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CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

2015

Vo l . 6 , N o . 2

RIGHT: KEN SCAGLIA, SARATOGA 300 (DETAIL), ACRYLIC ON CANVAS. ON THE COVER: FROM APPLETON MUSEUM OF ART’S EXHIBITION, MASTERWORKS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL GUILD OF REALISM: CEES PENNING, CUPCAKES, OIL ON PANEL. IMAGES COURTESY OF THE INTERNATIONAL GUILD OF REALISM.

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J U LY/ S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 5

34 Ocala

MASTERWORKS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL GUILD OF REALISM

Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida recognizes excellence in the art of contemporary realism. 2

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50 Miami

62 Miami

74 Sarasota

86 Tallahassee

ABORIGINAL

THE ART OF

APPALACHIA USA

TALLAHASSEE

NO BOUNDARIES: AUSTRALIAN

GREEN MACHINE: CARLOS LUNA

The Patricia & Phillip ABSTRACT Frost Art Museum PAINTING presents a selection of Pérez Art Museum mixed-media works Miami hosts a ground- by one of the world’s breaking exhibition foremost contemof Aboriginal porary Cuban artists. contemporary art drawn from the collection of Debra DeLand and Dennis Scholl. PAINTED BLACK: CONTEMPORARY

BUILDER LEVY:

The John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art features an epic documentary project exploring the life and labor in America’s coal mining communities.

102

THE JOHN H.

30TH ANNUAL

INTERNATIONAL

The pieces chosen for this juried competition, sponsored by the Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts, represent a wide spectrum of contemporary work encompassing all art forms from traditional to unconventional.

SUROVEK

COLLECTION

RIGHT: ANDREW WYETH, SARITA DANIELS, STUDY FOR THIN AS VANITY, 1978.

Issues of race and human dignity are elegantly portrayed in this compelling new exhibition coming to the Museum of Art–DeLand. OnV

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TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL), BODY MARKS, 1999, © THE ARTIST’S ESTATE AND KAREN BROWN GALLERY, DARWIN; CARLOS LUNA, BAILAORA, 2015; BUILDER LEVY, TOBY MOORE, OLD HOUSE BRANCH MINE, EASTERN COAL COMPANY, PIKE COUNT, KY, 1970; CAREL SCHMIDLKOFER, SONG OF THE BROMELIAD.

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CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

2015

Vo l u m e

6,

No.

7

Five Decades of Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, featuring The DandrewDrapkin Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg.

MUSE

Going Places: Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection at Norton Museum of Art, W. Palm Beach.

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SPOTLIGHT

18

WAYNE WHITE: ART IS

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

SUPPOSED TO HYPNOTIZE YOU OR SOMETHING

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery exhibitions and artists.

Currently on view at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood is a fun-filled display of eclectic, witty, and inspired twoand three-dimensional works by Emmy award-winning artist, Wayne White.

PICTURED: Wayne White, courtesy of the artist.

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Escher at the Dalí at The Dalí Museum, Sarasota.

FOCUS

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COMMENTARY

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Alumni Focus 2015: Commercial Success in Florida at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach.

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PROFILE

Ryan Sullivan at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami.


CONT EN T • D ES I GN I N TER PRETI VE EXHIB IT D ESIGN • Exhibition design, development, production & writing

• Construction administration

Driven by content, passionate about design, and sensitive to the visitor’s learning experience. We take stories from the past, lessons from nature

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and the facts of science and create intelligent designs and compelling experiences for visitors at museums, visitors centers and along the trail.

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The Heat is On!

M A G A Z I N E

S ummer is here and with it are some hot new shows you’ll definitely want to check out. Our cover offers a tantalizing taste of what’s in store at the Appleton Museum of Art this summer as they celebrate excellence in contemporary realism in Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism (on pg. 34). Take a trip in style at the Norton Museum of Art’s main summer attraction, Going Places (on pg. 8), where the planes, trains, and automobiles of our dreams come to life. Experience a groundbreaking survey of Aboriginal contemporary art opening at Pérez Art Museum Miami in No Boundaries (on pg. 50). And prepare to be moved by The Ringling Museum of Art’s presentation of Builder Levy’s epic documentary Appalachia USA (on pg. 74), an in-depth exploration into the heart of America’s coal mining country. All this and much more ahead. Enjoy the summer, have fun exploring—and keep art in your heart!

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney

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Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood

on iew FLORIDA

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s

J U LY/ S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 5

Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com Advertising

advertising.onviewmagazine@gmail.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com OnV

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GOING PLACES Transportation Designs from the JEAN S. FREDERIC A.

& SHARF Collection

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01.10.16 a t

N O RT O N M U S E U M O F A RT, W e s t P a l m B e a c h

w w w. n o r t o n . o r g

Golden Arrow model car, ca. 1929; Cast metal, paint, painted plaster. Gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf.


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AKE A TRIP IN STYLE!

Norton Museum of Art’s main summer exhibition, Going Places: Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection, focuses on the art of transportation design during the mid-20th century. Avid art collector, Frederic Sharf, whose energy is legendary­—and who is always on the move—has forever been fascinated by the great speeding up of life that occurred in the middle decades of the 20th century. Transportation is a recurring theme in the Sharf Collection, as Sharf has sought to capture the excitement that accompanied the simple act of getting

Burlington Zephyr electric train model; Maker: Western Coil & Electric Company, designed about 1934; manufactured 1940; Cast aluminum, plastic, electrical components; MFA, Boston. Gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf. 1ca. 0 1934 O n V– ca. i e w M a g a z i n e . c om • O c t o b e r / D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4


Above: Promotional Illustration for Bendix Helicopter Bus, Jeanne Weaver, ca. 1947; Airbrush and gouache on cardstock, mounted. Below: Design for Futuristic Bus, George S. Lawson, March 27, 1946; Watercolor, colored pencil, green paper. Jean S. and Frederic A Sharf Collection.

from one place to another in mid-century America. Going Places gathers the planes, trains, and automobiles of Sharf’s—and the world’s—dreams, in one place. There are “spin-dizzies,” concept cars, see-through model planes, and a train that lights up. The exhibition also highlights designers such as Raymond Loewy and Viktor Schreckengost, who created the look of the 20th-century vehicles that transported us and transformed the way we travel. Going Places includes objects from two previous exhibitions— Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, OnV

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Below: Martin Parr, Benidorm, Spain, 1997. Š Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

Stylish business executives at an airport, Larry Salk, American, Dec. 14, 1961; Graphite, opaque watercolor; MFA, Boston. Gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf.


and The Great Age of the American Automobile, both organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston—and is augmented with related period newsreels, TV ads, and clips from classic films and television programs. Highlights include design drawings, concept sketches, renderings, advertising art, and posters as well as models of trains, planes, and automobiles that literally examine how we got here. Journalist, Laura C. Mallonee, wrote in her essay, 20th-Century Models of Speed and Wonder: “Transportation is one of the few industries in which design has so This page (top to bottom): Design for Urich’s Texaco gas station and automotive center, American, about 1970; Transparent and opaque watercolor over graphite. Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Holiday Sport Sedan: Model Year 1959, 1958; Watercolor and gouache on illustration board. Images: Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection.

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consistently been a driving force. Who hasn’t at some point been stopped in their tracks by the polished silhouette of a classic Corvette? The car’s controlled curves evoke speed, and that speed creates the illusion of power.” Speaking to the era’s fascination with speed is a model car of the Golden Arrow, an ultra-streamlined racer that set a record of 231 mph in 1929. And in 1934, the Burlington Zephyr passenger train made a record-breaking nonstop trip from Denver to Chicago in just 14 hours, exceeding 100 mph at various points along the run—the Zephyr proved itself as the fastest train in the world. Sharf’s charming array of car models along with small-scale replicas of trains and planes are fascinating to behold. Many of these models were used in wind tunnels, or served as prototypes, and helped designers make engineering decisions. Some Above: Concept Gullwing with Stylish Couple, Wayne Kady, 1960/1961; Watercolor on illustration board. Opposite page (top to bottom): Proposal for a two-door convertible, model year 1950, 1950; Richard Arbib, American, 1917–1995; Graphite, opaque watercolor. Design Proposal for a Ford Sports Utility Vehicle – single view blue vehicle, Frederick J. “Bud” Magaldi, January, 1966; Gouache on illustration board. Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection.

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Airplanes, Boats, Trains, Trucks Coloring Book, design for a cover illustration, William F. Timmins; For: The Merrill Company Publishers, American, 1950; Opaque waercolor and ink over graphite. Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection.


MUSE

sat on executives’ desks while others were used by travel agencies to attract customers. Going Places was organized by guest curator, Matthew Bird, a professor of industrial design at Rhode Island School of Design. “The models,” said Bird of the Sharf’s collection, “are incredibly detailed. The concept sketches present radical new realities. The renderings show, in an amazingly vivid realistic way, what a design will look like long before it actually exists, and the amount of communicating the objects do—about location, aspiration, technology, who we were, and who we thought we could become—is amazing.” Merging art and architectural elements, Going Places celebrates the design ingenuity and engineering that revolutionized transportation. It invites viewers to share Sharf’s passion for the evolution of travel through a dialogue of design and function— well worth the trip! O n V iew This page (top to bottom): Aerocar: The Flying Automobile, Evan Sharer, ca. 1956; Gouache on illustration board. Poster: Over 200 Miles Per Hour. International Air Races St Louis October 1-2-3. Aeronautical Exhibition Aero Congress Air Institute Veiled Prophet; Designer: Carl Walter, American, 1923; Color lithograph. Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

09.11.15–01.10.16

BOCA RATON

Samuel Rothbort: Memories of the Shtetl

Boca Raton Museum of Art

+

www.bocamuseum.org

Veil of Memory, Prologue: The Last Supper

Thru 07.12.15

+

Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power

Stih & Schnock: Rosie Won the War

(See story in the April/June 2015 issue

+

on pg. 122.)

The Neighbor Next Door

07.25.15–08.23.15

Thru 01.10.16

Brenda Hope Zappitell: A Journey of Gestures

Izhar Patkin: You Tell Us What to Do

+

People and Places: Photographs from the Collection

CORAL GABLES Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Thru 08.23.15

www.lowemuseum.org

Shannon Plumb: What a Character

Thru 09.27.15

A Collector’s Legacy:

Image from Stih & Schnock: Rosie Won the War at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, Rosie Won the War, 2015, © Stih & Schnock, Berlin, 2015 / ARS New York City / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Berlin.

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{ P g. 2 o f 1 2 }

Coral Gables continued...

Highlights from The Francien C. Ruwitch and the Ruwitch Family Collections

DAYTONA BEACH

(See story on pg. 102.)

www.smponline.org

Fred Staloff’s Visual Poetry

Alumni Focus 2015: Commercial Success in Central Florida (See story on pg. 130.)

DELAND

DELRAY BEACH

+

Morikami

Purvis Young: Art of Street— Selections from the Permanent Collection

Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.morikami.org Thru 09.13.15

+

Museum of Art–

SPRINGS

Painted Black: The John H. Surovek Collection

07.17.15–10.04.15

Glexis Novoa: Emptiness

CORAL

Ben Schonzeit: Brilliant Realism

of Photography Thru 09.20.15

ArtLab @ The Lowe— GER•MANIA!

07.24.15–09.20.15

Southeast Museum

Thru 10.01.15

Thru 04.10.16

Thru 07.12.15

DeLand, Florida

www.moartdeland.org

West African Tribal Art: Sculptures, Textiles & Artifacts

Coral Springs

Japan’s Robot Kingdom: Mecha and Androids and Cyborgs, Oh My!

+

The Morikami Menagerie: Creatures in Japanese Art

Museum of Art

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

DUNEDIN

Thru 08.29.15

Romero Britto

Dunedin Fine Art Center

09.12.15–11.21.15

www.dfac.org

John Bowen

Thru 8.16.15

Renzo

Elemental: Florida Quilt Invitational

+ +

+

Melinda Trucks

Illumination:

Image from Fred Staloff’s Visual Poetry at Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida: Fred Staloff, Dancing Violets, 1960, oil on panel, 10 x 11”.

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{ P g. 3 o f 1 2 }

Dunedin continued...

The Art Cloth Network

Danish Avant-Garde During World War II

(See story in the April/June 2015 issue on pg. 108.)

+

GAINESVILLE

Quilt National 13

Harn Museum

+

of Art

Tampa Bay Surface Design Guild

www.harn.ufl.edu Thru 07.15.16

Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection

09.11.15–10.18.15

Call of the WILD

+

Linda Adele Goodine 07.21.15–11.29.15

Beauty & the Beasts

NEXUS: Experimental Photography in Florida

Carlton Ward, Jr.

Thru 07.26.15

09.11.15–12.23.15

+

FORT LAUDERDALE NSU Art Museum /

Thru 09.13.15

Thru 01.10.16

Julian Schnabel: Portrait of Olatz

Pablo Picasso: Painted Ceramics and Works on Paper, 1931-71

Fort Lauderdale

www.nsuartmuseum.org

Thru 10.04.15

Thru Fall 2015

From Within and Without: The History of Haitian Photography

Highlights from the William J. Glackens Collection

Art, Technology and the Natural World Thru 08.23.15

Kabas and Couture: Contemporary Ghanaian Fashion

Thru 02.04.16

(See story in the

War Horses: Helhesten and the

January/March 2015 issue on pg. 138.)

Image from Linda Adele Goodine at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Linda Adele Goodine, Bella Hawk from the Gibson Lemon series.

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{ P g. 4 o f 1 2 }

Gainesville continued... Thru 08.30.15

09.18.15–11.01.15

Thru 08.30.15

09.19.15–01.24.16

Hoppé Portraits: Society, Studio & Street Photographs, 1909-1945

Seventh All-Media Juried Biennial

Assemblage/ Collage

Smoke and Mirrors: Sculpture and the Imaginary

09.25.15–01.03.16

Museum of

Conversations: A 25th Anniversary Exhibition

Contemporary Art

+

In Time We Shall Know Ourselves: Photographs by Raymond Smith

JACKSONVILLE

The Cummer Museum of Art

Jacksonville

+

& Gardens

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.cummer.org

Project Atrium: Joelle Dietrick

Southern Exposure: Portraits of a Changing Landscape

Culture Center

Thru 08.16.15

09.05.15–11.22.15

Thru 10.04.15

of Hollywood

Art Aviators Exhibition

Avery Lawrence: Happy Everybody

Thru 08.23.15

All Together: The Sculpture of Chaim Gross

Douglas Hoekzema: Terrain

Thru 10.18.15

Project ​LSD— organized by Rob Tufnell

Reflections: Perspectives on the St. Johns River

07.18.15–10.25.15

HOLLYWOOD

Thru 09.13.15

Whitfield Lovell: Deep River

Art and

www.artandculturecenter.org

+

+

(See story in the

Wayne White: Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something

April/June 2015 issue

(See story on pg. 114.)

British Watercolors

on pg. 120.) Thru 11.29.15

Image from Southern Exposure: Portraits of a Changing Landscape at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Sally Mann, Untitled #26, Antietam, 2001.

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{ P g. 5 o f 1 2 }

The Ruth Funk

LAKELAND

MAITLAND

MELBOURNE

Polk Museum

Art & History

Foosaner

Textile Arts

of Art

Museums,

Art Museum

http://textiles.fit.edu

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Maitland

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Thru 08.22.15

07.07.15–10.03.15

www.artandhistory.org

Thru 08.30.15

Moon Museum

Thru 07.19.15

07.07.15–12.06.15

Participation: Classes of 2013/2015

Pop Art in America

Southern Accents Quilt Exhibition

Destinations in Paintings: The Kasten Collection

+

Paper Cuts: Andre Smith Collages

Thru 07.18.15

Dual Abstraction

09.19.15–12.12.15

Pop Artists and Friends: Works from the Permanent Collection

07.21.15–09.30.15

09.12.15–11.08.15

Thru 08.08.15

08.01.15–09.20.15

Presence

Color Theory

Center for

Evan Roth // Intellectual Property Donor

Light and Shadow: Contemporary Fiber Art by Hye Shin

MIAMI ArtCenter/ South Florida

www.artcentersf.org

Image from Destinations in Paintings: The Kasten Collection at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Louis Aston Knight, Path Along a River, ca. 1920, oil on canvas, from the Alex & Barbara Kasten Collection.

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{ P g. 6 o f 1 2 }

Miami continued... Thru 08.02.15

Thru 08.16.15

Museum of

08.13.15–05.08.16

Marina Gonella: Going Home

Downtown Miami: The Ground Beneath our Feet

Contemporary Art,

Project Gallery: Bik Van der Pol

Institute of

+

Contemporary Art,

Journeys: A Dialogue with Time. New works from Florencio Gelabert

Miami

www.icamiami.org Thru 08.09.15

Ryan Sullivan

Thru 08.30.15

(See story on pg. 132.)

Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis RodriguezDuarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres

08.21.15–09.13.15

Open Call— Web Based Art

North Miami

www.mocanomi.org Thru 08.30.15

Thru 08.15.15

High Above: The Art of Jerzy Kedziora

Global Positioning Systems

+

Ars Memoria: A Selection from MOCA’s Permanent Collection

Thru 08.23.15

Eugenio Espinoza: Unruly Supports (1970–1980)

Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 09.13.15

www.pamm.org Thru 09.25.15

Thru 09.30.15

Thru 07.26.15

Project Gallery: Shana Lutker

Guccivuitton

The Exile Experience: Journey to Freedom

Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

09.17.15–01.03.16

No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting

MDC Museum of Art + Design

www.mdcmoad.org Thru 07.12.15

Neighborhood Reclamation by Michael Vasquez

(See story on pg. 50.) Thru 09.27.15

Iman Issa: Heritage Studies

07.30.15–09.19.15

swing/SPACE/miami: Sebastian Munoz

Image from High Above: The Art of Jerzy Kedziora at Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Jerzy Kedziora, Balancing Sculptures.

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{ P g. 7 o f 1 2 }

Miami continued... Thru 10.04.15

07.03.15–11.15.15

Project Gallery: Gary Simmons

Promoting the Good Life: Recent Acquisitions

Thru 10.18.15

Thru 08.30.15

Marjetica Potrč: The School of the Forest/ Miami Campus

Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise

+

NAPLES

Poetics of Relation

Naples Art Thru 12.13.15

Association at

Project Gallery: Nicolas Lobo

The von Liebig Art Center

www.naplesart.org

Sea (Cartografias del Agua)

The Patricia

Thru 08.30.15

& Phillip Frost

Lorna Otero: Contemporary Families in Miami/A Photo Album 09.12.15–01.03.16 Carlos Estevez: 09.12.15–11.01.15 Celestial Traveler Florida Artist Series: Jim Couper/There are Thru 09.13.15 No Other Everglades The Green Machine: in the World The Art of Carlos Luna

Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu Thru 08.23.15

Museum Studies Exhibition: Exploring Identities/Recent Acquisitions

+

Creole World: Photographs of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere

(See story on pg. 62.) 09.12.15–12.13.15

Rufina Santana: Cartographies of the

The Wolfsonian–FIU

www.wolfsonian.org

Thru 07.17.15

Camera USA 2015: National Photography Exhibition and Award

+

Pictures in Process: Photography by Naples Art Association Members 07.27.15 –09.04.15

Gareth Rockliffe: The Great American Coastline

+

Image from Camera USA 2015: National Photography Exhibition and Award at Naples Art Association at the von Liebig Art Center: Robert Kenedi, Naples, FL, Woman in Yellow, 2013, photograph on aluminum, 30 x 24”.

24

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{ P g. 8 o f 1 2 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Olde Naples: Works from the Collection 09.21.15 –10.26.15

Your Choice 2015 The Baker Museum, Artis—Naples

Selections from the Arthur Primas Collection

08.22.15–11.14.15

University of Central Florida Flying Horse Editions: The Art of Collaboration

09.05.15–11.01.15

Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism

OCALA

Thru 09.06.15

Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art 09.26.15–12.06.15

MetaModern

(See story on pg. 34.)

http://artisnaples.org

Appleton

Thru 07.26.15

Museum of Art

09.12.15–11.01.15

Museum of

Celebrating 15 Years of Collecting

www.appletonmuseum.org

Toast to the Arts: Ocala Art Group Annual Juried Exhibition

American Art

+

Divers: The Sculpture of Rainer Lagemann

+

Jan Yoors: A Retrospective

+

The Mennello

07.11.15–09.06.15

Prints by Frank Stella: From the Permanent Collection of the Wiregrass Museum of Art

www.mennellomuseum.com Thru 09.27.15

Baskets and Boxes: The Ceramics of Sang Roberson

ORLANDO Orlando

+

Thru 08.23.15

Museum of Art

Promises of Freedom:

www.omart.org

Standing Strong in the Spirit: A Selection of Folk Art by Southern Women

Weegee by Weegee: Photographs from the Jean Pigozzi Collection

ORMOND BEACH Ormond Memorial

NEW SMYRNA

Art Museum

BEACH

& Gardens

Atlantic Center

www.ormondartmuseum.org

for the Arts

Thru 09.06.15

www.atlanticcenter

Elisa R. Boughner: Beguiled by Color

forthearts.org

Image from Baskets and Boxes: The Ceramics of Sang Roberson at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando: Sang Roberson, handbuilt basket, terracotta.

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{ P g. 9 o f 1 2 }

PENSACOLA Pensacola Museum of Art

www.pensacolamuseum.org Thru 08.09.15

The Lure of the Ocean: Original Works by Guy Harvey 08.21.15–10.17.15

Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast Curatorial’s Choice Exhibition

Thru 08.22.15

Annual Members’ Juried Exhibition

08.14.15–10.25.15

(See story in the April/June 2015 issue

+

Back and Forth: Thinking in Paint

Memories in the Making

Thru 09.07.15

09.25.15–12.06.15

From the Four Corners of the World

Paul Rudolph

09.03.15–11.07.15

Lincoln: Inspiration through the Ages

SARASOTA

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

The John and

09.11.15–11.30.15

Mable Ringling

Clowns

on pg. 46.)

ST. PETERSBURG Museum of

Museum of Art

Fine Arts,

www.ringling.org

Thru 09.13.15

St. Petersburg

The Cultural

07.10.15–09.13.15

www.fine-arts.org

Center

www.ccpvb.org

Builder Levy: Appalachia USA

Thru 07.17.15

(See story on pg. 74.)

Trenton Doyle Hancock— EMIT: What the Bringback Brought

Thru 08.16.15

Images of the Floating World and Beyond:

Image from Back and Forth: Thinking in Paint at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Carrie Ann Baade, Bad Government, 2015, oil on linen, 48 x 36”.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 2 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Japanese Woodblock Prints Thru 10.04.15

Five Decades of Photography at the MFA Featuring the DandrewDrapkin Collection

Around Rock Art

Thru 07.31.15

Thru 09.20.15

08.24.15–10.04.15

International Photography Competition 2015

In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation

The 30th Annual Tallahassee International 2015

08.07.15–08.28.15

(See story on pg. 86.)

15th Annual Members’ Show

(See story on pg. 128.)

Thru 11.08.15

Tampa Museum of Art

09.26.15–01.03.16

The Dalí Museum

New Acquisitions & Old Favorites

www.tampamuseum.org

XTO + J-C: Christo and Jeanne-Claude featuring works from the bequest of David C. Copley

www.thedali.org Thru 07.26.15

Dalí & da Vinci: Minds, Machines & Masterpieces

Thru 09.06.15

TAMPA Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.fmopa.org

The American Spirit: Painting and Sculpture from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art

University of South Florida

08.22.15–01.03.16

Escher at the Dalí (See story on pg. 00.)

TALLAHASSEE Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

www.mofa.fsu.edu 08.03.15–10.11.15

Tanzania: Life Image from Dalí & da Vinci: Minds, Machines & Masterpieces at The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg: Salvador Dalí, The Sacrament of the Last Supper, 1955, oil on canvas, 166.7 x 267 cm, Dale Chester Collection 1963.10.115, © Salvador Dalí. Fundación Gala-Salvador Dalí, (Artist Rights Society), 2015, courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 2 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Contemporary Art Museum

www.ira.usf.edu Thru 07.25.15

Museum at Work

+

With Hidden Noise 08.24.15–12.12.15

A Family Affair

TARPON SPRINGS Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

www.spcollege.edu/museum Thru 08.16.15

Henry and Abe: Finding America

Photographs of the Civil War

Thru 09.06.15

James Prosek: Ocean Fishes

Thru 08.31.15

Coastal Florida: Prints by Hal Stowers

VERO BEACH

Thru 09.20.15

From Painting to Video: Highlights from the Permanent Collection

Vero Beach Museum

Thru 07.12.15

09.26.15–01.03.16

Imaging Eden: Photographers Discover the Everglades

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick®

Thru 10.30.15

W. PALM BEACH

The Summer of ’68: Photographing the Black Panthers

Norton

of Art

09.19.15–01.03.16

Museum of Art

Thru 01.10.16

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Shadows of History:

www.norton.org

Going Places:

Image from Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick® at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Nathan Sawaya, Yellow, Photo courtesy of brickartist.com.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 2 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection

Marianela de la Hoz: SpeculumSpeculari

(See story on pg. 8.)

WINTER PARK Cornell Fine Arts

The Albin Polasek

Museum of

Museum &

American Art

Sculpture Gardens

www.morsemuseum.org

www.polasek.org

Thru 09.24.17

08.15.15–01.03.16

05.05.15–08.09.15

Enduring Documents: Photography from the Permanent Collection

Shapely Ves­sels: Gourds from Around the World

The Bride Elect— Gifts from the 1905 Wedding of Elizabeth Owens Morse

Museum at

+

Rollins College

Fashionable Portraits in Europe

cfam.rollins.edu Thru 08.02.15

Women and Abstraction

+

08.18.15–11.29.15

Art Leg­ends of Orange County: The Art of Hal McIn­tosh

+

Jess T. Dugan: Every breath we drew

Thru 01.24.16

The Charles

Selections from the Harry C. Sigman Gift of European and American Decorative Art

Hosmer Morse

O n V iew

Image from Going Places: Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection at Norton Museum of Art, W. Palm Beach: Golden Arrow model car, ca. 1929, cast metal, paint, painted plaster, gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf.

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FT. MYERS

Gallery: Bob Rauschenberg Gallery, FSW www.rauschenberg gallery.com

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Exhibition: THEO WUJCIK: ARTIST’S ARTIST ON VIEW THRU 08.08.15

The late artist Theo Wujcik’s final group of large-scale paintings from The Blue Chip Series is combined with works featuring fellow artist, Bob Rauschenberg, as his primary subject. PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Exhibition: The Lens Gazes Back: Reflections in Black and White on Classic Beauty ON VIEW THRU 08/01/2015

This exhibition invites viewers to witness how cameras are used to engage their subjects and our own attention in creating unique visual portraits. Above (left to right): Theo Wujcik, Bob Rauschenberg Direct Hit, 2008, acrylic on canvas, collection of Ward Visitor, Tampa, © Theo Wujcik 2008, courtesy of Bob Rauschenberg Gallery; Harry Benson, Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger at The Factory, archival pigment photograph, 1977, printed 2015, image: 33 x 72”, signed, titled, dated and # 15/35 in ink on recto., courtesy of Holden Luntz Gallery.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

MIAMI BEACH

ST. PETERSBURG

Gallery: The Sagamore

Gallery: Florida CraftArt

www.sagamorehotel.com

www.floridacraftart.org

Exhibition: Screen Play: Moving Image Art

Exhibition: WORLD ON A STRING: MASTERS OF PUPPETRY

ONGOING

Renowned as “The Art Hotel” for its distinguished collection of contemporary art treasures, The Sagamore stands as a pillar of the art community in Miami Beach. The collection is open to the public and displayed in the public spaces of the hotel. The current collection, Screen Play: Moving Image Art, is an anthology of digital art forms that pays homage to creative expression through video installations. Works on display include pieces by renowned artists John Baldessari, Merce Cunningham and Lawrence Weiner.

ON VIEW THRU 08.15.15

This exhibition will unleash your imagination by exploring international cultures from a worldclass, private collection and contemporary puppet craft by Florida artists.

Above left (top to bottom): Takeshi Murata, EAI Intro; Leslie Thornton, Binocular Menagerie; courtesy of the artists and The Sagamore. Above right: Greg Pellone, Whirlygig, courtesy of the artist and Florida CraftArt.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: NEW ARTIST EXHIBITION 2015 ON VIEW THRU 07.25.15

This group exhibition features work by six exceptional artists recently added to the Gallery’s roster: Bobbi Baugh, Rose Thome Casterline, Lin Hilf, BJ Lantz, Robert Ross, and John Westmark. BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

Exhibition: Modern & Contemporary Masters ON VIEW THRU 09.30.15

Rosenbaum Contemporary presents a showcase of Postwar, Modern and

Contemporary masters, including works by Fernando Botero, Alexander Calder, John Chamberlain, Jim Dine, Thomas Hartmann, Robert Indiana, Roberto Matta, Frank Stella, and Tom Wesselmann. From left: BJ Lantz, The Patina of Gratitude, oil & cold wax on cradled wood panel, 15 x 20 x 1.5”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas; Fernando Botero, Still Life with Fruits, 2003, oil on canvas, 30-3/4 x 39”, courtesy of Rosenbaum Contemporary.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

Gallery: Mindy Solomon Gallery

Gallery: Stellers Gallery www.stellersgallery.com

www.mindysolomon.com

Artist: CASEY MATTHEWS 


Exhibition: Ali Smith: Fever Pitch

THIS NEW SERIES BY

Casey Matthews employs layers upon layers of beautifully constructed organic shapes and washes of vibrant colors.

ON VIEW 09.11.15–10.16.15

Ali Smith uses the canvas as an open space of exploration, an empty landscape which serves as a starting point for investigation into abstract terrains. TAMPA

Gallery: Clayton Galleries www.claytongalleries.net

Exhibition: Hot Summer Show II ON VIEW THRU 07.29.15

Clayton Galleries continues its annual summer series with Hot Summer Show II, showcasing a variety of media, including oil, acrylic, and watercolor paintings, mixed-media works, photography, and sculpture.

Clockwise from top: Ali Smith, Flamethrower, 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Mindy Solomon Gallery; Casey Matthews, Simon Says (detail), mixed media on canvas, 48 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and Stellers Gallery; Dolores Coe, Passing Through, oil on linen, 52 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Clayton Galleries.

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09.05.15@

On view

APPLETON MUSEUM O

Masterw

FROM THE INTERNATIO

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-11.01.15

F A R T , College of Central Florida

works Realism

ONAL GUILD OF

W W W . A P P L E T O N M U S E U M . O R G


O


O Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism

OPENING SEPTEMBER 5, 2015, Appleton Museum

of Art, College of Central Florida in Ocala, presents a stunning new exhibition recognizing achievement in contempo-

rary realism. Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism consists of 70 artworks selected by a jury of peers,

shaped by input from the project’s curator, David J. Wagner. Jurors responsible for selecting works for the exhibition

included Donald Clapper, painter and founding charter

member, International Guild of Realism (IGOR); Vala Ola, painter, sculptor, and charter member, IGOR, and Art Renewal Center Living Master; and realism collector William

Rowett. The exhibition showcases the very best in contem-

porary realism and representational art by a select group of highly accomplished masters in this visually intriguing genre. Previous spread: Jette van der Lende, Freedom of Speech, oil on canvas, 28 x 41”. Opposite: Allan Gorman, Ruby & Sapphire, oil on linen, 36 x 24”.

Images courtesy of the International Guild of Realism; © David J. Wagner, LLC.

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Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism

Below: Cees Penning, Cupcakes, oil on panel, 24 x 36”.

“Realism,” as a general term in the arts, describes the visually accurate representation of the appearance of the world we live in. In the broadest sense, realism in a work of art exists wherever something has been well observed and accurately depicted. The International Guild of Realism represents over 370 artists from over 35 countries around the world. Its mission is to advance realism in fine art and to promote the careers of the artists it represents. Among the goals of The Guild are to recognize the best realists working today and to share their work with the public through juried exhibitions that span as many aspects of realism as possible, presenting the panorama of international work in this field while providing a snapshot of where realism is today. “All members go through a rigorous jury committee and then they must go through additional juries in our sanctioned exhibitions,” explained Donald Clapper. “The jurors for this exhibition were always


looking for the very best quality but also wanted a blend of classic traditional realism alongside new forms of contemporary realism. The Masterworks museum tour will showcase many styles within the umbrella of realism such as classical realism, trompe l’oeil, photorealism, magic realism and contemporary

realism. This upcoming exhibition will have a beautiful blend of all these styles. Viewers will not only be thrilled by the technical mastery of the brush but will also be captivated with the amazing array of creative compositions.” IGOR represents emerging artists all the way to living masters of the trade. “Price OnV

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Above: K. Henderson, PB&J #2, oil on linen, 24 x 36”.

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Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism

Opposite: Ken Scaglia, Saratoga 300, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 24”. Left: Sharon Guyton Lalik, Ketchup and Pepper, oil on canvas, 20 x 20”. Below: Hebe Brooks, Patriotic Melody, oil on linen, 30 x 20”.

points for our artist members range from relatively inexpensive to very high,” Clapper noted. “It’s always nice to see an emerging artist exhibit side by side with a living master.” The high-quality works in this exhibition are representative of what today’s Guild members have accomplished in a range of media, including oil, acrylic, egg tempera, graphite, watercolor, and colored pencil—extending from the ultra-contemporary to timeless traditional realism. Exhibiting artist Allan Gorman is drawn to the hid-

den abstract patterns, random shapes and aesthetic tensions he finds in real objects—particularly within the confines of mechanical structures as demonstrated in his painting Ruby & Sapphire (shown on pg. 36). “I look for a dance of patterns, shapes and colors, and then try to render images as best I can so that [the viewer] can enjoy the dance, too.” Although many of Gorman’s paintings appear photo-realistic, he says the focus isn’t necessarily on photorealism itself, but rather on the plays of light and shadow between colors, shapes and OnV

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“My goal is to engage the viewer on three levels: artistically, emotionally, and intellectually.”—A r l e t a P e c h

Above: Arleta Pech, Collected Toys, oil on linen, 21 x 29”. Right: Camille Engel, A Song Worth Volumes, oil on panel, 11 x 14”.

contrasts, and overall composition. “In this way, I think of my works as abstract paintings in the guise of realism, and I use this criteria to inform my choices of what to paint.” Some artists utilize a photographic style to showcase an ordinary subject in an extraordinary way. Sharon Guyton Lalik enjoys painting everyday objects in the genre of photorealism, also called hyperrealism, seeking out those original characteristics that make an object one-of-a-kind. “Creating paintings on a larger scale enables me to convey the subject’s unique characteristics and encourages the desire to reach out and interact with


Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism

the subject,” she said. “I am passionate about reproducing reflections, interesting textures, and luscious colors to create the illusion that the banana can be peeled, the foil can be crinkled, and the chocolate can be eaten.” Her painting Ketchup and Pepper (shown on pg. 41) illustrates the level of craftsmanship, discipline, and technical skill

that she aspires to achieve in her work. “If the viewer questions, ‘Is this a photograph?’ then I feel my goals have been accomplished.” For other artists,“time” is a recurring theme in their realist works—using images from the past to tell a story in the post modern still life. In Arleta Pech’s painting Collected Toys (shown opposite), she OnV

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Above: Atle Skudal, Sewing Machine, oil on canvas, 21 x 26”.

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Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism Opposite: Colin Poole, Daydream, oil on panel, 17 x 13”. Below: Priscilla Nelson, Chasing Shadows, oil on canvas, 49 x 37”.

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captures her subjects with a careful blending of high technical skill and a deep aesthetic appreciation for their inherent beauty. “My goal is to engage the viewer on three levels: artistically, emotionally, and intellectually.” Artist Priscilla Nelson Johnson focuses on figurative works in a contemporary realistic style. “As I observe and interact with those around me, I am intrigued by how people move and the statement they make by what they wear,” she said. “I love the movement of cloth and the moods that clothing can convey.” Her painting Chasing Shadows (shown left) conveys her love of the movement of cloth and her obsession with water and the way it channels light—creating its own chaotic movement. With its inception at the turn of the 19th century in France, realism has always been an important movement in the American art world. It rose to prominence with the Ashcan school, when artists like Robert Henri and Edward Hopper were interested in reflecting continued on pg. 49...


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Lyn Diefenbach, Reflections on a Journey 4 - Behind the Mask, oil on linen, 24 x 36”.

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Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism


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...continued from pg. 44 the more urban society of the time. While the movement fell to modernism in the following years, it returned to the fore-

Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism Opposite: Lee Alban, The Toy Box, oil on panel, 15 x 12”. Below: Jorge Alberto,“C” Is For Cat, oil on panel, 12 x 12”.

“ The paintings will be a visual overload, to say the least, and hopefully, viewers will leave the exhibition filled with excitement and admiration toward these amazing realism artists.”—D o n a l d C l app e r front in the 1970s and continues to resonate with artists, collectors, and the public. “We look forward to the Masterworks from the International Guild of Realism exhibition being held at the Appleton Museum of Art,” said Clapper. “Collectors and patrons of the arts will definitely enjoy the show in so many ways. The paintings will be a visual overload, to say the least, and hopefully, viewers will leave the exhibition filled with excitement and admiration toward these amazing realism artists.” On View


NO BOUN

ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN CONTE

@

On view 09.17.15 –01.03.16 WARLIMPIRRNGA TJAPALTJARRI, Pintupi. Born ca. 1958. Marawa (detail), 2012. Synthetic polymer

paint on canvas, 72 x 96”, © the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd, courtesy Papunya Tula Artists.

PÉREZ


NDARIES

EMPORARY ABSTRACT PAINTING ART MUSEUM MIAMI OnV

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A No Boundaries

A GROUNDBREAKING

exhibition of Aboriginal contemporary art opens

on September 17, 2015, at Pérez Art Museum Miami.

No Boundaries: Aboriginal Australian Contemporary Abstract Painting presents the work of nine trailblaz-

ing artists who were inspired

by their ancient cultural traditions to forge one of

the most dynamic painting

movements of recent times. Comprised of more than 75 paintings produced between

1992 and 2012, the exhibition highlights the distinctive vocabularies and modes

of gestural expression that define each of these artist’s

paintings and works on paper.

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JANANGGOO BUTCHER CHEREL, Gooniyandi. Born ca. 1918. Died 2009. Warooroo, 1999. Synthetic polymer paint on paper, 19-1/2 x 23-1/2”, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VISCOPY, Australia.


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No Boundaries

“From the arid central desert to the monsoonal tropical coast, remote northern Australia is a land of epic contrasts,” wrote curator and art historian, Henry F. Skerritt, in his essay for the exhibition catalog which accompanies PAMM’s presentation of No Boundaries.

These works speak across cultures, a reminder that contemporary art comes from all corners of the globe. “Sweeping vistas give way to rocky outcrops, which change from a sweltering umber into a rich sienna in the shifting light. For all its wilderness, one feels constantly shadowed by an otherworldly presence, as though floating between the material and spiritual realms. Nestled amid this natural

PADDY BEDFORD, Gija. Born ca.1922. Died 2007. Ngarrmaliny—Cockatoo at Police Hole, 2003. Natural earth pigments and synthetic binder on canvas, 59-1/16 x 70-7/8”, © Paddy Bedford estate, courtesy William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

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No Boundaries

grandeur are small Aboriginal communities with enchantingly sonorous names such as Wirrimanu, Warakurna, and Kiwirrkurra. Some are home to as many as 5,000 people, others to no more than a handful of families. Living close to the lands that nourished their ancestors, many Aboriginal Australians live in conditions of horrific poverty, marred by overcrowded and dilapidated housing, woeful sanitation, substance abuse, chronic illness, violence, and an epidemic of youth suicide. Aboriginal art is the unlikely product of this interzone. It is the cosmopolitan art of the frontier,

“[Aboriginal art] remains embedded in a landscape that few outsiders will ever see, rooted in an arcane cosmology that few will ever understand.”—Henry F. Skerritt BILLY JOONGOORA THOMAS, Wangkajungka. Born ca.1920. Died 2012. Waarna (Place for Good Food), 1997. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 18-7/8 x 14-3/16”, © Billy Thomas estate, courtesy Red Rock Art, Kununurra.

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designed to travel the world to art fairs and biennials, while remaining embedded in a landscape that few outsiders will ever see, rooted in an arcane cosmology that few will ever understand.”


Created at the frontier where Indigenous and Western cultures meet, these paintings speak across cultures, a reminder that contemporary art comes from all corners of the globe. Although rarely seen in the US, these artists stand at the vanguard of global contemporary art practice. No Boundaries offers a unique opportunity to view these artists’ works in depth, featuring

a stunning selection from each period in their careers. The turn of the 21st century was a moment of extraordinary experimentation and innovation in Australian Aboriginal contemporary art. Across the country, artists transformed their traditional iconographies into more abstract styles of mark making. The nine artists featured in No Boundaries were at the forefront of this OnV

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PRINCE OF WALES (MIDPUL), Larrakia. Born 1938. Died 2002. Body Marks, 1999. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 35-7/8 x 47-1/4”, © The artist’s estate and Karen Brown Gallery, Darwin.

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BOXER MILNER TJAMPITJIN, Jaru. Born ca.1935. Died 2009. Walkirr, 2000. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 47 x 31”, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VISCOPY, Australia.

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movement. Each artist was a respected senior Lawman— a special kind of guide who is knowledgeable in every aspect of Aboriginal ceremonial traditions—and used this knowledge to create a body of work that stands alongside that of their contemporaries in Europe and the US. As Ian McLean provocatively asserts in his contribution to the exhibition catalogue, “These paintings are aimed at the Western world with all the power and accuracy of a wellthrown spear.” They are not sentinels protecting a disappearing regime of knowledge; they are occupying forces, spreading their message with persuasive affect.” One of the artists included in the collection is Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri (born ca. 1958), whose work was included in dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany, in 2012. This was a highpoint in Tjapaltjarri’s career, which began in 1986, only a few short years after making international headlines as a member of the “Pintupi Nine”—one of the last groups


No Boundaries

TOMMY MITCHELL, Ngaanyatjarra. Born ca.1943. Died 2013. Nganturn Tali, 2011. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 30 x 20”, © Tommy Mitchell estate, courtesy of Warakurna Artists.

“These paintings are aimed at the Western world with all the power and accuracy of a well-thrown spear.”—Ian McLean OnV

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NGARRA, Andayin. Born ca.1920. Died 2008. Kungkaberri (Waterlilly), 2005. Synthetic polymer paint on paper, 14 x 20”, © Ngarra estate, courtesy Mossenson Galleries, Perth.

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of nomadic Aboriginal tribes to emerge from Australia’s Western Desert. Tjapaltjarri’s work will be shown alongside the renowned artists, Paddy Bedford (ca. 1922–2007), Jananggoo Butcher Cherel (ca. 1918–2009), Tommy Mitchell (ca. 1943-2013), Ngarra (ca.1920-2008), Prince of Wales (Midpul) (ca. 19382002), Billy Joongoora Thomas (ca. 1920-2012), Boxer

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Milner Tjampitjin (ca. 19352009), and Tjumpo Tjapanangka (ca. 1929-2007). No Boundaries: Aboriginal Contemporary Abstract Painting originated at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, and was organized by William Fox, director of the Center for Art and Environment; and scholar, Henry F. Skerritt. The works are drawn from the collection of Debra and Dennis


No Boundaries

Scholl, Miami-based collectors and philanthropists. Following four decades of collecting cutting-edge contemporary art, Debra and Dennis Scholl changed their focus to Aboriginal contemporary art after encountering

gone far beyond the boundaries of their community, their ‘country,’ and the very idea of their work as merely ethnographic. They are simply painters—some of the finest abstract painters this planet has ever seen.” On View

TJUMPO TJAPANANGKA, Kukatja. Born ca. 1929. Died 2007. Wati Kutjarra, 2004. Synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 70-7/8 x 59-1/16”, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VISCOPY, Australia.

“These painters have gone far beyond the boundaries of their community, their ‘country,’ and the very idea of their work as merely ethnographic.”—Dennis Scholl the extraordinary wealth of talent emerging from Northern Australia during several trips to that country. “The artists all have a common thread,” said Dennis Scholl, “each had reached senior status in their communities and had become abstract painters who transcended the expectations of both the community and the art world...We chose works by those who, to paraphrase the artist, Paddy Bedford, after having painted all of their mother’s countries and all of their father’s countries, finally chose to simply paint. These painters have OnV

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MA Artist, Carlos Luna. Portrait by Ignacio Barrios.


Now showing...

GREEN ACHINE THE ART OF

Carlos Luna & at the PATRICIA

FROST ART MUSEUM OnV

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O

GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna

ONE OF THE FOREMOST CONTEMPORARY

Cuban artists, Carlos Luna is part of a generation of artists who embrace their strong Cuban heritage and traditions but have reinvented themselves along the way. Luna conveys his compelling visual narratives through detailed and richly painted canvases and mixed-media works on paper. His new show, Green Machine: The Art of Carlos Luna­— currently on view at the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum FIU in Miami­­­, through September 13, 2015—includes the world premiere of a number of ceramic works and fine art tapestries as well as several new artworks showcas-

Dreamer, 2015, Jacquard tapestry,

ing Luna’s cross-pollination of influences from living and

Publisher: Magnolia Editions,

working in Cuba, Mexico, and Miami. OnV

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GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna

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GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna “Citing Rufino Tamayo and Wifredo Lam as major influences, Carlos Luna tells stories and relates fables that are culturally attuned to shifts in the social and political environments of the three countries where he has lived and created art,” said Frost Art Museum director, Dr. Jordana Pomeroy,” and the humanity that makes these places so vibrant.” Organized by guest curator, Dr. Barbaro Martinez Ruiz, the exhibition spans 5,000 square feet in the Grand Galleries of the Frost Art Museum and features more than 120 artworks—most shown for the first time and some created in new mediums the artist has been experimenting with during the past four years. On display are Jacquard tapestries and works on metal sheets with patina and aluminum leaf, created at Magnolia Editions; ceramic plates produced at the famed Talavera Pottery in Puebla, Mexico; mixed-media works on paper on wood; and his largescale oil on canvas paintings. The title, Green Machine, alludes to the importance of the rain forest known as El

Monte, a sacred space in the Afro-Cuban tradition one must enter to find meaning. The ‘machine’ represents the mechanism that perpetuates life’s continuity. Combined, these ideas represent the artist leaving behind his rural past and his contemplative journey into the present moment. The towering centerpiece of the exhibition, El Gran OnV

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Above: Catalina’s Mirror, 2015, Jacquard tapestry, Publisher: Magnolia Editions, 81 x 71”. Opposite: Bailaora, 2015, Jacquard tapestry, Publisher: Magnolia Editions, 101 x 85.”

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GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna Mambo, is a massive six-panel painting chronicling the artist’s own story. “El Gran Mambo tells the story of my journey through three countries,” the artist explained, adding that music passionately fuels his creative process while he’s painting. “The musicality and rhythm of El Gran Mambo are powerful elements of this centerpiece.” Luna also cites as his artistic influences the musical masters, Benny More and Ismael Rivero. Luna’s works exhibit a full range of emotion—beauty, anger, sorrow, passion, and hope. What is apparent is his ability to tell beautiful and tragic tales. He is able to take his experiences and emotions and translate them into paintings that speak for many. Though symbolic in nature, his works are grounded in the real world, and thus carry with them a poignancy not often found in the art world. Beyond that is his exquisite handling El Gran Mambo (The Great Mambo), 2006, oil on canvas, 144 x 192”, CCG Art Collection.

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GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna

“Carlos Luna tells stories and relates fables that are culturally attuned to shifts in the social and political environments of the three countries where he has lived and created art...” —D r . J o r d a n a P o m e r o y

of paint within a wide range of complex compositions. From portraits of roosters to swirling, dynamic murals, Luna’s imagery never fails to elicit dramatic responses. “The best artist is the one who makes his art a science,” said Luna. “And the best scientist is the one who makes an art of his science.” Intense yet controlled, earthy yet abstract, intimate yet boldly theatrical, dark yet exuding the power of life, his paintings present the essences of love and hate, freedom and repression, growth and decay—that is to say, all that makes up the human condition. According to Ruiz, the exhibition at the Frost Art Museum draws upon Cuba’s rich,

Round Plate, 2015, Talavera Ceramics, produced by Talavera Santa Catarina, 17” diameter.

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GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna oft-forgotten rural culture and popular wisdom, plus AfroCuban religious traditions. The work itself teems with edgy political commentaries, delivering a verbal-visual punch to map his journey with proverbs, riddles, and graffitilike scrawls. In the words of the artist: “The United States is a country with immigrants from everywhere, and this

gives me the opportunity to be in contact with the world.” While the work in this show reflects Luna’s love for and dislocation from his native country, it also explores subjects such as masculinity, violence, gender roles, and cultural traditions. The artist employs culturally significant symbols in his work—roosters, cigars, lions, among others—thereby

Below: Robo-Lucion, 2015, mixed media on paper on wood, 47 x 59”, Private collection.


GREEN MACHINE: The Art of Carlos Luna formulating an iconography that is deeply personal and, at the same time, universal. In a sense, Luna’s painted memories remain the only viable link to his homeland—serving collectively as his scrapbook, diary, and memoir. Carlos Luna was born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba, in 1969. Possessing a strong spirit, and an unquenchable desire for personal growth as an artist, he left Cuba in 1991 and migrated to Mexico, where his career entered a new phase of exploration and growth. After receiving a US EB-1-1 visa for extraordinary ability in 2001, Luna migrated to Miami along with his wife and three children. The art community has embraced his work with great enthusiasm since his arrival in the US in 2002. Carlos Luna’s work has been exhibited alone or as part of a collection in more than 25 museums and arts institutions around the country and is highly regarded by curators and critics alike. His exile has expanded his opportunities for exposure to a wider world audience and allowed his work

to be judged in a broader arena. His successes are noteworthy as measured by a growing list of solo museum exhibitions, including Pablo Picasso Ceramics / Carlos Luna Paintings, a joint exhibit showcasing his work alongside that of Picasso at NSU Art Museum / Fort Lauderdale; the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, CA; Miami Beach’s Bass Museum of Art; the American University Museum, Washington, DC; and Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, FL; among others. On View

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Opposite: Mr. C.O.Jones, 1012, mixed media on paper on wood, 59 x 47”, Private collection. Below: Grr-Miauu, 2015, mixed media on paper on wood, 38 x 48”, Private collection.

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BUILDER LEVY: Appalachia USA

Above: Morning Shift, Wolf Creek Colliery, Martin County, KY, 1971. Opposite: Toby Moore, Old House Branch Mine, Eastern Coal Company, Pike Count, KY, 1970.

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laborers and their families, the brutal work of mining, and the struggle for better conditions and wages. The series is an intense artistic exploration of a significant yet little understood, and often overlooked, region of the United States. Featuring 50 black and white photographs taken by Levy over a 40-year period, the exhibition showcases the artist’s in-depth exploration into the heart of Ameri-

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ca’s coal mining country from 1968–2009. Appalachia USA was organized by Christopher Jones, assistant curator of exhibitions at The Ringling, and will be on view from July 10, 2015 through September 13, 2015. “Builder Levy’s Appalachia USA does for today’s coal miners what Walker Evans did for sharecroppers and tenant farmers in the Dust Bowl,” wrote Vanity Fair. Inter-


BUILDER LEVY: Appalachia USA

Opposite: Sisters, Osage, Scotts Run, Monongalia County, WV, 1970. Below: Red Robin Inn, Borderland, Mingo County, WV, 1971.

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twining the traditions of fine art, and social documentary, Appalachia USA is an aesthetically and socially significant exploration that celebrates the human spirit. It highlights the rich heritage of the region and charts the dramatic changes that occurred over Levy’s four decades of artistic and social engagement. It’s a story of the people in this region, their collective struggles for better working conditions and improved standards of living, and their efforts to protect their natural environment against powerful economic interests. Despite the promise of alternative energy, coal still fuels

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Smith Brothers Mining Company, Williamson, Mingo County, WV, 1971.

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most of our power plants and steel mills. The story of its extraction, and of the people who live, work, and endure in West Virginia, Southwestern Virginia, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania, has been a source of fascination bordering on obses-

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sion for Levy. For four decades, he has been witness to a dangerous industry where workers operate heavy machinery in close quarters underground, extracting ever-increasing tonnage of coal. Over the last two decades at surface mines, he


BUILDER LEVY:

Appalachia USA

has seen powerful explosives tear apart mountain summits, followed by giant draglines that scoop out the exposed veins of coal in massive, destructive quantities. He has also witnessed strikes and picket lines, desperation and rage, hope and

dignity, and the inevitable natural and man-made disasters that are part of the territory. Levy’s images connect viewers to the heart of coal mining, bringing them deep underground where miners toil at the arduous and sometimes perilous work. Through his adept, empathetic portraiture, Levy connects with the miners on a personal level. His lens captures the intimate interiors of family homes, takes in the natural beauty of the landscape —even as it is marred through mining—and captures the distinctive rural vernacular and material culture that marks the region’s unique identity. Levy began this work in 1968. Initially, the project was a labor of love, supported by his teacher’s salary. Later, he was funded by grants to complete the project. He undertook the Appalachian project as a personal commitment to social justice and employed the documentary tradition to both record and teach others about the social landscape of America. In doing so, he hoped to dispel popular “hillbilly” steOnV

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reotypes by presenting his subjects in a way that emphasizes their humanity and dignity. “Levy’s photographs bring to life a group of people who have often been marginalized and stereotyped in the media,” said Jones. “This exhibition displays the artist’s dedication to documenting the region and community, and demonstrates his continued return to the area over the course of four decades to capture the changing story of Appalachia and its people on film.” In the new millennium, Levy revisited Appalachia to gain a new perspective and to complete his work. These trips included reconnecting with some of the subjects of his earlier pictures and witnessing how decades of mining had impacted the region. Beginning in 2002, Levy took ten flights over southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky to witness the grand scale of the mining operations, which left behind the poisonous byproducts of massive mechanized coal extraction. The exhibition at The Ringling features imagJ

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BUILDER LEVY: Appalachia USA

Above: Prepare to Meet God, Williamson, Mingo County, WV, 1971. Opposite: Nimrod Workman, Chattaroy, Mingo County, WV, 1972.

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es from each period of Levy’s project, presenting a full view of the region over four decades. “This exhibition is a powerful reminder of the ability of contemporary art to tell our collective stories and educate others about the times we live in. We are grateful for the opportunity to present this important work to our audiences,” said Steven High, executive director of The Ringling. Born in Tampa, FL, in 1942,

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and raised in Brooklyn, NY, Levy received a BA in art from Brooklyn College (CUNY) in 1964. He studied the Photo League and the photography program of the Farm Security Administration in conjunction with his master’s degree in art education at NYU in 1966. He worked as a New York City teacher of at-risk adolescents for 35 years and photographed in his students’ inner city communities. Levy’s photographs have appeared in more than 200 exhibitions. His photographs are in the collection of many institutions, including the Museum of Fine Arts of Houston, TX; the High Museum of Art, GA; and the Museum of the City of New York. He was awarded fellowships by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Alicia Patterson Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and Puffin Foundation. He is the author of three books: Appalachia USA: Photographs, 19682009; Images of Appalachian Coalfields; and Builder Levy: Photographer. O n V iew


Carel Schmidlkofer “The majority of my work is inspired by my love of nature. I never know where a photograph of a beautiful flower will take me. The work shown here is the result of a flower—the bromeliad.” —C. Schmidlkofer Carel Schmidlkofer, Song of the Bromeliad, photograph, 39 x 52 inches.

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F S U MUSEUM of FINE ARTS

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30 th

ANNUAL

Tallahassee

I N TER NATIONA L on view

08.24.15-10.04.15


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30TH ANNUAL

Tallahassee International

T H E T A L L A H A S S E E I N T E R N A T I O N A L I S

John Francis

University Museum of Fine Arts in Tallahassee and juried by

“Moments in Transition is an ongoing

an annual, juried competition sponsored by the Florida State faculty from the College of Fine Arts. The jurying process is blind and jurors decide on works based on their own merit

with the agreement that each artist demonstrates exception-

al skill within their chosen medium. This year’s jurors— Carolyn Henne, FSU College of Fine Arts Associate Dean

and Art Department Chair; and Allys Palladino-Craig, FSU

Museum Director—took on the gratifying task of reviewing nearly 400 works submitted by close to 200 artists. After

project begun in 2009, on a 120-minute train ride from Nagoya to Matsumoto, Japan. While traveling, I found myself seduced by the speed and its abstraction of a landscape streaming past. The camera captures what the eye cannot see... an intriguing blend of clarity and confusion, a visual dialog between the conscious and the subconscious.” —J. Francis

much consideration, 77 works by 40 artists were selected for the exhibition. The pieces chosen represent a wide array of contemporary work encompassing all art forms from tra-

ditional to unconventional. The FSU Museum of Fine Arts congratulates this year’s accepted artists and welcomes visitors to the 30th Tallahassee International.

John Francis, Moment in Transition 6, photograph archival pigment print, 10 x 15 inches.


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“With no restrictions on media, been the venue for ambitious ins

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30TH ANNUAL

this show has often stallations.”—A. P a l l a d i n o -C r a i g

Tallahassee International

“Our first competition was mounted in 1986,” said Palladino-

Craig. “The competition has always drawn a percentage of young

faculty entrants from across the country. With no restrictions on

media, the show has often been the venue for ambitious installations. Even in an era when many artists manage their own websites, there is merit in being selected by a professional jury for the introduction to the public that a competition format provides.”

The 2015 Tallahassee International includes works by Elis-

sa Armstrong (VA), Isrelah Brooks (SC), Andy Browne (FL),

Tracy Kerdman

Erin Desmond (CA), Francis Ditton (FL), Jose Esquivel (TX),

“I appropriate found

Ling Chun, (RI), John T. Cooksey (FL), Yara Damian (Spain),

images as references for

Jim Flahaven (ME), John Francis (ID), Victoria Goro-Rapoport

my paintings. The distance

(NE), Tej Greenhill (CA), Joshua Hagler (CA), Jonathan Hall

and anonymity allows

(UK), Veronica Jaeger (TX), Tracy Kerdman (NY), Ann Kim

me to copy and paste faces

(OH), Moran Kliger (Israel), Joe Korte (FL), Gray Lyons (IN),

and limbs in a provocatively

Rob Nixon (FL), Katsura Okada (NY), Miriam Omura (AL),

emptiness of stock photos,

abnormal way. The inherent

Christopher Owen Nelson (NM), Kortney K. Niewierski (OH),

when transferred into

Jim Pearson (IL), Judith Peck (VA), Rotem Reshef (NY), Maja

oil paint on canvas, becomes

Ruznic (CA), Oscar Salamanca (Colombia), Carel Schmidlkofer

more solid and cultural,

(FL), Olga Skorokhod (OR), Emily Sullivan Smith (OH), Nathan

contemplating contemporary

Taves (IN), Bethany Taylor (FL), Sandy Thiebeault (NC), Mark

social issues of gender, interaction, and identity.”

Walnock (FL), Xiong Xuan (PA), and Miriam Yuhvetz (Israel).

—T. Kerdman

Two prizes will be awarded and a catalogue will accompa-

ny the exhibit which opens August 24, 2015. On the following

Tracy Kerdman,

pages, On View presents a small sampling of the creative talent

At My Real Job, oil on canvas,

that will be presented.

24 x 24 inches.

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Tallahassee International

Maja Ruznic “This new body of work offers glimpses into uncanny yet familiar landscapes and evokes feelings of discomfort and displacement. The figures, whose gender is ambiguous, are alive and dead at once—they are ‘avet’—the Bosnian word for an apparition. I seek to bring out the fragility from within the subject, not to presume superiority, but to celebrate the intimacy possible when we bare our traumas, both large and small. I allow my paintings to tell me how to make them—the paint bleeds and washes over the figure, gently unmasking psychological deformations. The paintings are sketch-like and complete at once and evoke the feeling of having woken from a dream, recalling a few, small details while the rest recedes into obscurity. ” —M. Ruznic

Maja Ruznic, Trophies Were Made and the Message Did Not Matter. The Joy Was Already In Their Bones., ink and gouache on paper, 31 x 42 inches.

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30TH ANNUAL

Tallahassee International

Ling Chun “Food is a necessity of life; it also represents one’s cultural identity through the ritual of eating. I create food objects that specifically present cultural icons: chicken feet, dumplings, fortunes cookies, and soup spoons. The simple repetition of these objects is part of my ritual of art making and speaks to the complexity of my cultural identity.” —L. Chun

9 Andy Browne, Wet Dog, acrylic and charcoal on paper, 30 x 36 inches.

t Ling Chun, Teagather, clay, luster, 10 x 9 x 4 inches.

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Andy Browne

“This current work reflects my continual fascination with dots and spots. I am trying to distill images I see down to their basic ‘morse code’ of dots and dashes. I try to skate along the edge of where representation becomes abstract. The two pieces in this exhibition came out of watching a Dalmation dog over the course of several months. In the first of these pieces, the dots have escaped the boundaries of line and in this piece, lines are still implied and just beyond view. Concentrating the work in black and white and shades of grey, aids in the further effort to distill what I see down to the basic components.” —A. Browne OnV

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Tallahassee International

Christopher Owen Nelson “Through my work, I explore my own personal relationship to a variety of subjects that I have developed an important bond with. I spend a majority of my time outdoors. The environment puts me in a state of meditation. Absorbing information from the water and the trees makes me feel connected and attached. I try to address the spiritual and emotional impact that a particular tree has had on me by trying to understand its life, and by studying its characteristics and changes throughout the seasons, asking myself, ‘How are we connected?’” —C. Owen Nelson

t Christopher Owen Nelson, Glimpse, carved and painted cast acrylic, 20 x 16 inches.

Kortney Niewierski “Organic shaped objects reminiscent of anatomical or animal-like forms and metaphorical imagery are intended to intrigue one’s curious side. The choice of fabric as a medium and sewing as a means of construction speaks to a level of feminization and domestication. Fluid forms and fleshy casts dominate the vision of the work and imagery of the pieces exposing an underlying tone of self-evaluation, while the attempt of the work is to blur the lines between playful, appealing and humorous, and naughty and off putting.” —K. Niewierski

t Kortney Niewierski, Forget Me Knot, wire mesh, fabric, piping, rubber, 60 x 20.5 x 5 inches.

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Mark Walnock “My work is based on different growth processes seen in nature. The pieces depict scenarios in which extensions are formed, or are in the process of being formed off a stationary host. These living hosts can be protected by spikes or scales. Some hosts take shape as root systems or animal parts from the land or sea. The idea of protection through clustering and the persistence for survival in nature are my main themes. I personally connect with the passive aggressive qualities that I find in nature. I admire nature’s ability to grow under any harsh conditions and never be held back. Quiet but powerful, my pieces begin to reflect a self portrait as the growth within them is silent, subtle, and ongoing.” — ­ M. Walnock


30TH ANNUAL

Tallahassee International

Mark Walnock, Divided Roots, ceramic, 5.5 x 5 x 14 inches.

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Tallahassee International

Emily Sullivan Smith “The two pieces in this exhibition, Two Birds with One Stone and Plight of the Passenger, are part of a larger body of work entitled The Plight of Abundance. The works marry together instances of species being hunted to extinction or endangerment—investigating the tenuous balance between natural resources and human survival. Process, material and composition work to support the idea and provide the viewer with access to the concepts. In this body of work, I am using an environmental consciousness to develop works that both document and play with the ever-changing relationship.” —E. Sullivan Smith O n V iew

Emily Sullivan Smith, Two Birds with One Stone, relief print, gold leaf, 24 x 32.5 inches.

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Andrew Wyeth, Sarita Daniels, Study for Thin as Vanity, 1978; Watercolor on paper, 17 x 14�.


On view

07. 24.15-09.20.15

Black PA I N T E D

T h e J o h n H . S u r o v e k C o l l e ct i o n

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C

Painted BLACK

COMPRISED ENTIRELY OF PAINTINGS

depicting African Americans from the preCivil War era through the Civil Rights era, the Museum of Art–DeLand presents the exhibition Painted Black, showcasing the collection of John H. Surovek, a former director of the Daytona Beach Museum of Arts and Sciences, and current art dealer and proprietor of the John H. Surovek Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida. Assembled over more than 35 years, this collection includes works by well-known, mostly white American artists such as Thomas Hart Benton, and Andrew Wyeth in addition to works by several African-American artists. The paintings in the exhibition— predominantly genre scenes, street scenes, and portraits—deal with issues of race and human dignity, capturing ordinary and often poignant moments pertinent to the Black experience in America. OnV

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Thomas Hart Benton, South East Cotton Warehouse, 1934; Oil on canvas, 12-1/4 x 9”.

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Painted BLACK A collection of this size regarding the black image in art is a rarity. This exhibit is special not only in the size of the collection or in the eras it spans, but also in its depiction of AfricanAmericans across those years. “These are works of historical significance because they reveal attitudes about race over an extended period of time,” said Peter Blume, director of the David Owsley Museum of Art, Ball State University in Indiana and curator of the exhibi-

“These are works of historical significance because they reveal attitudes about race over an extended period of time” —P e t e r B l u m e

tion. Earlier works in the survey often treat African-Americans more as objects propagating a stereotype. This slowly changes as the 20th century progresses and the artists represent their subjects with more complexity and understanding. Viewers

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who come to see Painted Black, will see how black images change from the patronizing depictions during the Civil War and Reconstruction to the proud portrayals during the second half of the 20th century. “It’s very important to re-


member that some of the older images, some of the images that were patronizing, were the common depictions of Black Americans,” Blume said. “But we see that change throughout the exhibition. And that’s clearly changed throughout

America.” “The opportunity is definitely there for dialogue, and that’s the importance of art,” added Blume. “We hope the community comes to see this presentation, not only to marvel at these works, but to learn...what these OnV

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Madeline Hewes, Catfish Creek, 1961; Oil on canvas, 17 x 23”.

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Painted BLACK

images mean, and what the changes mean.” Also on view in the Museum of Art-DeLand’s presentation of Painted Black is work by contemporary artist, Stephen Scott Young, a Florida artist featured in Surovek’s gallery who won a first prize at the American Artist’s national art competition in watercolors. Blume noted that Young’s work offers a fitting bookend for those looking at the works from sociological and histori-

cal perspectives. “You can see a significant shift over the course of the century. And when you look at Stephen Young’s portraits, you see a very different attitude in the way he addresses his subjects—an attitude that is very obviously at odds with the attitudes of the late 19th century.” “The paintings in Surovek’s collection rarely depict their African-American subjects as victims of slavery or Jim Crow,” wrote Paul O’Donnell OnV

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Above: Harry Hoffman, Along the Shore, Florida Keys; Oil on panel, 9 x 12”. Opposite: Stephen Scott Young, Green Eyes, 1988; Watercolor drybrush on paper; 25 x 15”.

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Painted BLACK in an article for The Magazine Antiques. “The provocation in these pictures is more latent and more fascinating: they capture ordinary moments that...happened largely beyond white America’s imagination or concern.” Regionalist painter, Thomas Hart Benton, whose painting, South East Cotton Warehouse, is featured in Painted Black, became famous for his lively portrayals of ordinary people engaged in mundane activities.

important cultural factor in the South,’ to which Benton replied, ‘niggers,’ and explained: ‘The colored people by what they could do in your climate determined your way of life...They are responsible for the tradition of ‘good life’ which you have, for without them to do your work, you could not have had that life. Nearly everything you have can be traced to their influence except your architecture, and that is borrowed.’ ” Also featured in the exhibi-

“...most of the painters in 19th and 20th century America were white, but they regularly painted Negro subjects, sometimes in what were their masterpieces.”—J. H. S u r o v e k As Alexis L. Boylan wrote in her essay, From Gilded Age to Gone with the Wind: The Plantation in Early Twentieth Century Art, “for Benton, the romance of the South was embodied in his ideas about African Americans. He shared a conversation in which a southerner asked him about ‘the most

tion is work by William Bromley III, among the mid-19th Century’s best observers and documentarians of societal attitudes and forces in action, dress, and circumstances. His painting, White Slave, addresses the notion of “white slavery” in a pre-Civil War image of a white shoe shine boy polishing OnV

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William Bromley III, White Slave, ca. 1855; Oil on pine panel, 26-1/2 x 20”.

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Painted BLACK

Thomas B. Worth, The Fiddler, 1868; Oil on board, 12 x 8-3/4 “. Winthrop Duthie Turney, The Baker; Pencil on paper, 16 x 13-7/8”.

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the boots of a smartly dressed, likely wealthy and world traveling black gentleman. “As a collection,” O’Donnell stated, “the paintings leave the viewer with the unsettling sense that there is much about these quiet scenes that remains unseen. For all they tell us, there is much more we do not know.” After acquiring his first work in 1977—William Aiken Walker’s Man in Tattered Clothes

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(1886), which depicts a vagabond in an almost comically distressed overcoat cheerfully posing for his full-length portrait—Surovek had no idea that “the Negro subject” would be his life’s passion. “Why this became the focus of my collecting is still a mystery to me,” said Surovek. “I knew no one else (except Bill Cosby) who collected in the genre, and therefore, it presented no conflict with the purchases I was making on behalf of my patrons, clients, and friends. In fact, the more I learned, the more I realized that the Negro subject was almost completely overlooked. It didn’t take much to see that most of the painters in 19th and 20th century America were white, but they regularly painted Negro subjects, sometimes in what were their masterpieces. Yet, there was absolutely no scholarship on the topic. In my years as a museum director, I never once ran across a study that addressed the significance or important of the Negro subject in American art. If I could hone my focus and stay the course, I had an opportunity to make a contribution.” On View


WAYNE ART IS

SUPPOSED TO

HYPNOTIZE YOU

OR SOMETHING

&

ART 1 14

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on view through

08.23.15

at

CULTURE CENTER of HOLLYWOOD

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WHITE

Wayne White; Photo courtesy of the artist. Opposite page: Uh Huh, 2014, acrylic on

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offset lithograph,

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/courtesy S e p t eJoshua m b e Liner r 2 Gallery, 0 1 5 NYC. 00


WAYNE WHITE: Art is Supposed to

Hypnotize You or Something

IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE 100-YEAR

centennial celebration of Broward County, the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood commissioned internationally known and Emmy

Award-winning artist, Wayne White, to cre-

ate a large-scale puppet head of the county’s

namesake, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward. The puppet, which was created during a 9-day artist residency at the Center, is the centerpiece of

a major exhibition, Wayne White: Art is Sup-

posed to Hypnotize You or Something, which

will be on display at the Center through August 23, 2015.

This is the first solo exhibition in Florida for

Opposite and below:

the Los Angeles-based artist. The presentation

Napoleon Bonaparte Broward

includes a mixture of his eclectic, witty, and

(Puppet), 2015, cardboard, wood, bamboo, hot-glue, acrylic,

inspired two- and three-dimensional works.

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spray enamel.

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WAYNE WHITE: Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something

Clockwise from top right: Huckleberry, 2013, acrylic on offset lithograph; the Cruel Sissy*, 2014, acrylic on offset lithograph; Dunno, 2013, acrylic on offset lithograph; Art Jail, 2009, acrylic on panel. Images courtesy Western Project, LA. *Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery, NYC.

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The Art and Culture Center will host guided field trips and group tours for the exhibition. Visitors will not only learn about the history of Broward County in a fun and entertaining way, but will also be able to bring their own inspirations to life in the Interactive Art Room, which will remain open throughout the run of the exhibition. The art of puppetry in various forms has been a staple of White’s ongoing practice dating back to the 1980s. He won three Emmy Awards for his art direction on Peewee’s Playhouse, when he built puppets and sets on the seminal children’s show. His puppets included Randy, Cool Cat, Dirty Dog, Chicky Baby, Roger the Monster, Mr. Kite, and Cowntess the Cow. White’s recent work in this medium typically lampoons a person, place, or thing with a sense of showmanship and sly humor. His subjects include puppet heads of Elvis Presley, George Jones, and Lyndon Johnson, and gallery installations of a train station and a OnV

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WAYNE WHITE: Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something

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cubist cowboy rodeo. White was also the art director on acclaimed music videos for Peter Gabriel (Big Time) and Smashing Pumpkins (Tonight, Tonight), for which he won Billboard and MTV Music Video awards, respectively.  “Warmth and humility suffuse everything White touches, without taking the edge off

“Warmth and humility suffuse everything White touches.” —Los Angeles Times of his ferociously funny and wickedly sympathetic sketches, drawings, paintings, sculptures, and puppets,” wrote the Los Angeles Times. Born and raised in Chattanooga, TN, White draws upon his memories of the South to create highly unique works for film, television, and the fine art world. In addition to his three-dimensional works, Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something, 2014, acrylic on inkjet print on canvas, courtesy Western Project, LA.


WAYNE WHITE: Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something

White is renowned in the fine art world for his “word paintings.” He repurposes vintage offset lithographs, often found in thrift stores, and integrates these seemingly benign pastoral landscapes with painted phrases such as “Jellyball in the Bonedome,” “Tossed Off Crap,” and “Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something,”creating a completely surreal experience. A selection of White’s works on paper are on view in the exhibition as well, many of which have been reproduced in the monumental monograph designed by Todd Oldham, Maybe Now I’ll Get the Respect I So Richly Deserve— a comprehensive view of the artist’s oeuvre. The inspiring trajectory of White’s life and art is also the subject of the acclaimed documentary, Beauty is Embarrassing, directed by Neil Berkeley, which has been featured in several national and international film festivals with tremendous praise. Los Angeles

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Clockwise from top left: Jelly All in the Bone Dome, 2012, acrylic on offset lithograph; Tossed Off Crap, 2001, acrylic on offset lithograph; Pay for every Dance*, 2014, acrylic on offset lithograph; Good Looking People Having Fun Without You*, 2014, acrylic on inkjet print on canvas. Images Courtesy Western Project, LA. *Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery, NYC.

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WAYNE WHITE: Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something

Magazine wrote that the film should be required viewing “for every aspiring artist wondering how to build a life doing what they love...It’s a snapshot of the ways in which creativity and the business of daily living can be inseparably fused.”

“My mission is to bring humor into fine art.” —Wayne White Wayne White has had great success as a fine artist and has created paintings and public works that have been shown all over the world. “My mission,” he says, “is to bring humor into fine art.” His travels have taken him across the country delivering incredibly entertaining hour-long talks where he discusses his life and work while making time for a little banjo and harmonica playing. On View

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Wayne White; Photo courtesy of the artist.


ILLUSION {M.C.

THIS SUMMER, THE DALÍ

Museum will highlight the work of M.C. Escher, a renowned artist whose visual illusions have puzzled and delighted audiences worldwide. He is best known for his “impossible constructions” and use of “tessellation,” in which a pattern of identical shapes is repeated over and over without any gaps or overlaps. Coming on the heels of exhibitions from famed artists such as Picasso, Warhol and da Vinci, Escher at the Dalí adds yet another inspiring perspective for visitors to the Museum. On loan from the Herakleidon Museum in Athens, Greece, this robust exhibition will feature 135 works covering Escher’s entire artistic career. The show includes an array of the artist’s most famous works such as Drawing Hands, Reptiles and Waterfall alongside rarely exhibited early drawings of family members, panoramas of exotic landscapes, historic architecture of Italy and Spain, original preparatory sketches, mezzotints, and more.

ESCHER}

Exhibition:

Escher at the Dalí On view 08. 22. 15-01.03.15 at The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg www.thedali.org

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I L L U S I O N

“Escher, like Dalí, played in a serious way with that fundamental question of visual art — What is real? Is the world as it looks to be, or have I constructed an illusion in my mind? Escher delights every viewer with his visual sleights of hand,” said Hank Hine, The Dalí’s executive director. Escher at the Dalí will feature prints, drawings, a sculp-

ture, wood blocks, a lithograph stone, and posters drawn by the artist to explain his printing techniques. The exhibit will delve into his exploration of infinity through tessellation, including an enormous woodcut, Metamorphosis (193940), which spans 13-1/2 feet. “Escher’s work is captivating on many levels,” said curator of the collection, Joan Kropf. “His images are realistic but challenging, accessible but elusive, entertaining but serious. This Escher collection has only been shown at a handful of locations in the US, and never in Florida—this will be a rare treat for our visitors.” O n V iew

opposite page: M.C. Escher, Waterfall. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. M.C. Escher, Regular Division of the Plane VI. 2. M.C. Escher, Drawing Hands. 3. M.C. Escher, Reptiles. 4. M.C. Escher, Bond of Union. All images: ©2015 The M.C. Escher Company– The Netherlands. All rights reserved. www.mcescher.com. From the collection of Herakleidon Museum, Athens, Greece, www.herakleidon-art.gr.


FOCUS {50

t h

T H E M FA C O N T I N U E S I T S

SHOWCASE}

ANNIVERSARY

Exhibition:

Five Decades of Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, featuring The Dandrew-Drapkin Collection On view through 10.04.15 at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

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50th anniversary celebration with its most expansive survey of photography to date. Featuring images from the early days of the medium to the 21st century, the exhibition reveals why photography is one of our most vibrant and popular art forms. Visitors to the show will embark on a photographic journey through time and around the globe. Hazel and William Hough chief curator, Dr. Jennifer Hardin, organized the exhibition of approximately 200 images— many of which were gifts from Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew and Chitranee and Dr. Robert L. Drapkin, whose donations between 2009 and 2012 elevated the MFA’s collection to an entirely new level. The photographers represented read like a “Who’s Who” in the art form: Henry Fox Talbot, Édouard Baldus, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Julia Margaret Cameron, Margaret Bourke-White, Berenice Abbott, Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Weston, Edward Steichen,


F O C U S

Brassaï, Lewis Hine, Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, André Kértesz, Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, Minor White, Ilse Bing, Paul Strand, Aaron Siskind, Robert Frank, Ruth Bernhard, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Clarence John Laughlin, Richard Avedon, Jerry Uelsmann, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, Robert Map-

plethorpe, and Kenro Izu— the list goes go on and on. All known photographic media are on display. The images encompass fine art, photojournalism, portraits, breathtaking landscapes, and recent experimentation. The gifts of more than 15,000 images from Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew and Chitranee and Dr. Robert L. Drapkin were nothing less than historic in the life of the MFA. The collection is “a visual history of the modern era,” wrote Dr. Hardin. Five Decades of Photography is the perfect anniversary gift to the community and to all who come and see it. O n V iew

opposite page: André Kértesz, Satiric Dancer, Paris, 1926, Gelatin silver print, Museum Purchase with funds from NEA and FACF grants.

this page (clockwise from top left): 1. Louis-Emile Durandelle, Stone masons, The Paris Opera, ca. 1867, Albumen print, Gift of Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection. 2. Jerry Uelsmann, Small Woods Where I Met Myself, 1967, Gelatin silver print, Museum Purchase with funds from NEA and FACF grants. 3. Timothy O’Sullivan, Shoshone Falls, Snake River, Idaho, 1874, Albumen print, Gift of Dr. Robert L. and Chitranee Drapkin. 4. Ansel Adams, Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park, ca., 1940, printed ca. 1970, Gelatin silver print, Museum Purchase with funds from NEA and FACF grants.


SPOTLIGHT {PHOTOGRAPHY

ALUMNI FOCUS 2015 IS A

BIENNIAL}

Exhibition:

Alumni Focus 2015: Commercial Success in Florida On view through 09. 20. 15 at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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biennial event at the Southeast Museum of Photography. The exhibition presents new work by distinguished alumni of the Southeast Center for Photographic Studies— a consortium with Daytona State College and the University of Central Florida. Since the program’s inception 50 years ago, graduates have taken their place among the nation’s leading photographers. Co-curated by Dan Biferie, photography program chair; Gary Monroe, photography professor; and Juliana Romnes, the Museum’s interim director; the exhibition is a celebration of the accomplishments of 17 photographers that studied at the Southeast Center for Photographic Studies between 1979 and 2009, and focuses on alumni that have made Central Florida their home—pursuing, excelling, and succeeding in a myriad of commercial photography specializations from architectural, portrait, and wedding photography to fashion, travel, and lifestyle photography.


S P O T L I G H T

The exhibition includes photography by Todd Bates, 1993 (Daytona State College); Herb Booth, 1982 (Daytona State College); Susan Bourgoin, 1993 (DaytonaState College); Betsy Hansen, 2005 (UCF-Daytona); Billy Joe Hoyle, 1998 (Daytona

State College); Douglas Johns, 1979 (Daytona State College); Bryan Kasm, 2008 (UCFDaytona); James Kilby, 2003 (Daytona State College); Tom King, 1980 (Daytona State College); Erika Masterson, 1990 (Daytona State College); Ashley McCormick, 2009 (UCF-Daytona); Ed McDonald, 1984 (Daytona State College); Amy Mikler, 2004 (Daytona State College); David Roark, 1980 (Daytona State College); Scott S. Smith, 1999 (Daytona State College); Zach Thomas, 2008 (Daytona State College); and Ryan Wendler, 2011 (Daytona State College). O n V iew opposite page: ERIKA MASTERSON, Flower Shower, © Erika Masterson. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. AMY MIKLER, Prim & Proper Fashion, June 2013, © Amy Mikler. 2. SUSAN BOURGOIN, Cultivated Mushrooms, 2005, © Susan Bourgoin. 3. DOUGLAS JOHNS, Guinness Cake, Publix Supermarkets, 2014, © Douglas Johns. 4. Todd Bates, Ready for Blast-off, 2008, © Todd Bates.


PROFILE { RYA N

RYA N S U L L I VA N ’ S S O L O

show at ICA Miami features large-scale canvases created over the past two years, during which time the artist has explored a distinctive approach to abstraction. Utilizing non-compositional forms and an organic, even abject color palette that is alternatingly vivid, murky, and sublime, the works offer critical solutions to a world in which abstraction has taken on a life of its own. Sullivan’s richly-layered paintings are the result of a process of accretion that can take up to a month to complete. In his studio, the canvases sit parallel to the floor. As he progressively tilts the canvases (a crucial intervention), layers of oil paint, latex, enamel, and spray paint shift and spill. A subtle interplay between viscosity and gravity drive the progression of each work. Drying at varying rates, the layered mixture wrinkles, cracks, and coagulates. “Seeing how things change as they dry keeps me coming in every morning,” said Sullivan. “I wouldn’t want to learn how to control that. It’s really impor-

S U L L I VA N }

Exhibition:

Ryan Sullivan On view through 08. 09. 15 at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami www.icamiami.org

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P R O F I L E

tant to let a painting take on its own direction.” The dominant medium in Sullivan’s latest work is spray paint. He has amplified the automatic quality of spray paint through a new procedure. He literally explodes a can by puncturing it with a drawing pin. The action embodies the paradox of a “controlled explosion.” Sullivan likens the rapid discharge to shining a bright light against a textured surface. Through its replication of the movement of light, the ac-

tion achieves a photorealist representation of light and shadow resulting a photographic quality that is at dramatic odds with— yet inseparable from—the paintings’ physical make-up. Each of Sullivan’s paintings is simultaneously a process, an image, and an abstraction. Depersonalized yet expressive, superficial yet illusional, the prevailing medium of spray paint embodies the contradictions— and the volatile physics—of these new works. O n V iew

opposite page: untitled, 2014. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. Installation view, ICA Miami; PHOTO: Fredrik Nilssen. 2. untitled, 2014. 3. untitled, 2014. 4. Installation view, ICA Miami; PHOTO: Fredrik Nilssen. 5. Installation view, ICA Miami; PHOTO: Fredrik Nilssen. images © the artist, courtesy of maccarone, nY and sadie coles HQ , London.


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On View 07-09.2015  

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