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POP ART

Revisited:

A 21st Century Perspective AT T H E V E R O B E A C H

MUSEUM OF ART

In

VIBRANT

Color:

Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio AT T H E P O L K

MUSEUM OF ART, LAKELAND

OCTOBER/DECEMBER 2012

DUANE

Hanson:

Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995 AT T H E M U S E U M

OF FLORIDA ART, DELAND

The MODERN Impulse:

Photography from Europe and America Between the wars AT T H E S A M U E L P.

HARN MUSEUM OF ART, GAINESVILLE


CONTENTS October/December

2012

Vo l . 3 , N o . 4

ON THE COVER : JASPER JOHNS, FIGURE 7, FROM THE COLOR NUMERALS SERIES, 1969, COLOR LITHOGRAPH, 38 x 31”, COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. JAMES SINGER

RIGHT: JASPER JOHNS, FLAGS 1, 1973, SCREENPRINT, EDITION OF 65 PLUS ARTIST’S PROOFS, 27-3/8 x 35-1/2”, GIFT OF HILDE BABIN IN HONOR OF WILLIAM S. YOUNGMAN, JR., ©JASPER JOHNS/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK

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POP ART

OCTOBER/DECEMBER 2012

Revisited:

A 21st Century Perspective

DUANE

Hanson:

Sculptures & Photographs,

AT T H E V E R O B E A C H

1978-1995

MUSEUM OF ART

AT T H E M U S E U M

OF FLORIDA ART,

In

DELAND

VIBRANT

The MODERN Impulse:

Color:

Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio

Photography from Europe and America Between the wars

AT T H E P O L K

AT T H E S A M U E L P.

MUSEUM OF ART,

HARN MUSEUM OF ART,

LAKELAND

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POP ART REVISITED: A 21 st CENTURY PERSPECTIVE

Presented by the Vero Beach Museum of Art, Pop Art Revisited includes a selection of iconic works by the major artists associated with one of the 20th century’s most important art movements.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

66 Lakeland

76 Vero Beach

86 Tampa

94 DeLand

VINTAGE CELEB-

ROCKWELL: BEHIND

POWER: PHOTO-

SCULPTURES &

IN VIBRANT COLOR: RITY PORTRAITS

NORMAN

THE CAMERA

Vero Beach Museum WARNECKE STUDIO of Art presents a landPolk Museum of Art mark exhibition that is hosting the National unveils a significant Portrait Gallery’s stun- new body of Rockwell ning new show, featur- imagery in an unexing vivid color portraits pected medium. of celebrities who rose to fame at a time when color photography was Gainesville in its infancy. THE MODERN FROM THE HARRY

PORTRAITS OF

GRAPHS BY PLATON

See the world’s most powerful personalities, up close and personal, in an extraordinary presentation at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts.

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DUANE HANSON: PHOTOGRAPHS, 1978-1995

Viewers are sure to marvel at the artistry presented in this startlingly lifelike display of hyperrealistic works by sculptor, Duane Hanson, at the Museum of Florida Art.

IMPULSE:

PHOTOGRAPHY

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

FROM EUROPE

HARRY WARNECKE, ROBERT F.

AND AMERICA RIGHT: EDWARD WESTON, PEPPER 30, 1930, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, ON LOAN FROM A PRIVATE FLORIDA COLLECTION, ©1981 CENTER FOR CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY, ARIZONA BOARD OF REGENTS

CRANSTON AND GUS SCHOENBAECHLER, EDGAR BERGEN

BETWEEN

(DETAIL), 1948; norman

THE WARS

rockwell, Art Critic, 1955,

Covering the years between 1918 and 1945, The Modern Impulse, at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, explores how the newly portable 35mm camera was celebrated as an instrument of poetry, analysis and social change. OnV

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CONTENTS October/December

2012

Vo l u m e

3,

No. 4

COMMENTARY

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MUSE

Festive events for art lovers to enjoy this holiday season

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LYDIA AZOUT

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum presents Out of the Ordinary Geometry, an exhibition of powerful sculptures by Lydia Azout.

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

Craft O n Vi e w D e s t i n a t i o n

WASHINGTON, DC

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The Museums: An overview of the capital city’s outstanding art venues

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Gallery Tour: A listing of fine art galleries i e w

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The Man, the Image & the World, at Tampa Museum of Art, pays tribute to renowned photographer, Henri Cartier-Bresson.

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Retrospective

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NINGYŌ

Entertaining the Gods and Man: Japanese Dolls and the Theater, at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, shines light on a little-explored area of Japanese culture.


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Made In America

M A G A Z I N E

For decades, artists have captured our attention with works inspired by mainstream American culture. From the pioneers of Pop Art, who shared an obsession with urban culture and mass media (Pop Art Revisited: A 21st Century Perspective, on pg. 52), to photographers such as Henry Warnecke, whose vivid, uplifting and kitschy images of American celebrities, reflect the popular culture of the 1930s and ’40s (In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio, on pg. 66), to Norman Rockwell’s nostalgic depictions of the people and events taking place in small-town America (Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera, on pg. 76) and the hyperrealistic works of Duane Hanson, whose startlingly lifelike sculptures of Americans from all walks of life, continue to mesmerize audiences of all ages (Duane Hanson: Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995, on pg. 94), these artists have drawn from everyday objects, images and events to create a heightened awareness of our environment. Through their artistry, we see our world in a different light. These stunning shows are just a sampling of the extraordinary talent on view in fine art museums and galleries throughout Florida, and I hope they may inspire you to venture out and experience them in person. Let’s go...

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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MUSE

Celebrate

F

OR ALL WHO ENJOY ART

and the magic of the holidays, here are a few events you might like to consider...

DUNEDIN: From November 3rd through December 21st, Dunedin

Fine Art Center presents Behold!, an annual invitational holiday exhibition featuring a collection of fine art, craft and design from around the country. Call for details: 727.298.DFAC LAKELAND: The Polk Museum of Art celebrates Kwanzaa on

December 26th. Kwanzaa is a celebration of African-American culture, but this party is for everyone! Learn about the principles that Kwanzaa is founded upon and do a little dancing too! Call for details: 863.688.5423 OCALA: Opening November 16th, the Appleton Museum of Art pres-

ents A Dickens’ Christmas: The Urban Family Holiday Collection, an exhibition of miniature Charles Dickens-era villages, toy trains, Christmas trees, holiday decorations and ornaments. Call for details: 352.291.4455

image courtesy of orlando museum of art


MUSE ORLANDO: The Orlando Museum of Art presents The Festival of

Trees, a stunning annual display of designer decorated trees and wreaths,

gingerbread creations, stunning vignettes, a unique gift boutique, a children’s activity area and an inspiring garden. The holiday event, which

takes place November 10th-18th, has a new theme this year: Once Upon A Time...A Fairy Tale Festival. Call for details: 407.896.4231 x254

PALM BEACH: On December 2nd, the Flagler Museum holds its

Annual Tree Lighting ceremony featuring the 16-foot Grand Hall Christmas tree, adorned with lights and traditional ornaments in the Gilded Age style. Seasonal refreshments, brief organ and piano performances and holiday caroling add to the festivities. Holiday evening tours take place December 18th23rd. Call for details: 561.655.2833 VERO BEACH: Join the Vero Beach Museum of Art on

December 2nd for a free traditional holiday party with refreshments, entertainment, a hands-on holiday art project and a visit from Santa, of course! Call for details: 772.231.0707 WEST PALM BEACH: Stroll through the enchanted Ann

Norton Sculpture Gardens from December 1st-9th during the 6th annual Festival of Trees, with over 25 trees decorated around “A Musical Masterpiece” theme. A Gala Reception for the event takes place November 30th. Call for details: 561.832.5328 WEST PALM BEACH: The Norton Museum of Art’s Holiday Family

Festival takes place on December 2nd and embraces holiday traditions of different cultures. Treasure hunts, magicians, storytelling, live music and dance, holiday inspired art activities and decorated trees await! Call for details: 561.832.5196 WINTER PARK: On December 8th, the Albin Polasek Museum and

Sculpture Gardens will provide prime viewing for the Winter Park Boat Parade and Festival of Lights. Food, drink and live music will kick off the festivities. For details call: 407.647.6294 OnV

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{S P E C I A L

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

BOCA RATON Thru 01.13.13

Politics Not as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Highlighting textile masterpieces from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum in NYC, this exhibition includes bedcovers that have rarely been on view, and important cornerstones of the Folk Art Museum’s comprehensive quilt holdings. The exhibition also marks

the first opportunity for viewers to see the 9/11 National Tribute Quilt outside of the American Folk Art Museum. 10.24.12–01.13.13

The Art of Video Games Boca Raton Museum of Art

www.bocamuseum.org

The Art of Video Games explores the 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, focusing on striking graphics, creative storytelling and player interactivity, and will feature 80 video games presented

through still images and video footage. The exhibit includes video interviews with developers and artists, historic game consoles, and large prints of in-game screen shots as well as five featured games, one from each era, available in the exhibition galleries for visitors to play for brief periods. CORAL GABLES Thru 4.21.13

Artlab @ The Lowe: Adapting and Adopting— Waves of Change as East

Image from Politics Not as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say at Boca Raton Museum of Art: National Tribute Quilt (detail), organized and assembled by the Steel Quilters, Pittsburgh, 2002, cotton and mixed media, 8 x 30’, American Folk Art Museum, gift of the Steel Quilters: Kathy S. Crawford, Amber M. Dalley, Jian X. Li and Dorothy L. Simback, with the help of countless others in tribute to the victims of the September 11, 2001, attack on America, 2002.14.1. Image courtesy of American Folk Art Museum, New York City

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Encounters West, Modern & Contemporary Japanese Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

The integration of foreign influence and its contribution to the development of modern and contemporary Japanese art is highlighted through 32 paintings, works on paper and sculpture from the Lowe’s Permanent Collection.

www.lowemuseum.org

Varied in content and technique, the collection represents more than 40 years of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s versatile artistic career, dating from 1962 through 2004. Noteworthy pieces in the exhibition include preparatory works for and documentation photographs of Surrounded Islands, Project for Biscayne Bay, Greater Miami, Florida; lithograph/collages of Arc

de Triomphe, Wrapped and Wrapped Opera House, Project for Sydney; photographs of Valley Curtain, Rifle, Colorado and Running Fence, Sonoma and Marin Counties; and sculptural objects such as Wrapped New York Times and Wrapped Payphone. Thru 10.21.12

Introspection and Awakening: Japanese Art of the Edo and

11.10.12–01.13.13

Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Meiji Periods, 1615-1912 Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Featured are early examples of the various painting schools, woodblock prints and porcelains from the 17th to early 20th century, which address a variety of themes, including the influence of China and Korea on Japan during this crucial timeframe; the Japanese life-style and belief structure; and the impact of the West. CORAL SPRINGS Thru 11.10.12

Coral Springs Artist Guild:

Image from Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects at Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables: Surrounded Islands, Biscayne Bay, Greater Miami, Florida 1980-1983, 1984, portfolio with 4 dye-transfer color photographs, mounted on rag paper, and sample of fabric used in the project, photograph by Wolfgang Volz, ©Christo 1984

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Special Exhibition Coral Springs Museum of Art

www.csmart.org

Rolande Reverdy Moorhead depicts the violence of war on canvas, as a part of history, whereby the viewer can ponder on the miseries and futility of wars.

www.csmart.org

This intimate exhibition by the Coral Springs Artist Guild is a tribute to their member artists. Thru 11.10.12

Louis Jawitz: India and Woodbourne NY Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

“Timeless traditions passed on to younger generations produce a mystical essence, one rich with poignant photo opportunities,” says photographer, Louis Jawitz, who relies on his formal training in documentary photography to record historical and

religious communities in a non-invasive, realistic manner. 11.24.12–03.23.13

Ricky Bernstein: Queen for a Day Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

“Ricky Bernstein combines the satiric sensibility of Pop Art with the examination of common human activities found in historic genre painting,” says Racine Art Museum Executive

Director and Curator of Collections, Bruce W. Pepich. Bernstein’s visual collages, each composed of sections of vividly painted glass planes mounted on metal armatures and assembled on the wall, humorously convey his social observations to the viewer.

DAYTONA BEACH Thru 11.4.12

Artists, Art and Architecture: Discovering the Past from the MOAS Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Watercolors, drawThru 11.10.12 ings and oils by 18th Rolande Reverdy and 19th century Moorhead: War artists Piranesi, David and Patriotism Roberts and Panini Coral Springs are highlighted in this Museum of Art exhibit through im-

Image from Ricky Bernstein: Queen for a Day at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Ricky Bernstein, Betty’s Big Night, 2012, 8’x 10’x 14”

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ages filled with both academic excellence and beauty. 11.16.12–02.10.13

Old Master Drawings from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Examples of the importance and beauty of Old Master drawings are included in this show featuring works by Benjamin West, Fragonard, Vermeyen, Leoni, van de Velde, Angelica Kauffmann and their contemporaries.

www.moas.org

Victorian International focuses on art and decorative arts produced on both sides of the Atlantic in the Victorian age (1840s–early 20th century). The exhibition includes fine furnishings, paintings, sculpture, Tiffany and cut glass, ceramics, embroidery, sculpture and metalwork that individually and collectively define the merits and usage of Victoriana.

10.05.12–02.17.13

Anthology 2012: Contemporary Photography Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

The range and breadth of styles, techniques, themes and subject matter used by contemporary photographers presents a broadening and a deepening of the field of serious photography in ways that have reenergized and stimulated the

entire profession. The photographers exhibited in Anthology 2012 represent much of this new range and are producing some of the most significant new work that is starting to have an impact in the field. All of the artists are entering the solid core of their careers as their style and subject matter matures to reflect the concerns of a new generation of artists. Thru 12.14.12

Edge To Edge: Vintage Panoramic Photography in Florida Southeast Museum of Photography

Thru 01.06.13

Victorian International Museum of Arts & Sciences

www.smponline.org

This exhibition of more than 200 vintage

Image from Anthology 2012: Contemporary Photography at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Judith Fox, Untitled from the series Sea of Dreams, pigment inkjet print

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panoramic photographs and original vintage postcards, draws out the fascinating history of this unique style of photography from Florida’s “golden years” in the early 20th century.

theatrically arranged the action. (See story on pg. 94.) Thru 11.25.12

From the Outside In: Purvis Young Museum of Florida Art

Thru 12.14.12

www.museumoffloridaart.org

Rania Matar: A Girl and Her Room Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

12.07.12–04.07.13

D e LAND Thru 11.10.12

Focusing on contemporary young women from vastly differing cultures in the US and Lebanon, A Girl and Her Room, reveals the complex lives of girls in the unique setting of their own rooms. (See story in the August/ September 2012 issue on pg. 104.)

Art in Stitches Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

A fiber show featuring the dynamic textile work of nine exceptional Florida artists, Art in Stitches gives viewers an opportunity to discover the wide variety and deep placement of textiles in the art world.

Duane Hanson Sculptures Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

Around 1966, Duane Hanson began making figural casts using fiberglass and vinyl. Cast from actual people and painted to make the revealed skin look realistic with veins and blemishes, Hanson clothed the figures with garments from second-hand clothing stores and

The visual iconography of Purvis Young, a prolific, self-taught, “Outsider” artist, transforms our throwaway society items into compelling artwork that reveals inner-city realities and the struggles of African-Americans. Thru 11.25.12

Related Alternatives: KYLE and Jim Jipson Museum of Florida Art

Image from Art in Stitches at Florida Museum for Women Artists, DeLand: Jayne Bentley Gaskins, Homage to the Irish, 20 x 26” unframed

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www.museumoffloridaart.org

Using painting and mixed media, KYLE’s current body of work explores the deconstruction and devastation of natural disasters and global catastrophes, attempting to find a systemic explanation for the destruction.

bring her closer to the life-and-death forces of nature that both frighten and inspire her.

different purposes, from talismanic and ritual functions to starring in theatrical dioramas and public performances. This exhibition presents over 60 visually stunning and powerfully engaging ningyō, exemplifying this little-explored world of Japanese art. (See story on pg. 116.)

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

DELRAY BEACH 10.02.12–01.27.13

Entertaining the Gods and Man: Japanese Dolls and the Theater

For most of us the word doll connotes a child’s plaything or precious collectable, but in Japan, ningyō are doll-like forms that serve many

Thru 11.25.12

Survival Series: Barbara Neijna Museum of Florida Art

DUNEDIN Thru 10.14.12

BEAM Me Up Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.museumoffloridaart.org

The body of work created by Barbara Neijna during the past several years reflects her meditation on the condition of water—the fluid of life. The photographs shown in this exhibit are from an ongoing series titled Survival Kits. These works

www.dfac.org

Houston-based video and photographic team, Hillerbrand+ Magsamen, share contemporary interpretations of parenthood and family life in a humorous and provoc-

Image from BEAM Me Up at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Hillerbrand+Magsamen, Miranda, 2011, archival pigment print, 24 x 30”, ©Hillerbrand+Magsamen

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ative presentation that playfully and poetically explores perceptions of emotions, family, consumerism and media, within a uniquely American subjectivity. (See story in the August/September 2012 issue on pg. 100.)

In addition to drawings of all the known varieties of sharks in the world, this exhibition contains photographs, sculptures and video as well as a section devoted to the sensational impact of the 1975 Steven Spielberg film, Jaws.

11.03.12–12.21.12

Behold! Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

11.10.12–02.10.13

Each year, DFAC curators put together the best art, with a gift-giving perspective in mind, resulting in a collection of works from around the country that any of your friends or relatives would be delighted to find under their tree!

Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Contemporary artists go interplanetary—extraterrestrials, black holes, lunar landscapes— BEYOND the sky’s the limit! Thru 10.14.12

My Favorite Martian

 
 Thru 12.21.12 Dunedin Fine InterGALACTIC 


 Art Center

www.dfac.org

“Self-portrait as Alien” is the theme of this DFAC members show. Antennas, UP! FORT LAUDERDALE

Warhol and Cars: American Icons Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

This is the first exhibiThru 01.06.13 tion to examine Andy Shark Warhol’s enduring Museum of Art / fascination with autoFort Lauderdale, mobiles as products of Nova Southeastern American consumer University society. Featuring www.moafl.org more than 40 draw-

Image from Warhol and Cars: American Icons at Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Andy Warhol, Truck, 1985, ©2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

ings, paintings, prints, photographs and related archival material spanning the years 1946 to 1986, the exhibition traces the development of Warhol’s work with cars throughout his career.

variety of mediums, including watercolors, sculpture and mixed media, and represent countries such as Argentina, Cuba, Columbia, Dominican Republic, Mexico and Puerto Rico.

FORT MYERS

GAINESVILLE

10.05.12–01.05.13

Thru 03.10.13

Art Expressions of Latin America: 500 Years of History & Heritage Southwest Florida Museum of History

Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

This installation displays a selection of photographs by Anne Noggle, who became a professional photographer at age 40, after serving as one of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and as a captain in the US Air Force during WWII. Noggle’s work explores female vitality, aging and beauty with an honest, respectful and sometimes humorous view.

www.swflmuseum ofhistory.com

For the fourth year, the Museum is hosting an art exhibit illustrating history, influence and culture from Latin America. Artists will display a

Thru 02.03.13

Souvenirs of Modern Asia: The Prints of Paul Jacoulet Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Souvenirs of Modern Asia features a remarkable set of 55 woodcuts by French artist, Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960), who lived and worked in Japan most of his life. These colorful and masterfully printed woodcuts were inspired by Jacoulet’s extensive travels in China, Japan, Korea and the South Pacific, and demonstrate a synthesis of traditional Japanese printing techniques with modern European aesthetics.

Image from Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Anne Noggle, Reminiscence: Portrait with My Sister, 1980, gift of Anne Noggle Foundation, 2010.91.69

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in Ancient American Art Harn Museum of Art

10.09.12–01.06.13

The Modern Impulse: Photography from Europe and America Between the Wars Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

This show highlights the Museum’s collection of ceramic figures and vessels, stone sculptures and jade ornaments from Ancient America—primarily Meso-America, Central America and the Andes.

www.harn.ufl.edu

The Modern Impulse reflects a moment when the 35 mm portable camera became the catalyst for a revolution in art, culture and the way we perceive the world. More than 130 photographs, books, illustrated magazines and film focus on four regions—France, the Czech Republic, New York and California—and represent artists such as Berenice Abbott, Henri CartierBresson, Imogen Cunningham, Walker Ev-

ans, Dorothea Lange and Edward Weston. (See story on pg. 102.) 10.02.12–03.15.13

Things That Go Bump in the Night Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Things That Go Bump in the Night explores the sometimes fearful

anxieties experienced after the sun goes down. The exhibition features 18th-20th century Japanese paintings and sculptures from the Harn’s Asian Collection.

HOLLYWOOD Thru 10.21.12

Alex Trimino: Luminous Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 11.04.12

Verdant Earth and Teeming Seas: The Natural World

Luminous is an installation by Miami-based artist, Alex Trimino, consisting of illuminated totem poles that

Image from Alex Trimino: Luminous at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Alex Trimino, Luminous, (installation view), 2012, mixed media: neon lights, plexiglass, knittings, fibers, found objects, 133 x 96 x 84”, courtesy of the artist and Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, photography by Liam Crotty

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are covered in crochet, knitting and found objects. In employing such items, Trimino reveals similarities between modern, hitech materials (microcontrolled neon lights) and colloquial, lo-tech crafts (crochet, knitting and weavings). Old methods and new technologies commingle in ways that explore our connection to reality today.

for personal and social transformation. The Tampa and Brooklynbased artist approaches this landscape as a repository for individual and shared memories, associations and cultural experiences. Thru 10.21.12

Justin H. Long: Bow Movement Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

Miami-based artist, Justin H. Long, explores his passion for the ocean and sailboat racing with a mixedmedia gallery installation that includes a 60-foot-long boat hull. With a subversive whimsy that is at the core of his work, Long breaks new ground in his first exhibition in Broward County by claiming sailing as an

artistic medium, not only a sport. Thru 10.21.12

Lori Nozick: Walkabout Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Walkabout is a sitespecific installation focusing on the concept of a passage, a journey through the wilderness that takes place as an adolescent or young adult. Nozick presents life as a walkabout in which we continually explore the unknown in order to discover one’s self in relationship to the universe.

11.10.12–01.17.13

Elisabeth Condon: The Seven Seas Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

In her new painting and drawing exhibition, Elisabeth Condon introduces the 1980s Los Angeles nightclub scene as a metaphor

11.10.12–01.17.13

Millree Hughes and Peter Boyd McLean: Lummox

Image from Elisabeth Condon: The Seven Seas at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Elisabeth Condon, Here Comes The Night, 2012, acrylic, glitter and latex on linen, 48 x 48”

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

This exhibition presents a selection of drawings by artist, Millree Hughes, and a related film by Peter Boyd McLean. The drawings are of the Lummoxes, glam rock-loving hooligans that came on holiday to the little resort village of Towyn, North Wales, where Hughes grew up. The band eventually became a reality, playing during Art Basel Miami Beach in 2005, and McLean’s film is a mocumentary of the show. 11.10.12–01.17.13

Rosemarie Chiarlone and

Susan Weiner: Obstruction Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

photography, poetry and book art.

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 11.30.12

This collaborative effort of visual artist, Rosemarie Chiarlone, and poet, Susan Weiner, investigates women’s struggle for authenticity through a variety of formats, combining

JACKSONVILLE

In This Moment: Art with a Heart in Healthcare Exhibition Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

MOCA Jacksonville has teamed up with Art with a Heart in Healthcare to present In This Moment, a photography exhibit featuring the work of talented patientartists. More than 20 young photographers worked with Art with a Heart in Healthcare while receiving treatment at Wolfson Children’s Hospital. The exhibition is a glance into the lives, passions and experiences of these artists. 11.17.12–03.10.13

Project Atrium: Ian Bogost Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Ian Bogost is a noted www.mocajacksonville.org video game designer.

Image from Rosemarie Chiarlone and Susan Weiner: Obstruction at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Image courtesy of the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

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His research and writing consider video games as an expressive medium. His creative practice focuses on games about social and political issues, including airport security, consumer debt, disaffected workers, the petroleum industry, suburban errands, pandemic flu and tort reform.

ing the expanse of the Haskell Atrium Gallery are his largescale reproduction of the moon, constructed from a 12-foot tall inflatable covered in crater-pocked felt, and orbiting satellite and neon comets. Lowe is a multi-disciplinary artist whose practice delves into the crude and rude, absurd and abject, pushing low-brow, low-tech methods

and materials toward unexpected ends.

this important decade and the artistic and cultural milestones that continue to shape the scope of creative expression to this day.

Thru 01.06.13

ReFocus: Art of the ’80s Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Thru 12.30.12

Histories in In the final installAfrica: 20 Years ment of three projects of Photography chronicling contemby Elizabeth porary art, ReFocus: Gilbert Art of the ’80s proThe Cummer vides an opportunity Museum of Art to learn more about & Gardens www.mocajacksonville.org

Thru 10.28.12

www.cummer.org

American photojournalist, Elizabeth Gilbert, has lived and worked in Africa for 20 years, traveling from Kenya to Congo, throughout the Great Rift Valley, and reporting civil wars in Rwanda, Somalia and Sudan. The gelatin silver

Project Atrium: Tristin Lowe Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

MOCA launched its second season of Project Atrium with the cosmic work of Philadelphia artist, Tristin Lowe. Fill-

Image from Histories in Africa: 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Elizabeth Gilbert, Yao Dancers of Malawi (detail), ©Elizabeth Gilbert

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prints on exhibit, pull the viewer into an intimate world of African ritual and tell the story of a continent’s journey through change. (See story in the August/September 2012 issue on pg. 72.) 12.18.12–04.07.13

75 years as a painter, stretching from late Post-Impressionism to a contemporary mixture of African, Caribbean, American and African-American iconography, design and thematic elements.

Jim Draper: Feast of Flowers The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

material as anchors for the pictorial narratives being created for this show.

www.cummer.org

Thru 11.11.12

Feast of Flowers serves as a contemporary investigation of and response to the essential eco-systems that have existed in Florida for thousands of years. As a collaborative effort, ecologists, biologists, philosophers, historians, taxonomists and writers will provide essential

Leonard Baskin: Works on Paper The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition of dynamic works on paper, selected from the Museum’s holdings as well as the private collection of

Cindy and Dan Edelman, highlights images of humanity. The poignancy of Baskin’s artistic legacy is the common consciousness of humankind. 10.11.12–01.04.13

Loïs Mailou Jones: A Life in Vibrant Color The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

A Life in Vibrant Color surveys the vast sweep of Jones’s

LAKELAND 10.20.12–01.12.13

About Face Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

From mugshots of unfamiliar criminals to celebrity portraits and paparazzi snapshots, About Face features portraits of all mediums from PMoA’s Permanent Collection. Thru 12.01.12

David Maxim Polk Museum of Art

Image from Jim Draper: Feast of Flowers at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60”, ©Jim Draper

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www.polkmuseumofart.org

The elements of power and drama in David Maxim’s works are undeniable—tornadoes, masculine welders and warriors—even Maxim’s abstract pieces seem to evoke aggression. Yet despite all of their strength, each subject reveals an equal measure of vulnerability.

Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio, a collection of color photographs of celebrities who rose to fame at a time when color photography was in its infancy. This exhibition of color photographs from the 1930s and 1940s includes actors

Lucille Ball and Roy Rogers, trumpeter Louis Armstrong, baseball star Ted Williams, Olympian Babe Didrikson Zaharias and General George S. Patton. (See story on pg. 66.) Thru 10.13.12

Invisible Elephant:

10.27.12–01.12.13

In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Polk Museum of Art presents the National Portrait Gallery’s new exhibition, In Vibrant

Theo Wujcik and Kirk ke Wang Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

The central concept for this exhibition of contemporary artworks is an ancient parable telling of six blind men who encountered a large elephant, and how each defined what they encountered, based on their individual perspectives. The underlying message of this parable is the diversity of interpretation. For Invisible Elephant, Wujcik and Wang have produced new works based on their different perspectives in relation to the other’s cultural background.

Image from In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio at the Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Harry Warnecke and Robert F. Cranston, Gene Autry, 1942, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke

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MELBOURNE

Miscellaneous: New Works by Trent Manning 
 Polk Museum of Art

10.05.12–01.06.13

D.X. Ross: Talismans Foosaner Art Museum

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Trent Manning pairs lighthearted elements such as alphabet blocks, rocking horses and wagons with grimacing characters. Assembling his sculptures from discarded metal, old tools and wire, he transforms junk into eclectic masterpieces. (See story in the August/September 2012 issue on pg. 106.) MAITLAND

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Works from the Permanent Collection Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

The works exhibited in Spatial Relationships demonstrate powerful relationships based on formal composition.

Thru 12.30.12

Spatial Relationships: Selected

Thru 12.30.12

The Power of Two Art & History

Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

This group exhibition highlights some of Central Florida’s most renowned visual artist couples. Explore what it is like to have two creative minds living and working together. On select weekends during the exhibit, artists will be working in Gallery 4.

D. X. Ross (19532008) was perhaps best known for her totemic jewelry: hand wrought, intricate metal work, with juxtaposed materials of precious and semi-precious stones, unusual shapes and sharp contrasts. A prolific artist, Ross was also an etcher, lithographer and painter, and also created works in clay and fiber. Thru 01.06.13

Ernst Oppler: German Impressionist Foosaner Art Museum

Image from Miscellaneous: New Works by Trent Manning 
at the Polk Museum of Art: Trent Manning, Keepsake, courtesy of the artist

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www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Ernst Oppler (18671929) painted landscapes, interior views and portraits. He became one of the most important chroniclers of the history of ballet in Germany. He also chronicled the social life of the city of Berlin through his drawings and etchings.

session with the iconic metal dress sculptures. Carvalho’s work evokes humor, empathy, loss and sexuality. Thru 10.28.12

John Cage: Variations VII, 1966 Bass Museum of Art

locations around the city via telephone as well as sounds from household appliances and other similar objects. The performance also utilizes specialized electronic equipment that triggers noises based on the real-time movements of performers and members of the audience.

www.bassmuseum.org

The Bass Museum of Art is celebrating the centennial of John Cage’s birth with an exhibition of his performance, Variations VII, 1966, on DVD. Taking place in 1966 in New York City, Cage’s performance featured live noise from distinct

12.06.12–03.17.13

The Endless Renaissance Bass Museum of Art

MIAMI Thru 11.11.12

101 Dresses: A Solo Exhibition of Works by Adriana Carvalho ArtCenter/ South Florida

www.bassmuseum.org

Presented in this exhibition are solo artist projects by Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Barry X Ball, Walead Beshty, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ged Quinn and Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook.

www.artcentersf.org

This exhibition showcases the process and creative thinking behind the artist’s ob-

Image from 101 Dresses: A Solo Exhibition of Works by Adriana Carvalho at ArtCenter/ South Florida, Miami Beach: Adriana Carvalho, Kin of Hearts, 2006, aluminum, dimensions variable (6 pieces, each from 5 to 18”)

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Thru 11.04.12

Thru 11.04.12

UNNATURAL Bass Museum of Art

Rashid Johnson: Message to Our Folks Miami Art Museum

www.bassmuseum.org

UNNATURAL presents conceptions of nature through a variety of strategies that reflect advances in technology in the 21st century. The works reflect a cultivated, synthetic, manipulated nature, which includes allusions to science as manifestations of a reality oscillating between the real and imaginary. (See story in the August/ September 2012 issue on pg. 62.) Thru 10.14.12

Mel Finkelstein: Picturing the Man Behind the Camera Jewish Museum of Florida

www.miamiartmuseum.org

Rashid Johnson explores the complexities and contradictions of black identity in a www.jewishmuseum.com 11.21.12–05.12.13 practice that is rooted This collection of New Work in his individual expephotos from the 1950s Miami 2013 rience. Incorporating to the ’80s, focuses on Miami Art commonplace objects iconic symbols from Museum from his childhood in a our cultural past. The www.miamiartmuseum.org process he describes as exhibit is full of candid Miami Art Museum “hijacking the domesimages of well-known presents the second tic,” the artist transpersonalities such as iteration of the highly forms everyday mateFrank Sinatra, Humsuccessful New Work rials into conceptually phrey Bogart, Lauren Miami 2010. Like the loaded and visually Bacall, Jacqueline inaugural edition, this compelling works. Kennedy Onassis, The exhibition is conceived Beatles, John Travolta, as a salute to Miami’s 12.05.12–03.03.13 Kim Novak, Marilyn community of artists, Bill Viola: Monroe, Sylvester and includes a number Liber Insularum Stallone and Presidents of newly commisMuseum of Kennedy, Truman and sioned projects and Contemporary Eisenhower. special programs. Art, North Miami

Image from UNNATURAL at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Richard Mosse, Herd at Dusk, 2011, digital C-print, 72 x 90”, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY

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www.mocanomi.org

Part of MOCA’s Knight Exhibition Series, Liber Insularum presents a major solo exhibition of 11 screen works and projections by Bill Viola, who is internationally recognized as one of today’s leading pioneers in the art of video. Viola’s works focus on universal human experiences. His video installations—total environments that envelop the viewer in image and sound— employ state-of-theart technologies and explore the phenomena of sense perception as an avenue to self-knowledge.

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The Frost Art Museum and FIU’s Sculpture Park welcomes the addition of 10 monumental sculptures for an unprecedented outdoor exhibition. Made of a variety of materials, including steel, aluminum, cast fiberglass, copper,

concrete, wood and rubber tires, each work represents the best of contemporary sculpture through its most recognized artists and the diversity of styles, themes and technical approaches that characterize our times. Artists include John Henry, Albert Paley, Chakaia Booker and Verina Baxter.

11.17.12–01.02.13

Iván Navarro: Fluorescent Light Sculptures The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Iván Navarro’s light sculptures glow and buzz with color and electrical current, transforming utilitarian objects into radiant yet foreboding forms with double meanings. 10.17.12–12.09.12

Mark Messersmith: Fragile Nature —The Florida Artist Series The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

10.17.12–05.20.13

American Sculpture in the Tropics

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Since moving to the Southeastern US in

Image from Iván Navarro: Fluorescent Light Sculptures at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum: Iván Navarro, Nowhere Man I, 2009, cool white fluorescent lights and electric energy, 65 x 77”

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1985, Mark Messersmith has been captivated by the region’s unique environment. Messersmith continues his exploration of the tension between this wild, living place and ever-increasing human expansion. Drawing on inspirations ranging from the Pre-Raphaelites, Martin Johnson Heade, Southern folk art and medieval manuscripts, Messersmith’s paintings are dense, radiant and sculptural depictions of the flora and fauna of northern Florida struggling to survive.

works includes largescale, site-specific, multi-media sculpture constructed of steel and projections. (See story on pg. 114.) 11.17.12–01.13.13

Wolfsonian–FIU Collection The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Material and Meaning presents modern ceramics from the collection of The Wolfsonian–FIU to reveal the expressive and functional potentials of 10.17.12–12.09.12 the three major types Material and of clay. From elaboMeaning: Earth- rately ornamented enware, StoneArt Nouveau vases to ware, and Porutilitarian salt-glazed celain from The stoneware, and from

whimsical figurines to propaganda porcelains, modern ceramics have played a role in intimate, domestic spaces in architecture and in the realms of politics and ideology. Thru 10.21.12

Out of the Ordinary Geometry by Lydia Azout The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This survey of

Reflections Across Time: Seminole Portraits The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The Frost Art Museum and The Ah-TahThi-Ki Museum of the Seminole Tribe of Florida merge Native American portraiture with contemporary Native American ethnographic materials in a historic exhibition. Over 150 years of portraits of Seminole leaders and tribal members by

Image from Out of the Ordinary Geometry by Lydia Azout at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Lydia Azout, Major Temple, 2006, weathering steel, steel and copper, 34 x 380 x 242”

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George Catlin, Edward Curtis and other noted 19th and 20th-century artists will be featured. Thru 10.21.12

This and That: Unconventional Selections from the Permanent Collection The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Albertina Delgado, Guerra de la Paz, Graham Hudson, Sibel Kocabasi, Kate Kretz, Pepe Mar, Leonel Matheu, Jillian Mayer, Freddy Reitz, Bert Rodriguez and Alexandra Trimino. 10.17.12–02.24.13

To beauty: A Tribute to Mike Kelley The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

These works, which http://thefrost.fiu.edu can be complex, Often acknowledged mysterious, irreverto be one of the most ent or fun, challenge the visitor to reconsider their perceptions of what art is, to stimulate a response and question meanings. The exhibition includes work by Enrico Baj, Sandra Bermudez, Ana

influential and significant artists of our time, Mike Kelley created highly symbolic, representational and ritualism pieces that vastly transcended all mediums such as film, music, drawings, sculptures, collage and performance. His works frequently dealt with class, youthful rebellion and popular culture, and attacked the sanctity of cultural attitudes toward religion, history, education and family.

12.03.12–04.07.13

Esther ShalevGerz: Describing Labor The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Once the heroic image of classconsciousness and national character— pictured widely in the period of the Great Depression, the Soviet Revolution and the two World Wars—the worker has since disappeared from the contemporary visual landscape. Through video, audio, photography and text, Shalev-Gerz’s installation gives voice to these otherwise silent figures so that we might achieve a new awareness of

Image from This and That: Unconventional Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Guerra de la Paz,Trio, 2003, textile, recycled clothing, dimensions variable, gift of the artists, FIU 2005.002 a,b,c

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the human endeavor that shapes our daily realities.

with the fantasy of constructing an underground light spa built entirely out of Tiffany glass. McElheny substitutes characters drawn from Vizcaya’s history for Scheerbart’s and uses the estate as the ingenious setting for this narrative about the promise of modernity and utopia.

11.15.12–03.31.13

Postcards of the Wiener Werkstätte: Selections from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Designers such as Hoffmann, Oskar www.wolfsonian.org Kokoschka, DagobThis exhibition exert Peche and Egon plores a selection Schiele produced a of artists’ postcards variety of thematic produced from 1907 cards that bring to life to 1919 by the Wiener the rich social fabric Werkstätte (Vienna of turn-of-the-century Workshop). The post- Vienna-cafés, archicards were among the tecture, fashion, urban Wiener Werkstätte’s types and humor. most profitable products and have been 11.19.12–03.18.13 in great demand as The Light Club collector’s items of Vizcaya: A since their creation. Women’s Picture

Vizcaya Museum & Gardens www.wolfsonian.org

Josiah McElheny is a New-York based artist and MacArthur Fellow who has created a thirty-minute film for this commissioned project. The film references a little-known short-story, The Light Club of Batavia, written in 1912 by Paul Scheerbart. The characters in Scheerbart’s story become obsessed

NAPLES Thru 01.20.13

Fletcher Benton: The Artist’s Studio Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This experiential and interactive exhibition explores the unique attitudes and methods that Benton, a world-renowned kinetic and construc-

Image from Fletcher Benton: The Artist’s Studio at Naples Museum of Art: Fletcher Benton, Folded Square Alphabet Y, 2004, painted steel, 12 x 12 x 12”, ©Fletcher Benton

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tivist sculptor, applies to his work. The exhibition recreates Benton’s studio, with the images, textures and inspirations that constitute his working environment. The exhibition will also include several outdoor sculptures.

Thru 12.09.12

Martin Schoeller: Close Up Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

German-born photographer Martin Schoeller’s remarkable, larger-than-life photographs strip the

façades from some of the most recognizable faces of our time. Schoeller’s Close Up invites the viewer to consider the depths of the human face and to discover his subjects’ vulnerabilities. The artist’s hyper-close portraits push this

Thru 01.20.13 and 05.04–07.07.13

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art

form of intimacy to unprecedented levels, encouraging us to see the familiar in an unfamiliar way. The exhibition features photographs of famous actors, singers, athletes and politicians along with ordinary people living private lives. (See story in the August/ September 2012 issue on pg. 102.) Thru 12.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

An exciting new selection of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection are on display representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century.

www.thephil.org

The colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico are reflected in this exciting new installation, which includes works by Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo and others.

Image from Martin Schoeller: Close Up at Naples Museum of Art: Martin Schoeller, Jack Nicholson, 2002, type C color print, 61-1/16 x 49-9/16”, © Martin Schoeller

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Thru 12.30.12

OCALA

Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television Naples Museum of Art

Thru 11.04.12

www.thephil.org

Just in time for Halloween, Out of This World features more than 30 costumes and related items from your favorite science fiction films and television shows, including Batman, Star Trek, Blade Runner, The Terminator, Ghostbusters and others. The exhibition examines how costume design incorporates color, style, scale, materials, historical traditions and cultural cues to help audiences engage with the characters being portrayed.

12.22.12–03.24.13

Sight Unseen: International Photography by Blind Artists Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The first major exhibition of work by the world’s most accomplished blind photographers, Sight Unseen examines our definitions of blindness and encourages us to reevaluate what it means

to see. The artists employ diverse strategies in their work— some use the camera to present their own inner visions, others capture the outside world unfiltered with a nonretinal photography of chance, and a number of the artists, legally blind but retaining a limited, highly attenuated sight, photograph to capture the outside world and bring it into their realm.

FLORAda and Flowing Waters: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Presented are lush and beautiful portraits of natural Florida as interpreted by three of the state’s most prominent artists. Messersmith’s opulent, hyper-colorful paintings of Florida’s tropical flora and fauna comes together with Ross Tolbert’s abstract expressionist interpretations of our freshwater springs and Tomczak’s nostalgic large-format

Image from FLORAda and Flowing Waters: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak at the Appleton Museum of Art: Margaret Ross Tolbert, Cypress, courtesy of the artist

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photographic prints of antiques and native plants. (See story in the August/September 2012 issue on pg. 80.)

trait of Greta Garbo and Alfred Stieglitz’s famous The Steerage from 1907. 11.17.12–01.20.13

Thru 10.21.12

Pure Photography: Pictorial and Modern Photographs from the Syracuse University Art Collection Appleton Museum of Art

Sendak & Co.: Children’s Book Illustrations Since “Where The Wild Things Are.”

Mo Willems. The Exhibition features www.appletonmuseum.org drawings from the Featured are 34 of artists’ own colsome of the best lections, as well as known names in other sources. children’s book illustration, including 11.03.12–12.31.12 Chris Van Allsburg, The Nature of Chris Raschka, Leo Things: The and Diane Dillon, Art of Ed Smith Brian Selznick and Appleton Appleton Museum of Art

Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

View more than 20 large-scale oil paintings depicting wildlife’s struggle to survive with the modern world and technology.

www.appletonmuseum.org

On exhibit are 30 works by some of the best photographers starting in the early 1900s. Included are works by Eugene Atget, Berenice Abbott, Imogen Cunningham, Gordon Parks and Edward Weston. Among the iconic images in the show are Edward Steichen’s 1928 por-

ORLANDO 12.22.12–03.31.13

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass

Image from Pure Photography: Pictorial and Modern Photographs from the Syracuse University Art Collection at the Appleton Museum of American Art, Ocala: Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907

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tion organized by the Council of 101.

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass features approximately 65 works by internationally renowned artists as well as younger artists who are taking the medium in new directions. 12.12.12–02.13.13

Darkroom to Digital: Photography from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

This exhibition presents works by masters of 20th-century photography who created iconic images that es-

Thru 10.28.12

Frank Hallam Day: RV Night Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

tablished photography as a major medium for modern art. Today, a new generation of artists use digital technology to create images that were not possible to make in previous generations. Darkroom to Digital explores the shared ideas, practices and aesthetics of these artists and the new directions of photography today. 11.10.12–11.18.12

Festival of Trees Orlando Museum of Art

RV Night by Frank www.omart.org Hallam Day is a suite Central Florida’s favor- of photographs taken ite holiday event has a at night of recreational new theme this year: vehicles lodged deep Once Upon A Time...A within the seemingly Fairy Tale Festival. For impenetrable Florida 25 years, The Festival jungles. These images of Trees has showcased of RV’s—glowing life enchanting displays support pods—suggest of designer decorated a humanity isolated trees and wreaths, from a dark, unpregingerbread creations, dictable and ominous stunning vignettes, a nature. unique gift boutique, a children’s activity area Thru 10.28.12 and an inspiring garFrom Alice to den. The entire family Zeus: The Art of will enjoy the holiday John Rocco magic of this popular Orlando Central Florida tradiMuseum of Art

Image from Frank Hallam Day: RV Night at Orlando Museum of Art: Frank Hallam Day, Green Alumascape with Tree, 2010, archival pigment print, 44 x 66”, collection of the artist

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www.omart.org

John Rocco has written and illustrated numerous award-winning children’s books, including Wolf! Wolf!, Moonpowder and Fu Finds the Way. He has also illustrated covers for Rick Riordan’s bestselling youth literature series, Percy Jackson and the Olympians. Rocco’s exhibit at OMA features approximately 60 preparatory and finished drawings, providing examples of how an illustration evolves, from earliest sketches to the finished work. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 104.)

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Going Places will take visitors on a journey through four thematic sections: In the Garden, In the Snow, At the Beach and At Home. In

each section, a variety of outstanding paintings, sculptures and photographs will be discussed by viewers to interpret how artists use their imagination to explore the world around them.

Thru 10.28.12

Modern American Artists in Florida: Paintings, Sculptures and Prints from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Beginning in the 1960s, a generation of important modern American artists established homes and studios throughout Florida. Among the most prominent of these artists are Richard Anuszkiewicz, John Chamberlain, Roy Lichtenstein, Jules Olitski, Robert Rauschenberg and James Rosenquist, all of whom had, or still have, a strong connection to Florida.

12.01.12–02.08.13

Going Places: Adventures in Art from the OMA Collection

Image from From Alice to Zeus: The Art of John Rocco at Orlando Museum of Art: John Rocco, Alice, 1991, written by Whoopi Goldberg, ©1991 John Rocco

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Thru 10.28.12

Southernmost Art and Literary Portraits: Photographs of 50 Internationally Noted Artists and Writers in Florida by Jimm Roberts Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

With the rich tones of traditional black and white photography, Jimm Roberts captures his subjects in a variety of poses, from formal to candid, in the surroundings of their Florida homes and studios. The exhibition includes 80 photographs and a selection of original notes and letters by the artists and writers.

12.2012–02.2013

Tricks of the Trade: Trends and Techniques in Contemporary Art Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

This exhibition considers the creative practice of a number of important artists represented in the OMA’s Permanent Collection. The exhibition includes sculptures by John Chamberlain and

Ursula Von Rydingsvard, paintings by Robert Rauschenberg and Pat Steir, and prints by Chuck Close and Jennifer Bartlett. Thru 11.25.12

2012 Annual Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Hosted by The Mennello Museum

of American Art, The 2012 Annual Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition is recognized as one of the top watermedia exhibits in the US. The exhibit showcases 100 of the best works by artists from Florida and around the country. 11.16.12–03.17.13

The Big Dog Show The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

The Mennello Museum of American Art welcomes back sculptor, Dale Rogers, and his fresh pack of twenty 8-foot-tall, 10-footlong sculptures of dogs made of Corten

Image from Southernmost Art and Literary Portraits: Photographs of 50 Internationally Noted Artists and Writers in Florida by Jimm Roberts at Orlando Museum of Art: Jimm Roberts, James Rosenquist, Aripeka, 1983, gelatin silver print, collection of the artist, ©Jimm Roberts 2012, all rights reserved

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steel. Rogers has said that he thinks his work gives viewers a dog’s eye view of the world, and he hopes art, the public and animal welfare can all come together for a good cause. 12.01.12–01.20.13

Treasures from the Attic The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

The Museum’s Executive Director, Frank Holt, has curated a special exhibition, drawing from the Mennello Museum’s Permanent Collection as well as the City of Orlando’s Public Art Collection. Longtime visitors may see some old favorites, and new-

comers can get a glimpse of the depth of the collections.

Fairweather and Richard Herzog. PALM BEACH

ORMOND

10.16.12–01.06.13

BEACH Thru 10.14.12

Materialscape Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Materialscape presents an industrial view of nature, featuring sculptural works by Seth

Capturing The Cup: Yacht Racing During the Gilded Age The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum www.flaglermuseum.us

Capturing the Cup: Yacht Racing During the Gilded Age tells the exciting story of

yacht racing in America up to the Great Depression, through the elaborate gold and silver trophies made by the most important silversmiths of the period. PENSACOLA 10.05.12–12.08.12

Beating Hearts: Stories of Domestic Violence Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

Beating Hearts: Stories of Domestic Violence is a collection of photographs and text that reflect the individual experiences of victims of abuse. The stories were documented by Louisiana residents,

Image from Beating Hearts: Stories of Domestic Violence at Pensacola Museum of Art: Kate Sartor Hilburn, The Window, photo construction, 40 x 36 x 2”, ©2004 Kate Sartor Hilburn

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Kate Sartor Hilburn and Terrie Queen Autrey, both of whom have been active in domestic violence prevention and education on the Gulf Coast.

12.07.12–12.29.12

Small Objects Exhibition The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Artworks no larger than 12x12” and priced under $350, will be available for purchase, along with more than 300 handmade paintings, sculptures, glassworks and jewelry.

Thru 12.22.12

Integrate. Replicate. Generate. Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola

SARASOTA

museumofart.org

It was working in the field of graphic design that first inspired Chicagobased artist, Penny Feuerstein, to experiment with scanning, copying and manipulating images. Now, along with oil paint, she uses those concepts to create her artwork.

Thru 10.28.12

PONTE VEDRA BEACH Thru 10.20.12

S. Barre Barrett & Khamil Ojoyo The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Barrett’s watercolor and acrylic paintings

explore repetitive patterns and relationships between colors and shapes and their connections to the natural world, while mixed-media wood sculptures by Khamil Ojoyo evoke vibrant expressions of African art.

DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

The works on display in this exhibition highlight the Levenson collection—the world’s

Image from DECO JAPAN: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Ginga no uta (Song of the Milky Way), Theme song of the movie “Ginga no uta,” by Shôchiku Cinema, unidentified artist, 1931, courtesy of the Levenson Collection

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premier collection of Japanese art in the Deco style. Included are spectacular examples of metalwork, ceramics, lacquer, glass, wood furniture, jewelry, textiles, graphic design on paper, painting and woodblock prints, ranging from fine art objects to goods mass-produced for the modern home. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 92.)

years and others have never before been shown to the public. Important in their own right, they were also essential as a means for John Ringling to expand the Museum’s potential to feature the

roots and flourishes of the world of art.

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

12.07.12–04.14.13

www.ringling.org

Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) created art that was religious and secular, public and private, grand and intimate in scale. Drawing upon North American collections, the exhibition will illustrate this extraordinary versatility and closely examine Veronese’s artistic practice.

Paolo Veronese: A Master and His Workshop in Renaissance Venice

Thru 10.14.12

Thru 10.14.12

From the Vaults: John Ringling’s Asian and Cypriot Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Sanford Biggers: Codex The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

As part of his Constellation Series, the works featured in this exhibit consist of quilts that depict “con-

www.ringling.org

Some of the objects in this exhibit have not been on display for 30

Image from Paolo Veronese: A Master and His Workshop in Renaissance Venice at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art: Courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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stellations” inspired by Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad conductors, whose use of the stars to navigate from slavery to freedom in the 19th century, is a vibrant part of North American history. 11.09.12–02.03.13

The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Celebrating the gift of over 700 photographs to the Collection, this exhibition features a representative sampling of images spanning the 20th and 21st centuries and includes work by renowned photographers Henri

Women: A Selection from the Gift of Martha and Jim Sweeny Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

More than 60 prints by American women Cartier-Bresson, André display at the Crispartists, made after Kertész, Alfred Eisen- Ellert Art Museum, 1950, have recently staedt, Berenice Abbott takes the form of joined the Museum’s and Robert Capa. new paintings, drawCollection. This new ings and poems. Each installation features piece is a response to works by some of the ST. AUGUSTINE a particular work by most gifted artists of 10.26.12–11.22.12 the other artist. A poem our time: Vija Celmins, Transliteration takes a new shape as a Yvonne Jacquette, Lois Sara Pedigo & drawing, or a painting Lane, Georgia Marsh, Liz Robbins becomes a new story Elizabeth Murray, Crisp-Ellert on the page. Howardena Pindell, Art Museum, Betye Saar, Pat Steir Flagler College and Joan Snyder. www.flagler.edu/crispellert

The collaboration between visual artist, Sara Pedigo, and poet, Liz Robbins, on

ST. PETERSBURG Thru 02.02.13

Thru 10.14.12

Contemporary Prints by American

Global+ Local: Studio and Contemporary

Image from The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Robert Capa, Conchita Cintron, Mexico, 1940, gift of Warren J. and Margot Coville

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Glass on Florida’s West Coast Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Marking the 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, Global+Local reveals the range and richness of the area’s best glass from internationally renowned artists. 11.03.12–02.17.13

The Art of Golf Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

ies of Scotland, this exhibition spans four centuries of golf and features approximately 90 works by artists such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Hendrick Avercamp, Sir Henry Raeburn, Childe Hassam, George Bellows, Norman Rockwell, Andy Warhol and the celebrated photographer, Harold Edgerton.

Works from the Spanish National Collection The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

Beginning Monday, October 1, 2012, the Dali Museum, which holds the largest collection of Dalí in the Americas, will welcome 12 important Dalí works on loan from the National Opening 10.2012 Collection of Modern The Royal Art in Spain—MaInheritance: Dalí drid’s Museo Nacio-

nal Centro de Arte Reina Sofia. This selection of paintings will expand our knowledge of Dalí’s diverse production of art. The Royal Inheritance will present works that have never been on view in America before, including still lifes, the stunning stereoscopic work Las Meninas, portraits of his wife, Gala, and later works with a mathematical theme. TALLAHASSEE Thru 11.07.12

www.fine-arts.org

The Art of Golf is the first major museum exhibition in the US devoted to this popular game. Organized by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta and the National Galler-

The Cohen Collection Contemporary Native American Artists Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

Image from The Art of Golf at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Charles Lees, The Golfers (detail), 1847, oil on canvas, 51-1/2 x 84-1/4”, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, purchased with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund, The Art Fund and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, 2002; photo: A. Reeve

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Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

10.18.12–1.06.13

www.fine-arts.org

Works in this exhibition contain selections from the diverse areas of interest in the Cohen Family Collection, given to the Museum in 2011 by Sonia and Stanley Cohen. The contemporary works by Native American artists include pottery and jewelry as well as painting. Thru 11.11.12

Masters Artists of the Bahamas Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.fine-arts.org

Master Artists of the Bahamas presents works from 11 Bahamian artists acting as ambassadors for a broader generative movement. The works represent the diversity

Cuba 1999–2000: Photographs by Mario Algaze Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

of form and content of Bahamian art. TAMPA Thru 10.14.12

Civil War Exhibition Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

FMoPA celebrates the 150 year anniversary of this significant era in American his-

tory. On display are 41 photographs from the Drapkin Collection and 20 photographic jewelry and accessories from Larry West. The images demonstrate a turning point in the history of photography as a commercial enterprise, accessible to the general public with the progression from daguerreotypes to ambrotypes and tintypes.

Look, but don’t touch. Reach, but don’t grasp. Dream, but don’t wake up. That is how an exile feels about the homeland he cannot reclaim, and that is how Mario Algaze feels about Cuba. In his remarkable photographs, he brings you a world that is suffocating in stillness. Clocks seem frozen at the dawn of the Castro era. Time, although suspended, is visible on the façades of the aging buildings. The architecture is monumental, their grace and scale is overpowering.

Image from Cuba 1999–2000: Photographs by Mario Algaze at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Mario Algaze, Amanecer en Matanzas, Matanzas, Cuba, 1999-2000, ©Mario Algaze

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11.14.12–1.27.13

Dorothea Lange’s America Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Mike Disfarmer and others. Thru 11.11.12

Portraits of Power: Photography by Platon Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

During the crash of 1929, Dorothea Lange found her true calling as a peripatetic chronicler of the many faces www.fmopa.org of America—old and young, urban and rural, native-born and immigrant—as they dealt with unprecedented hardship, sometimes with resilience, often with despondence. Her immortal portraits seared these faces of the Depression era into America’s consciousness. Also included in the exhibition are notable social documentarians of the era, Walker Evans, Ben Shahn, Wright Morris,

For any museumgoer contemplating Platon’s poster-size faces, there is an unequal balance of power. With these giant faces, every pore is exaggerated, every presence is overpowering­, every pose—artificial or natural—is amplified. In many cases, a man’s

inner character is stripped naked—even as he frantically tries to cover up. (See story on pg. 86.) 10.06.12–01.13.13

The Man, the Image & the World: Henri Cartier-Bresson, a Retrospective Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. His images of world events and the people (famous and otherwise) who made these events happen, have shaped our understanding of the last century. The Man, the Image & the World includes over 330 photographs, films and important

Image from Dorothea Lange’s America at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936, from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg, courtesy of Art2Art

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publications. CartierBresson chose the works for this exhibition before his death in 2004. (See story on pg. 112.)

iquary for the sunken ships that descend into the sea. 10.28.12–01.06.13

The French Connection: Prints from the Caroline Adams Byrd-Denjoy Collection Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

Thru 12.15.12

The Andy Warhol Legacy Project University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

TARPON SPRINGS

www.spcollege.edu/museum

The French Connecwww.ira.usf.edu www.ira.usf.edu Songs from the tion presents 48 prints, The Andy Warhol This exhibition feaSea: Bronze created between Legacy Project is an tures a select groupSculptures by 1947 and 2005, by exhibition of Polaroids ing of contemporary David Smalley French, European and silver gelatin prints photographers who Leepa-Rattner and American artists USF Contemporary create situations Museum of Art working in Parisian Art Museum received where the subject www.spcollege.edu/museum print ateliers, selectas a gift from The and the photographer Using its outdoor Ter- ed from an extensive Andy Warhol Founda- engage in a dialogue race as an exhibition collection of prints tion for the Visual Arts. about the nature of space, the Leepa-Rat- gifted to the Leepabeing photographed— tner Museum of Art Rattner Museum of Thru 12.15.12 addressing issues presents seven bronze Art in recent years The Importance of class, sexuality, works by sculptor, Da- by Madame Caroline of Being sensuality, shame, vid Smalley. Each Adams-Byrd Denjoy Photographed despair and privacy. work symbolizes a rel- of Paris, France. 10.28.12–02.10.13

Image from The French Connection: Prints from the Caroline Adams Byrd-Denjoy Collection at the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art, Tarpon Springs: Hervé Télémaque, Bleu de Matisse, 1986, lithograph on Arches paper, edition 74/200, 21-1/2 x 29-1/2”, ©2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

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Adam Straus, a native Floridian who studThru 10.14.12 ied painting at Florida Form, Color, State University, has Light: Cast Glass been creating “beauby Rick Beck tiful and disturbVero Beach ing” landscape paintMuseum of Art ings for more than 25 www.verobeachmuseum.org years. The landscape Rick Beck takes every- paintings selected for day shapes and transStraus’s Vero Beach forms them into sculp- exhibition often have tures in glass, revealing a mysterious qualitheir unexpected beau- ty that allows viewers ty. Form, Color, Light plenty of room for includes a range of interpretation. work, from large floor pieces to small pedestal sculptures in translucent colors. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 106.) VERO BEACH

A 21st Century Perspective Vero Beach Museum of Art

10.13.12–01.13.13

Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Pop Art Revisited: www.verobeachmuseum.org A 21st Century Norman Rockwell: Be- Perspective is the hind the Camera reinaugural exhibition veals the role of phoin the Museum’s tography in Rockwell’s new Titelman Gallery. creative process. (See The works of art sestory on pg. 76.) lected for the exhibit are important exThru 01.02.13 amples of the Pop Art Pop Art Revisited: movement. The exhibition also sheds light on the original social context surrounding the creation of these art objects. (See story on pg. 52.)

Thru 01.06.13

WEST PALM

Landscape Paintings of Adam Straus Vero Beach Museum of Art

BEACH 12.01.12–12.09.12

Festival of Trees: A Musical Masterpiece

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Image from Pop Art Revisited: A 21st Century Perspective at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Andy Warhol, Portrait of Marilyn, 1967, color serigraph, 40-1/8 x 401/4”, collection of Mississippi Museum of Art, bequest of Sarah Virginia Jones

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

www.armoryart.org

This show features works by atmospheric landscape painter, Scott Armetta, in his first solo exhibition.

www.ansg.org

Be part of this unique holiday celebration and enjoy the wonder of more than 35 decorated themed trees. From Mozart to Motown, tree sponsors will select their favorite song as inspiration and a decorator will create a unique interpretation of their musical selection. The trees are a gift to share with family and friends at the Gala event on November 30th or during the Festival of Trees Community Days, December 1-9, 2012. 12.01.12–12.13.12

David Wilson: Cartoonist Armory Art Center

Thru 01.27.13

www.armoryart.org

The Armory Art Center presents an exhibition of David Wilson’s cartoons and editorials from the past decade. 12.01.12–04.26.13

Jane Manus: Geometry of Space Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

Though concrete and

heavy in themselves, Manus’s sculptures are artfully connected planes of line and geometric shape, joined so as to invoke a complex, shifting array of transparent spaces and paradoxically unsubstantial solid forms. 10.26.12–12.08.12

Scott Armetta: Dark Florida Armory Art Center

Clear Water and Blue Hills: Stories in Chinese Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Featured in this exhibition are works of art depicting tales from Chinese history and literature. 11.01.12–01.20.13

Keep Calm and Carry On: World War II and the British Home Front, 1938-1951 Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Image from Jane Manus: Geometry of Space at Armory Art Center, West Palm Beach: Jane Manus, 98 in the Shade, 2009, painted welded aluminum, 78 x 60 x 112”

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Keep Calm and Carry On explores the impressive gamut of England’s home-front efforts just before, during and after the war years. While millions of British men and women served in the military overseas, England’s entire creative class mobilized to win the war on the home front. Drawings, posters, photographs, film, furniture, fashion, and more, will illustrate how they did so.

who creates stunning and beautiful sculptures, reliefs and installations inspired by diverse sources such as art, literature and nature, will create a site-specific project for the Norton’s main lobby. Wynne has manipulated glittering, mirrored glass to create symbolic shapes and texts that simultaneously appear reflec-

tive and seem invisible. For this project, he will integrate the natural world through glass-beaded drawings and hand printed wallpaper, and incorporate examples of art from the Museum Collection. 12.27.12–03.03.13

Say it Loud: Art by African and AfricanAmerican

11.01.12–10.06.13

Rob Wynne: I Remember Ceramic Castles, Mermaids & Japanese Bridges Norton Museum of Art

Artists in the Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Paintings, sculpture, photographs and works on paper by African artists and artists of African descent comprise this exhibition which celebrates a renewed emphasis on diversity in the Museum Collection. More than 20 artists, whose practices span the 20th century, represent ideas and issues inspired by personal and artistic concerns. 12.09.12–03.03.13

Sylvia Plimack Mangold: Landscape and Trees Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

New York-based artist, Rob Wynne,

Image from Keep Calm and Carry On: World War II and the British Home Front, 1938-1951 at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Woman’s scarf­–British and American forces, 1940s, English silk, 28-1/8 x 28-1/8”, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf

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Thru 12.30.12

www.norton.org

Sylvia Plimack Mangold is the second artist to be celebrated in the Norton’s RAW (Recognition of Art by Women) program. For the last three decades, she has concentrated not only on the landscape surrounding her Hudson River-area studio, but also the individual trees comprising it, considering these subjects in paintings, drawings and prints. Thru 10.24.12

Watercolors from the Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Watercolors from the Museum Collection, include works by Paul Signac, John Marin,

The Prints of Gustave Baumann Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Charles Demuth and George Grosz. WINTER PARK Thru 12.30.12

The Mysterious Content of Softness Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Bringing together 11 national and international artists in various stages of their careers, The Mysterious Content of

This exhibition centers around Baumann’s mastery Softness explores the of the woodcut transformative power printmaking process of fiber and its conand includes images nection to the human of New Mexico body. Whether emand a series of ploying time-honored seldom seen prints techniques such as depicting the rugged knitting, crochet, coast and mammoth embroidery and loom trees of Northern weaving, or foraying California. (See into new uses of tradi- story in the June/ tional textiles, these July 2012 issue artists explore the on pg. 78.) physical, psychological and cultural asso- 10.02.12–04.14.13 ciations of fiber to the Life in the body. (See story in Fast Lane: the August/September The Art of 2012 issue on pg. 52.) David Delong

Image from The Mysterious Content of Softness at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Nathan Vincent, Locker Room, 2010, crocheted yarn, foam, wire, and polyester stuffing, courtesy of the artist. Yarn donated by Lion Brand Yarn. Photography by Steven Miller

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Over the course of five decades, American Realist, David DeLong, produced a body of work remarkable for its breadth, variety and dexterity. An avid motorcycle racer, DeLong considered these machines to be the perfect metaphor for life and art, explaining that each requires a high level of control and discipline. The original works on display focus on the culture of motorcycle racing and include paintings, pen and ink drawings and etchings from the late 1950s to 2001.

Bedouins riding their Focus Exhibition: camels across a distant Lockwood horizon at dawn and de Forest’s in the foreground, the The Wreck skeletal remains of The Charles a camel—the wreck Hosmer Morse of the painting’s title. Museum of A friend and busiAmerican Art ness partner of Louis www.morsemuseum.org Comfort Tiffany’s, de Lockwood de ForForest (1850–1932) est’s oil painting, The was a fine and successWreck, c. 1880, is the ful painter as well as subject of this Morse an importer and decofocus exhibition. The rator. The exhibition large Saharan landwill be accompanied scape depicts five by de Forest oil studies Opening 10.23.12

of other desert scenes and explanatory wall panels designed to help the viewer develop a full appreciation of this powerful painting. Thru 09.29.13

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm, Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. On View

Image from Life in the Fast Lane: The Art of David Delong at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: David Delong, Infield, 2001

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SARASOTA

Gallery: Hodgell Gallery www.hodgellgallery.com

Artist: SALLY ROGERS

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

ROGERS INCORPORATES

some elements with representational or narrative context into her sculptural work. Readily identifiable components are selected both for the appeal of their line and color as well as for their ambiguity of meaning.

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Addison Gallery www.addisongallery.com

Artist: Tatyana Klevenskiy

KLEVENSKIY’S PAINTINGS ILLUMINATE THE VIEWER’S

eye by her astounding ability to capture and create light on the canvas. Be it a still life study or a simple Russian village landscape, her paintings demonstrate her enchanting ability to bring a calmness and tranquility to the viewer by the magnificence and serenity of her paintings. From left: Sally Rogers, Elysium, forged/fabricated steel, cast glass, courtesy of the artist and Hodgell Gallery; Tatyana Klevenskiy, In Shadow, oil on canvas, 36 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Addison Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries

www.artsondouglas.net

www.virginiamiller.com

Artist: Anna Tomczak

Artist: MICHELLE CONCEPCIÓN

“ARTIFACTS DEPICT MY PER-

sonal experience through visual narrative and combine color, light and texture to welcome the interpretation of the viewer. I am interested in the impact of images combined together—textures, air bubbles, patterns of light and shadow.”

CONCEPCIÓN’S ABSTRACT

compositions evoke diametrically different interpretations. Some viewers see microscopic

DELTONA

Gallery: Lyonia Gallery www.smponline.org

Exhibition: Apprehending Nature/Nature Apprehending

organisms, others may see asteroids or aquatic plant forms. Contributing to the varying interpretations of Concepción’s subject matter is their extraordinary illusion of texture.

ERIC BREITENBACH’S

imagery stems from careful examinations and playful photographic experiments with common plant life, most of which was found in the photographer’s own backyard.

Clockwise from top left: Anna Tomczak, Pendula, Polaroid transfer, 20 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; Michelle Concepción, Twist, 63 x 63”, 2007, acrylic on canvas, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Eric Breitenbach, Untitled from the series Apprehending Nature/Nature Apprehending, gelatin silver print, courtesy of the artist and Lyonia Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

FT. LAUDERDALE

Gallery: Artists Haven Gallery www.artistshaven gallery.com

Artist: MONIKA JENSEN 
 JENSEN’S ABSTRACT

paintings explode with brilliant color and have an artistic flair that consists of a desirable texMIAMI

Gallery: Adamar Fine Arts www.adamargallery.com

Artist: Susan Silver Brown “I THINK OF THESE SCULPTURES AS ‘MYSTICAL SURREALISM.’

ture that must be seen. There is an aura of passion to her art, yet also a distinct sense of balance as she creates canvases that have no boundaries.

In this intoxicatingly passionate journey of being an artist, besides being influenced by African and Oceanic art, the primal, and travel, I’ve also been influenced by the surrealists. Mark Chagall and Dali have been major influences as well as Jungian psychology, Buddhism, Francesco Clemente, Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo and Eckhart Tolle,” says Silver Brown. “Glass is the perfect medium….With its fourth dimension of being able to see through the translucency and the breath of bubbles from within…It becomes spiritually and physically charged with life.”

From left: Monika Jensen, Composition 53,
oil on canvas,
24 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Artists Haven Gallery; Susan Silver Brown, The Blooming of Benevolence’s Offering, cast lead crystal glass and bronze, wallmount, 28 x 14 x 15”, courtesy of the artist and Adamar Fine Arts

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

NAPLES

MIAMI

Gallery: Longstreth Goldberg Art

Gallery: Zadok Gallery www.zadokgallery.com

www.plgart.com

Artist: PATRICK JACOBS

Artist: Alberto J. Carol

JACOBS CREATES

“MY PAINTINGS ARE BASED

on photographs usually shot by myself. I strive to render an accurate depiction of the object, but the deeper I go into it, the deeper I reach into myself. The more I try to capture the object, the more it boosts my feelings and imagination.”

intricate dioramas placed behind glass portals, which appear as reflections into another world. Each of Jacob’s portals instantly transports the

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Artist: Roberto Edwards EDWARDS’ PHOTOGRAPHS ARE

accurate records of an organic project involving models and artists who approach the human body as a three-dimensional canvas. His art is spontaneous, collaborative and creative.

viewer into an altered reality, the result of a highly detailed and labor-intensive process, which can take from weeks to months for the artist to complete.

Clockwise from top: Alberto J. Carol, Presence No. 4, 2000, acrylic/canvas, 36 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Longstreth Goldberg Art; Patrick Jacobs, Fly Agaric Cluster #5, 2012, diorama viewed through 2” window, styrene, acrylic, cast neoprene, paper, polyurethane foam, ash, talc, starch, acrylite, vinyl film, copper, wood, steel, lighting, BK7 glass, 11 x 14 x 8-3/4”, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery; Roberto Edwards, Pedro Ruiz (Colombia) #3 Cuerpos Pintados–Painted Bodies, 1997, printed 2012, archival Lambda color photograph, 51-1/4 x 39-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery

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POP ART

RE V I S IT E D A 21st Century Perspective On view through 01.02.13 at VERO BEACH MUSEUM of ART w w w. v e ro b e a c h m u s e u m . o rg

Andy Warhol, Pepper Pot, from Campbell Soup I, 1968, color serigraph on paper, ed. H/Z, 35-1/8 x 23-1/8”, Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art, Museum Purchase, 2000.010

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POP ART REVISITED:

A 21st Century Perspective

Text by JAY WILLIAMS

PRESENTED BY THE VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART,

Pop Art Revisited: A 21st Century Perspective includes iconic works by the major artists associated with one of the 20th century’s most important art movements.

The original antecedents of Pop Art were images in

slick magazines, billboards, comic books, newspapers,

and advertising. Classic Pop Art was the product of a very different world—bold, brash, consumption-driven, post-war America—but it is relevant to today’s media-

driven world. The debate surrounding Pop Art contained some familiar questions about controversial subject matter in art: Were artists giving up the higher calling of making personal statements and giving in to an overwhelming tide of commercial

This article consists of excerpts from an essay by Jay Williams, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections, Vero Beach Museum of Art Jasper Johns, Figure 7, from the Color Numerals Series, 1969, color lithograph, 38 x 31”, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Singer

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imagery? Was “high culture” changed for the worse by this brash new phenomenon? Was Pop Art a corrupting influence on the artistic standards of major galleries and museums? As the debate surrounding these and other questions went on in the early ’60s, the phenomenon of Pop Art com-

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manded the attention of New York’s most important critics, curators and gallery owners. Fifty years ago, the respected art dealer, Sidney Janis, presented an exhibition that shook New York’s art scene. The show did not feature the European painters he had championed such as Pablo Picasso,

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A 21st Century Perspective Piet Mondrian, Marcel Duchamp, Fernand Leger and Max Ernst, nor did it include the work of the American Abstract Expressionists, Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, he represented. Janis called his exhibition The New Realists, a term that applied to contemporary European artists such as Arman, Christo and Enrico

become known universally as Pop Artists. Janis explained that the “new Factual Artist” found “inspiration in urban culture” and mass media—including “the billboard, magazine, comic strip, daily newspaper,” and he went on to say that they were “attracted to abundant everyday ideas and facts” and “accumulations...of mass-pro-

“collaboration with materials” that redefined the idea of subject matter. He once stated: “I don’t want a picture to look like something it isn’t....I want it to look like something it is. And I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world.” Rauschenberg’s early “combines” were part painting, part

“ I don’t want a picture to look like something it isn’t....I want it to look like something it is. And I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world.”

—R obert R auschenberg

Baj, but also included in this show were works of art by Robert Indiana, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenberg, James Rosenquist, Wayne Thiebaud, Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann—artists who would Robert Rauschenberg, Signs, 1970, color serigraph, 44-5/8 x 35-1/4”, Collection of University of South Florida, Museum Purchase

duced objects.” Janis was aware that Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Jim Dine and Allan Kaprow had laid the groundwork for these “new Factual Artists” by transforming common objects and everyday events into a series of non-traditional paintings, assemblages of found objects, and Happenings. Throughout his career, Robert Rauschenberg enjoyed a O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

found-object sculpture, that often included art reproductions, postcards, photographs from magazines, newspaper headlines and illustrations. By the early ’60s, he had experimented with collaging found images in their original form, and also transferring, screen-printing, or photographically reproducing these everyday images in his paintings and prints—a process

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POP ART REVISITED:

A 21st Century Perspective of transformation that was key to the Pop Art movement. Jasper Johns, a close friend of Rauschenberg, had also gravitated toward pre-existing motifs such as American flags, numerals, maps and coffee cans, described by Johns as “things the mind already knows.” Both of these young artists anticipated Pop Art by experimenting with images from everyday culture years before anyone in America used that term. Johns’ first such painting was Flag (1954). During the next six years, Johns followed this initial flag painting with variations that were increasingly abstract. Like Rauschenberg, Johns worked freely between two and three-dimensional media. Rauschenberg and Johns set the stage for the appropriation, re-use and transformation of everyday objects and images by their contemporaries, and bridged the gap between the painterly Abstract Expressionism of the early 1950s and the harder-edged flat shapes more common to Pop Art. From the beginnings of Pop Art, the meaning of these imag-

es was hotly debated and the critical response to the burgeoning number of Pop-related exhibitions was mixed. In an article in which he referred to Pop artists as “the new vulgarians,” Max Kozloff saw in the work of Lichtenstein and Rosenquist “blatantly familiar images”... on the one hand “demonstrating that the recognizable is not necessarily communicative at all,” and on the other hand, that these were “precreated” images that required the viewer, rather than the artist, “to contribute the imaginative values.” Clement Greenberg, a champion of Abstract Expressionism, saw little value in Pop artists’ subject matter and gave only faint praise to their “clear and straightforward handling of their pictures,” noting that “novelty, as distinct from originality, has no staying power.” Given the large number of Pop-related exhibitions and the sometimes hostile critical response to them, it made perfect sense for the Museum of Modern Art to organize A Symposium on Pop Art in December, 1962. American Art Cura-

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tor, Henry Geldzahler, who was something of a misfit at the generally conservative Metropolitan Museum of Art, commented: “I have heard it said that Pop Art is not art, and this by a museum curator....Why are we


mistrustful of an art because it is readily acceptable?...The new art draws on everyday objects and images. They are isolated from their ordinary context, and typified and intensified. What we are left with is a heightened

awareness of the object and the image, and of the context from which they have been ripped, that is, our environment.” Through the mid-’60s, the debate about Pop Art continued in the press. As early as 1974, O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Jasper Johns, Flags 1, 1973, screenprint, edition of 65 plus artist’s proofs, 27-3/8 x 35-1/2”, gift of Hilde Babin in honor of William S. Youngman, Jr., ©Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York

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A 21st Century Perspective the Pop Art pioneer, Lawrence Alloway, declared that the work of the Pop Artists “[had] been legitimated...as representative of a certain view of culture and the world.” Their view was focused outwardly—unlike the inward view of the abstract expressionists—and recognized the importance of the ever-present, overbearing images and symbols of the commercial world of advertising and publishing. Living in the “now” and having a continuing artistic dialogue with the surrounding visual environment was what Pop Art was and is all about. Confusion arises when a critic or audience member assumes that a known visual symbol—a flag, a historical work of art, a word, or a photo of a political figure—retains only its original meaning when it is removed from its common context. When it moves from the everyday world, where it has a known significance, it is redefined as it becomes part of a work of art. The word or image may retain part of its popular meaning, take on a totally different meaning, or represent several meanings O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Above: Andy Warhol, Grace Kelly, 1984, screenprint, 48-5/8 x 40-11/16 x 1-7/8” (framed), Collection of the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, Margery Wolf-Kuhn Art Acquisition Endowment Fund, 87.011 Opposite: Andy Warhol, Portrait of Marilyn, 1967, color serigraph, 40 1/8 x 40 1/4, Collection of Mississippi Museum of Art, Bequest of Sarah Virginia Jones

simultaneously. The audience member who perceives a work of Pop Art participates in defining its meaning in contemporary culture. Whatever a Pop Art painting or print meant in the ’60s, it is likely to have taken on

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POP ART REVISITED:

A 21st Century Perspective new meanings in the present. Even Andy Warhol’s portraits, as universal as they may seem, are also subject to continual redefinition. His most famous subject, seen in his Portrait of Marilyn (1967), was based on a publicity photograph for the 1952 film, Niagara. Monroe received star billing in this film, which marked the beginning of a major publicity build-up by her Hollywood publicists. Warhol’s misaligned screens of red, pink, green and yellow transform the PR image of the glamorous star into a frightful mask. Warhol’s masked goddess of 1967 remains a powerful image, but one that defies stereotyping. To see Warhol’s Grace Kelly (1984) and Jacqueline Kennedy II (1965), as art images, as opposed to artistic versions of publicity stills, requires us to think of them as historical icons (their deaths having given them a kind of immortality). Warhol forces us to consider what society needs these figures to represent. While Warhol said that his subject matter was inspired by the historical portraits of Hans Memling, he was also obsessed

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with the forces of conformity and individuality in society: “Those who talk about individuality the most are the ones who most object to deviation… Some day everybody will think just what they want to think, and then everybody will probably be thinking alike.” His Flowers (a portfolio of ten screenprints on paper, 1970) have been interpreted as a wry comment on the supposedly individualistic flower-power culture of the ’60s. A continuation of a similar series of silkscreened canvases from 1964, they were based on an image he found in Popular Photography magazine. Warhol’s Pepper Pot Campbell’s Soup (1968) sums up his take on conformity. Asked why he painted soup cans, he said that he “used to have the same lunch every day, for 20 years,” and at times, talked about wanting to be a machine. Yet, as a surprisingly religious person, he believed that works of art could Andy Warhol, Flowers, 1970, screenprint, 36 x 36”, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. James Singer

October/December 2012


have the kind of power found in a religious icon: “The situation, physical ideas, physical presence,” he said, “I feel that is the comment.” The artist who dealt most directly with consumption and materialism was Claes Oldenburg. Oldenburg installed his first monumental outdoor sculpture, a giant lipstick on tank treads, in 1969. He went on to create some of America’s most notable works of public Pop Art, such as the forty-five foot high Clothespin (1976) in downtown Philadelphia. Before making any actual outdoor sculpture, Oldenburg created a drawing entitled Proposed Colossal Monument to Replace the Washington Obelisk, Washington, DC, Scissors Closed (1967). This drawing was the prototype for the color lithograph, Scissors as Monument (1967). In his notes about the

Claes Oldenberg, Scissors as Monument (Scissors Obelisk, Washington, DC) from National Collection of Art portfolio, 1967, lithograph, 30 x 22”, Collection of Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, The University of Oklahoma, Norman; Museum Purchase, 1969


POP ART REVISITED:

A 21st Century Perspective piece, Oldenburg wrote that scissors were “a central tool in my activity,” referring to the cutting of material for his soft sculpture. “I realized that showing them closed would bring in what is imagined as well as what can be seen— open does not evoke closed, whereas closed evokes open. Also, a mood of anticipation, like the period before dawn.” His inventive way of capturing the spirit of consumer culture has given this Pop insider’s sculpture staying power. From the pioneers of Pop— Hamilton, Rauschenberg and Johns—to the mainstream Pop artists—Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol, Indiana, Wesselmann, Thiebaud and Oldenburg—these artists have held our attention for more than five decades. Their works in Pop Art Revisited clearly demonstrate that the Pop artists were a collection of strong individuals who shared an obsession with the images and objects of mainstream culture, not members of an orchestrated movement with a political or social agenda. Yet, these artists could not have been O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

more effective in changing our way of thinking about art. Today, no one would dare to refer to James Rosenquist or Robert Rauschenberg as one of a group of “genial jesters,” as a reviewer did after seeing an exhibition by six major Pop painters at the Guggenheim in 1963. As late as 1974, Hilton Kramer scoffed at the notion that Pop Art could be justified as “some sort of grand synthesis of high culture and mass culture,” and, yet, that is exactly what these artists achieved. We are still fascinated by their images and recognize that their meanings are multi-layered and complex. Fortunately, we are no longer put off or offended by the Pop artists’ borrowing from popular culture, but we are still learning to open our eyes and minds to new forms of visual language, whether they originate in the realm of computers and the internet or in some other region outside high culture. The message of Pop Art urges us to approach the visual culture of the 21st century with the attitude they brought to their vibrant era. O n V iew

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“Best known for delighting television audiences with her hilarious antics, comedienne Lucille Ball had hoped to make her mark as an actress on the big screen. From 1929 to 1950, she appeared in more than seventy films, but Hollywood stardom remained elusive. Weary of roles that offered steady work but little satisfaction, Ball was delighted when CBS offered her the chance in 1950 to star in a new television show based on her radio program, My Favorite Husband. When she proposed casting her husband, Desi Arnaz, as her costar, CBS balked at the idea of pairing Ball with the Cubanborn bandleader. The network relented after the couple agreed to pay for and produce the show’s pilot through their own newly formed company, Desilu Productions. A huge hit with the public when it debuted on CBS in October 1951, I Love Lucy proved to be the perfect showcase for Ball’s comedic talents.” —National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke and Robert F. Cranston, Lucille Ball, 1944, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke


In

Vibrant

Color

Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio

10.27.12-01.12.13 Polk Museum of Art , Lakeland

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WE ARE SO USED TO VIEWING

images in color today, but in the

mid-1930s, most folks had never seen a color photograph. Pioneering photographer, Harry Warnecke (1900-1984), and his associates at the New York Daily News’ Color Studio changed all that when they began creating brilliant, eye-popping portraits for the newspaper’s Sunday News magazine. 68

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In Vibrant Color “A trumpet virtuoso with a wide smile and an ebullient personality, Louis Armstrong was a jazz pioneer who helped to transform that musical genre into an international phenomenon. In the process, he became one of the most beloved American entertainers of the 20th century. Raised in New Orleans, Armstrong moved to Chicago in 1922 to join King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band. Several years later, he formed his own band, billed himself as the ‘World’s Greatest Trumpet Player,’ and helped to develop the jazz style popularly known as ‘swing.’ His technical prowess, rhythmic ingenuity, memorable improvisations, and lively ‘scat’ singing made Armstrong a standout. As Duke Ellington observed, ‘Satchmo’ became the ‘epitome of jazz’ as he played before capacity audiences across America and abroad. A consummate performer first and foremost, Armstrong modestly declared, ‘I never tried to prove nothing, just always wanted to give a good show.’” —National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke and Gus Schoenbaechler, Louis Armstrong, 1947, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke


“After more thanColor a decade In Vibrant

on the vaudeville circuit,

ventriloquist, Edgar Bergen, and his wisecracking wooden cohort, Charlie McCarthy, rocketed to national fame in 1936 with their radio debut on the Rudy Vallee Show. The monocled dummy and his human straight man proved so popular with the listening audience that when NBC gave the pair their own program in 1937, it quickly became one of radio’s top-rated shows. One reviewer credited the success of the act to Bergen’s ability to endow an ‘inanimate bit of timber’ with ‘as distinct and as assertive an individuality’ as any entertainer in show business. Although other characters such as country bumpkin, Mortimer Snerd, were later added to the act, the irrepressible Charlie McCarthy remained its star. When Bergen announced his intention to one day donate his rambunctious alter ego to the Smithsonian, Charlie fired back, ‘Well, I won’t be the only dummy in Washington.’” —National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke, Robert F. Cranston and Gus Schoenbaechler, Edgar Bergen, 1948, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery,

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In Vibrant Color A true newsman, who credited his assistants on all of his works, Warnecke convinced the Daily News to invest in expensive technology that introduced color photography to a broad audience. Employing a special one-shot camera of his own design, he produced color images by utilizing the technically demanding tri-color carbro process that yields richly-hued prints because the color actually derives from pigment that is suspended in gelatin rather than from color dyes. That’s one of the reasons why the color carbro prints from the ’30s and ’40s still have this wonderful, vivid color, unlike the dye-based color processes that we are familiar with today. Warnecke and his team photographed hundreds of people in the news, from beloved film stars and athletes to military leaders and government officials, as they had never been seen before. His mastery of the process left lasting photographs and glimpses into popular culture of the 1930s and ’40s. His methods and portraits were grounded in simplicity and realism, unlike many of the celebO n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Below: Photographed just after the end of World War II in 1945, General Dwight D. Eisenhower flashes a victorious smile in front of an American flag backdrop. Warnecke’s photos always captured the spirit of the time, and the high circulation of the Daily News attracted many famous figures outside the entertainment world.e monocled dummy an Harry Warnecke and Robert F. Cranston Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1945, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke

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In Vibrant Color Below: “...[Gene] Autry got his start on the radio in 1927 as ‘Oklahoma’s Yodeling Cowboy’ and later gained an enthusiastic following as the ‘Nation’s Number One Singing Cowboy’ on radio’s National Barn Dance program....[he] went on to star in dozens of low-budget westerns...and also enjoyed a lucrative recording career, with hits that included Tumbling Tumbleweeds (1935) and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1949). In the 1950s Autry made the move to television, forming a production company and starring in his own series.” ——National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke and Robert F. Cranston, Gene Autry, 1942, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Elsie M. Warnecke

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rity portraits of today. Because color took priority over dramatic shadows and special effects, he produced the sorts of uplifting, kitschy images that have become the hallmark of American nostalgia. Yet after his death in 1984, many of Warnecke’s portraits were forgotten. “He sort of fell off the radar,” says Ann Shumard, Curator of Photographs for the National Portrait Gallery. “It’s the difference between a fine art photographer and the photographers who worked for major newspapers. The photographers at Life and Look certainly were more well known because they had national circulation.” Twenty-four of these photographs from the 1930s and ’40s have been brought together for the exhibition, In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio, at Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland, on view from October 27th through January 12th. The exhibition, which has been organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, is the first Smithsonian show traveling to the Polk Museum •

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“Before signing a film contract with Republic Pictures in 1943, Dale Evans enjoyed modest success as a singer, performing in nightclubs and on the radio. But when Republic cast her opposite singing cowboy, Roy Rogers, in The Cowboy and the Senorita (1944), her career was transformed. Teamed with Rogers in more than 25 films between 1944 and 1951, Evans became ‘Queen of the West’ to Rogers’s ‘King of the Cowboys.’ When the couple married on New Year’s Eve in 1947, they became off-screen partners as well. Following the wedding, Republic announced that Dale Evans would no longer play Roy Rogers’s leading lady. But after fans protested, that plan was scrapped and Evans returned to the screen with her husband. She also co-starred with him when the Roy Rogers Show debuted on television in 1951, and composed the Happy Trails theme song with which the pair closed each episode.” —National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke, Dale Evans, 1947, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution


“Convinced that being ‘a

COCKTAIL definite personality’ was

oneCulture of the keys to stardom, W. C. Fields invented a larger-than-life persona as a loveable misanthrope that was part and parcel of the comic characters he portrayed. After an early career as a masterful juggler on the vaudeville circuit, Fields found his way to Broadway in 1915, where he joined Florenz Ziegfeld’s celebrated Follies and honed his comedic skills. He scored a hit as a small-time con artist in the Broadway musical, Poppy (1923), and reprised the role in D. W. Griffith’s Sally of the Sawdust (1925)—just one of the many silent films that showcased his talent. Fields made the transition to talking pictures with ease, delivering memorable performances in movies such as David Copperfield (1935), The Bank Dick (1940), and My Little Chickadee (1940), for which he wrote the original screenplay with co-star, Mae West.” —National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Harry Warnecke and Lee Elkins, W.C. Fields, 1938, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution;

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In Vibrant Color

“ The famous subjects of these portraits, many of whom are primarily known through blackand-white imagery, take on new auras when viewed in color...” —A dam J ustice , C urator of A rt , PM o A of Art—a Smithsonian affiliate since August, 2010. “This exhibition is very important within the context of the history of photography,” says Adam Justice, Polk Museum of Art’s Curator of Art. “Warnecke was one of the first photographers to experiment with color photography and the first to produce a color photograph for a news publication. The famous subjects of these portraits, many of whom are primarily known through blackand-white imagery, take on new auras when viewed in color and work to enlighten our interpretations of 1930s and ’40s American culture. We are certainly very excited about being the first institution outside the Smithsonian to host In Vibrant Color, and proud to be bringing O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

this nationally acclaimed exhibition to Polk County.” Drawing from the National Portrait Gallery’s collection of large-format, color carbro photographs, the exhibition includes actors, Lucille Ball and Roy Rogers; trumpeter, Louis Armstrong; baseball star, Ted Williams; Olympian, Babe Didrikson Zaharias; and General George S. Patton. Many of the photos were donated by Warnecke’s widow, Elsie, to the NPG’s Permanent Collection. “You can tell Warnecke was never intimidated by his subjects,” Shumard once told The Washington Post. “He had fun doing these pictures. They really are visual documents from a time gone by, to move us and intrigue us. They’re just… delightful.” O n V iew

October/December 2012

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Reference photo for Norman Rockwell’s Mathew Brady Photographing Lincoln, 1975, photo by Louie Lamone. Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, IL. Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections.


Norman

ROCKWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B E H I N D the C A M E R A

10.13.12-01.13.13 at the

VERO BEACH MUSEUM of ART w w w. v e r o b e a c h m u s e u m . o r g

VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS A

landmark exhibition that sheds new light on Norman Rockwell’s art and artistry—Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera is the first exhibition to explore in depth, Rockwell’s richly detailed study photographs, created by the artist as references for his iconic paintings. Organized with Norman Rockwell Museum and author/guest curator, Ron Schick, whose companion book of the same name was released by Little, Brown and Company, the exhibition (and publication) reveals a rarely seen yet fundamental aspect of Rockwell’s creative process, and unveils a significant new body of Rockwell imagery in an unexpected medium. OnV

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This page and opposite: Reference photo for Norman Rockwell’s Breakfast Table Political Argument, 1948, photo by Gene Pelham, licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, IL, Norman Rockwell Museum Collections; Breakfast Table Political Argument, 1948, tear sheet, cover illustration for The Evening Post, October 30, 1948, Š1948 SEPS: licensed by Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections


NORMAN ROCKWELL: Behind the Camera

Rockwell’s photographs, displayed alongside his paintings, drawings and commercial illustrations, present a fascinating view of the development of some of the artist’s most memorable images. At the same time, the photographs themselves— each painstakingly staged by Rockwell and involving an array of models, costumes, props and settings—are works of art in their own right. Rockwell’s study photographs are part of the Norman Rockwell Archives, a 200,000-object collection of Rockwell’s papers, photographs and mementos, housed at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Curator, Ron Schick, is the first Saturday

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NORMAN ROCKWELL: Behind the Camera

researcher to undertake a comprehensive study of the Museum’s newly digitized photography archives—a repository of nearly 20,000 images encapsulating Rockwell’s use of photography over four decades. Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) is best known for his images of everyday American life. A masterful storyteller, Rockwell painted nuanced scenes of people and events inspired by his New England hometown. Born in New York City in 1894, he enrolled in art classes at the New York School of Art at the age of fourteen, and quickly found success as a commercial illustrator, receiving his first commission before his sixteenth birthday. Rockwell’s illustrations were extremely popular in his lifetime and were seen across America in books, advertisements, calendars and popular magazines, but it was his work with the Saturday Evening Post that made him a household name. And while he is remembered for his nostalgic approach to American daily

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Opposite and above: Norman Rockwell M ©1957 SEPS: licen


Reference photo for Norman Rockwell’s Expense Account, 1957, photographer unidentified, licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles,IL, Museum Collections; Expense Account, 1957, oil on canvas, 38 x 35-3/4�, cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, September 20, 1958, nsed by Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, Norman Rockwell Museum Collections


Above left to right: Art Critic, 1955, tear sheet, cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, April 16, 1955, Š1955 SEPS: License Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, Norman Rockwell Museum Archival Collections; Reference photograph for Art Critic, photo by Gene inkjet print, Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust; Reference photograph for Art Critic, photo by Bill Scovill, 1955, inkjet print, Norman Rock


ed by Pelham, 1955, kwell Art Collection

NORMAN ROCKWELL: Behind the Camera life, Rockwell also seriously addressed major social issues of the time in some of his later work. Early in his career, Rockwell hired professional models to pose for the characters in his paintings. Beginning in the mid1930s, however, the evolving naturalism of his work led him to embrace photography, which had increasingly come in vogue as a useful tool for fine artists—and a natural ally of commercial illustrators working on tight deadlines. For Rockwell, already known as “the kid with the camera eye,” photography was more than an artist’s aid. The camera brought a heightened sense of realism to his work and opened a window to the keenly observed

authenticity that signifies his art. Working with friends and neighbors rather than professional models provided him with a wide array of “everyday” faces, while the camera’s ability to capture a fleeting expression or freeze a difficult pose gave him free reign to imagine and construct his visual narratives, capturing the fine details and nuances of his beloved characters. Before committing his ideas to canvas, Rockwell brought them to life in studio sessions. He carefully orchestrated each element of his design for the camera, selecting props and locations, choosing and directing his models, even getting in on the action to pose and perform. In fact, Rockwell’s photographic OnV

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NORMAN ROCKWELL: Behind the Camera

archive reveals that the artist himself is his most frequently captured model. Rockwell staged his photographs much as a film director works with a cinematographer, instructing his cameramen when to shoot, yet never personally firing the shutter. He created numerous photographs for each new subject, sometimes capturing complete compositions and other times, piecing together separate pictures of individual elements. Photography brought all the essential elements of Rockwell’s art completely under his control. For an artist with a “camera eye,” narrative genius and commitment to painstaking perfectionism, no better instrument could have been devised. O n V iew

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Above images: Refere Norman Rockwell M ©1947 SEPS: license


rence photos for Norman Rockwell’s Going and Coming, 1947, photos by Gene Pelham, licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, IL, useum Collections; Opposite: Going and Coming, 1947, tear sheet, cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, August 30, 1947, sed by Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections


Portraits of

POWER Photographs by

PLATON Through NOVEMBER 11th at the

FLORIDA MUSEUM of PHOTOGRAPHIC ART S,

Tampa

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Sheikh Sharif Sheikh Ahmed, President, Somalia,

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2©02011 1 2 Platon 57


A

Portraits of POWER:

Photographs by PLATON

AN EXTRAORDINARY EXHIBITION OF images by portrait photographer, Platon, is on display at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa. Featured are some of the world’s most powerful personalities presented as we’ve never seen before, providing viewers with a glimpse at what lies behind their carefully constructed auras. As Platon once stated in an interview with BBC’s World News Today: “We’re all used to seeing these characters on the podium making dramatic speeches, but we never see them up close and personal, and I wanted to show in a humble, honest way, what it’s really like to connect with them on an intimate level.” All the subjects Platon has photographed are used to being in control, yet for a few seconds, Platon has been the one in control, determining with a click of a button, which momentary truth is captured and how each figure will be permanently represented in history. “Artists have been making portraits of the mighty for centuries—from Velázquez’s Philip IV to Lucian Freud’s Elizabeth II— and the act of portrait-making can leave the royal or the tyrant, the President or the diplomat, with a sudden feeling of disequilibrium, of a transfer of power….History is full of leaders who cannot bear the result of their sittings. Winston Churchill publicly praised a portrait of him by Graham Sutherland, but soon decided that it made him look senile. His wife, Clementine, destroyed it. Usually, it seems, politicians seek out a portrait artist at the beginning of OnV

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Portraits of

their career. On February 27, 1860, the day he delivered his careerdefining speech at Cooper Union, Abraham Lincoln walked over to Mathew Brady’s studio and had his picture taken. The greatest of American political lives had begun.”—from The New Yorker, December 7, 2009 In 1976, as renowned photographer, Richard Avedon, was about to photograph Henry Kissinger, the US Secretary of State made a request­—“Be kind to me,” he said. Did Kissinger want Avedon to make him appear wiser, warmer or perhaps more sincere than he thought he was? Avedon later wrote: “Isn’t it trivializing and demeaning to make someone look wise, noble (which is easy to do), or even conventionally beautiful when the thing itself is so much more complicated, contradictory and therefore, fascinating?” In September of 2009, during a meeting of world leaders at the United Nations in New York, Platon, a staff photographer for The New Yorker magazine, was granted unprecedented access to the event and set up a makeshift studio off the floor of the General Assembly, where he proceeded to lure the likes of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Hugo Chávez and Muammar Gaddafi in front of his camera. The artist recalled what Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, asked just before his portrait was taken—“Platon,” he said, “make me look good.” Born in London in 1968, Platon was raised in the Greek Isles until his family returned to England in the 1970s. He received his BA with honors in Graphic Design from St. Martin’s School of Art and his MA in Photography and Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. After working for British Vogue for several years, he was invited to New York to work for the late John Kennedy Jr. and his political magazine, George.

 Platon shot portraits for a range of international publications, including Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Esquire, GQ and The Sunday Times magazine. He also developed a special relationship with Time magazine, producing over 20 covers. In 2007, Platon photographed Russian Premier, Vladimir Putin, for Time magazine’s Person Of The Year cover. The image was awarded 1st prize at the World Press Photo contest.

 In 2008 he signed a multi-year contract with The New Yorker. OnV

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POWER:

Photographs by PLATON

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Portraits of

As the staff photographer, he has produced a series of large-scale photo essays, two of which won ASME Awards in 2009 and 2010. Platon’s New Yorker portfolios have focused on many themes, including President Obama’s inauguration, the US military, portraits of world leaders, and the Civil Rights Movement. 

 The following year, Platon teamed up with the Human Rights Watch to help them celebrate those who fight for equality and justice in countries suppressed by political forces. These projects have highlighted human rights defenders from Burma as well as the leaders of the Egyptian revolution. Platon photographed Burmese opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, for the cover of Time, just days after her release from house arrest. Platon’s first monograph, Platon’s Republic, was published in 2004 by Phaidon Press. To coincide with its publication, his work was exhibited in London and New York.

His second book, Power—a collection of portraits of over 100 world leaders—was published in 2011 by Chronicle. The book includes portraits of Barack Obama, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Dmitry Medvedev, Benjamin Netanyahu, Hugo Chavez, Mahmoud Abbas, Tony Blair, Robert Mugabe, Silvio Berlusconi and Muammar Gaddafi. 

 In recent years, public speaking has progressively played a major role in Platon’s career as a communicator and storyteller. He has been invited to be a keynote speaker at the World Economic Forum, Yale University, the London School of Economics, the National Portrait Gallery in London and the International Center of Photography in New York. He has also appeared on a range of television media, including Charlie Rose (PBS), Morning Joe (MSNBC), Fareed Zakaria’s GPS (CNN) and the BBC World News.

 In 2011, his work was exhibited in New York at the Matthew Marks Gallery and the Howard Greenberg Gallery. The New York Historical Society also exhibited a solo show of Platon’s Civil Rights photographs, which remain part of the Museum’s Permanent Collection.
Platon’s advertising credits include the United Nations Foundation, Credit Suisse Bank, Exxon Mobil, Diesel, The Wall Street Journal, Motorola, Nike, Converse, IBM, Rolex, Ray-Ban, Tanqueray, Kenneth Cole, Moschino and Timex.
Platon lives in New York with his wife, daughter and son. On View OnV

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POWER:

Photographs by PLATON

Opposite: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, President, Iran, © 2011 Platon

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DUA HAN S CU LP T U R E S & P H O T

12.07.12-04.07.13

at the

MUSEUM of FLORI


ANE SON O G R A P H S, 1 9 7 8-1 9 9 5

DA ART,

DeLand

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E

DUANE HANSON:

Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995

EVER SINCE DUANE HANSON MADE HIS

American museum debut at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978, he has continued to delight viewers with his lifelike and life-sized

sculptures of Americans from virtually all walks

of life. “I’m mostly interested in the human form

as subject matter and means of expression for my sculpture,” the artist

once said. “What can generate more interest, fascination, beauty, ugliness, joy, shock or contempt than a human being?...” Duane Hanson: Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995, hosted by the Museum of Florida Art in DeLand, presents nine hyperrealistic conceptual works by the sculptor as well as a selection of photographic “sketch book” studies that enhance our understanding of the artist’s process. “Duane Hanson’s sculptures are soundly rooted in the ‘Photo Realism’ school, stemming from the ‘Pop Art’ movement of the mid-1960s. This style is

generally associated with painters such as Chuck Close and Richard Estes, but Duane Hanson is the preeminent sculptor of this genera,” says David Fithian, the Museum’s Curator of Art and Exhibitions. “This exhibition will give viewers a unique chance to experience first-hand these superb works in the intimate atmosphere of the Museum’s upper galleries.” The initial, close-up encounter with a Hanson sculpture encourages the viewer to ad-

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DUANE HANSON:

Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995

mire his technique. Some may think the artist merely made casts of real people and then glued the parts together, inserted body-hairs, glass eyes and teeth. Hanson’s figures are actually composites of castings from various people or “New People,” composed of polyester resin and fiberglass. In his vignettes of American life, Hanson hasn’t missed a single detail. After casting his figures from live models in his studio, he adorned them with every attribute of lifelikeness, right down to tiny body hairs and varicose veins. He also hand-picked their clothes from second-hand shops, and meticulously accessorized them. We have all come across Hanson’s people at one time or another—at the market or the gas station or while simply walking about town. Hanson’s people are not beautiful. His figures are often overweight, garishly dressed and exhausted. Some appear merely tired out—others simply seem tired of living. “I’m not duplicating life, I’m making a statement

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about human values,” Hanson once explained. “I show the empty-headedness, the fatigue, the aging, the frustration. These people can’t keep up with the competition. They’re left out,

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psychologically handicapped.” Human values and destinies comprise the focus of his work. He transformed life into art and, in so doing, sharpened our view of the world, fellow

2012


Above: Self Portrait with Model, 1979, painted polyvinyl with accessories

human beings and our own lives as well. Duane Hanson was born in Alexandria, Minnesota, on January 17, 1925. He received his BA from Macalester colOnV

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lege in St. Paul, MN, in 1946 and his MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI, in 1951. From 1953 to 1960, Hanson lived in Munich and Bremerhaven, Germany, working as an art teacher for the US Army dependent school system. It was in Germany that he began to experiment with synthetic media, particularly, polyester resin and fiberglass—the materials that would become his signature media. He spent the following years perfecting his artistic skills and the use of these materials in such a way that the boundaries between real and artificial seem to blur. Hanson moved back to the US in 1960 and from 1962’65, he was an art professor at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta. It was during his time at Oglethorpe that he received a grant from the Ella Lyman Cabot Trust to develop his work with life-sized polyester resin and fiberglass sculpture. The subjects of his sculptures during the mid- to late 1960s were political. Though he later tempered his political message, he continued to address the roles of the working class— housewives, repairmen, office

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cleaners, dishwashers, museum guards and janitors. One of the first sculptures Hanson created after moving to South Florida in 1965, was Abortion, a mixed-media rendering of a dead pregnant woman, sprawled on a table and covered with a sheet. When the work was publicly displayed for the first time in Miami the following year, it provoked strong reactions—both favorable and negative—and Hanson suddenly became a celebrity in the South Florida art scene. Hanson’s provocative, lifelike sculptures soon attracted attention beyond Florida. In 1967, New York art dealer, Ivan Karp, began to woo Hanson away from Miami and in 1969, the artist moved to Manhattan. His works were shown in solo exhibitions in New York and Germany, and he created more than 25 sculptures over the next four years. Although Hanson’s move broadened his exposure in the New York art world, he grew tired of the city. In 1973 he returned to South Florida, settling in Davie, where he lived for the rest of his life. Despite his absence from New York, Hanson’s work OnV

gained popularity. It was during the 1970s that he attained international recognition. In 1974, a retrospective of Hanson’s work toured Europe and in 1976, his work went on a major tour of museums in the US. His solo show at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978 attracted more than 297,000 visitors, setting an attendance record for the Museum. Among the many awards and accolades Hanson received, he was perhaps most proud of those that identified him as a Florida artist. In 1983, he was given the Ambassador of the Arts Award of the State of Florida and two years later, he received the first annual “Florida Prize” of $10,000 for his outstanding achievements in sculpture. In 1987, he was honored with a “Duane Hanson Day” proclamation in Broward County, and was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 1992. Hanson is regarded as one of the most influential American sculptors of the 20th century, committed to Realism, and considered by many to be the most popular and significant artist ever to have come out of South Florida. O n V iew i e w

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DUANE HANSON:

Sculptures & Photographs, 1978-1995

Opposite: Queenie II, 1988, painted polyvinyl with accessories

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THE

M O D E R N IMPULSE Photography from Europe and America Between the Wars

On view

10.09.1 2– 0 1.0 6.1 3 at the

SA M U E L P . H A RN MUSEUM of ART, Gainesville

w w w. h a r n . u f l . e d u

Berenice Abbott, Manhattan Bridge,
1936,
gelatin silver print,
 on loan from a private Florida collection,
©Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics

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The Modern Impulse Text by KERRY OLIVER-SMITH, Harn Curator of Contemporary Art

THE SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM

of Art at the University of Florida

presents an exhibition that re-

flects a transformative moment

in photographic history during the tumultuous interwar years.

Above: John Gutmann, Chicago, 1936, gelatin silver print,
on loan from a private Florida collection, ©1998 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents Opposite: Berenice Abbott, New York at Night, c. 1932, gelatin silver print, on loan from a private Florida collection,
 ©Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics


The Modern Impulse: Photography from Europe and America Between the Wars explores how the newly portable 35mm camera

was celebrated as an instrument of poetry, analysis and social change. Covering the years between 1918 and 1945, the exhibition highlights

over 40 artists who expanded the new medium and changed the way the world was perceived. OnV

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The Modern Impulse

Opposite: Edward Weston, Pepper 30, 1930, gelatin silver print,
on loan from a private Florida collection,
 photograph by Edward Weston, ©1981 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents Below: Imogen Cunningham, Amaryllis, 1933, gelatin silver print, on loan from a private Florida collection,
 ©1933, 2012 The Imogen Cunningham Trust, www.ImogenCunningham.com

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The Modern Impulse showcases more than 135 photographs, books, illustrated magazines and films drawn from four regions that were among the era’s most prominent centers of photographic innovation—France and the Czech Republic in Europe, and New York and California in the US. Artists featured in the exhibition include such innovative talents as Berenice

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Abbott, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Imogen Cunningham, Frantisek Drtikol, Walker Evans, André Kertész, Helen Levitt, Josef Sudek and Jaroslav Rössler.
Celebrating technology while embracing spontaneity and improvisation, these artists captured the spirit, vitality and invention of a new age.
 Photographers from both sides of the Atlantic caught the fleeting moments of everyday life, focusing on cities, street life and the contours of industrial and natural forms. Their work ranged from abstraction to realism and was influenced by artistic movements such as Surrealism, Constructivism and New Objectivity along with creative approaches to documentary and reportage. Broadly, the work reflects what artist and theorist, László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946), described as a ‘new vision,’ a perspective that emerged from the technical culture of the 20th century, incorporating a multitude of unconventional forms and techniques such as unusual cropping and camera angles, high contrast and photomontage in both experimental and straight photography. The works displayed in the 2012


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The Modern Impulse

“The Modern Impulse offers a window into one of the most artistically fertile periods in the history of photography.” —R ebecca N agy , D irector exhibition are organized by the following five thematic areas, which reflect the diversity of production and expression under the “new vision” movement: ART AND TECHNOLOGY: NEW VISION AND

THE MODERN CITY

Responding to the new urbanism of the 1920s, photographers in Europe and America reflected the aesthetics of the “new vision” in metropolitan landscapes, creating groundbreaking work that emphasized the abstract forms, geometry and formal rhythms of city life and industrial production. Berenice Abbott’s photographs of New York City skyscrapers are iconic examples of this approach, which was also adopted by artists such as Alma Lavenson and Peter Stackpole in California and Josef Ehm in the Czech Republic.

of the

H arn M useum

of

A rt

PURE PHOTOGRAPHY

AND NEW OBJECTIVITY

Seeking an objective realism that pinpointed the essence of pure form, photographers like Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham and Ansel Adams formed the Group f.64—referencing an aperture that renders clear and precise representation. They advocated the use of modernist principles to capture the contours and textures of organic and industrial

Opposite: Marion Post Wolcott, Jitterbugging in a Juke Joint, Clarksdale, Mississippi,1939, gelatin silver print,
on loan from a private Florida collection Below: John Gutmann, New Orleans, 1937, gelatin silver print,
on loan from a private Florida collection, ©1998 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents


The Modern Impulse

subjects. Their works are notable for the use of close-ups, cropping and flattening to deemphasize contextual surroundings and focus instead on textural details and form.

slav Rösler, Eugen Wiskovsky and others carried on the Surrealist project beyond the parameters of the two World Wars.

DREAMS, MEMORY

MODERN LIFE:

AND DESIRE: SURREALISM IN FRANCE AND

THE CZECH REPUBLIC

Opposite: Walker Evans, Sharecropper’s Family, Hale County, Alabama, 1936, gelatin silver print,
on loan from a private Florida collection,
 ©Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Below: Henri Cartier‑Bresson, On the Banks of Marne, France, 1938, gelatin silver print, on loan from a private Florida collection,
 ©Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photo

During the interwar period, artists such as Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson and André Kertész connected the ordinary and the fantastic, the real and the surreal. They saw the city as a labyrinth of ephemeral moments, obscure places, forgotten objects, and marginal people linking to a deeper mystery behind ordinary appearances. This style was especially prevalent in the Czech Republic, where Jaro-

SOCIAL ACTIVISM AND DOCUMENTARY AND REPORTAGE

In the 1930s, economic turmoil and political extremism on both sides of the Atlantic inspired many photographers to use the camera as a tool for activism, uniting modernist aesthetics with progressive ideas. American artists like Walker Evans, Marion Post Wolcott, Paul Strand and Weegee captured the social hardships of the Great Depression, often with support from Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Farm Security Administration (FSA). MASS MEDIA:

PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE PUBLIC

The increasing recognition of photography as a new 20th century art form was accompanied by an explosion in the mass distribution of photographic images in the interwar period in


magazines such as Life, Look, Vanity Fair and Harper’s Bazaar as well as Vu, Minataure and De Stijl in Europe. These publications introduced new styles of photography to American and European readers, and gave artists a commercial platform on which to establish themselves. Books, magazines and films from this period will be featured. OnV

“The Modern Impulse offers a window into one of the most artistically fertile periods in the history of photography,” said Rebecca Nagy, Director of the Harn Museum of Art. “We’re delighted to share a remarkable exhibition that meaningfully contributes to a greater understanding of 20th century visual culture.” O n V iew

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RETROSPECTIVE { H E N R I

C A R T I E R - B R E S S O N }

Exhibition

The Man, the Image & the World. Henri Cartier-Bresson, A Retrospective On view October 6th–January 13th at the Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

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HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON

was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. His images of world events and the people—famous and otherwise—who made these events happen, have helped shape our understanding of the last century. The Tampa Museum of Art is the only US venue to host the international exhibition, The Man, the Image & the World. Henri Cartier-Bresson, A Retrospective. “We are dedicating the majority of our galleries to this exhibition, giving this Master his due,” said Museum Executive Director, Todd D. Smith. From his first works of the 1930s that stand out for their composition, the theatrical nature of the images and the selection of details, Cartier-Bresson succeeded in recording important moments with his camera. His 1952 book, Images a la Sauvette (The Decisive Moment), introduced his ideas about creating images that combined story, action and emotion. Entire stories are often condensed into a single image, the so-called 2012


R E T R O S P E C T I V E

“decisive moment.” The pho- following the German invatographer once said that pho- sion of France. He joined the tography was “putting one’s army but was soon captured by head, one’s heart and one’s eye German forces and forced into on the same axis.” prisoner-of-war camps for the Travel was a key element in next three years. In 1943, after Cartier-Bresson’s life and his two failed attempts, he escaped work. Following trips to Mex- and immediately returned to his ico, the artist was sent on large- photography and film work. scale global reporting assignAlong with friends such as ments to the US, the Robert Capa, CartSoviet Union, Chiier-Bresson foundna, India, Bali and ed Magnum PicIndonesia. His imtures in 1947. Opages provided early erating in Paris and and probing views New York City, behind the Iron this organization Curtain and into of photojournalHenri Cartierthe highly hidden ists successfully Bresson’s images cultures in Southchanged the manhelped establish east Asia and the Inner in which phophotojournalism dian Subcontinent. tojournalists were as an art form. His work is not only treated and recogconsidered a benchmark for nized by printed sources. photojournalism in the 20th The Man, the Image & the century but also for the ethics World. Henri Cartier-Bresson, of photography. A Retrospective includes over Born on August 22, 1908 in 330 photographs, films and imChanteloup, France, Cartier- portant publications. CartierBresson studied painting before Bresson chose the works for embarking on a career in pho- this exhibition before his death tography in the 1930s. His life in 2004, just a few weeks shy of took a dramatic turn in 1940, his 96th birthday. O n V iew

opposite page: The Maharadjah of Baria arrives on an elephant, escorted by his cousins, to marry the Maharadjah of Jaipur’s daughter. Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. 1948

Above: Place de l’Europe. Gare Saint Lazare. Paris, France. 1932 all images ©Henri Cartier-Bresson/ Fondation HCB / Magnum Photos This exhibition is held in conjunction with the Foundation Henri CartierBresson and Magnum Photos/Paris.


FORM { LY D I A

“WHEN YOU SUBMERGE

A Z OU T }

Exhibition

Out of the Ordinary Geometry by Lydia Azout On view through October 21st at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami http://thefrost.fiu.edu

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yourself underwater, you suddenly find another dimension; another way of seeing, another way of existing. What if… the real world is the world we do not see? What if… the possibilities and imaginative solutions that exist, are far beyond our comprehension? As a child, I used to watch ‘The Twilight Zone,’ an intriguing, imaginative, black and white television program that fired up my imagination.‘What if’ became my constant question. Today, ‘what if’continues to linger on my mind. The ‘what if’opened up a huge amount of possibilities, and my perception of the ordinary was never ordinary again. This exhibition is about the cosmos, Sacred Geometry, the unknown, the mysterious and the magical.” — Lydia Azout Out of the Ordinary Geometry presents large-format sculptures and installations, conceived by the artist specifically for the Museum’s space. “Throughout her career as 2012


F O R M

a sculptor, Azout has focused types of steel and projections to on the basic elements of form produce a confrontation with the and shape as symbolic of the materials, potentially extend the powers of nature, especial- human experience beyond that of ly the feminine forces she re- the merely functional or obvious, gards as reflections of creativi- and enter into a relationship dity, cosmic order and harmony,” rected at perception and personsays Frost Art Museum Director, al response. We hope the experiCarol Damian. “Often working ence will be memorable and inwith monumental spirational.” structures, which she Azout studied makes out of wood, at David Manzur’s steel and other maworkshop in Bogoterials, Azout boldly tá, Colombia, from faces the challenges 1970 to 1974. She of size and space as continued her studshe explores the obies with Luis Camject’s potential to exnitzer in Lucca, Itapress something be- “This exhibition is ly, and at the Granyond its geometric about the cosmos, ite and Art Institute references and delve Sacred Geometry, in Petrasanta, Italy. into a world that acSince 1978, she the unknown, knowledges the spirhas exhibited in imthe mysterious and itual through a conportant galleries, the magical.” temporary aesthetmuseums and biic. Her installation for the Frost ennials. Azout’s work is part of Art Museum calls for the viewer permanent collections in Mexito momentarily suspend the de- can, Colombian, Puerto Rican, mands of the everyday to inter- Venezuelan and American muact on an emotional basis with the seums, as well as numerous prisculptural forms. The large-scale, vate collections throughout the site-specific work is multimedia world. She currently lives and and constructed out of different works in Bogotá. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Major Temple, 2006, Weathering steel, steel, and copper, 34 x 380 x 242” 2. Feminine Forces, 1997, Steel With a Rust Patina, 107 x 107 x 292” above: Tree of Thoughts 2, 2012, Steel, stainless steel, and copper, 116 x 54 x 34-1/2” Photography by Ramon Giovanni left: Lydia Azout, courtesy of the artist


CRAFT

THE JAPANESE HAVE LONG

{ N I N G Y O }

Exhibition

Entertaining the Gods and Man: Japanese Dolls and the Theater On view October 2nd–January 27th at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach www.morikami.org

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been known for excellence in their theater arts. Kabuki, noh and ningyō-jōruri (puppet theater, more commonly known as bunraku) have served as cultural ambassadors since Japan’s opening to the West in the mid-19th century, introducing the world to a distinctive view of Japanese art and culture. Earlier forms and traditions, however, remain virtually unknown outside of Japan. Mechanical puppet theater (karakuriningyō), for example, easily rivaled in popularity that of both kabuki and more traditional puppet theater during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Dioramas of hyper-realistic dolls known as iki-ningyō (lifelike human forms) were all the rage in Edo (present-day Tokyo) for much of the 19th century, and were collected by museums in the West. While the term “doll” in the West is associated with a child’s plaything, in Japan, “ningyō,” usually translated as doll, describes an inanimate human 2012


C R A F T

shape or form. It is not a play- ed entertainment as the Japthing but rather a tangible ar- anese. While the hina-ningyō tistic form that carries myriad associated with the Girl’s Day cultural meanings. Ningyō, display and the intensely marboth mechanical and static, tial forms associated with the were once the central focus Boy’s Day festival have become of large festival floats in nu- familiar to those with at least a merous commupassing interest in nities around JaJapanese arts and pan. Today, we can culture, few have still witness some had the opportuof the grandeur of nity to be exposed these doll-related to the rich tradiforms of entertaintions surrounding ment during the dolls and the theGion Matsuri in ater. Ningyō, both Kyoto and the fesentertaining in and Few cultures tivals connected of themselves and with Tōshōgū and can approach the commemorative Wakamiya Hachiof various theatridepth and man shrines in Nacal traditions, have sophistication of goya. been a part of Jadoll-related Although most pan’s cultural toentertainment as cultures in the world pography for centhe Japanese. have puppet-relatturies. ed theatrical traditions—Punch Entertaining the Gods and and Judy in the European tra- Man presents over 60 examdition, warang shadow puppet- ples of these visually powerry of Indonesia, or the large- ful and intellectually engaging scale marionettes of the Sin- works of art in an effort to illuhalese tradition—few cultures minate this rich, undiscovered can approach the depth and world and little-explored area sophistication of doll-relat- of Japanese culture. O n V iew

opposite page: Mitate gosho-ningyô of a Sanbasô performer, 18” tall, early 20th century, Rosen Collection Above (top to bottom): 1. Ishô-ningyô depicting a Shishi Mai (Lion Dance), 18-1/4” tall, Edo Period, 18th century, Blewis Collection 2. Takeda-ningyô depicting a warrior with a pistol, 18” tall, Edo Period, 19th century left: Tamaya Shobei VIII (dates unknown), Karakuri gosho-ningyô, 20th century


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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Washington D C Th e mu seu ms . . .

THE POWER OF WASHINGTON, D C WILL SEDUCE YOU.

It was created with a single goal in mind—to showcase the greatness of our nation. With its impressive monuments and museums, its stately government buildings and mansions, D C is easily recognizable as the United States’ capital city. And within this 61-square-mile city, you’ll find staggering achievements in everything from architecture and art, literature, history and political prowess. Our tour of the city’s finest art museums includes: Art Museum of the Americas; Corcoran Gallery of Art; Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens; National Gallery of Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts; the Smithsonian museums: American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, National Museum of African Art, and National Portrait Gallery; The Kreeger Museum; and The Phillips Collection. O n V iew

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Art Museum of the Americas

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ALEJANDRO OBREGON,
 ESTUDIANTE MUERTO (THE DEAD STUDENT), 1956, OIL ON CANVAS, 55 x 69” 2. CANDIDO PORTINARI,
 RETURN FROM THE FAIR, 1940,
 OIL ON CANVAS,
40 x 32”,
 GIFT OF JOSE GOMEZ-SICRE 3. ARMANDO MORALES,
 FIGURES, 1972,
 OIL ON CANVAS,
40 x 32”

WITH ITS UNIQUE regional

focus, the Art Museum of the Americas’ Permanent Collection of 20th century Latin American and Caribbean art is one of the most important collections of its kind in the US. Established in 1976, the Museum’s Collection has grown to nearly 2,000 objects, including: painting, sculpture, installations, prints, drawings and photographs. The works reflect the rich diversity of artistic expression found in

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the region and provide an overview of stylistic and iconographic trends beginning in the early 20th century. Noted architect, Paul Cret, designed the Spanish colonial style building which houses the Museum. The Museum’s white walls, red tiled roof and loggia, decorated with richly colored tiles, provides a warm and intimate atmosphere in which to enjoy art. O n V iew

ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS www.museum.oas.org 201 18th St., NW Washington, DC 202.458.6016

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IMAGES COURTESY OF ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS


Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art + Design

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F O U N D E D I N 1 8 6 9 by Wil-

liam Wilson Corcoran, the Corcoran Gallery of Art is the largest privately supported cultural institution in Washington, DC. The Museum’s main focus is American art. Its historic American Collection spans the history of American art from colonial times through 1980 and includes remarkable paintings by such distinguished artists as John Singleton Copley, Frederic Church, Mary Cassatt, Winslow Homer, George

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CORCORAN GALLERY OF ART AND COLLEGE OF ART + DESIGN www.corcoran.org 500 17th St., NW Washington, DC 202.639.1700

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Bellows, and Edward Hopper. The Corcoran also has particularly strong collections of Colonial and Federal era portraiture, neoclassical sculpture, Hudson River School painting, art of the American West, American Impressionism and early 20th century realism. Its holdings include major works by painters, Albert Bierstadt, Childe Hassam and John Singer Sargent, as well as sculptors, Paul Manship, Hiram Powers and Bessie Potter Vonnoh. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Frederic Edwin Church, Niagara, 1857, oil on canvas, 42-1/2 x 90-1/2”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Museum Purchase, Gallery Fund 2. Gordon Parks, American Gothic, Washington, DC, 1942, gelatin silver print, 43-9/16 x 31-7/8”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, The Gordon Parks Collection 3. Mary Cassatt, Young Girl at a Window, ca. 1883-1885, oil on canvas, 39-1/2 x 25-1/2”, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Museum Purchase, Gallery Fund images courtesy of the corcoran gallery of art

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Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens

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FOUNDED BY AMERICAN

collector and heiress to the Post cereal empire, Marjorie Merriweather Post, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens is one of the premier art collector’s museums in the US. The Museum features the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia and a world-renowned collection of 18th century French decorative art and furnishings. Encircled by woodlands, the 25 acre estate pro-

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vides visitors a tranquil oasis of luscious formal gardens. Highlights from the Collection, which features more than 16,000 objects, include a diamond crown worn by Empress Alexandra, at her marriage to Nicholas II; Beauvais tapestries designed by François Boucher; two Imperial Easter eggs by Carl Fabergé; La Nuit by WilliamAdolphe Bouguereau; and a collection of costumes and accessories worn by Mrs. Post or her family. O n V iew

HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM & GARDENS www.hillwoodmuseum.org 4155 Linnean Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.686.5807

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. HILLWOOD MANSION 2. EASTER EGG, 1895, FABERGÉ (FIRM); PERKHIN, MIKHAIL (WORKMASTER), RUSSIA: ST. PETERSBURG, GOLD, CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL, DIAMONDS, SATIN, 3-1/8 x 2-3/16”, BEQUEST OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1973 3. FRANK O. SALISBURY, PORTRAIT OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1934, OIL ON CANVAS, 49-1/4 x 39-1/4”, BEQUEST OF MARJORIE MERRIWEATHER POST, 1973 IMAGES COURTESY OF HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND GARDENS


National Gallery of Art

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ESTABLISHED IN 1937,

the National Gallery of Art was created for the people by a joint resolution of Congress, with a substantial art collection donated by Andrew W. Mellon. The Gallery’s collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts, traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages to the present—including the only painting by Leonardo da

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART www.nga.gov 4th & Constitution Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.737.4215

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Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile ever created by Alexander Calder. The Gallery’s campus includes the original neoclassical West Building designed by John Russell Pope, which is linked underground to the modern East Building, designed by I. M. Pei, and the 6.1 acre Sculpture Garden, which provides an informal, yet elegant, setting for works of modern and contemporary sculpture. Temporary special exhibitions spanning the world and the history of art are presented frequently. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. LEONARDO DA VINCI, GINEVRA DE’ BENCI [OBVERSE], CA. 1474/1478, OIL ON PANEL, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, AILSA MELLON BRUCE FUND 2. PABLO PICASSO, FAMILY OF SALTIMBANQUES, 1905, OIL ON CANVAS, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, CHESTER DALE COLLECTION 3. ALEXANDER CALDER’S GIANT MOBILE HAS GRACEFULLY PRESIDED OVER THE ATRIUM OF THE EAST BUILDING SINCE NOVEMBER 1977. GIFT OF THE COLLECTORS COMMITTEE, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON; PHOTO: ROB SHELLEY IMAGES COURTESY OF NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

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National Museum of Women in the Arts

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

of Women in the Arts is dedicated to recognizing the contributions of women artists. The core of the NMWA’s permanent holdings is the Holladay Collection, comprised of art assembled by Wilhelmina Cole Holladay and her husband, Wallace F. Holladay, who began collecting art in the 1960s. Their devotion to collecting art by women and to creating a museum that would showcase women artists, led to the

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establishment of the NMWA. The Permanent Collection includes more than 4,000 works, providing a comprehensive survey of art by women from the 16th century to the present. The work in the Collection represents a wide range of styles and media—from the Renaissance paintings of Elisabetta Sirani to modern photographs by Barbara Morgan to Louise Nevelson’s contemporary sculptures. The NMWA also has several important special collections, including silver by 18th and 19th century Irish and English women silversmiths. O n V iew

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS www.nmwa.org 1250 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 202.783.5000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. SOPHIE TAEUBER-ARP, COMPOSITION OF CIRCLES AND SEMICIRCLES, 1935, GOUACHE ON PAPER, 10 x 13-1/2”, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS 2. CLAUDE RAGUET HIRST, A GENTLEMAN’S TABLE, AFTER 1890, OIL ON CANVAS, 18 x 32”, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS 3. JOAN MITCHELL, ORANGE, 1981, OIL ON CANVAS, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS IMAGES COURTESY OF NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS


Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery

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SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN

Info

Art Museum is home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Its artworks reveal key aspects of America’s rich artistic and cultural history from the colonial period to today. More than 7,000 artists are represented in the Collection, including: John Singleton Copley, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam, Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM and the Renwick Gallery http://americanart.si.edu 8th and F Streets, NW Washington, DC 202.633.1000

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Christo, and David Hockney. The Museum also features innovative public spaces such as: The Luce Foundation Center for American Art, a visible art storage and study center that allows visitors to browse more than 3,300 works from the Collection; and the Lunder Conservation Center, the first art conservation facility to allow the public permanent, behindthe-scenes views of the preservation work of museums. The Renwick Gallery houses the Museum’s craft and decorative arts collection, which includes works from the 19th century to the present. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MUSEUM COURTYARD, PHOTO: KEN RAHAIM 2. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, MANHATTAN, 1932, OIL ON CANVAS, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF THE GEORGIA O’KEEFFE FOUNDATION 3. ALEXANDER CALDER, NENUPHAR, 1968, SHEET STEEL, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF THE ARTIST IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

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Smithsonian Freer Gallery of Art & Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

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THE FREER GALLERY OF

Art, along with the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, forms the Smithsonian Institution’s national museums of Asian art. The two museums are connected by an underground exhibition space. The Freer houses 25,518 objects spanning 6,000 years of history, including but not limited to, ancient Egyptian

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stone sculpture and wooden objects, ancient Near Eastern ceramics and metalware, Chinese paintings and ceramics, Korean pottery and porcelain, Japanese Byōbu, Persian manuscripts and Buddhist sculpture. Collections span from the Neolithic to modern eras. The Sackler Gallery takes you on an underground journey and is home to Dr. Arthur M. Sackler’s incomparable collection of art, which includes ancient Chinese jades and bronzes as well as contemporary Asian art. O n V iew

SMITHSONIAN FREER GALLERY OF ART & ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY www.asia.si.edu Freer Gallery of Art: Jefferson Dr. at 12th St., SW Arthur M. Sackler Gallery: 1050 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202.633.4880

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. The Blue Dress, Thomas Wilmer Dewing (1851-1938), American, 1892, Oil on wood panel, 20 x 15-13/16”, Gift of Charles Lang Freer 2. FREER GALLERY COURTYARD 3. THUNDER GOD, HANGING SCROLL, KATSUSHIKA HOKUSAI (1760-1849), JAPAN, 1847, INK AND COLOR ON PAPER, 89-5/16 x 26-5/8” (OVERALL), 49-15/16 x 21-3/16” (IMAGE), GIFT OF CHARLES LANG FREER IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SMITHSONIAN’S FREER AND SACKLER GALLERIES


Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

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THE

SMITHSONIAN’S

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden presents art in a range of media, including works on paper, painting, installation, photography, sculpture, digital and video art, and works that mix all or some of the above. The collection of modern art from the late 19th century to mid-20th century and contemporary art from the 1970s to the present, includes in-depth holdings by some of the best-known artists of our time, including

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SMITHSONIAN HIRSHHORN MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDEN www.hirshhorn.si.edu Independence Ave. at 7th St., SW Washington, DC 202-633-1000

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Alexander Calder, Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky and Clyfford Still, as well as the work of today’s most promising emerging artists. The Museum’s architect, Gordon Bunshaft, conceived the Hirshhorn as “a large piece of functional sculpture.” The bold, drum-shaped structure, with a hollow-centered, elevated cylinder, floats above nearly four acres of landscaped grounds. The Museum also features a Sculpture Garden with cool green spaces and a geometric reflecting pool, offering visitors an atmosphere of contemplation and retreat. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Photo: Lee Stalsworth 2. Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe’s Lips (detail), 1962, the Hirshhorn collection 3. Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: Glow, 1966, the Hirshhorn collection IMAGES COURTESY OF SMITHSONIAN HIRSHHORN MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDEN

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Smithsonian National Museum of African Art

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

of African Art, located on the National Mall, specializes in African art and culture. It was established as a private museum in 1964, and officially became a part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1979. The Collection of the NMAfA embraces the diverse artistic expressions found throughout Africa, from ancient to contemporary times. Collection objects

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range from ceramics, textiles, furniture and tools, to masks, figures and musical instruments. The arts of painting, printmaking, sculpture and other media are well represented by living artists whose works highlight individual creativity, address global and local art trends, and innovatively transform artistic traditions into modern idioms.

SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART africa.si.edu 950 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202.633.4600

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT 1. FACE MASK, CHOKWE PEOPLES, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, ANGOLA, EARLY 20TH CENTURY, WOOD, PLANT FIBER, PIGMENT, COPPER ALLOY, 15-3/8 x 8-3/8 x 9-1/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 2. BOY AND THE CANDLE, GERARD SEKOTO (1913-1993), BORN SOUTH AFRICA, 1943, OIL ON CANVAS, 18-3/16 x 13-1/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 3. BRACELET, YORUBA PEOPLES, NIGERIA, 16TH CENTURY, IVORY, 5-11/16 x 4-1/8 x 4 1/8”, GIFT OF WALT DISNEY WORLD CO., A SUBSIDIARY OF THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY, PHOTO: FRANKO KHOURY, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART


Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery

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SMITHSONIAN

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National Portrait Gallery shares with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, one of Washington’s oldest public buildings, a National Historic Landmark that was begun in 1836 to house the US Patent Office, and one of the nation’s finest examples of Greek Revival architecture. Generations of remarkable Americans are kept in the company of their fellow citizens at the National Portrait SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY www.npg.si.edu 8th and F Streets, NW 
 Washington, DC 202.633.8300

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Gallery. The Gallery presents the wonderful diversity of individuals who have left— and are leaving—their mark on our country and our culture. Through the visual and performing arts, we celebrate leaders such as George Washington and Martin Luther King Jr., artists such as Mary Cassatt and George Gershwin, activists such as Sequoyah and Rosa Parks, and icons of pop culture such as Babe Ruth and Marilyn Monroe. They all link us to our past, our present and our future. For anyone fascinated by famous Americans and their stories, the National Portrait Gallery is a must-visit destination. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN BY ALEXANDER GARDNER, ALBUMEN SILVER PRINT, 1865, IMAGE: 17-11/16 x 15-3/16” 2. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BY JOSEPH SIFFRED DUPLESSIS, OIL ON CANVAS, CA. 1785, STRETCHER: 28-1/2 x 23-1/2 x 1-1/2”, GIFT OF THE MORRIS AND GWENDOLYN CAFRITZ FOUNDATION 3. GEORGE WASHINGTON (LANSDOWNE PORTRAIT) BY GILBERT STUART, OIL ON CANVAS, 1796, STRETCHER: 97-1/2 x 62-1/2”, ACQUIRED AS A GIFT TO THE NATION THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF THE DONALD W. REYNOLDS FOUNDATION ALL IMAGES: COLLECTION OF THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION; COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

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The Kreeger Museum

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE KREEGER MUSEUM, PHOTO BY EILEEN WOLD 2. PAUL CÉZANNE, THE DARK BLUE VASE, III, CA. 1880, OIL ON CANVAS 3. CLAUDE MONET, CLIFFS AT LES PETITES-DALLES, 1884, OIL ON CANVAS

THE KREEGER MUSEUM

is located in the former home of David and Carmen Kreeger, designed by renowned architect, Philip Johnson. The Museum showcases the Kreegers’ collection of modern art, which includes paintings and sculptures from the 1850s to the 1970s. The Impressionists are represented by nine Monet paintings, as well as works by Renoir, Sisley and Pissarro. Other 20th century European artists include Edvard Munch,

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE KREEGER MUSEUM

Max Beckmann, Wassily Kandinsky and Joan Miró. The American artists are introduced by the graceful motion of an Alexander Calder mobile. Visitors can either lose themselves in the infinite space of a painting by Clyfford Still, or enjoy the sly Pop humor of James Rosenquist’s Bowling Ball Diptych. Washington artists, such as: Gene Davis, Sam Gilliam, William Christenberry and Kendall Buster, as well as examples of traditional African and Asian Art, are also featured in the Museum’s Collection. O n V iew

THE KREEGER MUSEUM www.kreegermuseum.org 2401 Foxhall Road, NW Washington, DC 202.337.3050

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The Phillips Collection

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works of modern art in an intimate setting at The Phillips Collection, in Washington’s vibrant Dupont Circle neighborhood. The Museum, which opened to the public in 1921, is America’s first museum of modern art. Paintings by Renoir, Degas, Cézanne, Gauguin, van Gogh, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, Braque, Klee, Homer, Whistler, Hopper, Stieglitz, O’Keeffe, Calder and Rothko are among THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION www.phillipscollection.org 1600 21st St., NW
 Washington, DC 202.387.2151

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the many stunning impressionist and modern works that fill the Museum’s distinctive building, which combines extensive new galleries with the family home of its founder, Duncan Phillips. The Collection includes nearly 3,000 works and continues to develop with selective new acquisitions, many by contemporary artists. Special exhibitions and frequent changes in the arrangement of the Permanent Collection mean that there’s something new on every visit to The Phillips. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR, LUNCHEON OF THE BOATING PARTY, 1880-81, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1923 2. PAUL CÉZANNE, SELF-PORTRAIT, 1878-1880, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1928 3. VINCENT VAN GOGH, ENTRANCE TO THE PUBLIC GARDENS IN ARLES, 1888, THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON, DC, ACQUIRED 1930 IMAGES COURTESY OF THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Washington D C The galleries. . .

FOR A MORE INTIM AT E C U LT U R A L E X P E R I E N C E ,

the 50+ independent art galleries within the Washington, DC area offer art lovers an opportunity to view the works of emerging and established artists, and a chance to enjoy the city’s diverse local talent. Contemporary and traditional art, paintings, prints, fine art photography, glass, sculpture and other types of visual art are displayed within these fine art venues. Most of the galleries are located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood, a thriving cultural area with scores of top-notch restaurants, shops and nighttime entertainment, and along R Street and Connecticut Avenue in downtown DC—all easily accessible via one of the world’s best subway systems, the Metro. On the following pages, On View presents a selection of Washington’s exceptional galleries. O n V iew

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Washington DC Art Galleries

CARROLL

GALLERY

SQUARE

PLAN B

GALLERY

www.galleryplanb.com

ADAMSON

www.carrollsquare.com

1530 14th St. NW

GALLERY

975 F St. NW

202.234.2711

www.adamsongallery.jimdo.com

202.638.3000

1515 14th St. NW

G FINE ART

202.232.0707

CIVILIAN

www.gfineartdc.com

ART

1350 Florida Ave. NE

ADDISON/RIPLEY

PROJECTS

202.462.1601

FINE ART

www.civilianartprojects.com

www.addisonripleyfineart.com

1019 7th St. NW

GUARISCO GALLERY

1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW

202.607.3804

www.guariscogallery.com

202.338.5180

1120 22nd St. NW 202.333.8533

CONNER ALEX GALLERY

CONTEMPORARY

www.alexgalleries.com

ART

HAMILTONIAN

2106 R St. NW

www.connercontemporary.com

GALLERY

202.667.2599

1358 Florida Ave. NE

www.hamiltoniangallery.com

202.588.8750

1353 U St. NW 202.332.1116

AMERICAN PAINTING

CURATOR’S

FINE ART

OFFICE

HEMPHILL

www.classicamericanpainting.com

www.curatorsoffice.com

FINE ARTS

5118 MacArthur Blvd. NW

1515 14th St. NW

www.hemphillfinearts.com

202.244.3244

202.387.1008

1515 14th St. NW 202.234.5601

BURTON

GALERIE

MARINKOVICH

BLUE

HONFLEUR

FINE ART

SQUARE

GALLERY

www.burtonmarinkovich.com

www.galeriebluesquare.com

www.honfleurgallery.com

1506 21st St. NW

1662 33rd St. NW

1241 Good Hope Rd. SE

202.296.6563

202.957.1401

202.365.8392

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Wa s h i n g t o n D C g a l l e r i e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

INTERNATIONAL

www.littletongallery.com

design.com

VISIONS GALLERY

1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW

2552 Virginia Ave. NW

www.inter-visions.com

202.333.9307

202.338.4488

MORTON FINE ART

TOUCHSTONE

www.mortonfineart.com

GALLERY

JANE HASLEM

1781 Florida Ave. NW

www.touchstonegallery.com

GALLERY

202.628.2787

901 New York Ave. NW

2629 Connecticut Ave. NW 202.234.5112

202.347.2787

www.janehaslemgallery.com

2025 Hillyer Pl. NW

PARISH GALLERY

202.232.4644

www.parishgallery.com

Dupont Circle Art Galleries

1054 31st St. NW 202.944.2310

KATHLEEN EWING GALLERY www.kathleenewinggallery.com

P & C ART

3615 Ordway St. NW

www.pcart.com

FOUNDRY

202.328.0955

3108 M St. NW

GALLERY

202.965.3833

www.foundrygallery.org

1314 18th St. NW

LA LUNA

202.463.0203

GALLERY

PROJECT 4

www.lalunagallerydc.com

www.project4gallery.com

5171 MacArthur Blvd. NW

1353 U St. NW

MARSHA MATEYKA

202.316.4481

202.232.4340

GALLERY www.marshamateykagallery.com

LONG VIEW

THE RALLS

2012 R St. NW

GALLERY

COLLECTION

202.328.0088

www.longviewgallerydc.com

www.rallscollection.com

1234 9th St. NW

1516 31st St. NW

STUDIO GALLERY

202.232.4788

202.342.1298

www.studiogallerydc.com

2108 R St. NW 202.232.8734

MAURINE

THE WATERGATE

LITTLETON

GALLERY

GALLERY

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On View 10-12.2012  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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