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The P O W E R of the I M A G E F E AT U R I N G

A Second Telling – September

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Here is N E W YO R K AT T H E

SOUTHEAST MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY, D AY T O N A B E A C H


CONTENTS August/September

2011

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ON THE COVER : CHRISTOPHE AGOU, UNTITLED, 2001, DIGITAL PRINT, FROM THE EXHIBITION A SECOND TELLING– SEPTEMBER 11th: HERE IS NEW YORK. ©CHRISTOPHE AGOU RIGHT: A MAN WATCHES THE SHELLING OF NAHR AL-BARED CAMP, IN NORTHERN LEBANON, FROM HIS ROOFTOP. IMAGE (DETAIL) ©KATE BROOKS

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2011

The P O W E R of the I M A G E F E AT U R I N G

A Second Telling – September

11

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Here is N E W YO R K AT T H E

SOUTHEAST MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY, D AY T O N A B E A C H

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THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

The Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach presents a series of special exhibitions which pay homage to photojournalism and the men and women who risk their lives documenting the ravages of a world in conflict.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

54 Gainesville

64 Boca Raton

74 Orlando

84 Tampa

50 YEARS OF

ACCORDING TO

A RETROSPECTIVE

PROJECT, VOL. VIII

THE MIND’S EYE: PHOTOGRAPHY BY JERRY UELSMANN

The beautiful and surreal photographs of Jerry N. Uelsmann are presented in this major retrospective exhibition at the Harn Museum of Art.

THE WORLD

FEDERICO URIBE

TONY ROBBIN:

Art and geometry conCommon everyday verge at the Orlando objects take on new Museum of Art in this meaning in this creative retrospective exhibit display of whimsical of vibrant works sculptures at the Boca depicting higherRaton Museum of Art. dimensional space.

THE BIG PICTURE

Presented by the City of Tampa and hosted by the Tampa Museum of Art, The Hillsborough River: From the Green Swamp to the Bay, is a stunning showcase of landscape images by City of Tampa Photographer Laureate VIII, Karen Glaser.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): JERRY UELSMANN, UNTITLED (DETAIL), 1969, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, ©JERRY N. UELSMANN; FEDERICO URIBE, TRAFFIC

Dunedin

(DETAIL), 2011, WOOD, OIL AND

ART OF THE SIDESHOW

BICYCLE TIRES, 192 x 96”,

94 The wonder and spectacle of a bygone RIGHT: JOHN WHIPPLE, PARADE (DETAIL), 24 x 72”, MIXED MEDIA

era is rekindled through works inspired by the rich history of traveling carnivals and circuses in Sideshow, at the Dunedin Fine Arts Center. OnV

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COURTESY OF NOW CONTEMPORARY ART; TONY ROBBIN, 1999-4, 1999 (DETAIL), ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 56 x 52”, COLLECTION OF LISA AND JOE JENSEN; KAREN GLASER, HILLSBOROUGH RIVER CLARITY (DETAIL)

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CONTENTS August/September

2011

Vo l u m e

2,

No.

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

A powerful exhibition expresses, through art, the emotions and real life challenges people face every day.

118

CATCHING AIR

Japanese kites, with striking images of samurai warriors, demons and sea creatures, are on display at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach.

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

34

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists

Spotlight

Fo c u s

114

120

RON VAN SWERINGEN

Fascination, acrylic on canvas, 38 x 30”, Private Collection

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LILIAN GARCIA-ROIG

Craft

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PICTURED:

116

Lilian’s large-scale, surface leavened works transform the canvas into a painterly relief and pivot between the recognizable and the abstract.

5

Ron Van Sweringen,

3

Profile

E. BRADY ROBINSON

E. Brady Robinson The Mennello Museum of American Art, in exploits the tradition of the Orlando, presents an exhibition of striking snapshot to examine abstract works by the father of “Astroism” and and document social and Vero Beach resident, Ron Van Sweringen. cultural environments.

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C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew

The Power of the Image

M A G A Z I N E

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

T h e u p c o m i n g 10 t h a n n i v e r s a r y o f 9/11 is the inspiration behind several compelling exhibitions which revisit the devastating events surrounding the World Trade Center tragedy of 2001 as well as the conflicts and stresses that continue to plague the world today. The Power of the Image, on pg. 38, speaks to the powerful impact of photography and pays tribute to the men and women who document the ravages of war and terrorism by sharing their unique perspectives through intriguing and profound visual narratives. Our photographic journey continues with The Mind’s Eye: 50 Years of Photography by Jerry Uelsmann, on pg. 54, where both psychological and spiritual dimensions are revealed through surreal and masterfully handcrafted photographic montages, and The Big Picture Project, Vol. VIII, on pg. 84, which presents stunning panoramic landscape portraits of Tampa by City of Tampa Photographer Laureate, Karen Glaser. Rounding out our feature lineup are: The World According to Federico Uribe, on pg. 64, an exhibition of whimsical sculptures created from common everyday objects; Tony Robbin: A Retrospective, on pg. 74, a vibrant visual exploration of higher-dimensional space; and Sideshow, on pg. 94, an exotic showcase of works inspired by the wonder and spectacle of the circus sideshow—strange, unimaginable and amazing!

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney

Marketing Interns

Abigail Adkins, Christina C. Grass Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

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MUSE

Healing Art

T

BY STEVE SPECHT

THE WILD INSIDE

and

The Fixing of Me­—these are just two titles among the nearly 100 pieces of art presented at the exhibition, Healing Heart: Witness the Healing Power of Art, opening at the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, in Ocala on August 21st. The majority of the artwork in Healing Heart has been created by individuals who are receiving treatment for mental health and substance abuse disorders, trauma, bereavement, Alzheimer’s and dementia­—as well as caregivers and prison inmates. Coordinated by The Centers and the Marion County Mental Wellness Coalition, most of the artwork is for sale and proceeds benefit the 11 participating organizations. To create the artwork, a group of professional local artists


MUSE

Healing Heart is centered on the healing that takes place through art...

—M eghan S hay ,

development coordinator for

T he C enters

volunteered their time to guide the Healing Heart artists. Laurie Zink, development director for The Centers, said, “Many of the Healing Heart artists have never picked up a paintbrush in their lives. The professional artists were able to teach them techniques to help accomplish their visions. This program gives individuals the opportunity to test their limits and feel confident in artistic abilities they hadn’t before discovered. For our clients, this experience has allowed them to see that they are capable of so much more than they ever imagined. We’ve seen amazing growth through this process.” Meghan Shay, development coordinator for The Centers, added, “Healing Heart is centered on the healing that takes place through art, while also raising awareness about the challenges people are faced with everyday. This is an opportunity for the community to have a better understanding of the various issues addressed in the exhibit and to learn about the organizations providing vital care for those in need. Visitors to the exhibition are sure to be moved and uplifted.” Healing Heart runs through September 18th and includes a series of weekend family art programs and educational art

PICTURED (TOP TO BOTTOM): the wild inside; untitled images courtesy of the artists

films. For more details, visit www.AppletonMuseum.org or call 352-291-4455. O n V iew OnV

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CALENDAR Current

08-09.2011 BOCA RATON Thru 09.11

Art for the People: 20th Century Social Realism Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

A selection of more than 100 paintings, drawings and prints, representative of American art between

Exhibitions

the 1920s and 1960s, includes examples of American urban and rural scene painting, and political and social realism. Thru 08.28

C O M P I L E D

B Y

of politics, society and art, a dialogue between avant-garde movements and “indigenist” thinking, and the search for cultural identity. Twenty works, by many of the

Latin American Art from the Museum’s Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art

V I E W

cisco Zúñiga, to the modernism of Rufino Tamayo and Matta, to the contemporary abstraction of Enrique Castro-Cid and Carlos Cruz-Diez, and the poetic realism of Julio Larraz. 09.21-01.08.12

www.bocamuseum.org

This sampling of Latin American Art, from the Permanent Collection, introduces the work of several major Latin American artists whose works reflect the interaction

O N

most important 20th century Latin American artists, range from the traditional figurative sculpture of Fran-

Outsider Visions: Self-taught Southern Artists of the 20th Century Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

A veritable feast of more than 75 captivating works by selftaught artists, this

1. Richard Florsheim, Poles in Landscape, 1936, egg tempera on paper board, 14-1/2 x 21-1/4”, Museum Permanent Collection, gift of the Richard A. Florsheim Art Fund 2. Arturo Rodriguez, Sub Rosa, 1994, oil on linen, 94 x 68”, Permanent Collection, gift of the artist

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Boca Raton continued...

www.bocamuseum.org

exhibition presents, for the first time in South Florida, rare and fascinating works from the collection of Ted and Ann Oliver, who have spent more than 30 years studying, collecting and writing about southern contemporary folk art. 09.21- 12.04

The World According to Federico Uribe Boca Raton Museum of Art

Colombian conceptual artist, Federico Uribe, is known for his fascinating transformation of everyday objects into art. Included in the exhibition are works from Uribe’s 2008 Animal Farm and the debut of his new work—several life-sized palm trees made from the spines and fanned pages of books, and gardens constructed of gardening tools. (See story on pg. 64.) CORAL GABLES

www6.miami.edu/lowe

On view are 30 photographs by American photographer, Frank Paulin. Rediscovered in his eighth decade, Paulin is now recognized for uniquely documenting fleeting human

Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www6.miami.edu/lowe

Featuring some 100 paintings, drawings, ceramics, glass and sculptures, this exhibition explores thematic connections between mythic traditions in world art, drawn from the Lowe’s Permanent Collection, which moments of both spans 5,000 years humor and poetry, and represents the particularly against artistic traditions of the backdrop of gritty both western and nonurban scenes. western cultures.

Thru 09.25

Thru 10.23

Frank Paulin: American Documentarian Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Sacred Stories, Timeless Tales: Mythic Perspectives in World Art from the Permanent Collection

1. Mose Tolliver, Siamese Twins, 1980s, house paint on plywood, 24 x 21”, courtesy of Ann and Ted Oliver 2. Federico Uribe, Bull, 2008, wood and shoe soles, 96 x 72 x 36”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 3. Frank Paulin,
Man Smoking Cigarette Outside St. Francis Bread Line, New York, 1957, 
gelatin silver print, 9 x 13-1/2”,
gift of Bruce Silverstein 4. Japan, Edo Period, 1615-1868, 
Shoki and Oni, 18th century,
ivory and stain, 2-1/4 x 1-5/8 x 7/8”,
gift of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Kurstin

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Coral Springs Museum of Art

CORAL SPRINGS

www.csmart.org

Thru 08.20

Selections from CSMART’s Permanent Collection Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Works drawn from the Museum’s Permanent Collection are highlighted.

Tools in Motion is an exhibition of witty, light-hearted works by emerging and prominent contemporary artists. The 47 motionrelated and visually intriguing works selected for this exhibition were chosen with children, families and school groups in mind, to foster educational programming opportunities. In addition, works by artists such as Arman, Claes Oldenburg and Jim Dine are sure

Thru 08.20

Tools in Motion: Works from the Hechinger Collection

to attract contemporary the wilderness, cheerart lovers of all ages. fully accepting constant discomfort and danger. The beauty of DAYTONA his Birds of America is BEACH equaled by its scienThru 02.27.12 tific value as a part of Audubon! our nation’s natural Selections from heritage. (See story John James Audubon’s Birds of America Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

John James Audubon painted nearly threequarters of the North American species of birds, of which the Museum holds more than 30 superb examples. Audubon set a standard by which all other naturalistartists can be judged. His understanding of American birds reflected his years of traveling and living in

in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 62.) 08.18-10.02

A SECOND TELLING — September 11th: Here is New York Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

1. Alexandra Nechita, courtesy of Coral Springs Museum of Art 2. Edgar Soberon, The Kiss (detail), 1989 3. John James Audubon, Ruby-throated Hummingbird

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Daytona Beach continued...

9-11 by Kate Brooks Southeast Museum of Photography

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

www.smponline.org

In the Light of Darkness includes a collection of images that This powerful series chronicle Brooks’ of photographs, drawn 10-year passage from from the Museum’s the mountains of Tora Permanent CollecBora to the uprisings tion, was originally in the Arab world in displayed in the spring early 2011. (See The of 2002 in response to the World Trade Center tragedy of 2001 and to the unprecedented flood of images that resulted from that event. (See The Power of the Image on pg. 40.) Power of the Image on pg. 44.)

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Portraits of wounded fighters, orphans and children, injured by land mines and bombs, form a moving visual record of the toll taken on the population of Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation. (See The Power of the Image on pg. 46.)

09.09-12.16

In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey after

09.09-12.16

08.18-10.02

Portraits from Afghanistan by Khalid Hadi

Garmsir Marines by Louie Palu

In this series of images, Palu created simple, direct portraits of US Marines operating in Garmsir, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, where some of the most intense fighting of 2008 took place. (See

The Power of the Image on pg. 48.) 08.18-10.02

A Journey Through

1. Untitled, 2001, digital print, artist unknown 2. Image (detail) ©Kate Brooks 3. Image ©Khalid Hadi 4. Louie Palu, US Marine Gysgt. Carlos “OJ” Orjuela, age 31, Garmsir, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008

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Daytona Beach continued...

Afghanistan by Lucian Perkins Southeast Museum of Photography

womenartists.org

Portrayed in this series of photographs are images taken within fictitious Iraqi and Afghan villages on the training grounds of US Army bases. (See The Power of the Image on pg. 52.)

Following the success of Witness to Creativity, which took place in July of 2010, the Museum once again opened its doors to the public while a group of artists prepared their works. Viewers enjoyed a rare opportunity to engage the artists about their projects, work methods and messages. This dialog between the artists and viewers is part of the resulting art installations making up this exhibition.

D e LAND

DELRAY BEACH

08.18-10.02

Thru 09.03

Thru 10.02

Theater Of War: The Pretend Villages of Iraq and Afghanistan by Christopher Sims

Witness to Creativity II Florida Museum for Women Artists

Catching Air: Kites of Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.smponline.org

Taken in late 2001, these pictures show the immediate aftermath of the initial battles in Afghanistan with graphic and moving imagery.

(See The Power of the Image on pg. 50.)

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

www.floridamuseumfor

www.morikami.org

On display is an assortment of Japanese kites and kite papers featuring striking multicolored images of famous samurai warriors, demons, sea creatures and many

more! (See story on pg. 118.) Thru 10.02

Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists Morikami Museum

1. Image (detail) ©Lucian Perkins 2. Image ©Christopher Sims 3. Image courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

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Delray Beach continued...

and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Women in Japan have been involved in the production of ceramics for thousands of years, but only a few have ever been recognized. Soaring Voices includes ceramic works created by 25 exceptional contemporary women artists. The shape of the forms and the individual artist’s choice of subject matter, use of materials and technical process, reveal a wide range of artistic innovations that will

delight the senses. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 46.)

Roethlisberger and Admir Jahic. Thru 08.21

New Quilts from an Old Favorite 2010: Sunflower 09.09-12.23 and Portals Believe It or Not?
 Dunedin Fine Dunedin Fine Art Center Art Center www.dfac.org

DUNEDIN 09.09-10.17

Sideshow 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.dfac.org

www.dfac.org

Fresh interpretations of the ‘sideshow’ are presented by artists Lori Ballard, Bryan Cunningham, Amy Johnquest, Daniel Mrgan, Chris Rush, John & Lynn Whipple and Kreg Yingst. (See story on pg. 94.)

This international exhibition features contemporary artists whose works—in image, methods or materials—are simply, unbelievable! Artists, representing a range of media, include: CarrieAnn Baade, Cynthia Holmes, Jennifer Lederhouse, Jennifer Maestre, Carol Prusa, Brian Ransom and collaborative artists, Comenius

Two exhibitions of original quilts from the US and Canada provide a wonderful look at the skills, techniques and re-

markable creativity of today’s quiltmakers.

1. Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 03-III, 2003, stoneware and glass, photo ©Taku Saiki 2. Amy ‘Banner Queen’ Johnquest, It’s Here We Have It, 2005, approx. 39” x 3’, casien & acrylic on brown cotton mesh 3. Cynthia Holmes, Friends, oil on panel 4. Image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center

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7 thematic sections: The Art of Children and Family, LAUDERDALE Caring: A Look Love, Wellness, Healat Life through ing, Disaster, Aging Photography and Remembering. Museum of Art / The 200 photographs Fort Lauderdale, in the exhibition have Nova Southeastern been lent by artists, University museums, private www.moafl.org collectors and from Thru 10.02 Through the use of the holdings of the An Intimate photographs and Time/LIFE Picture Look at William film, The Art of CarCollection. (See story Glackens and ing examines how in the June/July 2011 The Eight key events are celissue on pg. 54.) Museum of Art / ebrated and how Fort Lauderdale, pivotal decisions are Thru 09.04 Nova Southeastern made by different Sight Specific: University cultures throughout Explorations in www.moafl.org the world. The exhibi- Space, Vision Included in this tion is organized into and Sound exhibition are works Museum of Art / by Glackens and Fort Lauderdale, his contemporaries Nova Southeastern as well as a special University installation of www.moafl.org landscapes created This highly unique by Glackens from special exhibition 1908 through the features 9 installa1930s. tions created by 11 Thru 09.25

FORT

of South Florida’s leading contemporary artists. Visitors are encouraged to give positive or negative feedback about the installations via social media, artists’ websites, etc., to expand the conversation about the arts in the local community and within the larger society. Thru 9.09.12

Associations and Inspiration: The CoBrA Movement and

1. William Glackens, Sledding, Central Park (detail), 1912, oil on canvas 2. Annie Leibovitz, Rebecca Denison, Founder of WORLD (Women Organized to Respond to Life-threatening Diseases), San Francisco, 1993, archival pigment print, courtesy Leibovitz Studio, NY, NY; ©Annie Leibovitz 3. Gavin Perry, Cluster F***

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

the Arts of Africa and Oceania Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

This lively and thought-provoking installation juxtaposes paintings, sculpture

and works on paper, by artists of the CoBrA movement, with masks, totems and carvings created on the South Pacific island of New Guinea and on the continent of Africa.

major retrospective exhibition to consider the full range of Uelsmann’s work, including his earliest documentary photographs and his experiments with artist books and three-dimensional photo-sculpture. (See story on pg. 54.)

GAINESVILLE Thru 05.27.12

Sebastião Salgado: World Witness Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Considered one of the most highly recognized photojournalists in the world, Salgado focuses on people who are politically, economically and culturally excluded from the promise of global development. In this exhibition, Salgado documents famine in Africa and manual labor around the world. His photographs have often been at the center of debates regarding the role of aesthetics, ethics and the documentary form.

Thru 09.11

The Mind’s Eye, 50 Years of Photography by Jerry Uelsmann Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

HOLLYWOOD Thru 08.14

Beautiful and surreal, funny and provocative, the photographs of Jerry N. Uelsmann have become icons of American photo history. For 60 years, Uelsmann has been challenging conventional ideas about what photography can and should do. The Mind’s Eye is the first

Ed Templeton: The Seconds Pass Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Internationally recognized artist and skateboarding legend,

1. Melanesia, New Guinea, Papua New Guinea, Abelam people, Abelam mask, 20th century, rattan with tied fiber, polychrome, earth

pigments, Collection of the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, gift of Mr. Robert Thornton 2. Jerry Uelsmann, Dream Theater, 2004, pigment inkjet print [Epson], gift of Jerry N. Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor 3. Ed Templeton, from The Seconds Pass (catalogue), 2010, courtesy of Roberts & Tilton Gallery

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Holly wood continued...

Ed Templeton, creates works that juxtapose his street photography in quasi-narrative groupings. Thru 08.14

Michael O’Brien: Impact Zone Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Michael O’Brien loves the water—specifically, the ocean. A surfer for 35 years, O’Brien has a unique connection to the ocean. His work is an expression of 20 years

with a camera in the ‘impact zone’.

Thru 08.14

Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Ryan Humphrey is a New York-based contemporary artist who incorporates BMX bikes in dynamic 2and 3-dimensional works. Fast Forward features a largescale, floor-to-ceiling installation in which BMX bikes are attached to the gallery wall. The installation includes a massive

wrap-around rug created by Humphrey with designer, Todd Oldham, a collection of bike-inspired paintings and mixedmedia pieces, and 3 versions of Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel (1913) set against BMX bike ramps. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 100.)

interested in the tumultuous years of the 1940s and 1950s, she began investigating the crimes that occurred during these decades. Her photographs are based on vintage crime-scene images she mined from the files of the Los Angeles Police Department, the County Coroner’s

JACKSONVILLE Thru 11.06

Project Atrium: Melanie Pullen Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

For her series, High Fashion Crime Scenes, Pullen focused on the violent past of her adopted city—Los Angeles. Particularly

Office and other primary sources. 09.16-01.08.12

Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso GonzalezFalla Collection of Photography

1. Michael O’Brien, C-print, 1992-2010 2. Ryan Humphrey, Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward, installation view, photo by Brian Barnhart 3. Melanie Pullen, Dorothy (Barrel Series) [detail], 2003, 
C-print, plexi face mount, 
Ace Gallery, Beverly Hills, 2005

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Presley, to historical figures, such as George Washington, to religious images, like The Devils Vice and Museum of John the Baptist, to his Contemporary own visions, Finster’s Art, Jacksonville “sacred art” paintings www.mocajacksonville.org incorporate colorful, The Sondra Gilman detailed, flat picture Collection presents a selection of modern and contemporary photographs by such celebrated figures as Eugène Atget, Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston. Thru 08.28

Stranger in Paradise: The Works of Reverend Howard Finster Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

From pop culture icons, like Elvis

planes, often covered with Bible verses. Thru 08.28

What a Doll: The Human Object as Toy Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

08.12-12.20

One in Three: Let’s Solve Our Dropout Crisis The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Serving as an anchor Artist, Christina West, for several campaign builds an enigmatic initiatives spreadnarrative in What a ing awareness of the Doll: The Human Ob- dropout crisis, this ject as Toy, an installa- exhibition features tion of three-quarters photographs by Jacklife-size clay figures sonville artist, Ingrid permanently frozen in Damiani, chronicling mid-gesture. Stripped the compelling chalfrom the context of lenges and successes previous actions, the of local students. figures’ personalities, motives and intentions are malleable and unfixed in the viewers’ minds. Who they are is in a state of flux, dependent on the stories viewers create. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 98.) www.mocajacksonville.org

1. Misrach, Richard, Battleground Point, No 20, Chromogenic print, courtesy of the Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla Collection, © Richard Misrach, coutesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Fransisco; Mark Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles; Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York 2. Howard Finster, Emages of Visions of Other Worlds Beyond (3077), n.d., tractor enamel on plexiglas, courtesy of the Arient Family Collection 3. Christina West, What a Doll: the Human Object as Toy (detail), 2010, glazed ceramic and stuffed fabric 4. Photograph by Ingrid Damiani

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Thru 08.14

On the Silk Road and the High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture, and Commerce The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition were treasured at home and abroad, and considered rarities until the mid-18th century. Specific

styles and innovations that arose as a result of cross-cultural exchanges are highlighted.

Cummers’ home, to recreate the domestic sphere in which their collection was originally displayed.

Thru 12.31

Thru 12.31

Re-opening of the Tudor Room The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer has unveiled a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnishings, a fireplace and a selection of art from the

More than 3 years of planning and research have culminated in a new reinstallation of The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain, recognized as the most important

collection of Meissen in the US. LAKELAND

09.17-12.10

“EN PLEIN” SIGHT: Paintings by Lilian Garcia-Roig Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Garcia-Roig transcends the typical definition of a landscape painter. Her style oscillates between realism and abstraction, combining brushwork with thick globs of color, forced directly onto the canvas. (See story on pg. 116.)

1. Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount, Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796–1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century, porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamel-on-biscuit decoration, 17 x 10-1/4 x 6-3/4”, gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection 2. Interior of Cummer Home (detail), ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives 3. Tea Caddy from the Queen Marie of Hanover Coffee and Tea Service, ca. 1730, porcelain with painted decoration Johann Gregorius Höroldt, 4-1/3” 4. Lilian Garcia-Roig, Rapid Waters, 2010, oil on canvas

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always been a defining characteristic of Decorative Art. Decorative Art objects from various cultures and time periods are presented, from Georgian silver to Asian porceThru 10.08 lain to Pre-Columbian Figuration ceramics. Each arttography, we witness a Polk Museum work is displayed fusion of intimacy and of Art curiosity. In Mexico www.polkmuseumofart.org consists of compelling This exhibition focusslivers of her experies on artworks from ence with the country’s the Polk’s Permanent culture. Collection that feature the human figure. 08.13-11.13 Thru 09.10

Form/Function: Decorative Arts from the Permanent Collection Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

The correlation between artistic design and functionality has

according to how its form relates to its intended function.

The (Lost) Art of Drawing

09.17-12.10

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Included in this exhibition are artworks from the Museum’s Permanent Collection that exemplify how drawing remains a fundamental basis for fine arts and an important component of creative process. MAITLAND Thru 11.01

Maitland History Illustrated: Works by Dawn Schreiner Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

This survey of works is an important example of how history can come to life! Schreiner’s images marry fact with whimsy in

Jessica Lange: In Mexico Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Through Lange’s pho-

1. Harrison Covington, Face to Face (detail), 1990, acrylic and collage on canvas, PMoA Permanent Collection, purchased through the Kent Harrison Memorial Acquisition Fund 2. Italian, Urbino, Plate depicting Piove la Manna (“It rains manna”), ca. 1550-1575, Majolica (tin-glazed earthenware), Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Dr. Jane Carver Holmes 3. Jessica Lange, Mexico, ed. 2/20, 2008, silver gelatin print, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Robert and Malena Puterbaugh 4. Ummarid “Tony” Eitharong, Attempt to Speak Clearly, 1987, graphite on paper, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection.

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this ode to Maitland’s beginnings.

cades navigating high society and portraying opulent life as one of America’s highest paid illustrators during the “Golden Age of American Illustration.” His “confident line” created a portrait of American aspirations. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 72.)

nary gift for conveying complex concepts in ways that are fun and engaging. The artist’s classic books, which bring together the worlds of art, history and science, include such outstanding volumes as The Way Things Work,

www.artcentersf.org

Thru 09.11

The Confident Line: Henry Patrick Raleigh Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Henry Patrick Raleigh (1880-1944) spent de-

MELBOURNE Thru 10.09

Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay Foosaner Art Museum www.brevardartmuseum.org

David Macaulay is an author and artist who has helped us to understand the workings and origins of everything from gadgets to gargantuan buildings. He has an extraordi-

ArtCenter/ South Florida

Cathedral, Castle, City, Mill, Pyramid, Ship, Building Big and Mosque. MIAMI Thru 08.21

GGG Presents The Pop Up


Graffiti Gone Global & ArtCenter/South Florida present an exhibit showcasing the private Eames Inspiration Collection along with street artists Flip, Sesper, Smael and Remed. The show blurs the line between the street and the gallery, presenting a multifaceted exhibition highlighting the freshest and most undeniable influences of urban aesthetics and contemporary design.

1. Dawn Schreiner, image courtesy of Art & History Museums Maitland 2. Henry Patrick Raleigh, photo courtesy of the Henry Raleigh Archive, Collection of Kate and Chris Raleigh 3. David Macaulay, from Cathedral, ©1999 David Macaulay, courtesy of Norman Rockwell Museum 4. Peru Ana Ana Peru, Eames Re-imagined, © Peru Ana Ana Peru

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Thru 10.16

Sandra Gamarra: At The Same Time (al mismo tiempo) Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Peruvian artist, Sandra Gamarra, takes images from wellknown contexts and makes them her own. Included in her exhibition at the Bass Museum are paintings based on photographs she has taken of visitors looking at works of art in

08.05-10.30

Vanishing Points: Paint and Paintings from the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Vanishing Points explores how we perceive painting today as it relates to the history and continued viability of the medium. Thru 08.28

the Museum’s galleries. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 96.)

Anchor Gallery: Mark Dion Miami Art Museum

of art, science, ecology, history and archeology, Dion’s large-scale installation, South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit, explores human attempts to rationalize

and control Florida’s Everglades. 08.19-11.06

Focus Gallery: Joel Meyerowitz Miami Art Museum

Zero after the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Armed with a worker’s badge and a large-format wooden camera, Meyerowitz spent nine months photographing Ground Zero and the over 800 people a day that were working in it. Thru 10.16

Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Rivane Neuenschwander’s practice

www.miamiartmuseum.org

MAM presents a recent acquisition of 24 photographs by www.miamiartmuseum.org the only photograInterweaving the pher granted right of diverse disciplines entry into Ground

1. Sandra Gamarra, Santos, 2008, oil on canvas, 63-3/4 x 76-3/4”, image courtesy of Galería Leme, São Paulo, Brazil 2. Jim Lambie, Zobop Colour, 1999, colored vinyl tape, variable dimensions, courtesy of the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection, Miami, Florida, image courtesy of The Modern Institute, Glasgow, Scotland, installation view, Days like these: Tate Triennial, Tate Britain, London, 2003 3. Mark Dion, The South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit: Mobile Laboratory, 2006, mixed media installation, 18’ 11” x 7’ 7” x 8’ 11”, Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Lin Lougheed, reproduced with permission of the artist, photo: Tim McAfee 4. I Wish Your Wish (detail), 2003, silkscreen on fabric ribbons, dimensions variable, from Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other, courtesy New Museum, NY, photo: Benoit Pailley

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merges painting, photography, film, sculpture, installation and participatory actions. The exhibition surveys Neuenschwander’s work of the past decade and includes 3 of her incredibly immersive, viscerally beautiful installations. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 94.)  

practice that, in form and function, advances understandings of 21st century technology, narrative and identity—and also propels these matters as expressive mediums.

This multi-media exhibit consists of 2 works that look at modern life and explore the idea that 21st century life is lived, to a surprising degree, in a context of boxes of our own making. Thru 09.18

East/West: Visually Speaking

Thru 08.14

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 09.18 Thru 09.04

Ryan Trecartin: Any Ever Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

David and Hi-Jin Hodge: Who’s Counting and Temporal State of Being The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Seven new video installations produced http://thefrost.fiu.edu in 2009, during Ryan Trecartin’s yearlong research-based residency in Miami, are presented. Trecartin has established a singular video

new styles of art. In some works, the reference to Western culture seems adoring, while in others, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 38.)

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

East/West: Visually Speaking highlights 12 contemporary Chinese artists who have adapted Western ideas and art forms to create

Rise of an Empire: Scenes of the SinoJapanese War of 1894-95 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

This exhibit features 20 woodblock print triptychs depicting the first major conflict of Imperial Japan after the Meiji Restoration of 1868 and the rapid westernization of Japan. These woodblock

1. Ryan Trecartin, Any Ever, installation view, photo by Steven Brooke 2. David & Hi-Jin Hodge, Who’s Counting (Dining 11 items), 2011, photo mounted aluminum, 48 x 32”, courtesy of the artist 3. Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China, 2002-2008, painted copper (dragon), 65-3/4 x 22-7/8 x 30-1/4”, courtesy of the artist

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The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The recent works of the recipients of the 2010 South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship are presented.

prints were made by important artists and used in Japan as both propaganda and for the depiction of places the Japanese were only able to read about in newspapers. Thru 08.14 Thru 08.21

South Florida Cultural Consortium Exhibition

crafting embroidered balls. Artist, Sharon Thieman, creates these beautiful objects with a modern sensibility. Thru 08.14

Art for All: British Posters for Transport Organized by the Yale Center for British Art The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

All features posters for both the Underground and British railways. 09.08-09.30

Reflections on Loss and Commemoration

www.wolfsonian.org

Tribute to Japanese Splendor: The Art of the Temari The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Temari is the centuries old tradition of hand-

In 1908, the London Underground began an aggressive campaign that became one of the most successful, adventurous and best sustained branding operations ever attempted. The works produced include some of the greatest achievements in poster art. Art for

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

1. Ogata Gekko, Ryojun no sankan ni roei shoshi nikko o haisu zu (Picture of Officers and Men Worshiping the Rising Sun While Encamped in the Mountains of Port Arthur) [detail], triptych woodblock print, ink &colors on paper, Meiji Period, 1894, 14 x 28”, gift of private donor, photo ©Alex Garcia, The Frost Art Museum 2. Michael Genovese, 13 reasons, 2010, aluminum, silver leaf, toner, enamel on paper, 18 x 24”, courtesy of OHWOW Gallery 3. Temari balls by Sharon Thieman, photo ©Carlos Aristizabal 4. To Summer Sales by Underground, 1926,
designed by Horace Christopher Taylor,
lithograph,
Yale Center for British Art, gift of Henry S. Hacker,
Yale College, class of 1965,
©TfL from the London Transport Museum Collection 4. Marcel Wolfers, Le Baiser de la Victoire [Kiss of Victory], 1925, wood, 47 x 20 x 19”, The Wolfsonian–FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection

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www.wolfsonian.org

An installation of objects from The Wolfsonian Collection commemorates the 10th anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001. The exhibit poses questions about how humans record and commemorate disaster, tragedy and loss through the visual arts. OCALA 08.21-09.18

Healing Heart: Witness the Healing Power of Art Appleton Museum of Art

Presented are more than 100 pieces of art created by individuals who are receiving treatment for mental health and substance abuse disorders, trauma, autism, bereavement, Alzheimer’s and dementia. (See Muse on pg. 6.) Thru 09.25

Recent Acquisitions

www.appletonmuseum.org

Appleton Museum of Art

ORLANDO

www.appletonmuseum.org

Thru 08.21

View examples of the newest works of art that have been added to the Appleton’s world-class collection of art, artifacts and antiquities.

Expressions in Glass: American Brilliant Cut Glass 1876-1914 Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

The works presented in this exhibition are from private collectors in the Southeast, associated with the American Cut Glass Society, and represent Tradition/Innosome of the finest exvation: American amples of cut and enMasterpieces of graved glass from the Southern Crafts 1860s to the 1920s. 09.24-11.06

& Traditional Art Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

This powerful exhibition expresses, through art, the emotions and real life challenges people face every day.

The Appleton presents a selection of fine, handmade artwork and crafts by Southern artisans.

1. The Wild Inside, image courtesy of Appleton Museum of Art 2. Ummarid “Tony” Eitharong, Superman Puzzle (detail) 3. Steve Miller, Skin 4. Inkwell with stand, 1893, J. Hoare & Co., glass, 9-1/2 x 8 x 8”, Collection of Chester and Brenda Cassel

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dimensional forms. (See story on pg. 74.) Thru 09.25

Thru 10.30

Tony Robbin: A Retrospective Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Tony Robbin has been exploring the depiction of fourdimensional objects and spatial configurations with paintings and sculptures for the past 40 years. The resulting work appears as complex layers of geometric forms animated by patterns of color. Tony Robbin: A Retrospective includes 25 paintings, works on paper, a sculpture and video animations of four-

FLA.ART: Art by Florida Artists from the Permanent & Private Collections The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

FLA.ART features a diverse selection of works from the Museum’s Collection, The City of Orlando and several public and private collections. The

exhibit will be altered over the upcoming months, allowing the museum to show the evolution and changing face of Florida art, as represented by such artists as Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, John Chamberlain, Barbara Sorensen, Cheryl Bogdanowitsch, Purvis Young and Anna Tomczak, to name a few. Thru 09.25

impressionist to classic landscape, still life, and beach scenes with and without people. Most recently, this talented artist has been driven by the art of airborne

painting known as “Astroism”, whereby paint is “thrown” at an upright canvas. (See story on pg. 114.)

Ron Van Sweringen The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Over the past 35 years, Van Sweringen has translated his lifelong fascination with art of all kinds into oil paintings ranging from early primitive and

ORMOND BEACH 08.17-09.18

Dual Nature: The Work of Cecilia Lueza

1. Tony Robbin, 1980-13, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 70”, Collection of the artist 2. Cheryl Bogdanowitsch, Doberman, mixed media 3. Ron Van Sweringen, Manhattan, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48”, Private Collection

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The Cultural Center

www.pensacola museumofart.org

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Cecilia Lueza’s works carry an implicit message that mixes mysticism and earthliness through a wide range of artistic media, which includes painting, drawing, sculpture and digital art.

Reproductions of over a dozen Chagall masterpieces, all accompanied by hands-on interactive elements, allow children to create mosaics, weave tapestries, alter Chagall’s masterpieces using digital touch screens, conduct symphonies and, through the use of video, insert

themselves into one of his paintings.

www.ccpvb.org

Imaginative digital media art from Mark Moran and Troy Works by Diane Eittreim, in consensus Fraser, Jean with the sculptural Banas and Pablo works of D. Lance Rivera The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

This exhibition showcases the visual clarity and tranquility of Diane Fraser’s paintings; vibrant, abstract works by Jean Banas; and sculptural creations by Pablo Rivera.

PONTE VEDRA

Thru 09.04

Chagall for Children Pensacola Museum of Art

BEACH 09.09-10.18

Aesthetic Connections:

SARASOTA Thru 08.14

Thru 09.03

PENSACOLA

Vickery, are showcased in this exhibit.

Emergent: Works by Mark Moran, D. Lance Vickery and Troy Eittreim



Beyond Bling: Voices of Hip-Hop in Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

1. Cecilia Lueza, Fantasy Journey (detail), 2009, oil on canvas 2. Image courtesy of Kohl Children’s Museum of Greater Chicago 3. Jean Banas, Carousel, 37 x 48” 4. Mark Moran, Pleasure of Exploration, digital image, 2008

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Hip-hop has become a dominant part of popular culture and its influence can be seen in contemporary art. Beyond Bling takes a look at the work of a diverse mix of artists who all operate within and are also informed by hip-hop culture. Thru 10.30

Crosscurrents of Design: Asian Export Ceramics The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Asian export ceram-

ics were created in areas that are now known as Thailand, Vietnam, China and Japan. Combining indigenous traditions and borrowed designs, these decorative and

practical objects document the crosscultural exchange of material goods and artistic motifs that began centuries ago and still continue today. 09.17-01.29.12

The Amazing American Circus Poster:

The Strobridge Lithographing Company The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Thru 10.30

The Art of Jade The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Jade’s hardness makes it almost impossible to carve—instead, it must

The Amazing American Circus Poster showcases 80 brilliantly colored, boldly bombastic posters advertising the feature attractions and peerless performers of the big top and provides a detailed portrait of be worn away, abraded the American circus and drilled—presentin its Golden Age. ing challenges far beyond those faced by sculptors of more compliant materials. Featured in this exhibit are objects created chiefly during the late Qing dynasty, reflecting ancient traditions with an occasional glimpse of a more modern spirit.

1. Sofia Maldonado, Concrete Jungle Divas (detail), 2010, courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery, NY 2. Japanese, early Meiji (1868-1912) period, painting 1868-1870, Montgolfier Balloon with Enameled Decorations, porcelain 3. The Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, Stobridge Lithographing Company, courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 4. Image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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are European, while those of the photogPETERSBURG rapher Walker Evans Thru 11.13 and artist William Four Portfolios Gropper are decidof the Twentieth- edly American. DoisCentury: neau’s photographs Archipenko, reveal his love for Gropper, Evans, Paris and Gropper’s and Doisneau color lithographs exMuseum of amine the Watergate Fine Arts, crisis, which drove St. Petersburg Richard Nixon from www.fine-arts.org power.

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

ST.

Thru 09.04

This exhibition of 53 works brings together two lithographic and two photographic portfolios by four important artists. The portfolios by Alexander Archipenko and Robert Doisneau

New Folk: Contemporary SelfTaught Art from the Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

New Folk contains old favorites as well as new acquisitions by many of America’s best-known folk artists, includ-

www.fine-arts.org

The Human Touch features 46 largescale paintings, ing Howard Finster, prints, works on paNellie Mae Rowe, per and photographs Juanita Rogers, Mose that give insight into Tolliver, Jimmie Lee the human psyche, Sudduth, Lonnie Hol- while helping us to ley, Buddy Snipes, Ned Cartledge and Carlton Garrett. The works explore religion, spirituality and the visionary; nature; popular culture; politics and current events; and much more. understand the huThru 09.04 man condition. The Human Touch: Contemporary Art from the RBC Wealth Management Collection

TAMPA 09.08-11.06

Life and Death by Duane Michals

1. William Gropper, To the Gallery, from the Watergate Series, 1973, color lithograph on paper, gift of Walter B. and Terri B. Finley in memory of Murray and Marilyn Blaivas 2. James “Buddy” Snipes,
THE HOUSE OF SHAME, 1995,
acrylic, wood, bone, plastic and metal,
gift of George and Nancy Ellis 3. Hung Liu,
Baby King II, 1996,
oil on canvas and painted wood,
RBC Wealth Management Collection

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Self-taught photographer, Duane Michals, merges writing and photography into highly distinct and innovative photo-sequences which explore thought and emotion. Thru 09.25

Syntax: Text and Symbols for a New Generation

Tampa Museum of Art

Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

This exhibition highlights several key works in the textbased genre, within the Hadley Martin Fisher Collection, by artists such as John Baldessari, Mel Bochner and Joseph Kosuth as well as a wide array of younger artists who revisit the importance of word, symbolism, communication and information transference. Together, these artists show that text-based art is a vital and vibrant presence.

specific river speaks volumes about Tampa, one of Florida’s most vibrant cities. (See story on pg. 84.)

Presented by the City of Tampa and hosted

Thru 11.20

by the Tampa Museum of Art, this portfolio of exquisite cultural and natural landscapes was created for The Big Picture Project during Karen Glaser’s tenure as the City of Tampa’s 8th Photographer Laureate. Each year, one photographer is commissioned to do a project of his or her choosing, resulting Thru 10.16 in a unique portfolio The Hillsborough about the city. Karen River: From chose the Hillsborough the Green Swamp River as her subject to the Bay and the story of this

Worlds Apart: Myth & History, Gods & Mortals, Heroes & Hybrids Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Drawn primarily from the museum’s

renowned antiquities collection, Worlds Apart explores the many intersecting spheres of the world of classical antiquity, in particular, those

1. Duane Michals, A Story About a Story, 1995, ©Duane Michals, courtesy of Pace/MaGill Gallery, New York. 2. Sean Landers, In the Garden of Gesthemane, 2008, oil on linen, 80 x 108” 3. Karen Glaser, Near the Source 4. Image courtesy of Tampa Museum of Art

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

of myth and history, gods and mortals, heroes and hybrids.

what the artist saw in his visionary state.

TARPON SPRINGS Thru 09.18

Thru 09.10

Stagecraft: Brian Bress, Deville Cohen, Kate Gilmore, Mary Reid Kelley University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Bassmi: The Isness of Being Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

VERO BEACH

from the Museum’s growing outdoor sculpture collection. 08.27-01.08.12

Thru 12.11

Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Visitors are invited The artists in Stageto explore an engagcraft work across the ing and focused look fields of sculpture, at more than a dozen theater, performance, www.spcollege.edu/museum large-scale threecinematography and Twenty large-scale, dimensional works animation to re-imagmeditation-inspired ine and re-script our re- abstract paintings by lationships to everyday Egyptian-born Tampa objects and characters. Bay artist, Bassmi Ibrahim, are on view. Bassmi creates unstructured abstract paintings by entering into a state of meditation. In Bassmi’s art, you see www.ira.usf.edu

Inspired by Nature: Celebrating the Beauty and Complexity of Trees Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Visitors can enjoy the beauty and complexity of arboreal forms in various media by Jennifer Steinkamp, James Balog, Charles Burchfield and other American artists.

1. Deville Cohen, Grayscale (A video in three acts), 2009/10, HD video, paper, 18 minutes 2. Bassmi Ibrahim, Isness Number 12, 2005 3. Joseph Wesner, Pherein Shaprea, 1990, welded steel, sandstone, paint and wax, 71 x 31 x 22”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Samuel A. Burns, II Memorial Fund 4. Jennifer Steinkamp, Fly to Mars 5, 2005, video installation, edition of 1, AP 1/1, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the John K. Moore Memorial Fund

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

edges the work of Selections from some of the most the Permanent notable photographers Collection of the 20th and 21st Vero Beach centuries, ranging from Museum of Art such seminal figures www.verobeachmuseum.org as Ansel Adams and Out of This World On view is a selection Vero Beach Edward Weston to a features more than 30 of works, in all media, Museum of Art costumes and related from celebrated www.verobeachmuseum.org objects from science American artists Jim A selection of 12 fiction films and televiDine, James Rosenworks from the sion programs, such as quist, William Museum’s Permanent Star Wars, Terminator, Collection invite Star Trek, Battlestar viewers to create their Galactica and Batman. own narrative. The exhibit examines how costume design helps performers and WEST PALM younger generation of audiences engage with BEACH photo-based artists. the characters being Thru 10.16 portrayed. Thru 08.14

Wegman, Conrad Marca-Relli, Reynolds Beal, Lyman Kipp, Andrew Wyeth and Judy Pfaff, among others.

From A to Z: 26 Great Photographs from the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art

Thru 09.25

www.norton.org

What’s the Story?

From A to Z acknowl-

Thru 09.04

Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

WINTER PARK Thru 10.09

It’s Always Rock and Roll: The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska

1. Therman Statom, Chair on Pedestal, ca.1985, painted plate glass and mixed media, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the John K. Moore Memorial Fund 2. Jon Davis, Lover, 2006, mixed media, 23 x 25-1/4 x 9”, Museum Purchase 3. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas, Juchitan, 1979, gelatin silver photograph, 24 x 20”, purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art, courtesy of the artist and Rose Gallery 4. George Clooney’s costume from Batman & Robin, image courtesy of the Paul G. Allen Family Collection

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

Janet Macoska has captured some of rock and roll’s most legendary performers through the lens of her camera. Her images have appeared in Creem, Rolling Stone, People, 16, Entertainment Weekly, the New York Times and the London Times.(See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 84.) Thru 10.09

Douglas Witmer: I Found a Reason

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

www.rollins.edu/cfam

www.rollins.edu/cfam

This exhibition marks the Florida debut of two series of intimate abstract works by Philadelphia artist, Douglas Witmer. Beginning with found materials, both bodies of work

go in unique directions that differ suprisingly from the artist’s usual reductive geometric paintings.

www.rollins.edu/cfam

E. Brady Robinson uses the camera to examine her environment and record fleeting moments of existence. (See story on pg. 120.)

This collection of photographs captures a time when Andy Warhol was emerging as a prominent visual artist and avant-garde filmmaker. 09.27-01.08.12

Darker Shades Thru 10.09 of Red: Soviet The Velvet Years: Propaganda from 1965-1967, the Cold War Warhol’s Factory
 The Albin Photographs by Polasek Museum Stephen Shore & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Darker Shades of Red provides a rare opportunity to revisit the Cold War period through the exploration of the Soviet Union’s official imagery. The collection reveals the

Thru 10.09

E. Brady Robinson: Transfer Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

1. Janet Macoska, Tina Turner, 1985,
courtesy of the photographer 2. Douglas Witmer, installation view, AxD Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 3. E. Brady Robinson, Above Virginia, 2011, inkjet print 4. Andy Warhol and Lou Reed, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter of the Velvet Underground;
photograph by Stephen Shore,
courtesy of the photographer

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 6 o f 2 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

economic, social and political ideology of the Soviet Union, from the mid-1940s to 1990, through striking poster graphics and Soviet ephemera.

Olson, issued an invitation to 28 area photographers to choose a piece of Orange County public art to incorporate into a photograph of their own artistic interpretation. The photograph also had to include a small red chair within the composition. The chair is not only symbolic of arts audiences but is also representative of the Red Chair Project, the area’s cultural in-

Thru 09.18

graphs from the Tiffany Studios Ecclesiastical Department

Thru 09.04

The Now and Then Room The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

This exhibition features more than 30 archival photographs which provide a glimpse into the creformation portal (www. ative range of Louis redchairproject.com). Comfort Tiffany’s www.polasek.org ecclesiastical comIn June 2010, Orange Thru 09.04 missions at the height County Arts & Cultural A Church of religious construcAffairs Director, Terry Record—Phototion in America. The Red Chair Visits Orange County Public Art The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

This Morse Museum vignette, created in 1974 for the Opera Gala Guild’s Decorator Show House in the Grace Phillips Johnson house in College Park, portrays a romantic themed interior scene developed from objects in the Museum’s Collection. On View

1. A. Dobrov, The Borders of the Soviet Union are Sacred and Inviolate, 1969 2. Chip Weston, Emily’s Red Chair, 2010 3. Louis Comfort Tiffany, Chapel Electrolier, ca. 1900, duplicate image from a mounted photograph 4. Alphonse Mucha, Reverie, ca. 1898,
lithograph

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PONTE VEDRA BEACH

Gallery: Stellers Gallery www.stellersgallery.com

Artist: SUZANNE MAGEE

gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

BEGINNING WITH A

sturdy piece of blank cold-press watercolor paper, Suzanne Magee’s interpretation of the elegance of floral life is transformed into an intricate assembly of meticulous brushstrokes, while incorporating fresh, bold colors forming a modern twist on a traditional subject. NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Artist: Hope Barton

BARTON DIVIDES HER TIME BETWEEN ETCHINGS AND PAINT-

ings inspired by water and its surrounding areas. In this painting, she explores the abstraction of reflections in the water and lingering light patterns on trees. From left: Suzanne Magee, Parrot Tulip III, acrylic on paper, 22 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Stellers Gallery; Hope Barton, Total Reflection, acrylic on canvas, 12 x 16”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries www.artfusiongallery.com

Artist: Nancy R. Hall

LARGELY A SELF-TAUGHT

artist, Hall spends a great deal of her time creating colorful FT. LAUDERDALE and expressionist paintings Gallery: with watercolor inks on Arches paper. Her abstract compositions evoke Artists’ Haven images of flowers, butterflies, birds, tropical fish and jungle foliage. Fine Art Gallery www.artistshaven gallery.com

MIAMI

Gallery: Alejandra Von Hartz Gallery

Artist: CHRISTINE ALFERY ALFERY’S PAINTINGS ARE

www.alejandravonhartz.net

Artist: Manuel Ameztoy

AMEZTOY’S INTRI-

cate works appeal to the imagination. “I intend to produce visual instability—pieces that show an image partly-produced and partly-invented by the imagination of the observer, the beholder.”

visual poems that sing the praises of the natural landscape. The subject matter of her work has been gathered over years of wilderness travel. When not traveling, she works in her lakeside studio at her home in the north woods of Wisconsin.

Clockwise from top left: Nancy R. Hall, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries; Christine Alfery, Come Down To The Still Grove My Beloved, mixed media on paper, 30 x 42”, courtesy of the artist and Artists’ Haven Fine Art Gallery; Manuel Ameztoy, The Sources of the Nile 2, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 49-1/4 x 102-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Alejandra Von Hartz Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebaker gallery.com

Artist: BILL ARMSTRONG ARMSTRONG’S UNIQUE

process of appropriating images and subjecting them to extreme blurring conjures a mysterious world that hovers between the real and the fantastic—a world just beyond our grasp, where place may be suggested

SARASOTA

Gallery: Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art www.allyngallup.com

Artist: Joan Moment

MOMENT’S NEWER WORK REPRESENTS THE BIOMETRIC

but is never defined— where the identity of amorphous figures remains in question.

and cosmic. “Multiple associations are inferred—planets, cells, comets, atoms, stars, earth and ocean surfaces. The clustering of circles implies cosmic entities, space as alive in a constant state of flux, assuming multiple dimensions of time. Scraping the imprints often brings surprising results, trails of paint that swoop away from the image, referencing speeding comets, or primordial ooze. Issues of mortality, transcendence and the continual change/flux in all that surrounds us, remain an important focus for my work. What I hope to achieve are visual metaphors of immateriality and the temporal nature of everything, including our own corporeal existence.”

From left: Bill Armstrong, Mandala 406, 2001-02, C-print, 10 x 10”, 20 x 20”, 30 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; Joan Moment, Outburst, 2004, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 42”, courtesy of the artist and Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

MIAMI

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery

Gallery: Zadok Art Gallery

www.jjohnsongallery.com

www.zagallery.com

Artist: YOM

Artist: Ryan McGinness

“I STRUGGLE TO PRODUCE

work with an honest language that is uniquely my own but that resonates a universal truth...I’m most interested in the language of images—the language of symbols, shapes, forms and semantics. By combining and remixing graphic vocabularies from a range of sources, I explore meanings in iconography and historical and contemporary symbolism.”

YOM BEGAN HIS WORK PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak Gallery www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: Wade Guyton

WITH THE AID OF AN

Epson inkjet printer, Guyton produces compositions, primarily in black and shades of gray. The abstraction he implements using standardized word processing, graphic design and digital printing software is heightened by variations in the quality produced by the printing technology.

in sculpture as a welder, trained by Marcello Zitelli. He then went on to mosaics and later turned to composite materials. YOM completed his training with Raymond Hains in 2002/2003, in Paris, and has since embarked on a mission to revolutionize contemporary sculpture through his own artistic language.

Clockwise from top: Ryan McGinness, Rainbow McTwist, 2007, twelve laser-cut painted skateboards with steel hardware, 55” dia. x 22” deep, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery; YOM, Bel Amour, 2007, 27” dia., courtesy of the artist and Zadok Art Gallery; Wade Guyton, Untitled (B&W Circles), 2005, Epson Ultrachrome ink on linen, 40 x 38”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery

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T H E P O WER OF THE

IMAGE The SOUTHEAST MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY in Daytona Beach presents a series of special exhibitions which pay homage to photojournalism and the men and women who risk their lives documenting the ravages of a world in conflict. THROUGH A SERIES OF COMPELLING

exhibitions featuring powerful imagery created by some of the most accomplished photojournalists in the field today, the Southeast Museum of Photography has attempted to shed light on various aspects of what has been a complicated decade following the tragic events of 9/11. Each of the exhibitions presented in this series provide interesting and unique perspectives on the conflicts surrounding war and terrorism and the toll each has taken on humanity. The images act as a tool, enabling us to dig beneath the surface and potentially reveal some of the underlying causes and stresses that have contributed to the violence and unrest that has plagued humankind for generations.

Image ©Kate Brooks

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From a recap of SMP’s original exhibition portraying the aftermath of 9/11, to the chronicles of a photographer’s extensive travels through the war-torn regions of Afghanistan, to the wounded soldiers and unwitting child victims, to rarely seen simulation camps preparing soldiers for war—the history, logistics and consequences of world conflicts are examined and explored from a variety of angles. These exhibitions speak to the power of the image both as a vital means of preserving history—allowing us to see, through the camera’s lens, reflections of life and the cultural complexities of diverse societies—and in its ability to create intriguing narratives and profound emotional connections. O n V iew

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THE POWER OF THE IMAGE THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

EXHIBITION

A SECOND TELLING September 11th: Here is New York

August 18th through October 2nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g THIS POWERFUL SERIES of photographs is

drawn from the Permanent Collection of the Southeast Museum of Photography. The origi­ nal exhibition was organized in response to the World Trade Center tragedy of 2001, and to the unprecedented flood of images that resulted from that event. The goal of the 2002 project was to collect, organize, display and preserve, for historical purposes, the broadest possible view of this event and its aftermath. The 2002 OnV

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presentation of Here is New York at SMP was one of only a handful of such presentations out­ side of New York City. More than 50 images were acquired by the Museum from the 1,200 photographs that were originally exhibited in the spring of 2002. The images were taken not only by top photo­ journalists and other professional photographers but also by schoolchildren, office workers, emer­ gency workers and amateurs of every stripe.

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Untitled, 2001, digital print, artist unknown

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Untitled, 2001, digital print, ŠMark Selliger


THE POWER OF THE IMAGE Previous pages (L to R): Untitled, 2001, digital print, ŠChristophe Agou Untitled, 2001, digital print, ŠPhilip Parker

Untitled, 2001, digital print, artist unknown


THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

E X H I B I T I O N

KATE BROOKS

In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey after 9-11 September 9th through December 16th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

K A T E B R O O K S B E G A N W O R K I N G as a

freelance photojournalist at the age of 20. Her photographs portray the harsh beauty and poi­ gnant pain of a region mired in conflict. In the Light of Darkness includes a collection of images that chronicle her 10-year passage from the mountains of Tora Bora to the upris­ ings in the Arab world in early 2011. At the age of 23, following the Twin Tower attacks, Brooks moved to Pakistan to photo­ graph the impact of US foreign policy on the region and its people in the wake of the Amer­ ican led operation that ousted the Taliban. In 2003, she covered the American invasion of Iraq from Kurdistan and, for Time magazine, she began to photograph the beginning of the Iraqi insurgency. Kate has since worked extensively across the Middle East and South Asia, cover­ ing many of the major news stories in both regions and photographing not only political events and violent conflicts but also docu­ menting daily life.

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An estimated 135 people were killed in a car bombing at the Tomb of Imam Ali in Najaf. The attack targeted a prominent Shi’ite cleric and occurred as the faithful were leaving after Friday prayers. Afghanistan’s nomadic All images ©Kate Brooks

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Kuchi people seek refuge in the ruins of Darulaman Palace

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after violent ethnic disputes erupted between them and the Hazaras.


Pakistani jihadis held in a makeshift prison in Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, were later released by the Afghan authorities as part of a Ramadan amnesty.

After a shooting at a US military checkpoint, in which five Iraqi civilians were killed, a shopkeeper slaughtered a sheep and marked his generator with his bloody handprints, asking God for his protection.


THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

E X H I B I T I O N

KHALID HADI

Portraits from Afghanistan CURATED BY ED GRAZDA*

September 9th through December 16th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

F R O M 1 9 9 0 T O 2 0 0 2 , thousands of identifi­

cation portraits of wounded Mujahideen and Taliban fighters, orphans and Afghan civilians were made by Khalid Hadi for an Afghan aid and welfare organization. The organization, established in 1992 by a mullah in Kandahar, was providing monetary support for people wounded or injured in fighting during the inva­ sion and occupation of Afghanistan by the Sovi­ et army in the 1980s and early 1990s. Using a primitive, locally made, box camera, Khalid made thousands of small paper-negative portraits of these wounded fighters. One of the men he photographed later became the founder of the Taliban—Mullah Omar—and when the Taliban took power, Khalid became the “offi­ cial” Taliban photographer. Although small in size, these portraits of wounded fighters, orphans and children, injured by land mines and bombs, form a moving visu­ al record of the toll taken on the population of Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation. The selection of images in the exhibition is drawn from more than 5,000 portraits produced by Hadi.

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Men and young boys sit stoically, presenting their t e m b e r

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severed arms and legs to the camera as proof.


*Exhibition Curator, Ed Grazda, was an instrumental force in making Hadi’s work available for this exhibit. Grazda spent 20 years photographing in Afghanistan and Pakistan. His most recent photographs record the post-Taliban era in Afghanistan as well as the Afghan community in the US. His work will be featured in Excerpts:

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Afghanistan Diary by Ed Grazda at SMP

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THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

E X H I B I T I O N

LOUIE PALU

Afghanistan: Garmsir Marines August 18th through October 2nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

DURING HIS LONG STINT in Afghanistan,

Toronto-born, award-winning photojournal­ ist, L ouie Palu, grew a long grey beard to blend in with the locals. He spent months in the field, on the line, out in the districts, with troops and unembedded, capturing gritty visuals of a country at war—the harsh landscape, the war-weary people and the soldiers. For this series, Palu created simple, direct portraits of US Marines operating in a single unit in Garmsir, Helmand Province, Afghani­ stan, where some of the most intense fighting of 2008 took place. The area is also known as the “Snakes Head”, due to the shape that the land and bases make when seen from the air. This unit, which was supposed to be a one-time, short-term, special deployment of troops, ordered to Afghanistan by President George W. Bush in 2007, marked the start of an escalation of US troops being deployed to the war in 2008. These stark and revealing portraits were taken in the final weeks of the unit’s operation in Afghanistan.

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U.S. Marine Lcpl. Patrick “Sweetums” Stanborough, age 21, Garmsir, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008 All images ©Louie Palu

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US Marine Pfc. Chad Wilson, age 21, Garmsir, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008

US Marine Gysgt. Carlos “OJ” Orjuela, age 31, Garmsir, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008

US Marine Lcpl. Anthony Nagel, age 25, Garmsir, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2008 O

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THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

E X H I B I T I O N

LUCIAN PERKINS

A Journey Through Afghanistan August 18th through October 2nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

“SEVEN

MONTHS

BEFORE

9/11,

Afghanistan stood isolated and in ruins after 22 years of war and the worst drought in memory. By 2001, 700,000 Afghans streamed toward the borders. Many had watched their crops and animals die. Many were caught in the middle of the long-standing civil war. At that time, Afthanistan was just a dot on the map to most Americans. No one seemed to care.” —L ucian P erkins Taken in late 2001, these pictures show the immediate aftermath of the initial battles in Afghanistan with graphic and moving imag­ ery. Over the years, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, Lucian Perkins, has covered many of the important world crises and con­ flicts as a photojournalist for The Washington Post. He is known for an approach that counterpoints a deep sympathy for his sub­ jects with an ability to expose their hopes and foibles, and a style that combines formal clar­ ity with an off-beat humor.

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The refugees look in every direction and see nothing but wind, sand and mountains in the distance. All images ©Lucian Perkins

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“That’s all their life is. The search for food.” The children

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become the unwitting victims in this.


A woman quietly lowers her head after watching a UN Delegation pass through Maslakh refugee camp near Herat, Afghanistan Afghan farmers left their land after losing their crops and livestock to the drought and headed toward every border


THE POWER OF THE IMAGE

E X H I B I T I O N

CHRISTOPHER SIMS

Theater of War: The Pretend Villages of Iraq and Afghanistan August 18th through October 2nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

“IN RECENT YEARS, I have been making pho­

tographs within fictitious Iraqi and Afghan vil­ lages on the training grounds of US Army bases. The villages, which are situated in the deep forests of North Carolina and Louisiana, and in a desert expanse near Death Valley in California, serve as way stations for people heading off to war and for those who have fled it. Here US soldiers interact with pretend villagers—often recent immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan—who have now found work playing a version of the lives they left behind. The villages are places of fantastic imagination. The actors continue playing their roles during the long stretches of day between training exer­ cises. Designers and inhabitants of these worlds take great pride in the scope and fidelity of their wars-in-miniature. By each day’s end, hundreds of soldiers and civilians lay dead—the electronic sensors on their special halters indicate whether friendly fire, an improvised explosive device, or a sniper’s bullet killed them.” —Christopher Sims

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Above (top to bottom): Iman’s Bodyguard, Camp Mackall, North Carolina Mosque, Camp Mackall, North Carolina All images ©Christopher Sims

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Jihad Lamp, Fort Polk, Louisiana

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Mother with Babies,

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50 THE

MIND’S EYE YEARS of

PHOTOGRAPHY by JERRY UELSMANN

Through

09.11

at the

SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM OF ART UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Gainesville w w w. h a r n . u f l . e d u 54

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B

The Mind’s Eye

BEAUTIFUL AND SURREAL, FUNNY AND

provocative, the photographs of Jerry N. Uelsmann

have become icons of American photo history. A master of the photo montage and pioneer of photo

manipulation, Uelsmann has been exploring—and pushing—the boundaries of the photographic medi-

um for over 50 years. The Mind’s Eye, 50 Years of Photography by Jerry Uelsmann, at the Harn Museum of Art, is the first major retrospective exhibition to consider

the full range of Uelsmann’s work, including his earliest documentary photographs and his experiments with artist books and three-dimensional photo-sculpture. The exhibition was organized by the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA, and curated by Phillip Prodger, Curator of Photography at PEM. Twenty-four additional works from Uelsmann’s personal archives— selected by Uelsmann and Tom Southall, retired Curator of Photography at the Harn— were added exclusively for the Gainesville show. “You will see the scope of his imagination, which is boundless,” said Dulce Roman, Curator of Modern Art for the Harn. While most photographers compose their images through

the lens of a camera, Uelsmann compiles images from within his contact sheets with elements from different negatives. The photographic manipulations take place in his darkroom, which functions as a visual research laboratory. With the use of several enlargers, he is able to execute multiple printing techniques to achieve his visions. The process often requires lots of testing for correct exposure and for correct blending of the separate elements before attempting to make a finished print. “Usually I run through 50 sheets of

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Above: Untitled, 1996, gelatin silver print Left: Untitled, 1976, gelatin silver print Previous spread: Dream Theater, 2004, gelatin silver print All images ©Jerry N. Uelsmann

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The Mind’s Eye

paper during a darkroom day,” Uelsmann explained. “I always hope that at the end of the day, I will have produced one or two images that I care about. I make a small edition of each of these, usually 6 prints. Over

hand. In an age of ever-evolving computer technology, he is more than happy to sequester himself in his darkroom with coffee by his side, music blaring (always the blues) and enlargers at his beck and call.

“ To me the camera is a license to explore. It’s a glorious instrument.”—Jerry Uelsmann

Above: Untitled, 1969, gelatin silver print Right: Untitled, 1982, gelatin silver print

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the years, I have discovered that approximately 10 percent of my finished images survive. This means that out of a year’s work, during which I produce approximately 150 images, about 15 of them have a lasting value for me.” Uelsmann has been extremely successful in creating his surreal photographic montages by

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“There’s something about the ambiance to this dimly lit place that greatly appeals to me,” he admitted, “it’s just a magical place for me.” While known for building new images from an existing library of pictures he’s taken over many years, Uelsmann still shoots quite frequently. “To me the camera is a license

2011


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to explore,” the artist once said. “It’s a glorious instrument. Without a camera, if you stop to look at a crack in the sidewalk, people question that. But as long as you have a camera, there’s a kind of heightened perceptual awareness that is very much a part of my consciousness.” His arsenal of images includes nudes, trees, clouds, bodies of water, win-

The Mind’s Eye

phy at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1957. He published his first image in Photography Annual that same year. Uelsmann continued his studies in audio-visual communications, art history and design at Indiana University, where he studied under Henry Holmes Smith, a professor whom Uelsmann says was his most important teacher and influence in

“Simply stated, my hidden agenda is to amaze myself.” —Jerry Uelsmann dows and open hands—all figure prominently in his work, acting as symbolic metaphors reflecting both psychological and spiritual dimensions. The images invite viewers to create their own interpretations. Ultimately, Uelsmann is focused on creating works that are uniquely his own and provide him with a sense of personal growth. “Simply stated, my hidden agenda is to amaze myself.” Jerry N. Uelsmann was born in Detroit, Michigan on June 11, 1934. He developed an interest in photography as a high-school student and went on to graduate in the first four-year B.F.A. degree program in photogra-

life. He received his M.F.A. and M.S. degrees from Indiana University in 1960. That same year he began teaching photography at the University of Florida in Gainesville (his first job offer) and was a graduate research professor of art at the University of Florida since 1974. He is currently retired from teaching. Uelsmann received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1967 and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1972. He is a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, a founding member of The Society of Photographic Education and a trustee of the Friends of Photography. He is

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Above: Magritte’s Touchstone (first version), 1965, gelatin silver print Left: Untitled, 2003, gelatin silver print

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The Mind’s Eye

Above: Eclipse, 2011, gelatin silver print Right: Untitled, 1997, gelatin silver print

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also the author of several books currently in print, including Referencing Art (2004) and Other Realities (2005). His work has been exhibited extensively in the US and abroad and his photographs are in the permanent collections of many museums worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Chicago Art Institute, the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House in Rochester, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Bibliotheque National in Paris, the National Museum of American Art in Washington, DC, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and the Harn Museum of Art.

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Uelsmann is represented by A Gallery for Fine Photography in New Orleans, John Cleary Gallery in Houston, Modernbook Gallery in San Francisco, Telluride Gallery of Fine Art, PaciArte in Italy, Galerie Stephen Hoffman in Germany and See+Gallery in Beijing. His photographs have also been featured in the opening credits of the television series The Outer Limits (1995), and the illustrated edition of Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot. Uelsmann currently resides in Gainesville with his wife, artist Maggie Taylor. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue of the same title, published by Modernbook editions (2010). On View

2011


FEDERICO The WORLD Accordin

On view

0 9.21-12.0 4 at

Traffic, 2011, wood, oil and bicycle tires, 192 x 96�, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art

the

B O C A R AT O N


CO URIBE g to

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C The World According to Federico Uribe

CONCEPTUAL ARTIST,

Federico Uribe, is known for his fascinating transformation of everyday objects into art. He creates sculptures which are constructed and woven in all kinds of ways—curious and unpredictable, intricate and compulsive. Individual works and whole-room installations are made entirely out of common everyday objects—like thousands of shoes, colored pencils and shoe laces. For the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Uribe will create a site specific walk-in environment filling an entire 5,000-square-

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foot gallery.
Included in the exhibition will be works from his Animal Farm series (2008), a huge installation containing a life-sized farmer’s family made of colored pencils, with flies hovering above, framed images on the walls and flocks of birds (fashioned with pliers) in flight across the sky. Several farm animals will also be on view—all created from an assortment of objects, from clothes hangers to corks, pencils, sneaker soles, screwedin pieces of wood and mop heads. Additionally, the exhibition will debut Uribe’s new

work—several life-sized palm trees made from the spines and fanned pages of books as well as gardens constructed of gardening tools. Born in 1962 in Bogota, Colombia, Uribe studied art at the University of Los Andes in Bogota. In 1988 he left for New York to study under the supervision of Luis Camnitzer—the beginning of a journey that included years of training and work in Cuba, Mexico, Russia, England and finally, Miami. Initially, Uribe’s formation began as a painter with sen-

Opposite page: Albinos, 2006, puma shoes, 72 x 36 x 12” Above: Bull (and Bull textural detail), 2008, wood and shoe soles, 96 x 72 x 36” Images courtesy of Now Contemporary Art


The World According to Federico Uribe

Left: Key, 2008, wood and corks, 48 x 66 x 30” Right: Horse, 2008, wood shavings and crutch, 96 x 72 x 48” Images courtesy of Now Contemporary Art

sual and brooding canvases. He abandoned his paintbrushes in 1996, attracted by the usually neglected beauty of simple objects in daily use. He began to observe these objects with care, collecting them, setting them side by side, and combining them so that they became unusual instruments of a new aesthetic—full of color, irony and lively playfulness. Humor, beauty and love are essentially what Uribe hopes viewers will take away from his exhibit. For an artist who comes from a country that has been at war for almost half a century, this is a means of reconciliation with life: “I have the hope that people who relate continued on pg. 72

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The World According to Federico Uribe

Left: Mule, 2008, wood and shoes, 78 x 60 x 30” Above: Mule (textural detail) Images courtesy of Now Contemporary Art

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The World According to Federico Uribe

Below (and right): Mother (and Mother textural detail), 2009, color pencils and plastic fasteners, 63 x 25 x 42” Opposite: Dog, 2009, color pencils and plastic fasteners, 24 x 12 x 36” Images courtesy of Now Contemporary Art

to my sculptures, and live with them, will see the love I put into them,” says the artist. “I want people to feel that I do this with a lot of careful attention and the purpose of beauty. I give my life to my work and I want people to see it.” Uribe has received international recognition with exhibits in New York City, Italy, Spain, Mexico and Germany. His artmaking is a labor-intensive, repetitive and compulsive process which re-envisions how the world around us is perceived. He introduces irony,

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humor, childhood memories and fantasy in his work with a fresh association of materials and ideas. He transforms the objects of daily life into new objects that have different significance, appearance and texture. Once the viewer gets past the “wow” factor of the work, Uribe’s world entices the viewer to physically experience and complete the work by interacting with it in a personal way. Federico Uribe lives and works in Miami and is represented by Now Contemporary Gallery in Wynwood. O n V iew

2011


“Art based on geometry is expected to be dry with only

TONY ROBBIN: A

O n v i e w t h ro u g h O C T O B E R 1 3 t h


primary colors—who wrote those rules?”—Tony Robbin

RETROSPECTIVE at the ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART w w w. o m a r t . o r g

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Previous pages: Untitled, 1976, acrylic on canvas, 54-1/2 x 140”, gift of William D. and Norma Canelas Roth Right: 1979-1, 1979, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 70”, Collection of William D. and Norma Canelas Roth

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Tony Robbin: A Retrospective

T

TONY ROBBIN’S VIBRANT

and lyrical work is founded upon the visualization of higher-dimensional space. He has been exploring the depiction of four-dimensional objects and spatial configurations for the past 40 years. His creations are infused with complex layers of geometric forms, animated by patterns of color—all based upon scientific research in the fields of geometry, mathematics and physics. Tony Robbin: A Retrospective, at the Orlando Museum of Art, chronicles the artist’s remarkable career and includes 25 paintings, works on paper, a sculpture and video animations of four-dimensional forms. A beautifully illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition. OnV

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Tony Robbin: A Retrospective As a 15-year-old, Robbin was inspired by the Impressionist paintings he saw while visiting Paris and decided early on that painting was his calling. He painted portraits and landscapes throughout his youth and undergraduate studies at Columbia University. His portfolio of work gained him admission into the Master of Fine Arts program at Yale University in 1965. After Yale, Robbin held several teaching positions before landing his first exhibition in 1974 at the Whitney Museum of American Art in NY. Marcia Tucker, the Museum’s Curator of Painting and Sculpture, commented that his work looked four-dimensional, and so marked the beginning of his life-long fascination with higher-dimensional geometry. Shortly after the Whitney exhibit, Robbin was presented with two highly influential books of the early- and mid20th century: Henry Parker Manning’s Geometry of Four Dimensions and William Ivins Jr.’s Art and Geometry: A Study in Space Intuitions. For Robbin, these books solidified his understanding of the intersection of

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1980-13, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 70”, Collection of the artist

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1999-4, 1999, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 52”, Collection of Lisa and Joe Jensen

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Tony Robbin: A Retrospective art and geometry as well as his fascination with their symbiosis. Around 1979, Robbin became interested in mathematical visualization while visiting with Brown University mathematician, Thomas F. Banchoff, who had created computer-generated images of hypercubes (objects resembling three dimensional cubes but extended into a fourth spatial dimension). Robbin was so impressed by this work that he decided to go back to school to become a computer programmer. Within just a few months of training, he created some of the most sophisticated programs for visualizing four dimensions. His work gained him recognition in both the mathematics and computer art communities. Robbin’s closeness to the mathematics community eventually led him to Quasicrystal geometry (a derivative of four dimensional geometry with remarkable visual properties), for which he holds the patent on its application to architecture. Robbin has lectured and written so widely on the idea that it is now studied in architecture schools. To date, he has made two large structures— OnV

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Tony Robbin: A Retrospective a large architectural sculpture in Denmark, completed in 1994, and a mural relief for the city of Jacksonville, FL. Since the Denmark project, Robbin has worked primarily on painting, which he believes to be the most powerful of media. Robbin has had over 25 solo exhibitions of his paintings and sculptures and has been included in over 100 group exhibitions in 12 countries. He has lectured to professional organizations and university departments of art, physics, mathematics, computer science, architecture and engineering in the US, Europe and Japan. His work is held in numerous museum and corporate collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Polk Museum, Lakeland; Orlando Museum of Art; Coca Cola USA; General Electric; IBM; and Sony. He is also the author of three books: Four-field: Computers, Art and the 4th Dimension (1992), Engineering A New Architecture (1996) and Shadows of Reality: The Fourth Dimension in Relativity, Cubism, and Modern Thought (2006). Tony Robbin lives and works in NY. O n V iew

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Above: Tony Robbin, courtesy of the artist Left: 2009-O-3, 2009, oil on canvas, 56 x 70”, Collection of the artist

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Karen G

THE HILLSBOROUGH RIVER: FROM Images by Karen Glaser, City of T

T H E C I T Y O F T A M P A presents T H on view through October 16th at w w w. t a m p a g o v. n e t / a r t s 00 O n River V i eClarity w M Hillsborough

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Glaser

M THE GREEN SWAMP TO THE BAY ampa Photographer Laureate VIII

E B I G P I C T U R E P R O J E C T , Vo l . V I I I the TA M PA M U S E U M O F A R T • w w w. t a m p a m u s e u m . o r g OnV

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Karen Glaser

The Hillsborough River: From

E ach

year , since

2003,

the

C ity

of

T ampa ’ s P ublic A rt P rogram

has commissioned an artist to photograph a portion or perspective of the city of

Tampa and/or its citizens and visitors at work, or at play, with an emphasis on what it means to be in Tampa at this particular time in history. The results of this

process have produced a public collection and archive that is representative of the life and times in Tampa, by regional, national and international photographers.


Karen Glaser has photographed in Florida for nearly 20 years. Her first proj-

ect, which featured manatees, culminated in a book titled Mysterious Manatees, Green Green Swamp


the Green Swamp to the Bay

released by the University Press of Florida, and a show with the Smithsonian. She has explored springs and rivers in the north and central part of the state and

was awarded Artist in Residence at Big Cypress National Preserve and Everglades National Park, where she photographed both under and above water. Glaser was also a recent Fellow at Florida’s prestigious Hermitage Artists Retreat.

On the following pages, the artist reflects on The Big Picture Project and

her travels from the swamp through the city, as she documented the unique cultural and natural landscapes of one of Florida’s most vibrant cities. OnV

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Karen Glaser

The Hillsborough River: From

“This portfolio was created for The Big Picture Project during my tenure as the City of Tampa Florida’s 8th Photographer Laureate. This progressive city project was modeled after those such as the Farm Security Administration photo program of the 1930s and ’40s and Tampa’s own historic Burgert Brothers archive. These men left an extraordinary visual link to Tampa’s past with photographs dating from the late 1800s to the early 1960s. The modern Big Picture Photographer Laureate program also becomes part of an Above (top to bottom): Aron’s Favorite; Near the Source Opposite: Brown Gars


the Green Swamp to the Bay

image archive about the life and times of Tampa. Each year, via a juried process, one photographer is commissioned to do a project of his or her choosing, resulting in a unique portfolio about the city. I chose the Hillsborough River as my subject. Florida is a most alluring state and a puzzle of contradictions. The state has a truly interesting history and a remarkable cultural and natural heritage. It is home to some of the most unique natural areas in the world. That said, it is no secret that there is a constant balancing act between the preservation of OnV

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Karen Glaser

The Hillsborough River: From

Above (top to bottom): Fallen Palm at Hillsborough River State Park; Fish Camp


the Green Swamp to the Bay

Florida’s wild areas and development. For me, the tie that binds all in this most diverse state is water. And my obsession has been Florida’s freshwaters, its springs, rivers and swamps. This interest recently culminated in an exhibition at the Southeast Museum of Photography, in Daytona Beach, titled The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps. The Hillsborough River Project allowed me to take my work one step further. The story of this specific river speaks volumes about Tampa, one of Florida’s most vibrant cities.
The river OnV

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begins at the still wild Green Swamp in Pasco County. Like so many other natural areas in Florida, it is a relatively short drive from the city. Not only is this area the headwaters of the Hillsborough, it is also the headwaters of the Withlacoochee, Peace and Ocklawaha rivers. When I began the project, I spoke to my friends Bill and Martin who are Tampa natives and have been friends since childhood. For them, the river was just part of growing up and has always been in their lives. It flows into Hillsborough Bay where, as boys, they

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Karen Glaser

The Hillsborough River: From

water-skied and fished. These waters were a place of adventure when they were young—Bill even found a dead body floating in it one day. Martin wished I could have talked to his dad. He lived in Tampa all of his 90 years. By trade, he owned a menswear store. By heart, he was an avid fisherman. He REALLY knew the waters around Tampa. For nearly a century he explored them and saw them change.
For a visual artist, the paradoxical scenery—as I traveled through time both culturally and naturally from the swamp through the Above: Bayshore Blvd.; Opposite: Yacht Club

city—was irresistibly compelling. I allowed the work to bend and flow, in whatever direction the experience took me—all the while creating work that reflects the life and character of Tampa in a very special way. The Hillsborough River project I created as the 2010 Photographer Laureate is formally complete. I commend the city for having such a forward-thinking program. My time of explorations and new directions this project nurtured, continues, and I welcome the vulnerability that it brings.” —Karen Glaser


the Green Swamp to the Bay

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ART SIDESHOW OF THE

Step right up and see the amazing wonders of the world… the strangest, most exotic things imaginable…and even some you could never imagine! Sideshow, at the Dunedin Fine Art Center, presents fresh interpretations of the ‘sideshow’, a phenomenon which, in its heyday­—from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s—was one of the biggest draws in entertainment. A sampling of these works, by a few of the artists represented in this show, are included here in this sneak preview—each have rekindled the wonder and spectacle of this bygone era through their unique visions, which draw from current events and pop culture as well as the rich history of traveling carnivals and circuses.

5

09.09-10.17 at the DUNEDIN FINE ART CENTER www.dfac.org 94

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Art of the Sideshow

“The concept for Sideshow or

historical connection as the wintering grounds for circus, carnie and sideshow artists whose works draw obvious inspiration from the genre. Artists Lori Ba Chris Rush, John & Lynn Whipple and Kreg Yingst share distinctly modern Come see DFAC’s Sideshow...AMAZING! LIVE! ORIGINAL!” —Catherine Previous page: Amy ‘Banner Queen’ Johnquest, There Is No Elephant, 2010, approx. 39” x 7’, acrylic on canvas ; Above: John Whipple, Parade, 24 x 72”, mixe


*Images may be representational of artists’ works on display.

riginally sprang from Florida’s

folks since the 1930s. What intrigued us was the number of contemporary allard, Bryan Cunningham, Amy ‘Banner Queen’ Johnquest, Daniel Mrgan, interpretations of the ‘sideshow’ that speak to the present, tilted moment. Bergmann, Curator, Dunedin Fine Art Center d media

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Art of the Sideshow

Miles Block (detail), 5.5 x 8”, photographic print mounted on wood block with acrylic

The Century Wheel (Ferris Wheel), 44 x 64”, photo iron-o

LORI BALLARD...“I have long appreciated the art of the circus sideshow banner line. About

7 years ago, I began to document the people and the attractions of carnival life. As I got more and more excited about my images, I began to wonder how I could recreate the banner line art with my photography. One day I recalled someone telling me about heat transfers—a perfect solution

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on on canvas with acrylic

Clown Block, 5.5 x 8”, photographic print mounted on wood block with acrylic

because it offered the weathered appearance I was looking for and the final coat of sepia tinted acrylic medium added to the antique feel that seems to transcend time. Although I want the banners to be traditional in their structure, I use mostly monochromatic images as opposed to the traditional bright colors that are used for midway advertisement.” OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Jackalope, 20 x 25”, acrylic and enamel on wood, textile and canvas with found objects

BRYAN CUNNINGHAM...Bryan Cunningham (a.k.a. MUTIE) has always been attracted to

sensational advertising­—those ads in the back pages of comic books promising X-ray vision and he-man strength, sideshow banners depicting nature’s grotesque mistakes, and the mail order hoodoo spells and powders guaranteed to rid you of your enemies, put a lover under your spell and get you

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Money to Burn, 12.25 x 20�, acrylic and enamel on wood, textile and canvas with found objects

rich quick. Of course what you get is a pair of paper glasses and spring loaded grips, some crafty taxidermy and bags of bad smelling incense. Yet, oh how these exaggerated promises and lurid visuals stoke the delinquent fires of the imagination! Cunningham uses his skills in painting and wood working to create unique mixed-media assemblages hand crafted from recycled wood and found objects. OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Welcome to the Fun Spot, 2011, 38” x 7’, casien & acrylic on muslin

Don’t Miss Peace on Earth, 1999, 38” x 7’, casien & acrylic on muslin

AMY ‘BANNER QUEEN’ JOHNQUEST...“My work is influenced by the historical adver-

tising in traveling circuses and sideshows. Using modern pop cultural references and imaginary scenarios, I play with text and imagery in a painterly way, finding double entendres and curiosities in the language of signage. These paintings are a balancing act of heartfelt sincerity and tongue-

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It’s Here We Have It, 2005, approx. 39” x 3’, casien & acrylic on brown cotton mesh

in-cheekiness...In the end, my images translate in any number of directions: political, evolutionary twists, loving tributes, weird science, or good ol’ comic relief.” Johnquest created her first sideshow banner in 1998 and has been exploring her art through this genre ever since, attracting commissions from notables such as Bruce Springsteen, Disney Magazine, American Express and more.” OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Slug, woodburning with wood stain and water colors, approx. 8 x 10”

DANIEL MRGAN...“I am a compulsive doodler. I’ll doodle any chance I get on any surface

available. I save most of my doodles and sometimes spread them out on the floor or a bed. I look at these drawings and wonder what event, color, smell, object, childhood memory, everyday pop culture debris, etc., possessed me to commit all this nonsense to paper. Then I start connecting the

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Rooster, woodburning with wood stain and water colors, approx. 8 x 10”

dots, coming up with little stories that amuse me and hopefully will translate into amusement for the viewer. Stylistically, my wood burnings owe much to my passionate love of the sideshow, cinema, Fleischer Studios’ cartoons, silent cinema, small press comics, daguerreotypes, Olympic games and East European stop motion animation.” OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Eclipse, from the Spin Art Series, 8 x 10”, oil on gessoed cardboard, courtesy of the Mindy Solomon Gallery

CHRIS RUSH...“As a child I searched junk shops and thrift stores for evidence of life outside

my little world. Over and over I would come across old medical books full of scary and beautiful images. In 1998, I began to work in a facility for people with mental and physical disabilities, with the agreement that I would sketch during the quiet hours. After several months, I began to make

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Nectar, from the Spin Art Series, 8 x 10”, oil on gessoed cardboard, courtesy of the Mindy Solomon Gallery

portraits. There is a strange grace around many of these people and I have found no better way to represent this than as a condition of light.” These portraits, placed in the middle of a carnival style ‘spin art’ frame, were included in the artist’s 10-year retrospective of figurative studies at the Mesa Center for Contemporary Art in 2010. OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Chain Smoker, 32 x 40”, mixed media

JOHN WHIPPLE...“I started my career as an art director and illustrator and then shifted to film

and television when Universal Studios and Nickelodeon opened in Orlando. I used the experience of painting large scenic backdrops to become a muralist. In 1996 while doing the Piedmont show in Atlanta, I met artists who brought their ‘art car’ to the show and they inspired me to decorate a car and

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Side Show, 32 x 40”, mixed media

take it to the Houston Art Car Parade. I wanted to embellish the car with sculptural elements, so I taught myself to carve. The whole experience inspired me and I now spend my studio time flitting back and forth from sculpture to painting, trying to let each discipline influence the other. At present, I am still painting and incorporating found objects with hand carved wood to create assemblage style sculptures.” OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Image fom Ninnies series, 4.25 x 6.5�, mixed media

LYNN WHIPPLE...Whipple is drawn to the absurd, believing that humor is one of humanities

greatest gifts. She incorporates drawing, painting, collage, sewing and found objects in her assemblage work and relishes the search for interesting items. Fascinated by history, old books, lost letters, worn fabrics, family photographs, wooden boxes and odd pieces of memorabilia, her process

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Image fom Ninnies series, 4.25 x 6.5”, mixed media

is to surround herself with all of these found items and play, seeing how different combinations will take hold and lead her down a path. Whipple’s work, at times, may be playful or serious, simple or complex, large or small. She enjoys objects with a past and things that are slightly beat up but have much more charm because of their journey. OnV

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Art of the Sideshow

Invisible Man, 24 x 12” framed, acrylic on panel

Sideshow, 16 x 8” framed, acrylic on panel

KREG YINGST... As a child, Yingst reveled in watching his grandfather perform magic tricks

in front of crowds of people. The innocence and wonderment of that special time remains with him to this day. In addition to using magic tricks as subject matter in his art, he depicts circus sideshows and performances. “The circus has always been a close relative to the magic show, depicting con-

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Starving Artist, 24 x 12” framed, acrylic on panel

Trapeze Artists, 24 x 12” framed, acrylic on panel

jurors and hosting many famous magicians. The specialty items off the midway presented embellished attractions of a dubious nature. This body of work merges the strange, humorous and surreal. My Magic/Circus Series is, in a sense, an homage to my Grandfather. The series is a nostalgic look at childhood wonder and a time remembered…an era that has virtually ‘disappeared’.” O n V iew OnV

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SPOTLIGHT { R O N

VA N

S W E R I N G E N }

Exhibition

Ron Van Sweringen On view through September 25th at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando www.mennellomuseum.com

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THE MENNELLO MUSEUM

of American Art presents an exhibition of striking abstract works by the father of “Astroism” and Vero Beach resident, Ron Van Sweringen. Van Sweringen describes himself as a “slightly eccentric” self-taught artist. Over the past 35 years, he has translated his lifelong fascination with art of all kinds into oil paintings ranging from early primitive and impressionist to classic landscape, still life and beach scenes. His many expressive styles have captivated a loyal following of art lovers around the world. Most recently, this multi-dimensional artist has been inspired by the art of airborne painting,
or “Astroism”—an original method he developed which utilizes airborne applications to create uniquely vibrant interpretations of his subjects. Derived from Abstract Symbolism, “Astroism” produces paintings created in midair. Pigment from the artist’s brush is thrown onto a canvas at rapid speed, pro2011


S P O T L I G H T

ducing images of incredible Born in Hampton, VA, in action and vitality.
Reminis- 1936—and heir to the C&O cent of the movement inspired Railroad fortune—Van Swerby Jackson Pollock’s famous ingen began painting when he “drip” paintings, “Astroism” was just 9 years old, after reworks of art are created when ceiving his first oil set. Durpaint is “thrown” at an upright ing his adult life, he lived in canvas. The larger of these Old Town Alexandria, VA, and canvases can require up to later relocated to Vero Beach. five thousand throws to com- He received notoriety in the plete the compoart world when,
in sition. The artist’s 1982, Nancy Reabrush rarely touchgan discovered his es the canvas, renwork in a Georgedering control of town gallery and the pigment nearpurchased two imly impossible. The pressionist paintairborne paint arings for the pririves on the canvate residence at Van Sweringen vas upon its own the White House. describes himself terms, creating a In addition to as a “SLIGHTLY spontaneous vitalhaving his works ECCENTRIC” ity—the hallmark hung at the White self-taught artist. of this new school House—in both of painting. Van Sweringen Reagan and Bush administradescribes this process as an tions—Van Sweringen’s realobsession “…it rules you!” ist and representational-styled All of his paintings reflect works have been included in a sense of proportion, style, exhibitions at the Corcoran color and beauty in the world Museum of Art in Washinghe sees around him—and he ton, DC, and in various priis compelled to share this vi- vate national and internationsion on canvas.

 al collections. O n V iew

opposite page: Fascination, acrylic on canvas, 38 x 30”, Private Collection Above (top to bottom): 1. Close to Heaven, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30”, Collection of Michael A. Mennello 2. Manhattan, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48”, Private Collection left: RON VAN SWERINGEN, courtesy of the artist


PROFILE { L I L I A N

LILIAN GARCIA-ROIG IS A

G A R C I A - R O I G }

Exhibition

“EN PLEIN” SIGHT: Paintings by Lilian Garcia-Roig On view September 17th through December 10th at the Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland www.polkmuseumofart.org

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native Cuban and currently a professor of art at Florida State University. She has been practicing the art of landscape painting en plein air over the past several years, primarily in New England, the Pacific Northwest and North Florida. Although her work is rooted in historical convention, she transcends the typical definition of a landscape painter—her largescale, surface leavened works transform the plane of the canvas into a painterly relief and pivot between the recognizable and the abstract. From afar, the paintings appear highly realistic but upon closer inspection, the images fade into pure abstraction. Her impastoed surfaces, created with brushes, gloved fingers and squeezed out paint, elicit comparisons to Vincent Van Gogh and Willem de Kooning. “ I try to capture the character of seemingly ordinary landscapes in a way that reflects a passionate engagement with the scene and with the painting process,” the artist explained. “I work onsite because it is the only way for 2011


P R O F I L E

a painter to capture the multi-di- ent times but compressed into mensional experience of a land- one intense impression.” scape, focusing in and out at variGarcia-Roig obtained her ous depths, noticing and trying to M.F.A. in 1990 from the Unibalance various relations among versity of Pennsylvania. She has spatial elements such as color, received numerous awards, insize, shape and visual weight… cluding the Joan Mitchell FounMoreover, by working on-site, I dation Award in Painting, State can achieve an expanded sense of Florida Individual Artist Grant of time in the work. Monet fa- and NEA Grant as well as resmously remarked idencies to Skowthat he could notice hegan, MacDowell the light change in a and Vermont Center scene after only sevColonies. Her work en minutes, so his has appeared in sevproblem was how to eral recent solo excapture the overall hibitions, including impression of a speHyperbolic Nature cific moment in so (2010) at MOCA, Garcia-Roig little time. For me, Jacksonville; More TRANSCENDS as the light changes Than a Brush With THE TYPICAL in the scene, differNature (2010) at definition of a ent features come to UNF Gallery, JackLANDSCAPE my attention and are sonville; Caught in painter. recorded on the canthe Act of Looking: vas…In this way, I see more than Post-Modern Plein-Air (2010) at what is apparent at any one mo- Broward College Gallery, Holment. This is not available in a lywood; Nature of Being There photograph, which only captures (2009) at the Bob Rauschena single monocular instant. Our berg Gallery, Edison College, memory of places is much more Ft. Myers; and Cumulative Nalike a summary of highlighted ture (2007) at Carol Jazzar Galmoments experienced at differ- lery, Miami. O n V iew

opposite page: 1. St. Mark’s inlet (florida), 2006, 48 x 36” Above (top to bottom): 1. Big River Rocks (Washington), 2010, 30 x 30” 2. central panel of Fall flows triptych (northeast), 2008, 48 x 48” 3. Water and rock flows (Washington), 2010, 48 x 48” left: LILIAN GARCIA-ROIG, courtesy of the artist


CRAFT { J A PA N E S E

THIS SUMMER, VISIT THE

K I T E S }

Exhibition

Catching Air: Kites of Japan On view through October 2nd at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach www.morikami.org

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Morikami and be inspired to go fly a kite! Japanese kites and kite papers, including striking multicolored images of famous samurai warriors, demons, sea creatures and more, are on display. These high-flying, colorful constructions of paper and bamboo are the products of artistcraftsmen following centuries of inherited tradition. Kites and kite-flying were introduced from China as early as the 8th century and were often used for military and religious purposes. Kites were flown to appease the wishes of the gods and to pray for successful harvests and healthy children—purposes for which they continue to be used today. Kite-making, as a profession, began to develop in provincial castle towns at the end of the 16th century. Regional kitemaking traditions thrived during the Edo Period (1600-1868) that followed, as kite-flying became popular among the growing urban population. Kite-making continues to be carried on in local craft traditions throughout Japan. These 2011


C R A F T

traditions dictate the form and “northern” and “southern” kites decoration of local products predominate in the southwestern and differentiate them from region of the country. others. While dozens of kiteThe “indigenous” kite is based making centers exist, three on simple geometric shapes like broad types of kites designs rectangles and hexagons, and inare distinguishable according cludes the Edo and Sanjō Rokkaku to place of origin—The “north- kites. “Indigenous” designs preern” type (designs which mi- dominate in northeastern Japan. grated from northern mainland The most influential of all Asia), the “southern” Japanese kite-maktype (those which ing traditions was derive from souththat of Edo (presern Asia and Indoent-day Tokyo). nesia), and the “inThe relatively simdigenous” type (deple construction of signs evolved soleEdo kites and their ly within Japan). wide range of moThe first type intifs, drawing from Edo KITES drew cludes the Baramon, history and legend, INSPIRATION Magoji and Oniyohad an impact on refrom “ukiyo-e” zu kites, known for gionally made kites WOODBLOCK their intricate frameverywhere. Fierce, PRINTS of Edo. ing structure and wild-eyed warriors complex shapes that require tails predominated on these kites, to retain equilibrium in flight. which drew considerable inspiThe popular Yakko, or footman ration from the ukiyo-e wooddesign, is also a “northern” kite. block prints also produced in The second type is exempli- Edo through much of the 18th fied by the Nagasaki Hata, a and 19th centuries. Today, such simple diamond-shaped kite that kites offer a unique look at Japmay have derived from a primi- anese values, legends and histive kite made from a leaf. Both tory. O n V iew

opposite page and above: typical forms and decoration found in traditional japanese kite designs left: YŌSHŪ Chikanobu (1838-1912), woodblock print, flying kites at new year’s (detail)


FOCUS { E .

B R A D Y

S N A P S H O T S … we all have

R O B I N S O N }

Exhibition

E. Brady Robinson: Transfer On view through October 9th at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park www.rollins.edu/cfam

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them. Popular since the 1880s, following the introduction of cheap, easy-to-use, hand-held cameras, the snapshot is considered by many photographers to be the purest form of photography—the true momentary capturing of a candid moment. Photographer, Elizabeth Brady Robinson, exploits the tradition of the snapshot to examine and document social and cultural environments. Her work is informed by the technology of instant mobile image capture as well as travel and landscape photography. Robinson’s images offer multiple points of view and cross-cultural references while evoking momentary life experiences. In her newest photography exhibition, Transfer, at Cornell Fine Arts Museum, the snapshot aesthetic is used as a means to record the environment by combining instant mobile image capture with the concept of drifting. The exhibit, which features photographs of fleeting landscapes taken from the window seats of cars, trains and air2011


F O C U S

planes—as well as still images an early age. Her mother gave taken on the street—is a map- her a camera when she was ping of geography encountered very young and the two phoas the artist drifted from various tographed together while taklandscapes. Within this body ing trips through the Virginof work, Robinson has created ia countryside. While in highnew formal and conceptual re- school, she started stringing as lationships between contrast- a freelance photojournalist for ing images through the use of The Northern Virginia Daily scale and sequence. A sense of and The Winchester Star. rhythm and moveE. Brady Robment guides viewers inson received through the series of her BFA from the images which visuMaryland Institute ally define an area College of Art in where social landBaltimore, MD, and scapes, personal exher MFA in photogperiences and pure raphy from Cranaesthetics meet. E. Brady Robinson brook Academy of Robinson first beArt in Bloomfield EXPLOITS came intrigued with Hills, MI. Her work the TRADITION this concept in the has been exhibited OF the fall of 2004 while at the Orlando MuSNAPSHOT. teaching in Cortoseum of Art; Corcona, Italy, for the University of ran Gallery of Art in WashingGeorgia. She began shooting ton, DC; ZONES Art Fair, Miimages from bus windows dur- ami; and Art Now Fair, Miami ing her travels through Europe Beach. She is Associate Profesand loved the effect of the blurs sor in the MFA program in Stuand reflections on her imagery. dio Art and the Computer at the Born in 1970 and raised in University of Central Florida and Winchester, VA, Robinson grav- maintains a studio in Washingitated toward photography at ton, DC, and Orlando. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. route 11, 2011, inkjet print, 18 x 24” 2. Wynwood, 2011, inkjet print, 12 x 16” above (top to bottom): 1. i-4 light, 2011, inkjet print, 36 x 48” 2. mco underpass, 2011, inkjet print, 36 x 48” 3. above virginia, 2011, inkjet print, 36 x 48” left: E. BRADY ROBINSON IMAGES courtesy of the artist

On View 08-09.2011  

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