. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, gift of Luis Calzadilla. Reproduced with the permission of the artist /© Alfredo Jaar

EXHIBITION:

Ai Weiwei: According to What?

Ai Weiwei, He Xie (detail), 2011. Porcelain. Collection of the artist. Installation view: Ai Weiwei: According to What? at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, 2012. Photo: Cathy Carver

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Dec. 4, 2013–Mar. 16, 2014 The first major international survey of this vital artist’s multifaceted artistic oeuvre, this exhibition reveals Ai Weiwei’s practice as emerging from an •

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The Inaugural Exhibitions ...continued Tina Barney, The Dining Hall (detail), 2001. Chromogenic print. 29-1/2 x 38 inches. Edition 3 of 5. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, promised gift of Charles Cowles. © Tina Barney

ever-questioning dialogue with the social, political, and cultural positions of his native China and the world at large. Through a range of media, the exhibit will feature work of the last 20 years, including photography and the largescale sculptures for which the artist is best known. His provocative and beautiful works of art and architecture are an exploration of the transformative potential of contemporary art, which he said is “not a form but a philosophy of society.”

Wallace Berman, Untitled, ca. 1960. Photograph, letraset, photocopied fragment, watercolor, frottage, graphite, and seal on paper. 7-7/8 x 10-1/2 inches. Collection of Ruth and Marvin Sackner. © Estate of Wallace Berman and Michael Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles. Image courtesy Ruth and Marvin Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry.

EXHIBITION:

Image Search: Photography from the Collection

Dec. 4, 2013–July 27, 2014 This exhibition presents a varied selection of photographs drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection, with a parOnV

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ticular emphasis on the Cowles Collection, a gift of iconic works of the 20th century, including photographs by Edward Steichen, Andy Warhol, and Rineke Dijkstra. Allowing the viewer to see the works through visual cues and historical connections, looking at the image within the photograph as well as relationships between photographs, this exhibit seeks to engender new ‘ways of looking.’ The show will employ digital didactic labels and text on iPads as part of PAMM’s growing engagement with technology and new platforms for education in the galleries. EXHIBITION:

A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry Dec. 4, 2013–May 25, 2014

Founded in 1979, this “archive of archives” has grown to encompass a broad array of historic and contemporary works that synthesize word and image. The collection provides a unique lens through which to examine the foundational OnV

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The Inaugural Exhibitions ...continued movements of modernism, including Italian Futurism, Russian Constructivism, Bauhaus, De Stijl, Dada, and Lettrisme, among others, with special strengths in artists’ books and “assemblings” (limited-edition groupings of materials by numerous contributors), as well as various subgenres such as typewriter art, performance poetry, and micrography (abstract or representational designs comprised of minuscule lettering). EXHIBITION:

Amelia Peláez: The Craft of Modernity Dec. 4, 2013–Feb. 23, 2014

Alongside artists such as Carlos Enríquez, Wifredo Lam, Victor Manuel, and Fidelio Ponce de León, Peláez personifies the primera vanguardia— the first wave of Cuban artists who traveled to Europe before World War II, where they were OnV

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exposed to Cubism, Surrealism, and other contemporaneous styles. Peláez is best known for brightly colored, quasi-abstract compositions that feature decorative objects and ornamental architectural motifs, evoking the traditional domestic interiors of Havana. This exhibition will take a socio-historical approach, examining Peláez’s work in the context of the changing material culture and urban landscape of Havana during the first half of the 20th century.

Amelia Peláez, Marpacífico (Hibiscus), 1936. Oil on canvas. 29 x 37-3/8 inches. Private collection. © Amelia Peláez Foundation. Photo: Sid Hoeltzell

EXHIBITION:

Project Gallery: Hew Locke

Dec. 4, 2013–May 25, 2014 The installation For Those in Peril on the Sea (2011) by British artist, Hew Locke, consists of dozens of scaled-down replicas of ships suspended from the ceiling, creating the impression of a massive exodus taking place throughout the architectural space above the viewer. It features a broad range of vessel types, from cigarette boats, catamarans, and cruise liners to ragged fishing skiffs and timeworn cargo ships. In light

Hew Locke, For Those in Peril on the Sea, 2011. Model boats and mixed media. Dimensions variable. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds from the Helena Rubinstein Foundation Challenge Grant. Reproduced with the permission of the artist. Photo: Hew Locke

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The Inaugural Exhibitions

Monika Sosnowska, Untitled (detail), 2010. Metal, PVC handrail. 96 inches in diameter x 228 inches. Installation view: Herzliya Museum, Tel Aviv, 2010. Photo: Yigal Pardo. Courtesy the artist, Foksal Gallery Foundation, The Modern Institute, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Kurimanzutto, and Hauser & Wirth / © Monika Sosnowska

...continued of Miami’s history as the site for numerous waves of immigration—particularly from the Caribbean, and specifically by sea—this installation promises a powerful initial experience for visitors to the new building. EXHIBITION:

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska

Dec. 4, 2013–Sept. 28, 2014 Monika Sosnowska is best known for large, site-specific sculptures made of steel, concrete, and other industrial materials. Though usually abstract, much of her work draws from the distinctive built environment of Warsaw, with its defunct or repurposed Soviet-era buildings, its vast industrial zones, and its reconstructions of historic neighborhoods destroyed during World War II. Sosnowska’s project for PAMM conOnV

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Yael Bartana, Mur i wieza (Wall and Tower), 2009. (2nd part of trilogy and Europe will be stunned). RED transferred to HD duration: 35 min. Courtesy Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam.

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sists of over 1,100 pounds of bent steel—the sculpture references the skeletal structures that are used as kiosks in Warsaw’s informal marketplaces. These structures embody the kind of spontaneous, streetlevel commercial activity that contributes to a given city’s economic vitality and dynamism, despite its ambivalent status with respect to the official financial system. Sosnowska’s sculpture transposes these social forces into the gallery space, amplifying and transforming them into a unified and impactful aesthetic encounter. EXHIBITION:

Project Gallery: Yael Bartana

Dec. 4, 2013–Apr. 20, 2014 Yael Bartana’s early video work, both documentary and staged, explores social phenomena that illuminate the complexity of contemporary life, particularly within her native country of Israel. More recently, Bartana has embarked on a long term, multiplatform work, and Europe will be stunned (2007-2011), OnV

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The Inaugural Exhibitions ...continued a video trilogy and body of related works, with which she represented Poland in the 54th Venice Biennale (2011). Critically acclaimed, this work has demonstrated Bartana’s acuity as both a filmmaker and as an artist deeply attuned to the most pressing political issues of our time. For her project at PAMM, Bartana is researching and producing a work in Sao Paulo focused on the rise of Pentecostalism. EXHIBITION:

Project Gallery: Bouchra Khalili

Dec. 4, 2013–Feb. 23, 2014 Bouchra Khalili’s works, which take the form of single- and multi-channel videos and films as well as photographs, employ a mode of poetic documentation to investigate the experiences of identity, immigration, and transience. Reflecting the OnV

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nomadic and often transnational state of existence that defines life for many people throughout the world, Khalili illuminates the realities, emotional, intellectual, and tangible, of an increasingly mobilized world. Khalili has been invited to create a new video work for PAMM based on research undertaken in New York.

Bouchra Khalili, Video still from Speeches Series– Chapter 2: Words on Streets, 2013. Video installation, 5 single channels. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Polaris, Paris /© Bouchra Khalili

EXHIBITION:

In the Sculpture Garden: Jedd Novatt

Ongoing from Dec. 4, 2013 Chaos Bizkaia (2012, bronze) and Chaos SAS (2013, stainless steel)—twisting, slipping, seemingly unstable stacks of monumental open rectangles, created by artist, Jedd Novatt—activate the lush tropical landscape of PAMM’s new sculpture garden with implied motion. As if arrested in a process of being formed from the primordial state of disorder to which the series title alludes, in a perpetual state of becoming, they inspire awe and impart grand emotions unfamiliar in the history of minimalism.

Jedd Novatt, Chaos Mundaka, 2009. Bronze. 102-1/2 x 102-3/8 x 160-1/2 inches. Installation view from Sotheby’s Beyond Limits exhibition at Chatsworth in England, 2009. Reproduced by the permission of Sotheby’s. © Jedd Novatt 2009

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On View 10-12.2013  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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