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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2012

THE MYSTERIOUS

Content of Softness

AT C O R N E L L F I N E A R T S M U S E U M , W I N T E R PA R K PLUS

UNNATURAL AT B A S S M U S E U M O F A R T , M I A M I B E A C H

HISTORIES in Africa : 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert AT T H E C U M M E R M U S E U M O F A R T & G A R D E N S , J A C K S O N V I L L E

FLORAda & Flowing Waters : The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak AT T H E A P P L E T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , O C A L A AND

STRIPPED BARE + Bathed : The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks AT T H E D A L Í M U S E U M , S T. P E T E R S B U R G


CONTENTS August/September

2012

Vo l . 3 , N o . 3

ON THE COVER : LISA KELLNER, ALMOST PERFECT (DETAIL), 2011, SILK, PIGMENT, PAINT, THREAD, EMBROIDERED TEXT (“ALMOST PERFECT”), SURGICAL PINS, 42 x 31 x 6” RIGHT: LISA KELLNER, IM PLANT, 2012, SILK, PIGMENT, PAINT, BLEACH, THREAD, HAND FORMED AND PAINTED SILK RODS, VARIABLE, ROUGHLY 12 x 12’ AREA IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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on iew FLORIDA

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2012

THE MYSTERIOUS

Content of Softness

AT C O R N E L L F I N E A R T S M U S E U M , W I N T E R PA R K PLUS

UNNATURAL AT B A S S M U S E U M O F A R T , M I A M I B E A C H

HISTORIES in Africa : 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert AT T H E C U M M E R M U S E U M O F A R T & G A R D E N S , J A C K S O N V I L L E

FLORAda & Flowing Waters : The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak AT T H E A P P L E T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , O C A L A AND

STRIPPED BARE + Bathed : The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks AT T H E D A L Í M U S E U M , S T. P E T E R S B U R G

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THE MYSTERIOUS CONTENT OF SOFTNESS

Consisting of a diverse range of sculptures, installations and crafts, The Mysterious Content of Softness, hosted by Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, explores the transformative power of fiber—its connection to the human body and potential for capturing the fluidity of life.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

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72 Jacksonville

80 Ocala

92 St. Petersburg

A new exhibition at Bass Museum of Art, UNNATURAL presents a fusion of reality, fantasy and simulation, while reflecting the freedom of the imagination and the wonders of simulation technology, which make the inconceivable conceivable.

AFRICA

FLOWING WATERS

BATHED

UNNATURAL

HISTORIES IN

FLORAda AND

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens will be featuring Elizabeth Gilbert’s glorious B&W photographs of a magnificent and sometimes harsh landscape and its peoples.

Works by Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak portray a lush and beautiful portrait of natural Florida in a new show at the Appleton Museum of Art.

STRIPPED BARE +

Conservation efforts are usually off-limits to the public, which makes this exhibit a rare opportunity to witness the skill and science involved in preserving several great Masterwork paintings at The Dalí Museum.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): Boaz Aharonovitch,

On View Destination: NEW YORK CITY

Mark Messersmith, Wild As Angels;

New York City’s outstanding art venues

A conservator works on Salvador Dalí’s

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Elizabeth Gilbert, The Circumcisionist (detail);

108 The Museums: An overview of

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CONTENTS August/September

2012

Vo l u m e

3,

No. 3

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COMMENTARY

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MUSE

Rob Kaz: Friends and Places­—An On View Interview with artist, Rob Kaz, and his imaginative world of fantasy and whimsy.

Matar’s unique exhibit, at the Southeast Museum of Photography, reveals the hopes, dreams and frustrations of young women in the setting of their own rooms.

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Spotlight

GALLERY

Diana (detail), 2011, Archival Pigment Print, ©hillerbrand+magsamen

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Naples Museum of Art presents a selection of arresting, large-format color images—many of which are Schoeller’s most famous celebrity portraits.

RANIA MATAR

Museum exhibitions

PICTURED:

MARTIN SCHOELLER

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CALENDAR

HILLERBRAND+MAGSAMEN,

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Insight

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A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

Fo c u s

Profile

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HILLERBRAND + MAGSAMEN

Dunedin Fine Art Center hosts a presentation of humorous and provocative imagery by the collaborative team, Hillerbrand+Magsamen, that explores the stresses, expectations and predilections of society and the domestic realm.

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TRENT MANNING

Manning’s new show, at Polk Museum of Art, is living proof that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.


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C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew

NatureInspired

M A G A Z I N E

Nature has long been a source of creative inspiration. It’s power, mystery and beauty has captivated the hearts and minds of artists for generations. Through a diverse range of media, artists continue to explore, interpret, challenge and celebrate its wonders, creating narratives and opening dialogs that allow our minds to examine and question our beliefs and perceptions of nature, in all its forms, as it applies to our personal lives and to the world around us. In The Mysterious Content of Softness, on pg. 52, artists explore the transformative power of fiber, it’s connection to the human body and potential for capturing the nature of the flesh and conveying an affinity for life. UNNATURAL, on pg. 62, presents a fusion of reality, fantasy and simulation as it questions conventional means and methods of representing the natural world, while FLORAda and Flowing Waters, on pg. 80, elegantly portrays a lush and beautiful portrait of natural Florida as interpreted by three of the state’s most prominent artists. Additional highlights include: Histories in Africa: 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert, on pg. 72, a moving photographic journey into the vanishing culture of the Maasai warriors of Kenya and Tanzania; Stripped Bare+Bathed: The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks, on pg. 92, a rare opportunity to witness the restoration of Dalí’s great Masterworks; and much more—enjoy! Diane McEnaney

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director

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...

MUSE

Rob Kaz: Friends and Places A N O N V I E W I N T E RV I E W. . .

P

OTENT COLORS, ENGAGING

atmospheres and a dramatic sense of light are what Central Florida-based artist, Rob Kaz, hopes will draw viewers into his imaginative world of fantasy and whimsy. “Quite simply, I want [viewers] to long to be in the painting, to take comfort and smile with a sense of whimsy, a sentiment in my paintings that can be contributed to my influential background in professional studio animation and video game art.” Much of Rob’s work is a mirror of his background in animation. Following graduation from University of Central Florida, he began working for a number of small animation studios. At that time, Disney had recently relocated their Floridabased animation studios to California, which left behind many animators in Central Florida who chose not to uproot. As a result, he found himself working along-

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Summer art camps are growing in popularity because of the positive experience the children are having.


MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places side “quite possibly the most talented artists I’ve ever known, right there in those small studios,” he recalls. “Their influence was invaluable.” Rob had the opportunity to work in many areas of film—in particular, the time spent in character creation and environments heavily influenced his painting style. He approaches each painting with a conscious sense of balance between earth and water. “I find natural beauty and a soothing logic in water that meets land, that I hope relates as emotions—even if not parallel to my own,” he says. Rob recently inked a deal with Disney Fine Art by Collectors Editions and is now among a handful of artists who can paint Disney fine art, featuring many favorite

“I like art that bring into a m

Disney characters. On View recently chatted with Rob about his work...

Much of Rob’s work is a mirror of his background i Previous page: Rob Kaz, What’s Up, 28 x 22”, from Friends Along the Way; Beau branches out to reach even more new friends. All images: ©Rob Kaz

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MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places OV: When did you become interested in art? RK: I’ve been creating art since I was a child. From paper plates to canvas, I’ve always looked at blank slates and had the drive to create. I guess it runs in the family—my dad was an art teacher. Though I never took art classes, even from my dad, I learned about dedication, determination and focus—both in art and life—from his example.

creating gs the viewer moment.” — Rob Kaz

OV: Did you plan to pursue a career in art? RK: I graduated from UCF with a degree in Criminal Justice. While I had a job lined up in law enforcement following graduation, a hiring freeze put a halt to

in professional studio animation and video game art. Above: Rob Kaz, Overlook, 12 x 48”, from Friends Along the Way; Beau looks down on a koi who happens to catch him staring. Art, courtesy of the artist

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MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places

my plans. As fate would have it, I was hired to begin work in an animation studio after the owner happened upon a few of my paintings and drawings. I later went on to become an artist at EA Tiburon (Electronic Arts) where I worked on video games, including Madden, Tiger Woods and NCAA Football. Shortly after that, I decided to take a leap of faith, to paint professionally as a fine artist—and here I am now! OV: You recently signed with Disney Fine Art by Collectors Editions. What has this adventure been like for you? RK: I am one of the biggest fans of animation art you’ll meet and being able to paint Disney is really an honor. I have had the privilege of working with many

Rob Kaz, Bambi, 30 x 40”, from Disney Fine Art by Collectors Editions

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MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places

Disney artists and they inspired me to make the transition from animation to fine art. I want artists and fans alike to enjoy how I try to expand on the movies and add something more, from my perspective. OV: Where do you typically find inspiration? RK: A lot of things influence my art. Life influences my art. Tropical places I visit, animals I see while walking my dogs, friends I meet throughout my journeys, my imagination—all are influences that can be seen in my finished pieces. In fact, Beau, the frog character found in many of my paintings, is the product of such influences. After a tiny green frog hopped onto a glass window near my office, I watched him for a while, imagining where he might have been, where he

Rob Kaz, Atop The Beanstalk, 22 x 28”, from Disney Fine Art by Collectors Editions

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MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places

was going. I wondered about his encounters with other animals and the curiosity that landed him on the window. At that moment, Beau was born. OV: How long does it typically take you to complete a painting? RK: The length of time varies. It’s hard to say exactly how long a painting takes as I have started and finished some in a matter of hours and others have taken up to a week or more. I always say that the signature is the hardest part of the process because I find it difficult to ever really call a painting complete. OV: What do you hope people may experience when viewing your work? Rob Kaz,Sunset Lagoon, 30 x 40”, from Places I’d Rather Be; “I came on a place not unlike this while in the Florida Keys. What a nice feeling to spend the evening watching the sun go down with nothing to do and nowhere to be.” —R. Kaz

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MUSE Rob Kaz: Friends and Places

RK: I create scenes that are drawn from my imagination. Even if a painting is based on a real place or subject, I tend to romanticize the landscape, the sky, etc. I like creating art that brings the viewer into a moment, whether it’s happiness, curiosity or tranquility. I don’t hide meaning in my paintings. You won’t find symbolism or deep, poetic thought, but you will find yourself wondering about the characters, or longing to be on the shore beneath the shade of a palm. I suppose, for that reason, my paintings tend to fall into one of two categories, “Places I’d Rather Be” or “Friends Along The Way”—and sometimes both. O n V iew To view more of Rob’s paintings, visit DisneyFineArt.com and www.robkazart.com.

Rob Kaz, Dinghy, 16x20”, from Places I’d Rather Be; “I started this painting while on Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas. The scene was inspired by a stop at Labadee, Haiti. I can just imagine some couple grabbing this little boat and going off to some secluded tropical locale.” —R. Kaz

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{S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S*

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

BOCA RATON Thru 10.07.12

A Little Birdie Told Me... Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

A gallery of birds has been drawn from the Museum’s Permanent Collections, showcasing American, European, Native American, and Pre-Columbian representations of our fine feathered friends. Noted artists featured include: Max Ernst, Joan Miró, Philip Pearlstein, Man Ray, James Rosenquist and Ben Shahn.

Thru 10.07.12

Big Art: Miniature Golf Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Designed by artists from across the US, Big Art: Miniature

Golf is a unique exhibition that explores the fusion between art, design and play. Visitors can see—and play on—a diverse selection of artist-created miniature golf holes (clubs provided),

ranging from an orbit around the Sun and into a black hole, playing inside an enormous golf hole cup, and a surrealist pinball hole, to the world’s smallest version of the world’s largest miniature golf course. Each hole offers a one-of-akind experience for all visitors, be they golf lovers, art lovers, or both. Thru 10.14.12

Glass Act: The Contemporary Art Glass Movement Turns 50 Boca Raton Museum of Art

Image from Big Art: Miniature Golf at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Erika Nelson (Lucas, Kansas), The World’s Smallest Version of the World’s Largest Miniature Golf Course, 2012, concrete, AstroTurf, landscaping, 3-1/3 x 8-1/4 x 3-1/4’

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Boca Raton continued...

www.bocamuseum.org

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement in America, this display showcases art glass representative of the full breadth of this defining period in contemporary glassmaking, and focuses on unique objects that explore ideas by leading glass artists such as Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Michael Glancy, Harvey Littleton, Concetta Mason, William Morris, Jay Musler, Toots Zynsky and others.

Highlighting textile masterpieces from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum in NYC, this exhibition includes bedcovers that have rarely been on view and important cornerstones of the Folk Art Museum’s comprehensive quilt holdings. The exhibition also

marks the first opportunity for viewers to see the 9/11 National Tribute Quilt outside of the American Folk Art Museum. In recognition of the quilt’s inclusion in the exhibit and to commemorate the day, the Museum will offer complimentary admission on September 11th.

09.11.12-01.20.13

Politics Not as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say Boca Raton Museum of Art

BRADENTON Thru 08.26.12

Preserving Eden: Clyde Butcher’s Florida Photographs South Florida Museum www.southflorida museum.org

Using black & white film as his medium, Clyde Butcher creates images that look beyond the obvious and attract the viewer with the drama of light and shadow, engaging not just our eyes, but our emotions­— and hopefully, as he says—our hearts. CORAL GABLES Thru 10.21.12

Introspection and Awakening: Japanese Art

www.bocamuseum.org

Image from Politics Not as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say at Boca Raton Museum of Art: National Tribute Quilt (detail); organized and assembled by the Steel Quilters, Pittsburgh, 2002; cotton and mixed media, 8 x 30’, American Folk Art Museum, gift of the Steel Quilters: Kathy S. Crawford, Amber M. Dalley, Jian X. Li and Dorothy L. Simback, with the help of countless others in tribute to the victims of the September 11, 2001, attack on America, 2002.14.1, image courtesy of American Folk Art Museum, New York City

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Coral Gables continued...

of the Edo and Meiji Periods, 1615-1912 Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Featured are early examples of the various painting schools, woodblock prints and porcelains from the 17th to early 20th century, which address a variety of themes, including the influence of China and Korea on Japan during this crucial timeframe; the Japanese life-style and belief structure; and the impact of the West.

Mexican Retablos from Joseph and Janet Shein Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

CORAL SPRINGS Thru 08.18.12

Painted devotional images of saints, called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects Thru 09.23.12 of veneration and to Saintly Blessings seek favors, are from Mexico: on exhibit for the A Gift of first time.

Ann Deon, Jack Newman, Isabel Perez and Deborah Gregg Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Paintings, sculptures and mixed-media works by artists: Anne Deon­—A Retrospective: Selections from Three Decades of Work; Deborah

Gregg—Inscriptive Manifestations: The Inner Voice; Jack Newman—The United Tastes of America; and Isabel Perez Salazar— Mixing Nature; will be on display in four distinctive special presentations. (See Jack Newman: The United Tastes of America in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 100.) DAYTONA BEACH Thru 11.4.12

Artists, Art and Architecture: Discovering the Past from the MOAS Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Watercolors, drawings and oils by 18th

Image from Jack Newman: The United Tastes of America at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Jack Newman, 22 Across, 42 x 49”

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Daytona Beach continued...

and 19th century artists Piranesi, David Roberts and Panini are highlighted in this exhibit through images filled with both academic excellence and beauty.

est, revealing rare glimpses of everyday life, including street vendors, pedestrians and aristocrats, in a world soon to be lost forever in the drama of WWI and the Bolshevik Revolution.

Thru 09.09.12

Empire and Empathy: Vintage Photographs of Russia Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Old Moscow photographs were shot in 1909 by Amateur photographer, Murray Howe, on a hand-held Graflex camera—at that time considered a stateof-the-art device. The results are extraordinary in both quality and inter-

Thru 09.09.12

The Tsars’ Cabinet: Two Hundred Years of Russian Decorative Arts Under the Romanovs

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The Tsars’ Cabinet illustrates two hundred years of decorative arts of Russia from the time of Peter the Great in the early 18th century, to that of Nicholas II in the early 20th century. Many of the pieces in the exhibition were designed for the use of the tsars or other Romanovs, while others

are indicative of the styles that were prominent during their reigns. 09.28.12-01.06.13

Victorian International Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Victorian International focuses on art and decorative arts produced on both sides of the Atlantic in the Victorian age (1840s–early 20th century). The exhibition includes fine furnishings, paintings, sculpture, Tiffany and cut glass, ceramics, embroidery and other textiles, sculpture, and metalwork that individually and collectively define the merits and usage of Victoriana.

Image from Empire and Empathy: Vintage Photographs of Russia at the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach: Murray Howe, Moscow Cucumber Street Vendor (detail), 1909

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Daytona Beach continued...

09.14-12.14.12

Women Artists

Florida Panoramics Southeast Museum of Photography

www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

www.smponline.org

This exhibition of more than 200 vintage panoramic photographs and original vintage postcards, draws out the fascinating history of this unique style of photography from Florida’s “golden years” in the early 20th century. 09.14-12.14.12

Rania Matar: A Girl and Her Room Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Following the success of Witness to Creativity II, which took place in July of 2011, the Museum once again opened its doors to the public while a group and subtle power. Women Artists of artists prepared Focusing on contemwww.floridamuseumfor their works. Viewers porary young women womenartists.org enjoyed a rare opfrom vastly differing A fiber show featuring portunity to engage cultures in the US and the dynamic textile the artists about their Lebanon, her project, work of nine excepprojects, work methA Girl and Her Room, tional Florida artists ods and messages. reveals the complex will be on exhibit, giv- This dialog between lives of her subjects in ing viewers an oppor- the artists and viewers the unique setting of tunity to discover the is part of the resulting the girls’ own rooms. wide variety and deep art installations mak(See story on pg. 104.) placement of textiles ing up this exhibition. in the art world. Thru 11.25.12

D e LAND

Rania Matar has produced an exhibition and a book of unique

Thru 08.18.12

08.24-11.10.12

Art in Stitches Florida Museum for

Witness to Creativity III Florida Museum for

From the Outside In: Purvis Young Museum of Florida Art

Image from Rania Matar: A Girl and Her Room at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Rania Matar, Shannon, Boston, MA, 2010, pigment inkjet print, 20 x 30”

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DeLand continued...

www.museumoffloridaart.org

The visual iconography of Purvis Young, a prolific, self-taught, “Outsider” artist, transforms our throwaway society items into compelling artwork that reveals inner-city realities and the struggles of African-Americans.

explanation for the destruction. Jim Jipson’s art offers metaphors for how we think, feel and experience life. Viewers are invited to explore his texts and imagery, which is generally metaphysical or symbolic. Which plane of experience

is more dominant is the revelation of this exercise. Thru 11.25.12

Survival Series: Barbara Neijna Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

The body of work

Thru 11.25.12

Related Alternatives: KYLE and Jim Jipson Museum of Florida Art

created by Barbara Neijna during the past several years reflects her meditation on the condition of water— the fluid of life. The photographs shown in this exhibit are from an ongoing series titled Survival Kits. These works bring her closer to the life-anddeath forces of nature that both frighten and inspire her. DELRAY BEACH Thru 09.16.12

Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.museumoffloridaart.org

Using painting and mixed media, KYLE’s current body of work explores the deconstruction and devastation of natural disasters and global catastrophes, attempting to find a systemic

www.morikami.org

Ghosts, Goblins and Gods comprises an

Image from Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach: Bairinsai Setsuzan (fl. 19th century), Courtesan Plucking Daruma’s Beard, painting mounted as a hanging scroll, ink and colors on paper, late Edo Period, mid-19th century, Clark Center for Japanese Art & Culture

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Delray Beach continued...

array of paintings, colorful woodblock prints, sculptures, masks and other objects depicting a host of legendary ghosts, gods and other-worldly beings.

ly explores perceptions of emotions, family, consumerism and media, within a uniquely American subjectivity. (See story on pg. 100.) 09.07-12.21.12

InterGALACTIC 


 Dunedin Fine Art Center

Thru 09.15.12

Wood Be Kindred Spirits: The Kokeshi Dolls of Bob Brokop Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Wood Be Kindred Spirits features one of the largest and never before seen collections of kokeshi in the US. Kokeshi, simple wooden cylindershaped forms with

www.dfac.org

round heads, debuted in the mid-19th century. Their whimsical and kindhearted faces bring joy and comfort to all those who come into contact with them. DUNEDIN 09.07-10.14.12

BEAM Me Up

Dunedin Fine Art Center

Contemporary artists go interplanetary—extraterrestrials, black holes, lunar landscapes— BEYOND the sky’s the limit!

www.dfac.org

Houston-based video and photographic team, Hillerbrand+ Magsamen, share contemporary interpretations of parenthood and family life in a humorous and provocative presentation that playfully and poetical-

09.07-10.14.12

My Favorite Martian

 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

“Self-portrait as Alien” is the theme of this DFAC members show. Antennas, UP!

Image from BEAM Me Up at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Hillerbrand+Magsamen, Miranda, 2011, archival pigment print, 24 x 30”, ©Hillerbrand+Magsamen

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FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 09.2012

Associations & Inspiration: The CoBrA Movement and the Arts of Africa and New Guinea Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

{ P g. 8 o f 3 4 }

This lively and thought-provoking installation juxtaposes paintings, sculpture and works on paper by artists of the CoBrA movement with masks, totems and carvings created on the South Pacific island of New Guinea and on the continent of Africa.

Thru 01.06.13

Shark Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

In addition to drawings of all the known varieties of sharks in the world, this exhibition contains photographs, sculptures and video as well as a section devoted to the sensational impact of the 1975 Steven Spielberg film, Jaws.

and as a captain in the US Air Force during WWII. Noggle’s work explores female vitality, aging and beauty with an honest, respectful and sometimes humorous view.

GAINESVILLE Thru 03.10.13

Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This installation displays a selection of photographs by Anne Noggle, who became a professional photographer at age 40, after serving as one of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP)

Thru 09.09.12

Deep Roots, Bold Visions: Self-Taught Artists of Alachua County Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Deep Roots, Bold Visions presents paintings, sculptures and a variety of mixedmedia works by self-taught artists who work outside mainstream art traditions. Thru 02.03.13

Souvenirs of Modern Asia:

Image from Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Anne Noggle, Reminiscence: Portrait with My Sister, 1980, gift of Anne Noggle Foundation, 2010.91.69

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Seas: The Natural World in Ancient American Art Harn Museum of Art

stallation by Miamibased artist, Alex Trimino, consisting of illuminated totem poles that are covered in crochet, knitting and found objects. In employing such items, Trimino reveals similarities between modern, hi-tech materials (micro-controlled neon lights) and colloquial, lo-tech crafts (crochet, knitting and primarily Meso-Amer- weavings.) Old ica, Central America methods and new and the Andes. technologies commingle in ways that explore our connecHOLLYWOOD tion to reality today.

www.harn.ufl.edu

09.07-10.21.12

The Prints of Paul Jacoulet Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Souvenirs of Modern Asia features a remarkable set of 55 woodcuts by French artist, Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960), who lived and worked in Japan most of his life. These colorful and masterfully printed woodcuts were inspired by Jacoulet’s extensive travels in China, Japan, Korea and the South Pacific, and demonstrate a synthesis of traditional Japanese printing techniques with modern European aesthetics. Thru 11.04.12

Verdant Earth and Teeming

This exhibition highlights the Museum’s collection of ceramic figures and vessels, stone sculptures and jade ornaments from Ancient America—

Alex Trimino: Luminous Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Luminous is an in-

09.07-10.21.12

Justin H. Long: Bow Movement Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Image from Alex Trimino: Luminous at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Alex Trimino, Luminous, (installation view), 2012, mixed media: neon lights, plexiglass, knittings, fibers, found objects, 133 x 96 x 84”, courtesy of the artist and Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, photography by Liam Crotty

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Miami-based artist, Justin H. Long, explores his passion for the ocean and sailboat racing with a mixedmedia gallery installation that includes a 60-foot-long boat hull. With a subversive whimsy that is at the core of his work, Long breaks new ground in his first exhibition in Broward County by claiming sailing as an artistic medium, not only a sport.

that takes place as an adolescent or young adult. Nozick presents life as a walkabout in which we continually explore the unknown in order to discover one’s self in relationship to the universe. Thru 08.19.12

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

The Art and Culture Center of Hollywood presents its third exhibition of the work of New Yorkbased artist, Nathan Sawaya, whose work transforms LEGO® bricks into whimsical and awe-inspiring

creations. In the 2012 exhibition of The Art of The Brick, Sawaya reveals a selection of many new works, most of which have not been seen at the Center. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 42.) JACKSONVILLE 08.12-10.07.12

Rendering Italy Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

09.07-10.21.12

www.mocajacksonville.org

Through paintings, photography, collage and video, eight UNF faculty members from the Department of Art and Design reflect contemporary responses to the enduring beauty, majestic history and rich cultural fabric of Italy.

Lori Nozick: Walkabout Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Walkabout is a sitespecific installation focusing on the concept of a passage, a journey through the wilderness

Image from Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Nathan Sawaya, Peaces, image courtesy of brickartist.com

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

and the artistic and cultural milestones that continue to shape the scope of creative expression to this day.

Thru 10.28.12

Project Atrium: Tristin Lowe Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

MOCA has launched its second season of Project Atrium with the cosmic work of Philadelphia artist, Tristin Lowe. Filling the expanse of the Haskell Atrium Gallery are his large-scale reproduction of the moon, constructed from a 12-foot tall inflatable, covered in crater-pocked felt, and orbiting satellite and neon comets. Lowe is a multi-disciplinary artist whose practice delves into the crude and rude, absurd and abject, pushing low-brow, low-tech methods and materials toward unexpected ends.

Thru 08.12.12

contemporary art in the 1960s,’70s and ’80s.

Thru 08.26.12

ReFocus: Art of the ’70s Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

09.15.12-01.06.13

ReFocus: Art of the ’80s Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

The Joys of Collecting: Selections from the Eisen Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

The subject matter MOCA examines the of the Eisen Collec“Me Decade” that tion is delightfully gave rise to photorevaried—ranging from alism, Earthworks, www.mocajacksonville.org the whimsical to the and conceptual art, In the final installfantastic. Many of and expanded the ment of three projects the artists’ names boundaries of abchronicling contemrepresented are well stract painting, video, porary art, ReFocus: known to the muperformance and Art of the ’80s proseum-going public: installation art in the vides an opportunity Andy Warhol, Roy second of a 3-part to learn more about Lichtenstein, Robert series examining this important decade Rauschenberg, James www.mocajacksonville.org

Image from Project Atrium: Tristin Lowe at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Tristin Lowe, Comet: God Particle, 2011, neon, glass, aluminum; fabricated with (Uncle) Dean Lowe at Neon Works, Hamilton, MA; photo by Claire Iltis, courtesy of Fleisher/Ollman Gallery

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Rosenquist, Robert Motherwell, Richard Diebenkorn, Jean Dubuffet and Lucien Freud—all united by being highly characteristic of their styles and movements, which range from Pop Art to Art Brut to abstract and figural expressionism. Thru 08.09.12

Beyond Ukiyo-e: Japanese Woodblock Prints and Their Influence on Western Art The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

cases this uniquely expressive art form and provides an extensive view of the styles and themes encompassed by this genre as well as an understanding of 19th century Japanese culture. 09.13.12-01.27.13

Histories in Africa: 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

American photojournalist, Elizabeth Gilbert, has lived and worked in Africa for 20 years, traveling from Kenya to Congo, throughout the Great Rift Valley, and reporting civil wars in Rwanda, Somalia and Sudan. The gelatin silver prints on exhibit pull

www.cummer.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens presents a collection of 19th century Japanese woodblock prints that show-

the viewer into an intimate world of African ritual and tell the story of a continent’s journey through change. (See story on pg. 72.) Thru 11.11.12

Leonard Baskin: Works on Paper The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition of dynamic works on paper, selected from the Museum’s holdings as well as the private collection of Cindy and Dan Edelman, highlights images of humanity. The poignancy of Baskin’s artistic legacy is the common consciousness of humankind.

Image from Histories in Africa: 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Elizabeth Gilbert, Yao Dancers of Malawi (detail), ©Elizabeth Gilbert

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Theo Wujcik and Kirk ke Wang Polk Museum of Art

Thru 09.16.12

Miradas: Ancient Roots in Modern Mexican Art: Works from the Bank of America Collection The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.cummer.org

This exhibition examines and celebrates works by artists on both sides of the border—American and Mexican-American— to reveal a variety of cultural aspects as they emerged in the years after the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) to the present day. Included are works by some of the best-known Mexican artists— Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, Gabriel

Orozco, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Gunther Gerzso. LAKELAND 08.25-12.01.12

David Maxim Polk Museum of Art

are undeniable—tornadoes, masculine welders and warriors—even Maxim’s abstract pieces seem to evoke aggression. And yet, despite all of their strength, each subject reveals an equal measure of vulnerability.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

The elements of Thru 10.13.12 power and drama in Invisible David Maxim’s works Elephant:

Image from Invisible Elephant: Theo Wujcik and Kirk ke Wang at Polk Museum of Art: Courtesy of Polk Museum of Art

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The central concept for this exhibition of contemporary artworks is an ancient parable telling of six blind men who encountered a large elephant, and how each defined what they encountered, based on their individual perspectives. The underlying message of this parable is the diversity of interpretation. For Invisible Elephant, Wujcik and Wang have produced new works based on their different perspectives in relation to the other’s cultural background.


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labeled the growing Miscellaneous: interest in art proNew Works by duced by artists living Trent Manning 
 beyond the realm of Polk Museum popular culture. In of Art 1972, the term “outwww.polkmuseumofart.org sider art” became the Trent Manning pairs official English translighthearted elements lation of art brut. such as alphabet This exhibition uses blocks, rocking hors- pieces from the Mues and wagons with seum’s Permanent grimacing characters, Collection to initiate boasting large bald a conversation about heads, empty eyes the contemporary and prominent beakstate of art brut. like noses. Assembling his sculptures from discarded metal, old tools and wire, he transforms junk into eclectic masterpieces. (See story on pg. 106.) 09.08-11.11.12

Thru 09.02.12

Outsider vs Folk Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Art brut (or ‘raw art’)

Art & History Museums, Maitland

Thru 08.18.12

3-D Polk Museum of Art

www.artandhistory.org

André Smith (1880– 3-D showcases sculp- 1959) founded the tures in all shapes Research Studio and sizes from the (now called the Museum’s Collection. A&H’s Maitland Art Center) in 1937. He invited artists to live MAITLAND and create within Thru 09.19.12 its walls. During its A Day in the heyday (1938–1957), Life of the nearly 70 artists Research Studio participated in this great experiment, including Milton Avery, Doris Lee, Ralston Crawford, and more. What was their day-to-day life like? Using artworks and newlyfound color photography as documentation, this exhibition recreates the atmosphere of that classic period. www.polkmuseumofart.org

Image from Miscellaneous: New Works by Trent Manning 
at the Polk Museum of Art: Trent Manning, Keepsake, courtesy of the artist

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Opening 09.28.12

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Ernst Oppler (18671929) painted landscapes, interior views and portraits. He became one of the most important chroniclers of the history of ballet in Germany. He also chronicled the social life of the city of Berlin through his drawings and etchings.

The Power of Two Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

This group exhibition highlights some of Central Florida’s most renown visual artist couples. Explore what it is like to have two creative minds living and working together. On select weekends during the exhibit, artists will be working in Gallery 4. MELBOURNE Thru 09.09.12

Cuban Daydreams: Dionel Delgado Gonzalez Foosaner Art Museum

Thru 09.09.12 www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Havana artist, Dionel Delgado Gonzalez, showcases his largescale paintings of magazine covers. Reminiscent of Norman Rockwell’s style, the subjects depict everyday life in Cuba. Living in Habana Vieja (Old Havana),

his inspiration comes from the characters that inhabit the surrounding streets near his studio. 09.15.12-01.06.13

Ernst Oppler: German Impressionist Foosaner Art Museum

Shared Vision: Photographs of Baracoa, Cuba Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

The concept of Shared Vision was developed to explore the simple, remote culture of Baracoa. James Quine and Theresa Segal, both

Image from Cuban Daydreams: Dionel Delgado Gonzalez at Foosaner Art Museum: Dionel Delgado, Untitled (And the Sea was Parted into Two...), 2012, oil on canvas, 78.5 x 59”, private collection of Norman Bardavid

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St. Augustine photographers, traveled to Baracoa in 2003. Two Cuban photographers, Lissette Solórzano and José Martí, joined them from Havana to photograph this eclectic Cuban city. MIAMI 08.11-09.23.12

By Hand ArtCenter/ South Florida

by their ability to intimately engage viewers. What is visible in this painstaking work is not just labor, but the joy of making. From books and prints, to painting and installation, each artist initiates a dialogue with their work that brings viewers in to touch, read, examine and soak up details. 09.29-11.11.12

101 Dresses

ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

This solo exhibition celebrates Adriana Carvalho’s work at the culmination of her residency at the ArtCenter. Thru 08.12.12

Charles Ledray: Bass Museum of Art Bass Museum of Art

www.artcentersf.org

This show brings together a range of artists working in multiple disciplines. Each artist creates with an intense and timeconsuming method of production that is obvious in the final product, yet the works are held together conceptually

www.bassmuseum.org

Charles Ledray’s work is a poetry of material, scale and cultural resonance, rich with history and emotion. Well known for his exquisitely crafted objects, working in a range of materials from fabric to human bone, Ledray’s work touches on loss, pathos and absence. This exhibition is focused on creating a unique dialogue between four individual, powerful works. (See story in the April/ May 2012 issue on pg. 104.) Thru 08.12.12

Erasey Page Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Erasey Page is a newly commissioned

Image from Charles Ledray: Bass Museum of Art at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Charles Ledray, Mens Suits (installation view), 2009, mixed media, photo: John Kennard

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web-based project that Jillian Mayer produced in collaboration with computer programmer, designer and creative technologist, Eric Schoenborn. The interactive website encourages visitors to live an internet-free and happy life by simply deleting the World Wide Web, page by page, questioning our increasingly virtual lives (via social media, etc.) to playfully imagine a world without the Internet. 09.09-11.04.12

UNNATURAL Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, The Beatles, John Travolta, Kim Novak, Marilyn Monroe, Sylvester Stallone and Presidents Kennedy, Truman and Eisenhower. advances in technology in the 21st century. The works reflect a cultivated, synthetic, manipulated nature, which includes allusions to science as manifestations of a reality oscillating between the real and imaginary. (See story on pg. 62.) Thru 10.14.12

UNNATURAL presents conceptions of nature through a variety of strategies that reflect

Mel Finkelstein: Picturing the Man Behind the Camera Jewish Museum of Florida

Thru 09.30.12 www.jewishmuseum.com

Finkelstein’s ability to “play the hunch” resulted in his capturing special moments that tell a story. This collection of photos from the 1950s to the ’80s, focuses on iconic symbols from our cultural past, giving a sense of this larger-than-life man and his world of time, place and celebrity. The exhibit is full of candid images of well-known personalities such as Frank Sinatra, Humphrey

Once Upon a Time in Lithuania and the Florida Connnection Jewish Museum of Florida www.jewishmuseum.com

This exhibition of paintings and prints by English artist, Naomi Alexander, records the last remnants of Jewish heritage to be found in the country of Lithuania. Alexander traveled the country to create artwork depicting

Image from UNNATURAL at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Richard Mosse, Herd at Dusk, 2011, digital C-print, 72 x 90”, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY

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her impressions of the people and their communities. The Museum makes a Florida connection using photographs and artifacts from Floridian Jews whose origins are from Lithuania.

Shanghai and Tokyo. In each projection, the artist exemplifies the perennial struggle to preserve a place for the individual within contemporary society, while poetically embodying the experience of being engulfed within a foreign culture.

In New York–based artist Rashid Johnson’s first major museum solo exhibition, he explores the complexities and contradictions of black identity in a practice that is rooted in his individual experience. IncorpoThru 08.26.12 rating commonplace Kimsooja: A objects from his childNeedle Woman hood in a process he Miami Art 09.07-11.04.12 describes as “hijackMuseum Rashid Johnson: ing the domestic,” www.miamiartmuseum.org Message the artist transforms A Needle Woman to Our Folks everyday materipresents a multi-chan- Miami Art als into conceptually nel video installation Museum loaded and visually by Korean artist, www.miamiartmuseum.org compelling works. Kimsooja. This epic work consists of eight synchronized videos projected at large scale, each depicting a bustling area of a major metropolitan center—Cairo, Delhi, Lagos, London, Mexico City, New York,

Thru 09.02.12

Transcultural Pilgrim: Three Decades of Work by José Bedia Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

This major career retrospective of the work of José Bedia includes works on paper and canvas and two largescale installations. Bedia’s personal border crossings (social, racial and religious) reflect his exploration of historical and contemporary encounters between cultures and countries. Thru 09.02.12

Ed Ruscha: On the Road Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Image from Kimsooja: A Needle Woman at Miami Art Museum: Kimsooja, A Needle Woman (Cairo, Delhi, Lagos, London, Mexico City, New York, Shanghai, Tokyo), 1999-2001, eight-channel video installation, silent, duration: 6:33 minute loop, courtesy of the artist

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Ed Ruscha is known for his use of language to document and comment on the shifting character of American culture. Drawing inspiration from the classic American novel, On the Road, by Jack Kerouac—in his own limited art book version of the novel—he has created a new body of paintings, drawings and photographs. eos reflect the artist’s interest in music, theThru 09.02.12 ater and the personae Ragnar of its performers, often Kjartansson: coupled with extreme Song environments. Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Part of MOCA’s Knight Exhibition Series, Song presents video works by Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The vid-

Hurricane Andrew is presented, 20 years after the devastating storm hit South Florida. Thru 09.02.12

08.20-09.02.12

Hurricane Andrew Exhibition The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

A remembrance of

Lynne Golob Gelfman: Scapes The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Gelfman makes abstract paintings that are rooted in the

visible world. She identifies and isolates textures, forms or patterns, either natural or manmade, then repeats them to create flowing compositions. As a result of their repetitive markings, her works become as much about the process of their own making as about any outside source. 09.12-10.21.12

Out of the Ordinary Geometry by Lydia Azout The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This survey of works includes largescale, site-specific, multi-media sculpture constructed of steel and projections.

Image from Lynne Golob Gelfman: Scapes at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Lynne Golob Gelfman, Dune 17, 2011, acrylic on panel, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist, photo: Richard Fendleman

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Thru 09.30.12

Shared Threads: Maria Lino’s Portrait of a Shipibo Healer The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Shared Threads is a collaborative experience where two artists from vastly different cultures and artistic traditions came together in the Amazon region, in Pucallpa, Peru. The results are an extraordinary multimedia integration of tradition, design and technique in a soulful exchange of knowledge.

the Permanent Collection The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

These works, which can be complex, mysterious, irreverent or fun, challenge the visitor to reconsider their perceptions of what art is, to stimulate a response and question meanings. The exhibition includes work by Enrico Baj, Sandra Bermudez, Ana Albertina Delgado,

Guerra de la Paz, Graham Hudson, Sibel Kocabasi, Kate Kretz, Pepe Mar, Leonel Matheu, Jillian Mayer, Freddy Reitz, Bert Rodriguez and Alexandra Trimino. Thru 09.09.12

Graphic Intervention: 25 Years of International AIDS Awareness Posters 1985–2010 The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

www.wolfsonian.org

This exhibition features a selection of 152 posters, which presents an insightful overview of diverse visual strategies, employed by many different countries, in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a public health emergency. NAPLES 08.27-10.05.12

The Fifth Annual Non-Juried All Artist Member Show of Shows Exhibition Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

This annual showcase features artwork in all media by Naples Art Association members.

Thru 10.21.12

This and That: Unconventional Selections from

Image from This and That: Unconventional Selections from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Guerra de la Paz,Trio, 2003, textile, recycled clothing, dimensions variable, gift of the artists, FIU 2005.002 a,b,c

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

09.22.12-01.20.13

Fletcher Benton: The Artist’s Studio Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This experiential and interactive exhibition explores the unique attitudes and methods that Benton, a worldrenowned kinetic and constructivist sculptor, applies to his work. The exhibition recreates Benton’s studio, with the images, textures and inspirations that constitute his working environment. The exhibition will also include several outdoor sculptures. 09.22.12-01.20.13 and 05.04-07.07.13

Leaders in American Modernism

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

09.22-12.09.12

An exciting new selection of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection are on display, representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century.

Martin Schoeller: Close Up Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

German-born photographer Martin Schoeller’s remarkable, larger-than-life photographs strip the façades from some

of the most recognizable faces of our time. Schoeller’s Close Up invites the viewer to consider the depths of the human face and to discover his subjects’ vulnerabilities. The artist’s hyper-close portraits push this form of intimacy to unprecedented levels, encouraging us to see the familiar in an unfamiliar way. The exhibition features photographs of famous actors, singers, athletes and politicians along with ordinary people living private lives. (See story on pg. 102.) 09.22-12.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art

Image from Martin Schoeller: Close Up at Naples Museum of Art: Martin Schoeller, Jack Nicholson, 2002, type C color print, 61-1/16 x 49-9/16”, © Martin Schoeller

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.thephil.org

The colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico are reflected in this exciting new installation, which includes works by Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo and others. 09.22-12.30.12

Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television Naples Museum of Art

busters and others. The exhibition examines how costume design incorporates color, style, scale, materials, historical traditions and cultural cues to help audiences engage with the characters being portrayed. Costume highlights include the hat worn by Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz (1939), the

leather jacket worn by Arnold Schwarzenegger in The Terminator (1984) and much more. OCALA

by Ocala-based artist, George Hanover. Showcased are a variety of paintings and sculptures in a variety of media.

Thru 08.12.12

09.16-11.04.12

A Salute to the Art of George Hanover Appleton Museum of Art

FLORAda and Flowing Waters: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak Appleton Museum of Art

www.appletonmuseum.org

On exhibit is a retrospective of artwork

www.thephil.org

www.appletonmuseum.org

Just in time for Halloween, Out of This World features more than 30 costumes and related items from your favorite science fiction films and television shows, including Batman, Star Trek, Blade Runner, The Terminator, Ghost-

Presented are lush and beautiful portraits of natural Florida as interpreted by three of the state’s most prominent artists. Messersmith’s opulent, hyper-colorful paintings of Florida’s tropical flora and fauna comes together with Ross Tolbert’s

Image from FLORAda and Flowing Waters: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak at the Appleton Museum of Art: Margaret Ross Tolbertt, Cypress, courtesy of the artist

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abstract expressionist interpretations of our freshwater springs and Tomczak’s nostalgic large-format photographic prints of antiques and native plants. (See story on pg. 80.) 09.08-10.21.12

Pure Photography: Pictorial and Modern Photographs from the Syracuse University Art Collection Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

On exhibit are 30 works by some of the best photographers starting in the early 1900s. Included are works by Eugene Atget, Berenice Abbott, Imogen Cunning-

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

ham, Gordon Parks, and Edward Weston. Among the iconic images in the show are Edward Steichen’s 1928 portrait of Greta Garbo and Alfred Stieglitz’s famous The Steerage from 1907. ORLANDO Thru 09.09.12

FloridaScapes: I-4—The Exits Less Traveled Orange County Regional History Center

www.thehistorycenter.org

Documenting the cities and neighborhoods along Interstate 4 through photography, Sherri Bunye, Crealdé Studio Artist, hopes her images inspire others to take an exit less traveled and discover the unexpected beauty and charm she captures. Thru 09.02.12

Daniel Kariko: Substitute Cartography

Substitute Cartography attempts to forge a dialogue between the man-affected landscape and the idealized presentation of a landscape created for purposes of habitation, or simply, entertainment. Photographed in various locations and seemingly unconnected, these images range from humorous to ironic—some present strictly fake-as-real landscapes, and others discuss the consumption of the world that surrounds us. Thru 10.28.12

From Alice to Zeus: The Art of John Rocco Orlando Museum of Art

Image from FloridaScapes: I-4—The Exits Less Traveled at Orange County Regional History Center, Orlando: Sherri Bunye, Door, Window, Meter

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www.omart.org

John Rocco has written and illustrated numerous award-winning children’s books, including Wolf! Wolf!, Moonpowder, and Fu Finds the Way. He has also illustrated the covers for Rick Riordan’s bestselling youth literature series, Percy Jackson and the Olympians. Rocco’s exhibition at OMA features approximately 60 preparatory and finished drawings, providing examples of how an illustration evolves, from earliest sketches to the finished work. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 104.)

Photographs of 50 Internationally Noted Artists and Writers in Florida by Jimm Roberts Orlando Museum of Art

and studios. The exhibition includes 80 photographs and a selection of original notes and letters by the artists and writers.

www.omart.org

IMPRINTS: 20 Years of Flying Horse Editions The Mennello Museum of American Art

With the rich tones of traditional black and white photography, Jimm Roberts captures his subjects in a variety of poses from formal to candid in the surroundings of their Florida homes

Thru 08.12.12

08.31-11.25.12

www.mennellomuseum.com

This interactive exhibition is a celebra-

tion of fine art book printing. It highlights the limited-edition art objects and fine art books printed by Flying Horse Editions, located at the University of Central Florida’s Center for Emerging Media in downtown Orlando.

2012 Annual Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Hosted by The Mennello Museum of American Art, The 2012 Annual Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition is recognized as one of the top watermedia exhibits

Thru 10.28.12

Southernmost Art and Literary Portraits:

Image from the 2012 Annual Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando: Barbara Vey, All Tucked In

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in the US. The exhibit will showcase 100 of the best works by artists from Florida and around the country.

08.17-09.22.12

The Experience Collection Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

ORMOND BEACH 09.01-10.14.12

Materialscape Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Materialscape presents an industrial view of nature, featuring sculptural works by Seth Fairweather and Richard Herzog.

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens presents a multi-artist, mixed-media tribute to “man’s best friend.”

Thru 08.19.12

The Dog Days of Summer Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

PENSACOLA Thru 09.01.12

Surfing Florida: A Photographic History

Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola

In 2007, Florida Craftsmen initiated the Experience Collection, a fine craft collection of work accessible to a diversity of senses. The goal is to inform, educate and engage all audiences. The collection consists of 17 works of art which are designed to be viewed, touched and in some cases, strummed.

museumofart.org

More than 25 professional surf photographers have contributed their images for this exhibition, which presents the history of Florida, surfing and surf culture.

PONTE VEDRA BEACH 09.07-10.20.12

S. Barre Barrett & Khamil Ojoyo The Cultural Center

Image from The Dog Days of Summer at Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens, Ormond Beach: Susan Long, All Ears, pastel

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P o n t e Ve d r a B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.ccpvb.org

Barrett’s watercolor and acrylic paintings explore repetitive patterns and relationships between colors and shapes and their connections to the natural world, while mixed-media wood sculptures by Khamil Ojoyo evoke vibrant expressions of African art.

www.ringling.org

SARASOTA Thru 10.28.12 DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

The nearly 200 works on display, highlight the Levenson collection—the world’s premier collection of Japanese art in the Deco style. Included are spectacular examples of metalwork, ce-

ramics, lacquer, glass, wood furniture, jewelry, textiles, graphic design on paper, painting and woodblock prints, ranging from fine art objects made to impress the public at national art exhibitions, to goods mass-produced for the modern home. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 92.)

Thru 09.01.12

Thru 10.21.12

SoMMA (Society of Mixed media Artists) The Cultural Center

From the Vaults: John Ringling’s Asian and Cypriot Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ccpvb.org

This exhibition features innovative works by artists working in all forms of mixed media, including collage, assemblage and experimental artwork.

www.ringling.org

Some of the objects in this exhibit have not been on display for 30 years and others have never before been shown to the public.

Image from DECO JAPAN: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945 at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Ginga no uta (Song of the Milky Way), Theme song of the movie “Ginga no uta,” by Shôchiku Cinema, unidentified artist, 1931, courtesy of the Levenson Collection

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Important in their own right, they were also essential as a means for John Ringling to expand the Museum’s potential to feature the roots and flourishes of the world of art.

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition explores contradictions between idealistic images and life in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR).

Thru 10.14.12

Sanford Biggers: Codex The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

As part of his Constellation Series, the works featured in this exhibit consist of quilts that depict “constellations” inspired by Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad conductors, whose use of the stars to navigate from slavery to freedom in the 19th century, is a vibrant part

Thru 09.09.12

of North American history.

Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, Global+Local reveals the range ST. PETERSBURG and richness of the Thru 10.14.12 area’s best glass Global+ Local: from internationally Studio and renowned artists. Contemporary Glass on Florida’s West Coast Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Marking the 50th

Thru 08.19.12

Picturing a New Society: Photographs from the Soviet Union 1920s– 1980s

Dalí’s Grotesque Carnival The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

Dalí’s Grotesque Carnival features four suites of Dalí’s ambitious engagement in printmaking, which explores complex and baroque themes of festival and celebration. Most of the works in this selection of etchings and lithographs have never before

Image from Global + Local: Studio and Contemporary Glass on Florida’s West Coast at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: William Morris, Artifact: Tooth (1995), blown glass, collection of William R. and Hazel Hough, ©William Morris

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

been on display at the museum. Thru 09.09.12

Stripped Bare and Bathed: The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

A behind-the-scenes glimpse at the dramatic preservation of four of the Museum’s eight Masterworks—Galacidalacidesoxiribunucleicacid, 1963; The Ecumenical Council, 1960; The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, 1959; and The Hallucinogenic Toreador, 1970— this exhibition presents a video documentary of the painstaking process from start to finish, projected in the

Hough Family wing. (See story on pg. 92.) TALLAHASSEE 08.27-11.11.12

Masters Artists of the Bahamas Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.fine-arts.org

ists acting as ambassadors for a broader generative movement. The works represent the diversity of form and content of Bahamian art. TAMPA 08.23-11.11.12

Portraits of Power: Photography by Platon Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

An exhibition touring from the Waterloo Centre for the Arts in Iowa, Master Artists of the Bahamas presents works from eleven Bahamian art- www.fmopa.org

For any museumgoer contemplating Platon’s poster-size faces, there is an unequal balance of power. With these giant faces, every pore is exaggerated, every presence is overpowering­, every pose—artificial or natural—is amplified. In many cases, a man’s inner character is stripped naked—even as he frantically tries to cover up. Thru 08.19.12

The Secret Paris of the 1930s: Vintage Photographs by Brassaï Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Alone, or in the company of friends, Hungarian photographer,

Image from Stripped Bare and Bathed: The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks at The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg: Photography by Chuck Bendel, courtesy of The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg

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sculptor and filmmaker, Brassaï, discovered and recorded the forbidden Paris of the 1930s—the sordid yet fascinating moments where high society mingled with the underworld. The Secret Paris of the ‘30s is one of the most remarkable photographic memories ever published. These unique pictures are accompanied by an immensely interesting text in which Brassaï reminisces and describes the extraordinary conditions under which he took his photographs. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 66.) Thru 09.16.12

A Hundred Years—A Hundred Chairs:

Thru 09.09.12

Masterworks of 20th Century Sculpture from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Masterworks chroniMasterworks Tampa cles important develfrom the Vitra Museum of Art opments in sculpture Design Museum www.tampamuseum.org in the second half of Tampa This thought-prothe 20th century. In Museum of Art voking exhibition addition to sculptures www.tampamuseum.org presents 59 editorial by such 20th century This show offers a cartoons lampooning luminaries as Joan view of the different more than 100 years Miro, Willem de periods of furniture of political discusKooning and Louise design of the past sion from both sides Nevelson, the exhicentury and is certain of the fence, drawn bition also includes to appeal to all lovers exclusively from The works by Isamu Noof great design. Mahan Collection of guchi, Manuel Neri, American Humor and George Segal and 08.04-09.16.12 Cartoon Art, Special Deborah Butterfield. Art of the Poison & Digital CollecAn abiding fascinaPens: A Century tions, and Univertion with the figure of American sity of South Florida unites all the works Political Cartoons Tampa Library. in the show.

Image from Masterworks of 20th Century Sculpture from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection at Tampa Museum of Art: George Segal, Three People on 4 Benches, 1980, bronze and steel, Martin Z. Margulies Collection, ©The George and Helen Segal Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 09.23.12

Object Image/ Erik Levine/ Sculpture & Video Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

New York-based sculptor, Erik Levine, is known for his use of humble plywood in massive installations. In 2011, the Museum acquired one of his large-scale sculptures, ironically titled Hand-Held (1997), for its Permanent Collection. This exhibition marks the debut of this new acquisition and also includes two recent video works.

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

This collection of drawings, collages and mixed-media works represents a survey of two-dimensional work by some of the most celebrated sculptors, installation artists and

video artists of the 20th www.ira.usf.edu and 21st centuries. The Andy Warhol Legacy Project is an 08.20-12.14.12 exhibition of PolaThe Andy roids and silver gelatin Warhol Legacy prints USF ContemProject porary Art Museum University of received as a gift from South Florida The Andy Warhol Contemporary Foundation for the Art Museum Visual Arts in 2008. 08.20-12.14.12

The Importance of Being Photographed University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

Taking its cue from a gift from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts, this exhibition features a select grouping of contemporary photographers who create situations where the subject

Thru 09.23.12

Sculptors on Paper: Selections from the BNY Mellon Collection

Image from The Andy Warhol Legacy Project at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Andy Warhol, Unidentified Woman #23 (Blonde Hair and Dog), 1986, Collection University of South Florida

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

and the photographer engage in a dialogue about the nature of being photographed— addressing issues of class, sexuality, sensuality, shame, despair, and privacy. VERO BEACH Thru 10.14.12

Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Rick Beck takes everyday shapes and transforms them into sculptures in glass, revealing their unexpected beauty. Form, Color, Light includes a range of work, from large floor pieces to small pedestal sculptures in translucent colors. (See story in

the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 106.)

paintings selected for Straus’s Vero Beach exhibition often have a mysterious quality that allows viewers plenty of room for interpretation.

09.15.12-01.06.13

Landscape Paintings of Adam Straus Vero Beach Museum of Art

09.09.12-01.02.13

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Adam Straus, a native Floridian who studied painting at Florida State University, has been creating “beautiful and disturbing” landscape paintings for more than 25 years. The landscape

Pop Art Revisited: A 21st Century Perspective Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Pop Art Revisited: A 21st Century Perspective is the inaugural exhibition in the Muse-

um’s new Titelman Gallery. The works of art selected for the exhibit are important examples of the Pop Art movement. The exhibition also sheds light on the original social context surrounding the creation of these art objects. WEST PALM BEACH Thru 09.02.12

American Masters at the Norton: Clyfford Still and Joan Mitchell Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Three exceptional canvases by Joan Mitchell and Clyfford Still, each a master of late 20th century

Image from Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Rick Beck, Winged Figure, 2008, cast glass, 72-1/2 x 42 x 12”, collection of the artist, photo: David H. Ramsey

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American painting, are on view. Thru 01.27.13

Clear Water and Blue Hills: Stories in Chinese Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition features works of art depicting tales from Chinese history and literature. Thru 09.30.12

ous live performances are featured in this exhibit. Images and essays from photographers Jeff Dunas, David Sheinbaum, Henry Hornstein, Moby and others, illuminate the worlds of country music, hip-hop, rock ‘n’ roll and the blues.

www.norton.org

Four works by three artists are featured in this installation, including Tear, by Jaye Rhee, a dramatic study of physical struggle; and Crying, a classic animated sculpture by Tony Oursler. Thru 09.02.12

Thru 10.07.12

Crying Seasaw Tear Between New Video Norton Museum of Art

Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey Norton Museum of Art

Clubs, Joints and Honky-Tonks Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

Edward Gorey’s stories and illustrations carry an Edwardian sophistication, while still able to impart the whimsy of an invented world that was all his own. The exhibition features more than 170 works by the master artist and author, drawn from The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 6.) 08.03-10.14.12

Watercolors from the Collection Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

Extended bodies of work by photographers who have immersed themselves in the places, spaces and energy of concerts, shows and spontane-

www.norton.org

Watercolors from the Museum Collection, include works by Paul Signac, John Marin, Charles Demuth and George Grosz.

Image from Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Edward Gorey, After it had passed, Lord Wherewithal was found crushed beneath a statue blown down from the parapet. From The Secrets: Volume One, The Other Statue, 1968, pen and ink, 4-1/2 x 5-1/2”, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

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Rollins College

WINTER PARK

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru 09.02.12

A Room of One’s Own Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This exhibition features paintings by Grandma Moses and Jennie Augusta Brownscombe; prints by Georgia O’Keeffe, Faith Ringgold and Nancy Graves; and threedimensional work by Anna H. Huntington and Jennifer Bartlett.

Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Best Impressions provides an overview of many post-war aesthetic styles, including Photorealism, Op Art, and the Expressionism of the 1980s. The prints on view demonstrate the strength of the Thru 09.02.12 Museum’s modern Best Impressions: and contemporary Modern & print holdings. InContemporary cluded are works by Prints from Chuck Close, Judy the Collection Pfaff, Richard AnuszCornell Fine kiewicz and Jacob Arts Museum at Lawrence.

Bringing together 11 national and international artists in various stages of their careers, The Mysterious Content of Softness explores the transformative power Thru 09.02.12 of fiber and its conBritish and nection to the human Modern body. Whether emCornell Fine ploying time-honored Arts Museum at techniques such as Rollins College knitting, crochet, cfam.rollins.edu embroidery and loom Paintings and drawings weaving, or forayby Vanessa Bell, Dun- ing into new uses of can Grant, and others traditional textiles, working in the UK in these artists explore the early 20th century, the physical, psychoare on display. logical and cultural associations of fiber 09.15-12.30.12 to the body. (See The Mysterious story on pg. 52.) Content of Softness Cornell Fine Arts Museum at

Thru 12.30.12

The Prints of Gustave

Image from The Mysterious Content of Softness at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Nathan Vincent, Locker Room, 2010, crocheted yarn, foam, wire, and polyester stuffing, courtesy of the artist. Yarn donated by Lion Brand Yarn. Photography by Steven Miller

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Baumann Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This exhibition centers around Baumann’s mastery of the woodcut printmaking process and includes images of New Mexico and a series of seldom seen prints depicting the rugged coast and mammoth trees of Northern California. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 78.)

André Renoux (1939 -2002) captured the charm of Paris by documenting the intimate landmarks of daily Parisian life and its environs, preserving the details of its soul. (See story in the June/July 2012 issue on pg. 54.) Thru 10.07.12

At Home with Roseville Pottery

The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

Roseville Pottery Company (1890– 1954) of Ohio was one of the country’s most prolific and longlived art potteries. In this exhibit, the Morse presents new acquisitions of Roseville ceramic objects, which represent the rich

colors and beloved patterns that made the pottery so popular in its era and contribute to its collectability today. Thru 02.03.2013

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm, Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle Atlantic farms and forests, to ocean and river shorelines.

www.polasek.org

On View

Thru 09.23.12

Image from A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: André Renoux, Café de Flore à Paris, 1998, oil, 17-1/2 x 17-1/4”

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NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles http://artsondouglas.net

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Artist: TIM LUDWIG “I AM FORTUNATE TO

get up everyday and have the opportunity to express myself through an artistic process...I hope to stimulate your mind and senses through [my] ceramic vessels ...and evoke thoughts that will enhance your life.”—T. Ludwig

MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: David T. Kessler

USING A PERFECTED TECHNIQUE IN THE PHOTO-REALIST

tradition he developed over the past 25 years, David Kessler has created a series of spectacular waterscape paintings that incorporate realistic imagery painted over a surface of abraded and polished aluminum. From left: Tim Ludwig, Boat with Tulip, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; David T. Kessler, Twilight Splendor, airbrush on aluminum, 44 x 64”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art

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PALM BEACH

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: Studio E Gallery

www.holdenluntz.com

www.studioegallery.com

Artist: Lynn Goldsmith

Artist: BRIAN RUSSELL

GOLDSMITH’S PHOTOGRAPHS

“I WANT PEOPLE TO USE

are hybrids of fantasy and reality, offering greater investigation than found in a typical portrait. They are commentaries about living in a consumer-based world that defines us by our possessions.

my sculpture as an excuse to mentally shift to another level of consciousness, above the daily hubbub, even for a moment, and to reconCORAL GABLES

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries www.virginiamiller.com

Artist: Ramiro Pareja Herrera HERRERA HAS EXHIBITED

in dozens of solo exhibitions in Peru, Germany and Spain, and has participated in group shows in Europe, South America, Canada and the US. A poet as well as a painter, his words embellish the borders of his canvases.

nect with themselves via that primal, emotional, cortex-controlled spasm of an encounter with an unexpected oasis in a visual desert.”—B. Russell

Clockwise from top left: Lynn Goldsmith, Dancing Marionettes, c. 2003, archival pigment photograph, signed and # 2/6 on mount verso, 61 x 46”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Brian Russell, Hemisphere Willowfly, mixed media, 14 x 13 x 11”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery; Ramiro Pareja Herrera,
Vision Barroca III, 2007, acrylic on canvas, 36-1/4 x 36-1/4”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/ Virginia Miller Galleries

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SARASOTA

Gallery: State of the Arts Gallery www.sarasotafineart.com

Artist: A. DASHA REICH 
 DASHA’S LUMINOUS

paintings are about the expressiveness of color. She creates the illusion of glass by floating pigments, stains and metalCORAL GABLES

Gallery: The Americas Collection www.americascollection.com

Artist: Jean Jacques Ribi “I HAVE NAMED MY TECHNIQUE ‘PHOTOPAINT’ BECAUSE

lic foils between layers of epoxy resin. You can see river currents, spiraling galaxies, river stones and flora silhouettes in her vibrant montages.

I feel like a classical painter using a traditional color palette. My personal palette consists of a wide range of photographs from which different elements are taken to make them act as ‘photocolors’ to create ‘photopaintings.’ Photocolors have a more complex set of rules. They create infinite possibilities in the use of materials, dimensions, patterns and chromatic scales. It is a synesthesia I developed in response to my color-blindness. RealArt (Art of Reality) consists of taking different snapshots of reality and transforming their meaning by changing their initial context. This brings to life an alternate environment governed by different laws where nothing is truly created nor destroyed but totally transformed.” —J. J. Ribi

From left: A. Dasha Reich, Clear Multi-Dots, assemblage/wall sculpture, courtesy of the artist and State of the Arts Gallery; Jean Jacques Ribi, Evolution in Spring, 1/5, Photopaint, 37 x 59-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and The Americas Collection

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JACKSONVILLE BEACH

MIAMI

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery

Gallery: Seth Jason Beitler Fine Arts

www.jjohnsongallery.com

www.sethjason.com

Artist: Lisa Hoke

Artist: WILLIAM HILLMAN

HOKE TRANSFORMS

“the debris of everyday life” into art, constructing complex, colorful compositions from familiar objects. “I use objects that are inexpensive, accessible, and profoundly available,” says the artist.

HILLMAN HAS EXPERI-

mented throughout his career, moving from painting to montage to computer-

MIAMI

Gallery: Zadok Gallery www.zadokgallery.com

Artist: Alexandra Pacula “MY WORK INVESTIGATES

a world of visual intoxication; it captures moments of enchantment, which are associated with urban nightlife...In my oil paintings, I aim to capture various atmospheres that occur in such environments.”—A. Pacula

digitized photographic images. His innovative photographs explore light and space, and range from being almost completely abstract to wholly recognizable.

Clockwise from top: Lisa Hoke, Red Blaze, 2011, cardboard, glue and rivets, 51 x 58 x 12”, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery; William Hillman, Epiphany Series, 2006, cibachrome photograph, 20 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Seth Jason Beitler Fine Arts; Alexandra Pacula, Blissful Recollection, 2010, oil on canvas, 72 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery

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T H E M Y S T E R I O U S C O On view

09.15-12.30.12

at C O R N E L L F I N E c f a m . ro


Below and inset: Lisa Kellner, Almost Perfect, 2011, silk, pigment, paint, thread, embroidered text (“Almost Perfect”), surgical pins, 42 x 31 x 6”, courtesy of the artist

In Lisa Kellner’s work, each bulbous silk organza shape is hand-formed by stretching fabric around an object and treating this surface through a lengthy process in which pigment, ink, acrylic and bleach are applied until the intended painterly effect is achieved. Once the original object is removed, what is left is a translucent, apparently fragile, yet deceptively strong skin, maintaining the shape of an organ-like form or cell structure. Inspired by microscopic images of disease and yet prompting feelings of fragile beauty, Kellner’s silk sculptures strive to capture life’s duality of beauty and decay.

N T E N T O F S O F T N E S S A R T S M U S E U M a t R o l l i n s C o l l e g e , Wi n t e r P a r k llins.edu OnV

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Right: Miriam Schapiro, Grandma Bolero, 1980, fabric and mixed media collage, 16 x 20”, courtesy of Flomenhaft Gallery, New York A leader in two art movements: the “Feminist Art Movement” and “Pattern and Decoration,” Miriam Schapiro transforms such commonplace elements as lace, fabric scraps, buttons, rickrack, sequins, and tea towels into sophisticated compositions she calls “Femmages,” that speak to women’s experiences.


The Mysterious

Content of Softness

THE MYSTERIOUS CONTENT OF SOFTNESS,

hosted by the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park, explores the transformative power of fiber and its connection to the human body.

Consisting of sculptures, installations, and crafts, “the

artists were selected for their emotional response to, and understanding of fiber’s potential for capturing the fluidity

of life,” says Stefano Catalani, curator of the exhibition,

which comes from the Bellevue Arts Museum in Washington. Exploiting the durability and fragility of the medium,

a number of artists address issues of gender identity, “by

repositioning and humorously challenging the expectations

from a medium so stereotypically feminine,” adds Catalani.

Whether employing time-honored techniques such as

knitting, crochet, embroidery and loom weaving, or foraying into new uses of traditional textiles, these artists explore

the physical, psychological and cultural associations of fiber to the body. The intrinsic qualities of fiber: its softness, sagginess and fragility, its ability to drape, protect and clothe, as well as to fabricate and express identity, make it

possible for the textile medium to incomparably capture the

Above and opposite: L. J. Roberts, We Couldn’t Get In.

nature of flesh and convey an affinity for life.

We Couldn’t Get Out., (details),

Featured artists in The Mysterious Content of Softness

2006–2007, hand-woven wire, crank-knit

include: Diem Chau, Lauren DiCioccio, Angela Ellsworth,

yarn, steel poles, assorted hardware,

ner, Miller & Shellabarger, L.J. Roberts, Jeremy Sanders,

L. J. Roberts’ current work

courtesy of the artist, photo: Team Photogenic

James Gobel, Angela Hennessy, Rock Hushka, Lisa Kell-

merges craft with objects of violence and

and Nathan Vincent.

control to examine large structures of

The sampling of works on the following pages illustrates

power and how they might be interrupted by ways of making that are often

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The Mysterious

This exhibition se highlight the almost unique to merge art wit

Content of Softness

Nathan Vincent, Locker Room, 2010, crocheted yarn, foam, wire and polyester stuffing, courtesy of the artist; yarn donated by Lion Brand Yarn. Photographs by Steven Miller

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eeks specifically to e quality of fiber and textiles th everyday life. Above: Locker Room (detail) Nathan Vincent’s work explores gender permissions and the challenges that arise from straying from the prescribed norms. It questions the qualities of gender by considering what constitutes masculine and feminine. It critiques stereotypical gender mediums by creating “masculine objects” using “feminine processes,” such as crochet, sewing, and appliqué.


Angela Ellsworth is an interdisciplinary artist whose startling performance pieces and objects often draw on her own background as a descendant of Mormon pioneers. Ellsworth’s Seer Bonnets series focuses on the relationships of sister-wives and on polygamy’s legal prohibition as a result of its perceived immorality, finding a parallel between this cultural history and the artist’s own identity as a lesbian woman. The bonnets’ iridescent exteriors, formed entirely by the pearl-tips of tens of thousands of corsage pins, belie their dangerous needle-point interiors.

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The Mysterious

Content of Softness

Left and opposite: Angela Ellsworth, Seer Bonnet XIX (Flora Ann) (detail and installation view,) 2011, 1 bonnet, 24,182 pearl corsage pins, fabric, steel, wood, 60 x 13 x 16�, base: 25 x 40 x 4�, images courtesy of Lisa Sette Gallery


The Mysterious

Content of Softness

Above: Diem Chau, Empty Hand, 2010, porcelain plate, organza & thread, 6 x 4-1/2 x 3/4”, photo courtesy of the artist

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Diem Chau, Bound, 2010, porcelain plate, organza, cotton fabric & thread, 6-1/2 x 9 x 3/4�, photo courtesy of the artist A Vietnam native, Diem Chau and her family came to the US as refugees in 1986. Working from photos, the artist embroiders silhouettes and portraits onto silk organza, delicately stretched over the rims of porcelain plates, saucers and cups, which have been found in thrift stores or gifted by friends. The images, floating in the hazy, milky gauziness of the organza, suggest a form of storytelling in which the hairstyle and attire of some of the figures reveal identity issues at work. The intrinsic fragility of the taut translucent silk celebrates ultimately, the preciousness of fleeting existence.

O n V iew


UNNAT

09.09.12 – a

BAS MUSEU AR MIAMI

www.bassm


TURAL

–11.0 4.12 t

SS UM of RT, BEACH

useum.org

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UNNATURAL

Previous pages: Tomer Sapir, slide from Research for the Full Crypto-Taxidermical Index, 2010-2012, computer PPT, continuous loop, courtesy of the artist and Chelouche Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv; additional photography by Elad Sarig and Hilit Kadouri Opposite: Boaz Aharonovitch, Dark Matter, 2010-2012, four archival pigment prints, 48 x 48” each, courtesy of the artist and Dan Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv Right: Sigalit Landau, still from DeadSee, 2005, digital HD video, silent, 11:39 minutes, courtesy of the artist

T

The concept of nature has acquired a new relevance in the hyper-technological age, leading many artists to reflect on artificial environments where one is unable to trust what is real and what is not. A significant number of artists today, challenge the gap between traditional perceptions of “nature” and “culture.” In many

cases, they introduce new understandings of the sublime that replace its Romantic and the related sense of awe with a diverse range of critical, political and poetic approaches. The new exhibition, UNNATURAL, presented by the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach and curated by Tami Katz-Freiman, presents


scientific, romantic, conceptual, poetic, sensual and ecological conceptions of nature through a variety of strategies that reflect advances in technology in the 21st century. The

works in the exhibition question conventional means and methods of representing the natural world and metaphorically embody both the paradoxical longing to fuse with

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UNNATURAL

Opposite: Richard Mosse, Herd at Dusk, 2011, digital c-print, 72 x 90�, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY Below: Jennifer Steinkamp, still from Daisy Chain (twist), 2004, video installation, continuous loop Lindemann Collection, Miami Beach

nature and the threat embedded in such fusion. The works included in UNNATURAL thus reflect a cultivated, synthetic, manipulated nature, which includes allusions to science as manifestations of a reality oscillating between the real and imaginary. The artists selected for UNNATURAL come from diverse cultural backgrounds and work in a wide range of me-

dia, including video, photography, sculpture and installation. These artists seem to be stretching the limits of time and place, while collecting and assembling imagery from dif-

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ferent sources to create a new, artificial form of nature. The majority of the artists in this show are Israeli-born, which charges the exhibition with a political accent that relates to

2012


Nature, territories and landscape in critical ways. In the contemporary Israeli context, it is impossible to disassociate the landscape from its political resonances and from the mul-

tiple narratives that surround it. Landscape imagery and representations of nature in contemporary Israeli art are rarely naive, and certainly not romantic. They are scorched by

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UNNATURAL

Right: Uri Shapira, still from Six Days Dark Bobo Timelapse, 2011, stop-motion video, sound, 5 minutes, courtesy of the artist Below: Wendy Wischer, installation view of Puddled II, 2012, projected video on acrylic, 53 x 25�, courtesy of the artist and Julian Navarro Projects, NY

the fire of conflict and marked by the fervor of internal controversy. UNNATURAL represents the far-fetched fusion of reality, fantasy and simulation.

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At the same time, it reflects the freedom of the imagination and the wonders of simulation technology, which make the inconceivable conceivable. It reveals how the unmediat-

2012


ed sense of awe and wonder provoked by nature has been replaced by the work of art, which enables us to marvel at the act of representation and to re-imagine nature, while cele-

brating the wonders of the human imagination. The location of this project in Miami Beach—a subtropical, botanically lush barrier island that was built on a

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UNNATURAL

UNNATURAL reflects the freedom of the imagination and the wonders of simulation technology, which make the inconceivable conceivable. Opposite: Ori Gersht, still from Falling Bird, 2008, digital HD film, sound, 5:53 minutes, courtesy of the artist and Noga Gallery of Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv Below: Meirav Heiman & Yossi Ben Shoshan, Sperm Whale, 2009, four-channel HD video installation, sound, 216-1/2 x 521-5/8 x 194-7/8”, courtesy of the artists; Thanks: The Petach Tikva Museum of Art, Israel; Nadav Smulian & the Israeli Fund for Video Art and Experimental Cinema

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filled coral reef—where even the beach sand was artificially imported—further strengthens the tangible relationship between the “natural” and the “unnatural.” Artists represented include: Boaz Aharonovitch, Aziz + Cucher, Céleste BoursierMougenot and Ariane Michel, Einat Arif-Galanti, Blane De St Croix, Rose-Lynn Fisher,

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Ori Gersht, Meirav Heiman and Yossi Ben Shoshan, Hilja Keading, Freddy Shachar Kislev, Sigalit Landau, Dana Levy, Tobias Madison, Richard Mosse, Gilad Ratman, Samantha Salzinger, Tomer Sapir, Yehudit Sasportas, Michal Shamir, Uri Shapira, Jennifer Steinkamp, Gal Weinstein, Wendy Wischer, and Guy Zagursky. O n V iew

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HISTORIES 20 YEARS of PHOTOGRAPH

On view

09.13.12-12.30.12

at the CUM

Jacksonville


Yao Dancers of Malawi All images ©Elizabeth Gilbert

S in AFRICA:

Y by ELIZABETH GILBERT

MMER MUSEUM of ART & GARDENS,

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Brotherhood of the Maz


A

HISTORIES IN AFRICA:

20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert

AMERICAN PHOTOJOURNALIST,

Elizabeth Gilbert, has lived and worked in

Africa since 1991, traveling from Kenya to the Congo, throughout the Great Rift Val-

ley, and reporting on civil wars in Rwanda, Somalia and Sudan. She is the author of two

photographic books on vanishing African culture: Broken Spears and Tribes of the Great Rift Valley. Her glorious black-and-white photography, accompanied by her thoughtful, engaging text, offers sweeping views of a magnificent and

sometimes harsh landscape and its peoples. Thought-provoking and remarkable,

her work is a time capsule, perhaps even the last record, of age-old traditions and a way of life that will almost certainly soon vanish from our planet. Histories in Africa: 20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert, at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville, presents a midlife retrospective as diverse as Africa itself, depicting a traditional world seemingly suspended in time, as well as its modern urban parallel. The gelatin silver prints on exhibit pull the viewer into an intimate world of African ritual and tell the story of a continent’s journey through change.

When Gilbert first came into contact with the Maasai, over ten years ago, their images were everywhere in Africa. Pictures of warriors were printed on postcards, T-shirts, safari advertisements and hotel logos—but in reality, their traditional life was disappearing. So Gilbert set out on a fouryear journey to photograph what was left of traditional Maasailand. Her book, Broken Spears: A Maasai Journey, is the stun-

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Above: Samburu Initiate Wearing Trophy Birds

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HISTORIES IN AFRICA:

20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert

Right: Holding the Bull Opposite: Sekenani Warrior

Above: Leaping Warriors

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ning result of this remarkable journey. Over 120 images capture the rituals, secret ceremonies and landscapes of the Maasai, documenting the life of this extraordinary tribe. Gilbert’s intimate relationship with the Maasai allowed her to photograph centuries-old Maasai ceremonies, including male and female circumcisions, weddings and perhaps the most dangerous of all Maasai rituals—a lion hunt. A moving photographic journey into the vanishing culture of the Maasai warriors of Kenya and Tanzania, Broken Spears is a haunting testament to a rapidly dis-

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appearing way of life. Gilbert’s second book, Tribes of the Great Rift Valley, is a celebration of the traditional peoples who occupy the lands of the Great Rift Valley, from the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Eritrea, across the Ethiopian highlands, and down to the great lakes and plains of Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. Here are the proud, majestic warriors of the Maasai and Samburu, the Mursi with their jutting lipplates, the guinea-fowl-painted faces of the Karo, the bull jumpers of the Hamar, and the honey seekers of the forests, the Batwa, among many other

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The Circumcisionist


HISTORIES IN AFRICA:

20 Years of Photography by Elizabeth Gilbert tribes. Sadly, nearly all of these communities face extinction in the near future due to Western influence. “The loss of African tradition in the last century and the change I witnessed during my own travels slowly redefined my role as a photographer,”

bert’s work: “Across Kenya and Tanzania, from Serengeti to Kilamanjaro and beyond, Elizabeth Gilbert has heroically and artistically photographed the last moments of tribal Africa with the Maasai, those herdsmen, lion hunters, warriors and aristocrats of the bush. The pages

“ The loss of African tradition in the last century and the change I witnessed during my own travels slowly redefined my role as a photographer.” —E. G ilbert said Gilbert. “I no longer saw myself as an invisible recorder, but as a collaborator with the people whom I photographed. I was a stranger, yet they had allowed me to document their most private rituals and ceremonies. This permission in itself was their own acknowledgement that a way of life was disappearing. Influenced by this, I began to create a more idealized portrayal of what I believed was a vanishing world.” Peter Beard, author of The End of the Game, said of Gil-

of this book are already history in a compromised, ravaged, denatured content. Luckily, Gilbert has photographed what is left—everything that is authentic and valuable in Africa.” Gilbert’s pictures have appeared in Time, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, Life and The New York Times, as well as numerous major European publications. Her photographs of the Maasai have been awarded prizes for portrait and reportage by the Society of Publication Designers. O n V iew

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Above: Elizabeth Gilbert, courtesy of the artist

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FLORAda

&

FL

THE

Mark

MESSERSMITH

AR

Margare

TOLB

On view 09.16-11.04.12 at the APP

w w w. a p p l e t o


OWING

WATERS :

RT OF

et Ross

BERT

Anna

&

TOMCZAK

LETON MUSEUM of ART , Ocala nmuseum.org

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FLORAda & FLOWING WATERS: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak

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F

F L O R A d a & F L O W I N G W A T E R S , presented by the Appleton

Museum of Art in Ocala, represents a lush and beautiful portrait of natural Florida, as interpreted by three of the state’s most prominent artists—Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak. The theme of Florida’s unique natural environment has not just occasionally occupied these artists’ highly productive careers—it is central to their work. “Messersmith’s opulent, hyper-colorful paintings of our state’s tropical flora and fauna comes together with Ross Tolbert’s abstract expressionist interpretations of our famous springs and Tomczak’s nostalgic large-format photographic prints of Mark Messersmith, Wild As Angels, oil on canvas with carved wooden top parts and mixed media predella box on bottom, courtesy Ogden Museum of Southern Art

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FLORAda & FLOWING WATERS: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak

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antiques and our native plants,” says Ruth Grim, the Appleton’s Curator of Exhibitions, “...and in the case of Anna Tomczak,” she adds, “this will be an opportunity to see a truly extinct art form, as Tomczak will no longer be able to create her large-format Polaroid prints, since Polaroid has gone out of business.” Grim hopes visitors to this special presentation will not only take away an appreciation of the work of these talented individuals, but will also heed their call to cherish and safeguard the unique natural beauty we are so lucky to have here in Florida. Themed events accompany the exhibition, including a photography workshop by Anna Tomczak. For event details, visit www.appletonmuseum.org.

THE

Mark Messersmith Tallahassee, FL

A RTISTS...

Margaret Ross Tolbert Gainesville, FL

Anna Tomczak Lake Helen, FL

Opposite: Anna Tomczak, Lusitano, courtesy of the artist Above: Images courtesy of the artists

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Mark MESSERSMITH WHEN MARK MESSERSMITH FIRST

moved to Tallahassee, FL, he was immediately struck by the wildness of the surrounding landscape—a wildness gone from much of America. In his paintings, he explores the tension between this wild, living place and ever-increasing human expansion. “Since moving to the Southeastern US in 1985, I have been fascinated with the uniqueness of the region’s environment and the beauty of its lands and animals,” the artist said. “While both the land and animals are vulnerable, they share a strong determination for survival and can still offer potential dangers for the unwary visitor.” Drawing on inspirations ranging from the Pre-Raphaelites, Martin Johnson Heade, Southern folk art and medieval manuscripts, his paintings are dense, radiant and sculptural depictions of the flora and fauna of northern Florida, struggling to survive.

“The fading landscape I paint, is at least for awhile, out there someplace, somewhere just beyond the urban sprawl, shopping malls and trailer parks,” he explained. “It is still a land of myths and facts, inhabited by powerful birds, vigilant panthers, weary gators, blackwater swamps, old cypress trees, back road citrus stands and careening logging trucks.” Messersmith sees his work as “a beautiful warning of a time and a place, midways between hope and despair.” Messersmith received his MFA in 1980 from Indiana University. He joined the Florida State University art department’s painting faculty in 1985, where he teaches drawing and painting. Over the years he has won numerous state, national and international art honors, including a Ford Fellowship, four Individual Artist Fellowship Awards from the Florida Department of State, and a 2006 Joan Mitchell Foundation Painting Award.

Mark Messersmith, From a Dark Twilight, oil on canvas with carved wooden top parts and mixed media predellas boxes on bottom, courtesy of Ogden Museum of Southern Art

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FLORAda & FLOWING WATERS: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak

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Margaret ROSS TOLBERT OVER THE LAST 20 YEARS, Gaines-

ville artist, Margaret Ross Tolbert, has executed a series of paintings, drawings and lithographs from studios in the US, France and Turkey. Her commissions include projects for a series of paintings with residencies in Turkey, Azerbaijan and Oman. In recent years, Tolbert has developed two distinctive bodies of work: the Springs of North Florida, which explores the depth and beauty of Florida’s springs; and Doors, inspired by travels to many of the most beautiful and exotic buildings in the world. The two subjects are united through the artist’s powerful use of color in her brilliant, large-scale oil paintings. The cool blues and greens of the springs appear as lush as the golden hues of the doors. The Springs of North Florida, whose paradisiacal presence provides a sense of ideal destination and the exotic in the here-and-now, counterpoints the sense of

passage, time and journey implicit in the Doors paintings. The colors and light are unique and remarkable. Tolbert works on-site to capture these elements before transferring them to her large canvases. “The paradisiacal Springs of North Florida are my paintings’ subject and metaphor,” says Tolbert. “The springs paintings begin on-site at the water’s edge, and often in the water. I swim in the springs, I sketch underwater; I am inspired to write when I am beside them.” Tolbert’s paintings have been exhibited in numerous solo and group shows throughout the southern US and abroad. She is the recipient of a Visual Arts Fellowship from the State of Florida. Her work also encompasses performance and writing. Tolbert has published two books: GEZI, which includes sketches and narratives from her travels in Eastern Turkey; and AQUIFERious, which includes detailed chronicles of the rarely-seen life forms inhabiting the depths of the springs.

Margaret Ross Tolbert, Entering Spring, courtesy of the artist

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FLORAda & FLOWING WATERS: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak

“The springs paintings begin on-site at the water’s edge, and often in the water. I swim in the springs, I sketch underwater; I am inspired to write when I am beside them.” —M. R. T olbert OnV

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Anna TOMCZAK ANNA TOMCZAK’S IMAGES EXPLORE

a rich visual playground of found objects, associative images and botanicals—all woven in an intricate web of visual metaphor. For over 15 years, Tomczak has utilized the 20 x 24 camera to make hauntingly beautiful constructions. Drawing on a large personal collection of unique and eccentric artifacts, she creates an assemblage that only exists long enough to be recorded on large-format Polaroid film. These timeless compositions are heightened by her use of the Polacolor Image Transfer technique. This process interrupts the normal peel-apart development by separating the negative from the positive film earlier than intended and placing it in contact with wet watercolor paper. This technique mutes the color and softens the image, producing a more dreamlike and antique sensibility. “For many years, I have collected iconic treasures—some are derived

from old manuscripts and others are from searching through antique markets or collections,” says Tomczak. “Each one of these figures holds a different meaning, symbolic reference or spiritual influence for both myself as the artist, and the viewer/interpreter.” Anna’s large-format, dye-infusion transfer photographs are widely exhibited and are in museum, university, private and corporate collections, including the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach; Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland; Orlando Museum of Art; Brooklyn Museum of Art, NY; Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville; Sony Latin-America; McGraw-Hill, NYC; R.J. Reynolds; the Mayo Clinic; and IBM. Anna teaches workshops in Florida and various university, museum and studio classrooms throughout the US, Italy and Spain. The recently published book, Sanctuary, features a collection of Tomczak’s stunning images.

Anna Tomczak, Devil’s Backbone II, courtesy of the artist

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FLORAda & FLOWING WATERS: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert & Anna Tomczak

O O nn V V ii ee w wM M aa gg aa zz ii nn ee .. cc om om

••

A A uu gg uu ss tt // SS ee pp tt ee m mb b ee r r 2 2 00 11 22

55 91


STRIPPED BA

The Preservatio

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R E + B AT H E D:

n of Dalí’s Masterworks On view through September 9th at The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg www.thedali.org Conservation image photos by Chuck Bendel, courtesy of The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg


S

Stripped Bare + Bathed:

The Preservation

of Dalí’s Masterworks

SALVADOR DALÍ IS considered one of the most famous and controversial artists of the 20th Century—his artwork is unforgettable and immensely popular. The Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, holds the largest collection of Dalí art outside Spain, with more than 2,100 works, including 96 oil paintings that richly present his entire career. More than 15 years ago, all of the oil paintings in the Museum’s Permanent Collection were assessed, and a program was established for conservation treatment according to the assessment rating. In the fall of 2011, The Dalí launched a conservation campaign called “Keepers of the Masterworks.” At that time, Museum curators determined that four of the Museum’s Master-

Above: A painstaking process, conservators carefully remove decades of dust and grime from The Discovery of America. Left: Salvador Dalí, The Discovery of America, 1959, oil on canvas All images copyright: In the USA: ©Salvador Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL, 2012; Worldwide rights: ©Salvador Dalí, Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí (Artists Rights Society), 2012


work paintings were in greatest need of restoration and repair, and the Museum made a plea to its loyal patrons to assist in the effort to preserve and maintain these priceless Masterworks. Since then, many works have been treated, but other paintings still require major or minor conservation work. In June of 2012, a team of

nine conservators cleaned and restored four of the Museum’s eight Masterworks: The Discovery of America (1959), The Ecumenical Council (1960); Galacidalacidesoxiribunucleicacid (1963) and The Hallucinogenic Toreador (1970). A live video feed recorded and broadcasted the work during a two-week live phase. Currently on view in the

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Hough Family wing, the exhibition, Stipped Bare + Bathed: The Preservation of Dalí’s Masterworks, presents a video documentary of the conservation process from start to finish, providing visitors with a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the dramatic and painstaking work of conservators, including detailed commentary and close-up views

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Stripped Bare + Bathed: The Preservation

of Dalí’s Masterworks

Right: Conservators work on The Hallucinogenic Toreador as a live video feed records and broadcasts their progress during a two-week live phase of the conservation project.

Above: Salvador Dalí, The Hallucinogenic Toreador, 1970, oil on canvas

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of the action. The $100,000 project was funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and was further supported by a group of private donors—the Keepers of the Masterworks—who gave generously to assist with this vital restoration project. Preservation is a continuous, labor-intensive process, involving the care of works of art in all media—oils, works on paper, and objects. Works on display in museums are subjected to a variety of damaging pollutants—from •

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our breath and sweat, to dirt and grime—all of these factors and more, contribute to art’s slow deterioration. How to protect precious artwork, while making it accessible to vast numbers of people, remains a constant dilemma for museums. Stripped Bare + Bathed is the realization of an essential part of The Dalí’s mission: to present and preserve these priceless works for future generations. Conservationist, Rustin Levenson, President and Founder of Rustin Levenson Art Conservation Associates,

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along with her team of conservators, spent 8-10 hours a day during the eleven day project, lifting decades of dust, dirt and grime from the canvases and making whatever repairs necessary to restore the works. Levenson has worked at Harvard University’s Fogg Museum, the National Gallery of Canada and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She now has her own company with studios in New York and Miami, and a client list filled with museums and private collectors. Levenson and her team

spent weeks assessing damage, testing each of the works using ultraviolet light and loupes (magnifying devices similar to what jewelers use). With a variety of cleaning solvents, they gently dabbed at each canvas with cotton swabs to determine which cleaning solutions worked best, removing only dirt—never paint. Each painting was then divided into sections with hanging strings and each team member worked, inch by inch, slowly swabbing each section. “It’s more complicated than it looks,” Levenson says. “It’s

Above: Inch by inch, Galacidalacidesoxiribunucleicacid is slowly restored. Below: Salvador Dalí, Galacidalacidesoxiribunucleicacid, 1963, oil on canvas


Below: The Ecumenical Council, divided into sections with hanging strings, is gently swabbed.

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part art history, part science. No one should ever try to clean art at home. The worst damage I have seen was by untrained restorers.” On the first day of the project, Levenson and her team started with two of the paint-

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ings, Discovery of America and Ecumenical Council. Council took the most time, according to Levenson. It had been restretched several times before it came into the Dalí’s collection, meaning the canvas was removed from its wood frame and reattached. During the course of the last restretching, the canvas was not put on straight, leaving uneven lines of canvas visible on the vertical sides of the painting. In addition, the fabric was riddled with uneven holes from old nails. The painting also had a small hole in the canvas, incurred during its journey to or from Australia for a special exhibition, requiring retouching with paint. If paint is applied to any work, it must be used according to the universal conservation dictum: “Do nothing that can’t be undone.” In the case of this painting, which has a protective varnish, the paint was applied over the varnish and can be easily removed in the future. Discovery of America had a mold problem, the result of a leaky roof in the Museum’s former location. The mold was discovered during a hurricane

2012


Stripped Bare + Bathed:

The Preservation

of Dalí’s Masterworks

Left: Salvador Dalí, The Ecumenical Council, 1960, oil on canvas Below: Rustin Levenson, President and Founder of Rustin Levenson Art Conservation Associates, at work on The Ecumenical Council.

evacuation. The painting had to be cleaned and treated. When treating the mold, conservators wore protective masks. “We used organic sponges and ethanol solution, which made us all feel better,” said Levenson, referring to the mold. Conservation efforts are usually off-limits to the public, which makes this a rare opportunity to witness the skill and science involved in preserving great artworks. “There is a

mystery to conservation,” said Hank Hine, Director of the Museum, “the chemicals, the arcane technology. But most of it is very hands-on and we wanted to demystify and dramatize the technique.” The long-term payoff is knowing that Dalí’s most important paintings are in the best condition possible and offering visitors an opportunity to see his works in a new light. O n V iew


SPOTLIGHT {H I L L E R B R A N D + M AGSAMEN}

Exhibition

BEAM Me Up

 On view September 7th–October 14th at Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

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LIKE MOST PARENTS TODAY,

artists Stephan Hillerbrand and Mary Magsamen are experiencing the day-to-day pressures that exist in the domestic sphere of family life. Unlike most parents, they’ve channeled their circumstances into their work. The results will be on view at Dunedin Fine Art Center in the new show, BEAM Me Up. “Under the title, BEAM Me Up, we recognize, through the artists’ eyes, the other-worldly realms of parenthood, relationships, the modern world, or Life, as we do not know it—until we are knee-deep in it’s laundry, or lost in its ethers,” says DFAC Curator, Catherine Bergmann. This humorous and provocative presentation includes a photographic series by the collaborative team, Hillerbrand+ Magsamen, that interstices between art and the contemporary American family by playfully and poetically exploring perceptions of emotions, family, consumerism and media, within a uniquely American subjectivity. Hillerbrand+Magsamen use their immediate environment 2012


F O C U S

and conditions to depict and dis- been included in film festivals, tort space and time and reflect our galleries and museums internaeveryday visual vocabulary and tionally, including Ann Arbor human experiences. The subur- Film Festival, Boston Underban environment they inhabit ground Film Festival, Center functions as a base from which for Photography at Woodstock, to leap into bigger ideas and vi- Houston Center for Photography sually rich, engaging imagery. and Dallas Contemporary. They Portraits of each member have been awarded residencies of the Hillerbrand/Magsamen at Lawndale Art Center, Housfamily—the parents ton, TX; the Lowand their two grade er Manhattan Culschool-age kids— tural Council, NY; are featured in an arand Experimental ray of domestic sitTelevision Center, uations, playing on Owego, NY; as well gender and family as grants from Ausstereotypes. Each tin Film Society’s Hillerbrand portrait is a symbolTexas Filmmakers’ and Magsamen ic representation of Production Fund, CHANNEL the stresses, expecOhio Arts Council, their LIFE INTO tations and predilecHouston Arts Altheir WORK. tions that exist in soliance, and a Carciety and the domestic realm. ol Crow Fellowship from the Domestic imprisonment and the Houston Center for Photography. confines of motherhood, the sufThe artists live and work focation of the household and in Houston, TX, where Mary all it’s stuff, suburban artificial- Magsamen is the curator for the ity, banality and monotony are a mirco-cinema, The Aurora Picfew common themes. ture Show, and Stephan HillerHillerbrand and Magsamen brand teaches in the University received MFAs from Cranbrook of Houston Digital Media ProAcademy of Art. Their work has gram. O n V iew

opposite page: 1. Diana, 2011, Archival Pigment Print, 24 x 30” Above (top to bottom): 1. Miranda, 2011, Archival Pigment Print, 24 x 30” 2. Sisyphus, 2011, Archival Pigment Print, 24 x 30” left: DIY Love Seat, 2011, HD Video images ©hillerbrand+magsamen; Hillerbrand+Magsamen are represented by Darke Gallery in Houston, TX, and Camara Oscura Galleria de Art in Madrid, Spain


FOCUS { M A R T I N

FOR MORE THAN A DECADE,

S C H O E L L E R }

Exhibition

Martin Schoeller: Close Up On view September 22nd–December 9th at Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

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Martin Schoeller has been making close-up portraits of the most recognizable faces of our time, as well as of ordinary people living private lives. Martin Schoeller: Close Up, hosted by Naples Museum of Art, presents a selection of arresting large-format color images—many of which are Schoeller’s most famous celebrity portraits. A native of Germany, Schoeller’s career evolved from unassuming beginnings. After high school, a friend urged him to apply to photography school. Of 800 applicants, he was one of just 40 students accepted. After graduation, Schoeller moved to New York City to pursue a photography career. From 1993 to 1996, he worked as an assistant to renowned portrait photographer, Annie Leibovitz, and in 1999, he was named one of three contracted photographers at The New Yorker magazine. While he continues to shoot for The New Yorker and other major publications, he has also pursued his own photographic interests. 2012


F O C U S

Large, close-up portraits are row depth of field, which helps Schoeller’s signature style. Over to bring out his subjects’eyes and the years, he has photographed lips. “Most of the expression in a many celebrities and politicians person’s face is all about the eyes in this intimate format. “It’s a re- and the lips,” he explained. “I try flection maybe of my personal- to get my focus right so the eyes ity that I feel comfortable being and the lips are the focus. Evclose to somebody,” he said. For erything falls away so quickly Schoeller, it’s not about making because of the shallow depth of people look good or look bad. “I field. Everything else becomes just think I’m trysecondary.” ing to take real porSchoeller’s work traits, what portraits has appeared in should be like, showRolling Stone, GQ, ing a person for who Esquire, Vogue, Inthey are and what terview, W and The they look like withNew York Times out retouching, withMagazine, in addiCLOSE-UP out tricky lighting, PORTRAITS are tion to The New without distortion, Yorker, where he Martin Schoeller’s without crazy wide remains on conSIGNATURE angle lenses, without tract. He is repreSTYLE. any cheap tricks— sented for fine art just straight up honest portraits.” by Hasted Kraeutler Gallery in Using a medium format cam- NY, Ace Gallery in Los Angeles era that takes roll film, Schoeller and Camera Work in Germany. shoots his subjects from a dis- His portraits are exhibited and tance of about four to five feet collected internationally, appearaway with a fairly long lens, to ing in solo exhibitions as well as avoid distortion. He uses Kino the permanent collections of the Flos, a type of lighting system National Portrait Gallery in Lonused mainly in the film industry, don and the Smithsonian Instituideal for very shallow and nar- tion in Washington, DC. O n V iew

opposite page: 1. Henry Kissinger, 2007, Type C color print, 42-7/16 x 34-9/16” Above (top to bottom): 1. George Clooney, 2007, Type C color print, 61-1/16 x 49-9/16” 2. Jack Nicholson, 2002, Type C color print, 61-1/16 x 49-9/16” all images ©Martin Schoeller left: martin schoeller, courtesy of the artist MARTIN SCHOELLER: CLOSE UP IS ORGANIZED & CIRCULATED BY CURATORIAL ASSISTANCE TRAVELING EXHIBITIONS, PASADENA, CA


INSIGHT { R A N I A

R A N I A M ATA R H A S P R O -

M A T A R }

Exhibition

A Girl and Her Room On view September 14th–December 14th at the Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

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duced an exhibition of unique and subtle power. Focusing on contemporary young women from vastly differing cultures in the US and Lebanon, A Girl and Her Room, reveals a dizzying array of personalities, dreams, hopes, wishes and frustrations in settings that are clearly expressions of the girls’ individual identities—their own rooms. “As a mother of teenage daughters, I watch their passage from girlhood into adulthood, fascinated with the transformation taking place, the adult personality shaping up, and a self-consciousness now replacing the carefree world they had known and lived in so far,” said Matar. “I started photographing them and their girlfriends, and quickly realized that they were very aware of each other’s presence, and that their being in a group affected very much whom they were portraying to the world. From there emerged the idea of photographing each girl by herself.” When Matar asked the girls to choose where they wanted to be photographed, 2012


I N S I G H T

a number of them chose their ilege that they have extended to bedrooms. “I realized that was the viewers of this exhibition. the nexus of a project,” she said. My deepest hope for this proj“The room was a metaphor, an ect is that we help them achieve extension of the girl, but also the fullness of their promise.” the girl seemed to be part of the Born and raised in Lebanon, room, to fit in, just like every- Matar moved to the US in 1984. thing else in the room.” She trained and worked as an arMatar eventually moved chitect before studying photogaway from photographing girls raphy at New England School of she knew well and Photography and expanded the projMaine Photographect to include girls ic Workshops. from the two worlds She is the recipshe herself experiient of numerous enced as a teen and awards and fellowa young 20-yearships. Her images old—the US and are in the collecRania Matar’s the Middle East. tions of museums IMAGES are She spent time dethroughout the US revealing portraits veloping comfortand abroad. She OF FEMALE able relationships has also authored ADOLESCENCE. with her subjects two books: Ordiand soon, the photography ses- nary Lives (2009) and A Girl sions became beautiful and in- and Her Room (2012). timate collaborations. Matar currently works full“The beauty and strength, the time as a photographer and aspirations and dreams of these teaches photography at the Masyoung women are deeply mov- sachusetts College of Art and ing. I have tried to be the invis- Design. She also devotes time ible mirror of those qualities to teach photography to teenhere. Their frankness and gener- age girls in Lebanon’s refugee osity in sharing them was a priv- camps. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Shannon, Boston, MA, 2010, Pigment Inkjet Print, 20 x 30” 2. Christilla, Rabieh, Lebanon, 2010, Pigment Inkjet Print, 20 x 30” Above (top to bottom): 1. Anna, Winchester, MA, 2009, Pigment Inkjet Print, 20 x 30” 2. Danielle, Boston, MA, 2010, Pigment Inkjet Print, 20 x 30” all images ©Rania Matar left: Rania Matar, courtesy of the artist


PROFILE { T R E N T

By Sandra Dimsdale Horan TRENT MANNING IS LIVING

M A N N I N G }

Exhibition

Miscellaneous: New Works by Trent Manning On view September 8th–November 11th at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland www.polkmuseumofart.org

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proof that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. His mixedmedia works incorporate discarded pieces of metal, screws, wooden handles, old tools and wire, combined with woodworking, painting and sculpting. “I try to create a rebirth of interest in these miscellaneous items that they didn’t have in their previous roles,” says Manning. “The search for new material is a major step in the creative process. Since I never know what I might find next, I never know what my next piece will be. Constantly changing materials provides a natural evolution in my work, letting me explore new techniques and grow as an artist with every piece I create.” The 38-year-old artist from Winter Haven describes his work as a reflection of his personality: “a somewhat disillusioned cynic, with an odd sense of humor, who still clings tightly to his inner child.” Inspired by children’s toys and cartoons, many of his pieces are whimsical in nature, 2012


P R O F I L E

but they are also an expression cluding Best of Show at Gaspaof the world today, and often rilla Festival of the Arts, and first contain dark or macabre under- place in sculpture at Beaux Arts tones. “It’s this mix of light and in Coral Gables. dark that have become a signaFor his exhibition at Polk Muture theme in my work,” he says. seum ofArt, Manning will feature As a child, Manning’s mom almost exclusively new work, would constantly find him hid- since he has no inventory. Visiing under the covers, drawing tors to the show can expect to find pictures when he “childlike” themes. was supposed to be “There’s a nice balasleep. While he was ance of good and hooked on art earevil, though. It’s not ly on, it took years all sugary clouds,” before he realized he insists. his work was good Manning recentenough to sell. With ly joined Arts Ensome persuading, he semble in Winter eventually agreed Haven, where artists FOR Trent to start showing his are invited to use MANNING, one work. Things “refree studio space in man’s TRASH ally clicked” when exchange for donatIS another man’s he submitted a piece ing time to an outTREASURE. for a “found object reach program that show” at a local gallery. “I knew works with everyone from teen I had found my niche,” says Man- artists to Alzheimer’s patients. ning. “Now it’s about more than I He is currently mentoring “a talcan keep up with, which is a real- ented graffiti artist,” who wants ly fortunate problem to have.” He to make a living as an artist. “I’m spends about 10 hours a day, six trying to help him understand days a week, in the studio. His he’s not going to do that spraycommitment has paid off with painting a building—unless he several prestigious awards, in- sells the building.” O n V iew

opposite (left to right): 1. Dunce Cap 2. She’s Got Her Father’s Eyes above (top to bottom): 1. Keepsake 2. High Chair left: trent manning images courtesy of the artist


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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

New York City The museums. . .

AMERICA’S CULTURAL CAPITAL,“The Big Apple”, is iconic,

diverse and ever-changing. The city is home to the best and the brightest the world has to offer. From the newest culinary creations, to trendsetting fashion, to glittering Broadway shows, The Big Apple lives up to its reputation. New Yorkers and visitors alike, enjoy a cultural experience second to none—and no visit to New York City would be complete without taking in the exciting exhibitions and collections available at the city’s myriad of fine art venues. Join us as we take a brief tour of the premier fine art museums located throughout this wonderful metropolis, including: American Folk Art Museum, Cooper-Hewitt National Museum of Design, International Center of Photography, Museum of Arts and Design, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Frick Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art—“Taxi!” O n V iew

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. SPENCERIAN BIRDS, 1850-1900, STUDENTS OF MISS LILLIAN HAMM (DATES UNKNOWN), UNITED STATES, WATERCOLOR AND INK ON PAPER, 19-1/2 x 18-1/4”, GIFT OF CYRIL IRWIN NELSON IN MEMORY OF HIS GRANDPARENTS, GUERDON STEARNS AND ELINOR IRWIN HOLDEN, AND IN HONOR OF HIS PARENTS, CYRIL ARTHUR AND ELISE MACY NELSON, 1983-29-4 2. FEDERAL SIDEBOARD TABLE, ARTIST UNIDENTIFIED, NEW ENGLAND, 1810-1830, PAINT ON WOOD WITH BRASS KNOB, 34-7/8 x 26 x 20”, EVA AND MORRIS FELD FOLK ART ACQUISITION FUND, 1981.12.6 3. SEATED CAT, ARTIST UNIDENTIFIED, EASTERN UNITED STATES, 1850-1900, PAINT ON PLASTER OF PARIS, 15-5/8 x 8-1/4 x 10-1/8”, GIFT OF EFFIE THIXTON ARTHUR, 1963.3.1

American Folk Art Museum

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THE AMERICAN FOLK ART

Museum is the premier institution devoted to the aesthetic appreciation of traditional folk art and creative expressions of contemporary self-taught artists. The Museum preserves, conserves and interprets a comprehensive collection of the highest quality, with objects dating from the 18th century to the present. The Museum’s collection was launched in 1962 and in the 45+ years since, has continued

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to grow and evolve to include works by US and international self-taught artists, demonstrating an exciting new collecting initiative. The visual connections between American artists and their European counterparts are compelling and speak eloquently of common creative ground shared by all artists unindoctrinated in either fine art canons or mainstream art trends. O n V iew

AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM www.folkartmuseum.org 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Ave. at 66th St.) New York, NY 212.595.9533

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ALL PHOTOS BY JOHN PARNELL, NEW YORK; COURTESY AMERICAN FOLK ART MUSEUM


Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

T

THE COOPER-HEWITT,

National Design Museum is the only museum in the nation devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. The Museum was founded in 1897 by Amy, Eleanor, and Sarah Hewitt—granddaughters of industrialist Peter Cooper—as part of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. A branch of the Smithsonian since 1967, Cooper-Hewitt is housed in the landmark Andrew Carnegie

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COOPER-HEWITT, NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM www.cooperhewitt.org 2 East 91st Street New York, NY 212.849.8400

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Mansion on Fifth Avenue. The campus also features two historic townhouses and a unique terrace and garden. Cooper-Hewitt’s collection encompasses product design and decorative arts; drawings, prints and graphic design; textiles; and wallcoverings. While currently undergoing a renovation, Cooper-Hewitt’s schedule of exhibitions, programs and events are being staged at various off-site locations in NYC. For details, visit www.cooperhewitt.org. O n V iew i e w

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : NEW YORK CITY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Massive Paisley, detail, Designed by Maharam Design Studio, Produced by Maharam, New York, NY, 2007, Woven polyester and cotton, Gift of Maharam, Photo: Matt Flynn 2. Handbag watch: Case designed by Simon DeVaulchier (1893–1971) and George W. Blow (1897–1960), DeVaulchier and Blow, Manufactured by Westclox, Us, 1933, Bakelite, metal, glass, paper, Gift of Max Pine and Lois Mander, Photo: Andrew Garn 3. Book: page from New Illustration of the Sexual System of Carolus Von Linnaeus, Written and illustrated by Robert John Thornton (ca. 1768–1837), London, England, ca. 1807, Hand-colored engraving, Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Institution Libraries, Photo: Matt Flynn images courtesy of the museum

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International Center of Photography

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LOCATED IN THE HEART

of New York City, the ICP is a world-class museum and school, dedicated to exploring the possibilities of the photographic medium through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs. ICP presents a wide range of historical and contemporary photographs in its acclaimed exhibitions and houses a collection of more than 100,000 original prints that span the history of the photographic

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medium, from daguerreotypes to gelatin silver and digital chromogenic prints. The collection is strongest in its holdings of American and European documentary photography of the 1930s to the 1990s and is comprised of large bodies of work by W. Eugene Smith, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Farm Security Administration photographers, Alfred Eisenstadt, Lisette Model, Gordon Parks, James VanDerZee and Garry Winogrand. O n V iew

INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY www.icp.org 1133 Ave. of the Americas New York, NY 212.857.0000

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. LAURIE SIMMONS, WOMAN/ RED COUCH/NEWSPAPER, 1978, ©LAURIE SIMMONS, GIFT OF ANNE AND JOEL EHRENKRANZ, 2010, 2010.23.7 2. WEEGEE,
SIMPLY ADD BOILING WATER, DECEMBER 19, 1943, ©WEEGEE / INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY / GETTY IMAGES, 150.1982 3. DAVID SEIDNER, BERNADETTE JURKOWSKI, CA. 1995, ©INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY, DAVID SEIDNER ARCHIVE, 2007.65.1 ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY


Museum of Arts and Design

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THE MUSEUM OF ARTS

and Design–formerly the American Craft Museum–has served as the country’s premier institution dedicated to the collection and exhibition of contemporary objects created in media such as clay, glass, wood, metal and fiber. MAD collects, displays and interprets objects that document contemporary and historic innovation in craft, art and design. In its exhibitions and educational programs, the

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MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN www.madmuseum.org 2 Columbus Circle New York, NY 212.299.7777

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Museum celebrates the creative process through which materials are crafted into works that enhance contemporary life. In 2008, the Museum moved into its new home at 2 Columbus Circle. Working in collaboration with architect Brad Cloepfil, of Allied Works Architecture, MAD has developed a building design that will enable the institution to meet the growing public demand for its exhibitions and display its rapidly expanding Permanent Collection. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JOHN ERIC BYERS, HAT BOX (CHEST OF DRAWERS),1998, WOOD, PAINT, MAHOGANY, SUGAR PINE, FOUND BRASS SCREWS; CARVED, ROUTED, PAINTED, 65 x 18 3/4 x 18 3/4, GIFT OF THE ARTIST AND TERCERA GALLERY, 1998, PHOTO: EVA HEYD 2. MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN EXTERIOR, PHOTO: HÉLÈNE BINET 3. HIROSHI SUZUKI, DUAL RIVULET VII, 2005, FINE SILVER 999, BRITANNIA STANDARD SILVER 958; HAMMER-RAISED, DOUBLE SKINNED, 8 1/4 x 14 3/4 x 14 3/4”, MUSEUM PURCHASE WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY NANETTE L. LAITMAN, THE WINDGATE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, & THE COLLECTIONS COMMITTEE, 2005, PHOTO: MAGGIE NIMKIN IMAGES COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

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New Museum of Contemporary Art

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THE NEW MUSEUM OF

Contemporary Art is a leading destination for new art and new ideas. It is Manhattan’s only dedicated contemporary art museum and it is respected internationally for the adventurousness and global scope of its curatorial program. Conceived as a sculptural stack of rectilinear boxes dynamically shifted off-axis around a central steel core, the New Museum’s innovative structure has a variety of open,

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fluid and light-filled spaces, with skylights created by the setbacks between floors. The exterior is clad in a seamless, anodized aluminum mesh, dressing the whole building in a delicate, softly shimmering skin. The elegantly rough structure suits both the New Museum’s character as well as its neighborhood. The edifice appears as a shimmering beacon, visually mutable and dynamic, animated by the changing light of the day—a perfect metaphor for the everchanging nature of contemporary art. O n V iew

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART www.newmuseum.org 235 Bowery New York, NY 212.219.1222

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE PARADE: NATHALIE DJURBERG WITH MUSIC BY HANS BERG, 2012, EXHIBITION VIEW: NEW MUSEUM, PHOTO: BENOIT PAILLEY 2. ROSEMARIE TROCKEL, BOTANICAL SLIDE SHOW, 2011–2012, SLIDE PROJECTION, COURTESY SPRÜTH MAGERS, BERLIN/LONDON, ©ROSEMARIE TROCKEL / VG BILD-KUNST BONN, 2011 3. MUSEUM EXTERIOR, PHOTOGRAPH BY DEAN KAUFMAN IMAGES COURTESY OF NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART


Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

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C O M P L E T E D I N 1 9 5 9 , the

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Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed museum is among the 20th century’s most important architectural landmarks. The museum’s great rotunda has been the site of many celebrated special exhibitions, while its smaller galleries are devoted to the Guggenheim’s renowned collection of over 7,000 works, ranging from Impressionism through contemporary art. Visitors can experience speSOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM www.guggenheim.org 1071 Fifth Avenue
 New York, NY 212.423.3500

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cial exhibitions, lectures, performances and film screenings, and daily tours of the galleries, led by experienced docents. The story of the Guggenheim collection is essentially the story of several very different private collections that have been brought together. Augmented through numerous acquisitions under the leadership of the Foundation’s directors, curators and international partners, these collections form a unique, shared global collection that reflects the rich trajectory of art from the mid-19th century through the present. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. CAMILLE PISSARRO, THE HERMITAGE AT PONTOISE, 1867, OIL ON CANVAS, 59 5/8 x 79”, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, THANNHAUSER COLLECTION, GIFT, JUSTIN K. THANNHAUSER, 1978 2. EDOUARD MANET, BEFORE THE MIRROR, 1876, OIL ON CANVAS, 36 1/4 x 28 1/8”, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, THANNHAUSER COLLECTION, GIFT, JUSTIN K. THANNHAUSER, 1978 3. MUSEUM INTERIOR, PHOTO: DAVID M. HEALD, ©SRGF, NY

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

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The Frick Collection

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A VISIT TO THE FRICK

Collection evokes the splendor and tranquillity of a time gone by, and at the same time, testifies to how great art collections can still inspire viewers today. Housed in the New York mansion built by Henry Clay Frick (1849-1919), one of America’s most successful coke and steel industrialists, are some of the best-known paintings by the greatest European artists, major works of

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sculpture (among them one of the finest groups of small bronzes in the world), superb 18th century French furniture and porcelains, Limoges enamels, Oriental rugs, and other works of remarkable quality, displayed in a serene and intimate setting. Each of the seventeen galleries offers a unique presentation of art arranged, for the most part, without regard to period or national origin, in the same spirit as Mr. Frick enjoyed the art he loved before he bequeathed it to the public. O n V iew

THE FRICK COLLECTION www.frick.org 1 East 70th Street New York, NY 212.288.0700

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE FRAGONARD ROOM OF THE FRICK COLLECTION, WITH ITS FAMOUS SERIES OF PANELS PAINTED FOR MADAME DU BARRY; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB 2. THE LIVING HALL OF THE FRICK COLLECTION, FEATURING FURNITURE BY BOULLE AND PAINTINGS BY EL GRECO, HOLBEIN, TITIAN, AND BELLINI; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB 3. johannes VERMEER, MISTRESS AND MAID, CA. 1665-1670, OIL ON CANVAS, THE FRICK COLLECTION; PHOTO: MICHAEL BODYCOMB IMAGES COURTESY OF THE FRICK COLLECTION


The Metropolitan Museum of Art

T

“ T H E M E T ” is one of the

world’s largest and finest art museums. Nearly five million people visit each year to experience its notable special exhibitions and Permanent Collections, which include more than two million works of art spanning five thousand years of world culture, from prehistory to the present and from every part of the globe. Founded in 1870, “The Met” is located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what

Info

THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART www.metmuseum.org 1000 5th Avenue New York, NY 212.535.7710

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is known as “Museum Mile.” A roof garden offers views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline, and features an annual summertime single artist sculpture exhibition. A much smaller second location in upper Manhattan, at “The Cloisters”, houses a remarkable collection of medieval art. O n V iew i e w

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : NEW YORK CITY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Claude Monet (1840–1926), Garden at Sainte-Adresse, 1867, oil on canvas, 38 5/8 x 51 1/8”, purchase, special contributions and funds given or bequeathed by friends of the Museum, 1967 2. Fernando Botero (born 1932), Dancing in Colombia, 1980, oil on canvas, 74 x 91”, anonymous gift, 1983 3. John Singer Sargent (1856–1925), Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau), 1883–84, oil on canvas, 82 1/8 x 43 1/4”, Arthur Hoppock Hearn Fund, 1916 IMAGES COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

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The Museum of Modern Art

T

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. SALVADOR DALÍ

THE RICH AND VARIED

collection of The Museum of Modern Art constitutes one of the most comprehensive and panoramic views into modern art. From an initial gift of eight prints and one drawing, MoMA’s collection has grown to include over 150,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, architectural models and drawings, and design objects. The Museum maintains an active schedule of modern and

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ewYork City NewYork

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : NEW YORK CITY

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contemporary art exhibitions addressing a wide range of subject matter, mediums and time periods, highlighting significant recent developments in the visual arts and new interpretations of major artists and art historical movements. Works of art from its collection are presented in rotating installations so that the public may regularly expect to find new works on display. Visitors also enjoy access to a bookstore offering an assortment of publications and reproductions, and a design store featuring objects related to modern and contemporary art and design. O n V iew

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART www.moma.org 11 West 53rd Street
 New York, NY 212.708.9400

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(1904-1989), THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY, 1931, OIL ON CANVAS, 9 1/2 x 13”, GIVEN ANONYMOUSLY, ©2010 SALVADOR DALÍ, GALA-SALVADOR DALÍ FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY 2. KAZIMIR MALEVICH (1878-1935), WOMAN WITH PAILS: DYNAMIC ARRANGEMENT, 1912-13, OIL ON CANVAS, 31 5/8 x 31 5/8”, 1935 ACQUISITION CONFIRMED IN 1999 BY AGREEMENT WITH THE ESTATE OF KAZIMIR MALEVICH & MADE POSSIBLE WITH FUNDS FROM THE MRS. JOHN HAY WHITNEY BEQUEST (BY EXCHANGE) IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART


Whitney Museum of American Art

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THE WHITNEY MUSEUM

Info

of American Art presents a full range of 20th century and contemporary American art, with a special focus on works by living artists. The Whitney’s Permanent Collection— arguably the finest holding of 20th century American art in the world—is comprised of approximately 19,000 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings and photographs, representing more than 2,600 artists including: Thomas Hart WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART http://whitney.org 945 Madison Avenue
 New York, NY 212.570.3600

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Benton, Edward Hopper, Roy Lichtenstein, Georgia O’Keeffe and Andy Warhol. The Museum presents acclaimed exhibitions ranging from historical surveys and indepth retrospectives, to group shows introducing emerging artists to a larger public. The Biennial, an invitational show of work produced in the preceding two years, is the only continuous series of exhibitions in the US to survey recent developments in American art. O n V iew i e w

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. EDWARD HOPPER (1882-1967), EARLY SUNDAY MORNING, 1930, OIL ON CANVAS, OVERALL: 35-3/16 x 60-1/4”, FRAMED: 68-1/2 x 43”, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY; PURCHASE, WITH FUNDS FROM GERTRUDE VANDERBILT WHITNEY, 31.426, ©WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY 2. RICHARD DIEBENKORN, GIRL LOOKING AT LANDSCAPE, 1957, OIL ON CANVAS, 59 x 60-3/8”, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NY; GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. ALAN H. TEMPLE, 61.49, ©THE RICHARD DIEBENKORN FOUNDATION 3. WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART; ARCHITECT: MARCEL BREUER AND HAMILTON SMITH (1963–1966). PHOTOGRAPH BY JERRY L. THOMPSON IMAGES COURTESY OF WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

New York City The galleries. . .

WITH OVER 600 ART G A L L E R I E S , “The Big Apple” is

the planet’s premier marketplace for contemporary art and host to the most extraordinary and cutting-edge exhibitions, featuring a mind-blowing display of global talent. Over the past 10 years, more than 250 galleries have moved into the Chelsea area of Manhattan alone. Galleries have taken over many of the city’s former warehouse and industrial spaces—revitalizing neighborhoods and creating wonderful new walkable arts districts. And although a vast majority of galleries feature contemporary art, you will find the finest in every genre of visual art and expression here. A leisurely stroll through the city’s gallery districts is a wonderful way to spend an afternoon, transporting yourself to a world of inspiration and artful bliss. On the following pages, On View presents a sampling of New York City’s outstanding galleries. O n V iew

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • N E W Y O R K C I T Y : A gallery tour

Chelsea Galleries

ANDREA ROSEN

525 West 19th St.

GALLERY

212.727.2070

ABLE FINE ART NY GALLERY

www.andrearosengallery.com

www.ablefineartny.com

525 West 24th St.

DILLON GALLERY

511 West 25th St.

212.627.6000

www.dillongallery.com

212.675.3057

555 West 25th St. BARRY FRIEDMAN LTD.

212.727.8585

ACA GALLERIES

www.barryfriedmanltd.com

www.acagalleries.com

515 West 26th St.

ELIZABETH HARRIS

529 West 20th St.

212.239.8600

GALLERY

212.206.8080

www.eharrisgallery.com BORTOLAMI GALLERY

529 West 20th St.

AGORA GALLERY

www.bortolamigallery.com

212.463.9666

www.agora-gallery.com

520 West 20th St.

530 West 25th St.

212.727.2050

FREIGHT + VOLUME

212.226.4151

www.freightandvolume.com CAROLINA NITSCH

530 West 24th St.

ALEXANDER AND BONIN

www.carolinanitsch.com

212.691.7700

www.alexanderandbonin.com

534 West 22nd St.

132 Tenth Ave.

212.645.2030

GAGOSIAN GALLERY

212.367.7474

www.gagosian.com CHEIM & READ

555 West 24th St.

AMERINGER |

www.cheimread.com

212.741.1111

McENERY | YOHE

547 West 25th St.

www.amy-nyc.com

212.242.7727

GALLERY HENOCH

525 West 22nd St.

www.galleryhenoch.com

212.445.0051

DANZIGER PROJECTS

555 West 25th St.

www.danzigerprojects.com

917.305.0003

AMSTERDAM

527 West 23rd St.

WHITNEY GALLERY

212.629.6778

GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY

www.amsterdamwhitneygallery.com

www.georgebillis.com

511 West 25th St.

DAVID ZWIRNER

521 West 26th St.

212.255.9050

www.davidzwirner.com

212.645.2621

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Chelsea Galleries continued...

GLADSTONE GALLERY

LENNON,

MARY RYAN GALLERY

www.gladstonegallery.com

WEINBERG, INC.

www.maryryangallery.com

515 West 24th St.

www.lennonweinberg.com

527 West 26th St.

212.206.9300

514 West 25th St.

212.397.0669

212.941.0012 JAMES COHAN

MATTHEW MARKS

GALLERY

LEHMANN MAUPIN

GALLERY

www.jamescohan.com

www.lehmannmaupin.com

www.matthewmarks.com

533 West 26th St.

540 West 26th St.

523 West 24 St.

212.714.9500

212.255.2923

212.243.0200

JENKINS JOHNSON

LESLIE TONKONOW

McKENZIE

GALLERY

ARTWORKS + PROJECTS

FINE ART

www.jenkinsjohnsongallery.com

www.tonkonow.com

www.mckenziefineart.com

521 West 26th St.

535 West 22nd St.

511 West 25th St.

212.629.0707

212.255.8450

212.989.5467

JONATHAN LeVINE

MAGNAN METZ GALLERY

METRO PICTURES

GALLERY

http://magnanmetz.com

www.metropicturesgallery.com

www.jonathanlevinegallery.com

521 West 26th St.

519 West 24th St.

529 West 20th St.

212.244.2344

212.206.7100

MARGARET THATCHER

MITCHELL-INNES

JOSHUA LINER GALLERY

PROJECTS

& NASH

www.joshualinergallery.com

www.thatcherprojects.com

www.miandn.com

548 West 28th St.

539 West 23rd St.

534 West 26th St.

212.244.7415

212.675.0222

212.744.7401

KATHRYN MARKEL

MARLBOROUGH

NANCY HOFFMAN

FINE ARTS

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.markelfinearts.com

www.marlboroughgallery.com

www.nancyhoffmangallery.com

529 West 20th St.

545 West 25th St.

520 West 27th St.

212.366.5368

212.463.8634

212.966.6676

212.243.3822

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NANCY MARGOLIS

SARA MELTZER

GALLERY

GALLERY

http://nancymargolisgallery.com

www.sarameltzergallery.com

523 West 25th St.

525-531 West 26th St.

212.242.3013

212.727.9330

Downtown and Lower East Side Galleries ARCADIA FINE ARTS

NICOLE KLAGSBRUN

STEPHEN HALLER

http://arcadiafinearts.com

GALLERY

GALLERY, INC.

51 Greene St.

www.nicoleklagsbrun.com

www.stephenhallergallery.com

212.965.1387

532 West 24th St.

542 West 26th St.

212.243.3335

212.741.7777

CHINASQUARE GALLERY

NOHO GALLERY

SUNDARAM TAGORE

www.chinasquareny.com

www.nohogallery.com

GALLERY

102 Allen St.

530 West 25th St.

www.sundaramtagore.com

212.255.8886

212.367.7063

547 West 27th St. 212.677.4520

ELEVEN RIVINGTON

PAULA COOPER

www.elevenrivington.com

GALLERY

WINSTON WÄCHTER

11 Rivington St.

www.paulacoopergallery.com

FINE ART

212.982.1930

534 West 21st St.

www.winstonwachter.com

212.255.1105

530 West 25th St.

GALLERY SATORI

212.255.2718

www.gallerysatori.com

164 Stanton St.

PAVEL ZOUBOK

646.896.1075

GALLERY

303 GALLERY

www.pavelzoubok.com

www.303gallery.com

533 West 23rd St.

547 West 21st St.

HELLER GALLERY

212.675.7490

212.255.1121

www.hellergallery.com

420 West 14th St. 212.414.4014

P.P.O.W.

1500 GALLERY

www.ppowgallery.com

www.1500gallery.com

535 West 22nd St.

511 West 25th St.

JEN BEKMAN GALLERY

212.647.1044

212.255.2010

www.jenbekman.com

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Downtown and

L ower East Side Galleries continued...

6 Spring St.

SPERONE WEST

EDWYNN HOUK

212.219.0166

www.speronewestwater.com

GALLERY

257 Bowery

www.houkgallery.com

212.999.7337

745 5th Ave.

JUNE KELLY GALLERY

212.750.7070

www.junekellygallery.com

166 Mercer St.

WOODWARD GALLERY

212.226.1660

www.woodwardgallery.net

GERING & LÓPEZ GALLERY

133 Eldridge St.

www.geringlopez.com

212.966.3411

730 5th Ave.

LISA COOLEY

646.336.7183

www.lisa-cooley.com

Midtown Galleries

107 Norfolk St. 212.680.0564

GREENBERG VAN DOREN GALLERY

LOUIS K. MEISEL GALLERY

A. JAIN MARUNOUCHI

www.gvdgallery.com

www.meiselgallery.com

GALLERY

730 5th Ave.

141 Prince St.

www.artin2000.com

212.445.0444

212.677.1340

24 West 57th St. 212.969.9660

HAMMER GALLERIES

MARTIN LAWRENCE

www.hammergalleries.com

GALLERIES

ALEXANDRE GALLERY

475 Park Ave.

http://martinlawrence.com

http://alexandregallery.com

212.644.4400

457 West Broadway

41 East 57th St.

212.995.8865

212.755.2828

HIRSCHL & ADLER GALLERIES

OK HARRIS

BONNI BENRUBI GALLERY

www.hirschlandadler.com

www.okharris.com

www.bonnibenrubi.com

730 Fifth Ave.

383 West Broadway

41 East 57th St.

212.535.8810

212.431.3600

212.888.6007 HOWARD GREENBERG

SIMON PRESTON GALLERY

D. WIGMORE FINE ART

GALLERY

www.simonprestongallery.com

www.dwigmore.com

www.howardgreenberg.com

301 Broome St.

730 5th Ave.

41 East 57th St.

212.431.1105

212.581.1657

212.334.0010

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JADITE GALLERIES

MAXWELL DAVIDSON

WALLY FINDLAY

www.jadite.com

GALLERY

GALLERIES

413 West 50th St.

www.davidsongallery.com

www.wallyfindlay.com

212.315.2740

724 Fifth Ave.

124 East 57th St.

212.759.7555

212.421.5390

www.jasonmccoyinc.com

SCOTT JACOBSON

ZABRISKIE

41 East 57th St.

GALLERY

GALLERY

212.319.1996

www.scottjacobsongallery.com

www.zabriskiegallery.com

114 East 57th St.

400 East 57th St.

212.872.1616

212.752.1223

www.laurencemillergallery.com

SPANIERMAN GALLERY

20 West 57th St.

www.spanierman.com

Uptown Galleries

212.397.3930

45 East 58th St.

JASON McCOY, INC.

LAURENCE MILLER GALLERY

212.832.0208

ACQUAVELLA

MARIAN GOODMAN

GALLERIES, INC.

GALLERY

SPANIERMAN

www.acquavellagalleries.com

www.mariangoodman.com

MODERN

18 East 79th St.

24 West 57th St.

www.spaniermanmodern.com

212.734.6300

212.977.7160

53 East 58th St. 212.832.1400

ADAM BAUMGOLD

MARLBOROUGH

GALLERY

GALLERY

TIBOR DE NAGY GALLERY

www.adambaumgoldgallery.com

www.marlboroughgallery.com

www.tibordenagy.com

60 East 66th St.

40 West 57th St.

724 5th Ave.

212 861.7338

212.541.4900

212.262.5050 AMERICAN

MARY BOONE

THROCKMORTON

ILLUSTRATORS

GALLERY

FINE ART

GALLERY

www.maryboonegallery.com

www.throckmorton-nyc.com

www.americanillustrators.com

745 Fifth Ave.

145 East 57th St.

18 East 77th St.

212.752.2929

212.223.1059

212.744.5190

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Uptown galleries continued...

ANITA SHAPOLSKY

HAUSER & WIRTH

LEO CASTELLI

GALLERY

www.hauserwirth.com

GALLERY

www.anitashapolskygallery.com

32 East 69th St.

www.castelligallery.com

152 East 65th St.

212.794.4970

18 East 77th St.

212.452.1094

212.249.4470 HELLY NAHMAD

DAVID FINDLAY JR

GALLERY

McKEE GALLERY

GALLERY

www.hellynahmadgallery.com

http://mckeegallery.com

www.davidfindlayjr.com

975 Madison Ave.

745 Fifth Ave.

724 Fifth Ave.

212.879.2075

212.688.5951

JANE KAHAN

MICHAEL WERNER

DIDIER AARON

GALLERY

www.michaelwerner.com

www.didieraaron.com

www.janekahan.com

4 East 77th St.

32 East 67th St.

922 Madison Ave.

212.988.1623

212.988.5248

212.744.1490

212.486.7660

RICHARD GRAY GAGOSIAN

KEITH DE LELLIS

GALLERY

GALLERY

GALLERY

www.richardgraygallery.com

www.gagosian.com

www.keithdelellisgallery.com

1018 Madison Ave.

980 Madison Ave.

1045 Madison Ave.

212.472.8787

212.744.2313

212.327.1482 TILTON GALLERY

GERALD PETERS

KOUROS

www.jacktiltongallery.com

GALLERY

GALLERY

8 East 76th St.

www.gpgallery.com

www.kourosgallery.com

212.737.2221

24 East 78th St.

23 East 73rd St.

212.628.9760

212.288.5888

VAN DE WEGHE FINE ART

GODEL & CO. FINE ART

L&M ARTS

www.vdwny.com

www.godelfineart.com

www.lmgallery.com

1018 Madison Ave.

39A East 72nd St.

45 East 78 St.

212.744.1900

212.288.7272

212.861.0020

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On View 08-09.2012  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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