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on iew FLORIDA

J U LY/ S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 4

I Have Seen the Future: NORMAN BEL GEDDES

Designs America

Beatriz Milhazes: JARDIM BOTÂNICO AT P É R E Z A R T

MUSEUM MIAMI

AT T H E W O L F S O N I A N - F I U ,

AND

MIAMI

+

Outside the Box:

Gone with the Wind: REEL

to

INSTALLATION

by

REAL

AT T H E O R A N G E C O U N T Y

REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER, ORLANDO

ALSO INSIDE...

On View

FLORIDA ARTISTS

{ 2014 Biennial } AT T H E A P P L E T O N

M U S E U M O F A R T, O C A L A

Featured Destination: DeLAND, FL


CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

2014

Vo l . 5 , N o . 2

RIGHT: VANDAMM STUDIO, “TRAVEL SMARTLY IN TWEED,” Norman Bel Geddes’ WINDOW DISPLAY FOR THE FRANKLIN SIMON DEPARTMENTSTORE CHAIN, CIRCA 1929 ON THE COVER : Norman Bel Geddes’ Streamlined Railway Train design, ca. 1930-1933. Photo: Maurice Goldberg images courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation/ Harry Ransom Center

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J U LY/ S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 4

Beatriz Milhazes:

I Have Seen the Future: NORMAN BEL GEDDES

JARDIM BOTÂNICO AT P É R E Z A R T

Designs America

MUSEUM MIAMI

AT T H E W O L F S O N I A N - F I U ,

AND

MIAMI

+

Outside the Box:

Gone with the Wind: REEL

to

INSTALLATION

by

{ 2014 Biennial}

AT T H E O R A N G E C O U N T Y

REGIONAL HISTORY

AT T H E A P P L E T O N

CENTER, ORLANDO

ALSO INSIDE...

2

On View

OnV

FLORIDA ARTISTS

REAL

M U S E U M O F A R T, O C A L A

Featured Destination: DeLAND, FL

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38 Miami Beach

I HAVE SEEN THE FUTURE: NORMAN BEL GEDDES DESIGNS AMERICA

Wolfsonian-FIU presents the first major exploration of visionary designer, Norman Bel Geddes—dubbed “the Leonardo da Vinci of the 20th century” by The New York Times—who expressed his dynamic vision of America’s future in innovative, streamlined designs for everything from household appliances to urban utopias.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50 Orlando

68 Miami

82 Ocala

94 Fort Lauderdale

THE WIND:

JARDIM BOTÂNICO

INSTALLATION BY

BEGIN TO FALL:

GONE WITH

BEATRIZ MILHAZES:

REEL TO REAL

The Orange County Regional History Center commemorates the 75th anniversary of one of the most popular films ever made with an exhibition of authentic Gone with the Wind memorabilia from the ShawTumblin Collection. PLUS: An interview

with collector, James Tumblin, on pg. 60.

RIGHT: LEN PRINCE, SPIKE LEE, 1999

Pérez Art Museum Miami hosts a major survey of colorful, kaleidoscopic collages, prints, paintings, and installations by Brazilian abstract artist, Beatriz Milhazes.

OUTSIDE THE BOX: FLORIDA ARTISTS

For its third Biennial celebration, the Appleton Museum of Art brings together works selected from among Florida’s best installation artists.

108 Tampa

PORTRAITS &

PLACES: SELECTIONS FROM FM o PA’ s

IMAGINATION AND THE AMERICAN SOUTH

In a wild and vibrant new show at NSU Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, “outsider” art masterpieces explore and challenge our perceptions of “black art.”

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): SEE GONE WITH THE WIND (1939) ON TMC,

PERMANENT

TM & © 2007 TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES,

COLLECTION

A TIME WARNER COMPANY, ALL RIGHTS

A diverse selection of inspired portrait and landscape imagery is on display at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, including the photography of Bud Lee, Len Prince, Bruce Albert Dale, Burk Uzzle, and Jamie Francis, among others. OnV

WHEN THE STARS

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RESERVED, TCM.COM; BEATRIZ MILHAZES, POPEYE (DETAIL), 2007-2008, PHOTO: JASON MANDELLA, © THE ARTIST / COURTESY JAMES COHAN GALLERY, NY / SHANGHAI; RICK HERZOG, CREEPING IVY (DETAIL), 2013; KARA WALKER, 8 POSSIBLE BEGINNINGS, OR THE CREATION OF AFRICAN-AMERICA, A MOVING PICTURE BY KARA E. WALKER (VIDEO STILL) (DETAIL), 2005, © 2005 KARA WALKER, COURTESY OF SIKKEMA JENKINS & CO., NY

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CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

2014

Vo l u m e

5,

No. 2

7

8

MUSE

Currently on view, the Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art honors 10 of the most progressive and exciting artists working in Florida today.

132 GOLD

Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach celebrates its 50th anniversary with all that glitters in “GOLD.”

CALENDAR

O n Vi e w D e s t i n a t i o n

DELAND, FLORIDA: HOW FINE ART BECAME LOCAL

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions PICTURED: Museum of Art - DeLand downtown at 100 North Woodland Boulevard; Photo courtesy of Museum of Art - DeLand

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TERRA INCOGNITA: PHOTOGRAPHS OF AMERICA’S THIRD COAST

Celebration

20

34

130

Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland, hosts an exhibition of black-andwhite photography by Richard Sexton.

COMMENTARY

Museum exhibitions

Fo c u s

120

The draw of DeLand is not sidewalk urban hipsters sipping lattes; instead, it speaks of a new age of curiosity, individuality, and appreciation for experience outside of the roaring din of the city. The Museum of Art–DeLand signifies a powerful future for this part of Central Florida.

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Po p C u l t u r e

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WHEELS & HEELS: THE BIG NOISE AROUND LITTLE TOYS

Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach presents a real toy story this summer with Barbie dolls and miniature cars.


Experience the Power of Art

Tour. Shop. Join

Museum of Art - DeLand 100 N. & 600 N. Woodland Blvd. DeLand, FL 32720 386.734.4371 Above, Tasting Notes: The Paintings of Sandro Chia, Watercolor

Christmas in July Sale visit MoArtDeLand.org


WHAT DO YOU GIVE A KID

ALL THE RIGHT

WHO WANTS TO CREATE?

INGREDIENTS.

“I WISH TO BE A CHEF.” CHUN HSUN, AGE 13, TAIWAN

TOGETHER WE CAN GRANT MORE WISHES.

JOIN THE WORLD SM AT WORLDWISH.ORG


C O M M E N T A R Y OUR SUMMER EDITION HIGHLIGHTS SEVERAL

exciting milestone exhibitions. Now upon the 75th anniversary of the 1939 New York World’s Fair, the Wolfsonian-FIU pays tribute to visionary, and “Futurama” designer, Norman Bel Geddes, in I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America (on pg. 38). Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real (on pg. 50) at the Orange County Regional History Center commemorates the 75th anniversary of one of the most popular films ever made. For its third Biennial, The Appleton Museum of Art presents Outside the Box: Installation by Florida Artists (on pg. 82), and Bass Museum of Art celebrates its Golden Jubilee with all that glitters in GOLD (on pg. 132)...Cheers! Diane McEnaney Publisher & Creative Director dmcenaney@onviewmagazine.com

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on iew M A G A Z I N E

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney

Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb

Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Contact Us:

editorial@onviewmagazine.com www.onviewmagazine.com


MUSE the

ORLANDO MUSEUM

of

ART

Florida Prize in Contemporary Art o n v i e w t h ro u g h

09.07.14

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HE ORLANDO MUSEUM of ART

presents the inaugural exhibition of the Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art, an invitational exhibition honoring 10 of the most progressive and exciting artists working in the State today. The award and invitational exhibition recognizes the achievement and potential of these artists and encourages their continued innovation and creation of new work. With this initia-


tive, the Orlando Museum of Art underscores its commitment to support talented emerging and mid-career artists, while celebrating the vibrant cultural life of Florida.

Jillian Mayer, Swing Space, 2013, video installation

The exhibition runs through September 7, 2014, and features works by the following artists: Sarah Max Beck, Elisabeth Condon, Vanessa Diaz, Christopher Harris, Ezra Johnson, Brookhart Jonquil, Sinisa Kukec, Jillian Mayer, Juan Travieso and Agustina Woodgate... OnV

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with 4 swings, running time 2:23 minutes, Courtesy of David Castillo Gallery, Miami, Florida. Š2013 Jillian Mayer, Image courtesy of David Castillo Gallery, Miami, Florida.

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Sarah Max Beck (ORLANDO)

“My ideal is to leave things better than I found them. I am trained as a sculptor and am a materials snob by nature. This project started as infatuation with the texture— both physical and visual—of the plastic sleeve in which the newspaper is delivered, and that opened an internal dialog: Does fine art really require the best material? Must we consume to grow? The answer to both of those questions is YES! Every square foot created consumes roughly 72 bags or 173 grams of post-consumer plastic, a material perfectly suited to my current internal dialog. My creative effort has elevated a onetime-use material but the material has, in turn, elevated my work.”

Sarah Max Beck, Repeat Initiative, 2014, post-consumer plastic, 102 x 150 in., Courtesy of the artist. ©2014 Sarah Max Beck, Image by Pixel Acuity.

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Elisabeth Condon (TAMPA)

“I reinvent landscape from sketchbook drawings made on my travels around the world. My paintings employ poured paint, gesture, projected drawings, Chinese bamboo and plum blossom idioms to splice and re-order pictorial space. Combining sources from multiple locations generates a free wheeling terrain where form and mark share equal priority. Space becomes palpable; form skeletal...As I work, the experience of one place overlays another. Space begins to warp and vibrate, as it does in memory and the heightened awareness of travel. Landscape materializes as a figment of remembered experience reconstituted in the movement of paint.”

Elisabeth Condon, Here Comes the Night, 2012, enamel, acrylic and glitter on linen, 48 x 48 in., Courtesy of Emerson Dorsch, Miami, Florida. ©2012 Elisabeth Condon, Image courtesy of the artist. Portrait image: Etienne Frossard.

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Vanessa Diaz (JUPITER)

“The core of my practice involves selective acts of deconstruction and reassemblage, which challenge associations of function and offer an uncanny observation of the domain experience...I dismantle the functionality of an object, thus removing evidence of the previous owner. The progression of inflicting damage, enacting repair and resurfacing materials are methods of claiming ownership and territory. My sculptural and installation work reevaluates the discarded and abandoned contents of the dwelling, specifically the furnishings and architectural elements, which I utilize to define territory and offer an alternate observation of function.”

Vanessa Diaz, upon which everything rests, 2013, reclaimed wood, 36 x 36 x 42 in., Courtesy of the artist. ©2013 Vanessa Diaz, Image courtesy of the artist.

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Christopher Harris (ORLANDO)

Christopher Harris’ two videos from 2014, A Willing Suspension of Disbelief and Photography and Fetish, are cinematic responses to the 1850 daguerreotypes Harris saw of a young American-born slave woman named Delia. His work presents a contemporary voice to American slavery by animating an historical time. Harris’ work has been screened at festivals, museums and cinémathèques throughout North America and Europe.

Christopher Harris, A Willing Suspension of Disbelief (film still), 2014, 3-channel video installation, running time 9:03 minutes, Courtesy of the artist. ©2014 Christopher Harris, Image courtesy of the artist. Support for this project provided by the Film/Video Studio Program at the Wexner Center for the Arts. Funding support provided by the College of Arts & Humanities, the Office of the Provost, and the Office of Research and Commercialization at the University of Central Florida.

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Ezra Johnson (TAMPA)

“I work between painting and animation. I use each medium to propel the other in sort of a perpetual motion, creativity machine—where what I do in painting is then recorded by video and transformed by time and narration. This transformed painting then feeds back into my still painting and gives me courage to try some other things which are then filmed and continue the process. In this way a new logic and energy begins to form between the two. This is then repeated over and over until a resolution occurs.”

Ezra Johnson, Untitled (Coffee Table Group), 2014, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 in., Courtesy of Freight + Volume Gallery, New York. ©2014 Ezra Johnson, Image by Andrea Long.

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Brookhart Jonquil (MIAMI)

“While my sculptures and installations are certainly tangible, they are in constant dialog with the virtual and formless. I use reflective surfaces to open up perceptual spaces within architecture, and I use solid forms to perceptually collapse physical spaces. Mirrors, glass, digital photographs and everyday objects have material qualities that I use to probe the relationship between the physical and the virtual or intangible. In my work I attempt to access this paradoxical duality, creating uncanny situations where a space, an object, or a moment in time, seems to contradict its own existence.”

Brookhart Jonquil, E)A)R)T)H), 2011, mirrors, EPS, MDF, plaster, and paint, 60 x 60 x 60 in., Courtesy of Emerson Dorsch, Miami, Florida. ©2011 Brookhart Jonquil, Image courtesy of Emerson Dorsch, Miami, Florida.

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MUSE

Sinisa Kukec (MIAMI)

Incorporating complex light projections, otherworldly sculptural forms and a notable reliance on the dynamics of natural landscapes, Sinisa Kukec synthesizes prefabricated elements to reflect wholly unusual, original, three-dimensional states of flux. Kukec’s interest in discarded or obsolete items is transformed into aesthetic conversations between things both beautiful and betrayed, delicacies and the disregarded. “My artwork creates and inhabits a sad and beautiful space of interpretation, that at one moment encourages conscious critical dialogue and at another draws on its own subconscious, intuitive logic.”

Sinisa Kukec, Veil and Globe (pictured with the artist), 2013, architectural foam, plaster, epoxy, and graphite, 66.5 x 66.5 x 66.5 in., Collection of the Related Group, Miami, Florida. ©2013 Sinisa Kukec, Image courtesy of Spinello Projects, Miami, Florida.

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MUSE

Jillian Mayer (FORT LAUDERDALE)

Indebted to the cultural constructions of the sitcoms of her childhood but looking ahead to the infinite implications of the Internet, Jillian Mayer uses photography, video, drawing, installation, online platforms and performance to enact scenarios of apathy, dysfunction and disillusionment, and tease out the pathways and pitfalls of postmodern identity formation while considering our increasing integration with the web. Cloaked with humor, fast editing, and pop soundtracks, Mayer’s videos are designed for mass appeal but ask big questions about human connection and manufactured realities. Her work lives in, and is activated by, viewer participation.

Jillian Mayer, Swing Space, 2013, video installation with 4 swings, running time 2:23 minutes, Courtesy of David Castillo Gallery, Miami, Florida. ©2013 Jillian Mayer, Image courtesy of David Castillo Gallery, Miami, Florida.

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Juan Travieso (MIAMI)

Juan Travieso’s work explores notions of impermanence and decay through a combined language of pop, realism, and abstraction. Figures—humans or animals—are broken up into spaces and forms much like 3D models, speaking to both their temporality and transition into the digital age. His paintings involve images ranging from Soviet propaganda and cartoons to the iconic figures of the Cuban revolution, but woven inside is the personal, and how these personal and cultural icons are in constant conflict and transformation.

Juan Travieso, Self Portrait, 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 in., Courtesy of the artist. ©2013 Juan Travieso, Image courtesy of the artist.

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Agustina Woodgate (MIAMI)

Often responding to a place or situation, Agustina Woodgate makes objects, site-specific and context-based installations, performance and collaborative event-based projects that focus on the interplay between human beings and their surrounding environment at both macro and micro levels. Combining many disciplines, she pursues ongoing collaborations with creatives from various backgrounds. Agustina works inclusively and socially, finding new access points for communication to create public, intensive and process-oriented works.

Agustina Woodgate, Seven Seas (pictured with the artist), 2013, stuffed animal skin, 120 x 180 in., Collection of the Related Group, Miami, Florida. Š2013 Agustina Woodgate, Image courtesy of the artist and Spinello Projects, Miami, Florida.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition

AVON PARK

SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture

www.bocamuseum.org

09.24.14–12.05.14

Tribute to an American Painter: Robert Butler— Wildlife and Landscape Artist www.mofac.org

BOCA RATON

Boca Museum of Art Thru 07.27.14

CORAL GABLES

The Freedom of Gesture

Thru 07.27.14

Elaine Reichek: The Eye of the Needle

www.bocamuseum.org

Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami Thru 10.19.14

08.09.14–10.18.14

www.bocamuseum.org

(See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 138.)

Afghan Rugs: The Contemporary Art Thru 10.25.14 of Central Asia Roberto www.bocamuseum.org Matta:

Boca Museum Artists’ Guild Biennial Exhibition

China’s Last Empire: The Art and Culture of the Qing Dynasty www.lowemuseum.org

www.bocamuseum.org Thru 04.26.15 08.10.14–10.18.14

63rd Annual

ArtLab @ The Lowe: Conquest

Image from Tribute to an American Painter: Robert Butler—Wildlife and Landscape Artist at SFSC Museum of Florida Art and Culture, Avon Park: Robert Butler, Charlie Creek

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 4 }

Coral Gables continued...

and Coexistence: The Cultural Synthesis of Spanish Colonial Art www.lowemuseum.org

CORAL SPRINGS

07.12.14–09.12.14

09.13.14–10.17.14

Nathan Selikoff: Fine art playing at the intersection of interactivity, math, and code.

Karolina Sobeca

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

BEACH

Thru 09.21.14

Museum of Arts & Sciences

09.06.14–11.22.14

Thru 08.23.14

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Thru 08.23.14

Southeast Museum of Photography

DAYTONA

Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

www.moas.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Coral Springs Museum of Art Beverly Myers: Fearless with Color

Historic St. Augustine

Jayanti Seiler: Of One and The Other

Thru fall 2014

Contemporary Paintings from the MOAS Collection

www.smponline.org Thru 09.21.14

Kurt Knobelsdorf: Paintings by Kurt

www.moas.org Thru fall 2014

M. Laine Wyatt: Obsessions, Curiosities, and Fancies

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Images of

www.smponline.org

09.06.14–11.22.14

Pablo Cano: Marionettes to Cake Boxes

09.12.14–12.14.14

Stewart Nachimas: Pulp Icons—Cast Paper & Prints

Pure Photography: Pictorial and Modern Photographs from the Syracuse University Art Collection

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

www.smponline.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org Thru 08.23.14

Image from Jayanti Seiler: Of One and The Other at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Jayanti Seiler, Untitled, from the series, Of One and the Other, archival pigment print, 24 x 30”

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 4 }

A juried all-media exhibit

D e LAND

Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida

www.dfac.org

(See On View Destination: DeLand beginning on pg. 120.)

Thru 08.17.14

Our Gang­: A celebration of works by DFAC’s faculty

Thru 08.24.14

Collectors Choice: Samuel Blatt Collection www.moartdeland.org Thru 08.24.14

www.dfac.org Thru 08.17.14

Symbols, Private Totems www.moartdeland.org

Karl Zerbe: Works on Paper www.moartdeland.org Thru 08.24.14

Steve Tobin: Roots

DELRAY BEACH

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Thru 08.31.14

Samurai Culture: Treasures of South Florida Collections www.morikami.org

DUNEDIN

Dunedin Fine Art Center

Thru 08.31.14

From a Quiet Place: The Paper Thru 10.05.14 Sculptures of Stephen Althouse: Kyoko Hazama Personal www.morikami.org www.moartdeland.org

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www.dfac.org Thru 08.17.14

Word UP: A mixed media celebration of the WORD in contemporary art-making www.dfac.org

Thru 08.17.14

In a Dark Time, the Eye Begins to See…

Image from The Poetics of Space at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Leslie Lerner, The Mountain Fortress

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The Poetics of Space

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09.12.14–10.19.14

Living Matter(s): Invitational exhibit of artists


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 4 o f 1 4 }

Dunedin continued...

who embrace the LIVING www.dfac.org

Imagination and the American South www.moafl.org

Thru 08.04.14

PLANTS Illustrated

(See story on pg. 94.)

Joan Miró www.harn.ufl.edu

Terra Incognita www.dfac.org

Thru 09.06.14

FORT LAUDERDALE

NSU Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale

www.harn.ufl.edu

FORT MYERS

Southwest Florida Museum of History

09.12.14–12.23.14

Emperor’s River: China’s Grand Canal— Philipp Scholz Rittermann

Harn Museum of Art

09.12.14–10.19.14

www.dfac.org

07.01.14–11.30.14

GAINESVILLE

Thru 08.17.14

Life is a Highway: Prints of Japan’s Tokaido Road

Enchantments: The Photographic Adventures of Julian Dimock and Clyde Butcher

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.swflmuseumofhistory.com

www.harn.ufl.edu

08.12.14–06.07.15

Patterns Past and Present: Arts of Panama

Thru 09.14.14

www.harn.ufl.edu

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting

08.19.14–07.26.15

07.13.14–09.21.14

Art, Technology and the Natural World

The Miami Generation: Revisited

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.moafl.org

solo:: together / 50th Annual UF Art Faculty Exhibition

09.16.14–01.04.15

08.03.14–10.12.14

When the Stars Begin to Fall:

www.harn.ufl.edu

Image from The Miami Generation: Revisited at NSU Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale: Humberto Calzada,The Mediator, 2000, acrylic on canvas, from the Collection of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum, Florida International University, Miami, FL; gift of the artist

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 4 }

Scott Ingram

HOLLYWOOD

www.mocajacksonville.org

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 08.24.14

The New York Times Magazine Photographs

Thru 08.17.14

H-Allen Benowitz: People of the World

www.mocajacksonville.org

(See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 134.)

www.artandculturecenter.org Thru 08.17.14

Rod Faulds: Recent Photo-Based Works

Thru 09.14.14

Collector’s Choice: Inside the Hearts and Minds of Regional Collectors

www.artandculturecenter.org

(​ See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 124.) Thru 08.17.14

09.05.14–11.02.14

Echos Myron (Group Show)

Monica Uszerowicz

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 11.02.14

www.artandculturecenter.org

The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring “In Pieces” www.artandculturecenter.org

(See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 96.)

JACKSONVILLE

09.05.14–11.02.14

Project Room: Sri Prahba www.artandculturecenter.org

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville Thru 08.24.14

09.05.14–11.02.14

The Landing:

Backdoor Formalism:

A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art www.mocajacksonville.org

Image from Project Atrium: Caroline Lathan-Stiefel/Wider Than the Sky at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Caroline Lathan-Stiefel, Hinterland (detail), 2010; pipe cleaners, fabric, plastic, pins, yarn, thread, lead weights, electrical boxes, styrofoam balls, juice jugs, car speakers; dimensions variable, image courtesy of Caroline Lathan-Stiefel and Diana Lowenstein Fine Art Gallery, Miami

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 6 o f 1 4 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

07.26.14–10.26.14

Enzo Torcoletti

Thru 08.02.14

Florsheim

Project Atrium: Caroline Lathan-Stiefel/ Wider Than the Sky

www.cummer.org

Ekphrasis

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.mocajacksonville.org 09.13.14–01.04.15

Get Real: New American Painting www.mocajacksonville.org

www.polkmuseumofart.org Thru 11.02.14

MAITLAND

A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art

Thru 09.13.14

Thru 09.13.14

Battlefield

www.cummer.org

Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast

www.artandhistory.org

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Foosaner Art Museum

LAKELAND

Collected Color www.polkmuseumofart.org

Art & History Museums, Maitland Thru 08.10.14

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

Polk Museum of Art

Thru 09.14.14

All Decked Out!

07.26.14–10.12.14

Collector’s Choice: Inside the Hearts and Minds of Regional Collectors

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Remembering

(See story on pg. 130.)

Thru 07.20.14

MELBOURNE

Thru 08.17.14

Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity www.foosanerartmuseum.org 08.23.14–10.12.14

Imagining Reality: Kathleen Elliot and Huguette Despault May

www.cummer.org Thru 10.19.14

The Human Figure: Sculptures by

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Image from Remembering Florsheim at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Richard Florsheim, Paris (aka La Seine à Paris), 1963, color lithograph, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection 2004.8.14, gift of the Richard Florsheim Art Fund

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 4 }

Melbourne continued...

The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

the CINTAS Foundation www.mdcmoad.org

Thru 08.23.14

Florida in Fabric II, Wish You Were Here!

Thru 07.12.14

William Cordova: Ceiba—Reconsidering ephemeral spaces

http://textiles.fit.edu 09.13.14–12.13.14

www.mdcmoad.org

Embellished: A Celebration of Wearable Art

Bass Museum of Art

http://textiles.fit.edu

Thru 09.21.14

MIAMI

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui

ArtCenter/ South Florida

Thru 08.24.14

www.bassmuseum.org

(See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 56.)

Thru 08.17.14

Spare Room: Michelle Weinberg

Cinema Judaica: The War Years, 1939–1949 http://jmof.fiu.edu

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami Opening 09.05.14

Ryan Sullivan www.mocanomi.org

MDC Museum of Art + Design Thru 07.12.14

Pérez Art Museum Miami Thru 07.27.14

GOLD

The Influencers I & II: Prominent Works from the MDC Permanent Art Collection

07.02.14–08.24.14

www.bassmuseum.org

www.mdcmoad.org

www.pamm.org

Nothing Goes to Waste: Gustavo Oviedo

(See story on pg. 132.)

08.08.14–01.11.15

www.artcentersf.org

www.artcentersf.org

Thru 07.27.14 Thru 07.12.14

Jewish Museum of Florida

Image Search: Photography from the Collection

Impact & Legacy: 50 Years of

Project Gallery: Hew Locke www.pamm.org

Image from Ryan Sullivan at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Ryan Sullivan, December 1, 2012 - December 3, 2012, 2012 (detail). Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles, HQ, London

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 4 }

Miami continued...

Thru 08.03.14

Thru 09.14.14

Jardim Botânico

Caribbean Art

A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry

Project Gallery: Simon Starling

www.pamm.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

(See story on pg. 68.) Thru 08.24.14

www.pamm.org Thru 10.12.14

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Arturo Rodríguez: School of Night

Thru 08.03.14

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Monika Weiss: Sustenazo (Lament II)

Thru 08.24.14

Thru 08.17.14

08.21.14–01.18.15

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Caribbean: Crossroads of the World

Project Gallery: Leonor Antunes

Thru 08.24.14

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org 09.19.14–01.18.15 Thru 08.31.14

Edouard Duval-Carrié: Imagined Landscapes

Beatriz Milhazes:

25 Sq. Inches: The Faces of the Permanent Collection

European & Caribbean Masters: Another History of

http://thefrost.fiu.edu 07.12.14–10.19.14

Crossroads of the Dystopia: Leonel Matheu http://thefrost.fiu.edu 07.12.14–10.26.14

www.pamm.org

Project Gallery: Shahzia Sikander

Simon Ma: Heart. Water . Ink World Tour Exhibition 2014— Tribute to Mr. Xu Beihong

www.pamm.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 09.14.14

Image from Crossroads of the Dystopia: Leonel Matheu at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Leonel Matheu, Pacific Times, 2009, mixed on canvas, 8 x 12”, Private Collection

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 4 }

Miami continued...

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Chronicle of the Arts, 1960-1995 (Selected works)

Thru 08.31.14

www.atlanticcenter

BUMMER:

forthearts.org

An installation curated by Todd Oldham

OCALA

www.wolfsonian.org

Appleton Museum of Art

Thru 09.28.14

Thru 07.13.14

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America

Symphonic Style: The Art of Benny Collin

www.wolfsonian.org

(See story on pg. 38.) NAPLES

08.11.14–09.26.14

Camera USA: National Photography Exhibition and Award 2014 www.naplesart.org

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

08.11.14–09.26.14

50th Founders Juried Awards Exhibition

Pictures in Process: Photography by Naples Art Association Members

www.naplesart.org

www.naplesart.org

Thru 07.25.14

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Atlantic Center for the Arts 07.05.14–08.16.14

Sandra Ramos Lorenzo: Dreaming Ithaca… www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org 08.16.14–11.15.14

Icons & Idols: A Photographer’s

www.appletonmuseum.org Thru 12.31.14

Art of the Ancient World www.appletonmuseum.org 07.19.14–10.19.14

Outside The Box: Installation Exhibition by Florida Artists [2014 Biennial] www.appletonmuseum.org

(See story on pg. 82.)

Image from 50th Founders Juried Awards Exhibition at the Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center: Steve Mason, Canyon 1c, 2012, digital print

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 4 }

Ocala continued...

07.26.14–11.02.14

A Creative Life: Gladys Shafran Kashdin www.appletonmuseum.org

ORLANDO

Orange County Regional History Center 08.16.14–11.30.14

Stand By Your Accidents

American Art

www.omart.org

Lamar Peterson: Suburbia Sublime

Mingled Visions: Images From “The North American Indian” by Edward S. Curtis

www.omart.org

www.mennellomuseum.com

The Mennello Museum of

Thru 09.14.14

09.27.14–01.04.15

Thru 09.14.14

Prehistoric/

Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

Historic Southwest Pottery www.mennellomuseum.com Thru 09.14.14

Native American Art and Artifacts from the Collection of I.S.K. Reeves and Sara W. Reeves www.mennellomuseum.com

www.thehistorycenter.org

(See story on pg. 50.)

ORMOND BEACH

Orlando Museum of Art

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

Thru 09.07.14

Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art

Thru 08.22.14

09.27.14–01.04.15

Colored Pencil Society of America’s 22nd International Exhibition

David Rathman:

www.ormondartmuseum.org

www.omart.org

(See story on pg. 8.)

Image from Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real at the Orange County Regional History Center, Orlando: See Gone With the Wind (1939) on TMC. TM & © 2007 Turner Classic Movies. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. tcm.com

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 4 }

Ormond Beach continued...

09.12.14–10.26.14

SARASOTA

Between Dreams and Reality: Beau Wild, Fay Samimi and Titane Laurent

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Thru 07.13.14 PANAMA CITY

Visual Arts Center Thru 08.08.14 of Northwest The Art of the Florida Brick: LEGO® Thru 08.22.14 Brick Sculpture by Capturing Nathan Sawaya Camelot: Stanley www.pensacolamuseum.org Tretick’s Iconic (See story in the Images of the April/June 2014 issue Kennedys on pg. 110.) www.vacnwf.org

Pensacola Museum of Art

www.pensacolamuseum.org

Thru 07.26.14

08.15.14–10.19.14

60th Annual Members’ Juried Exhibition

Guild Hall: An Adventure in the Arts— Selections from

www.pensacolamuseum.org

Thru 08.02.14 09.19.14–11.01.14

Intent to Deceive

Pat Regan: Roots www.ringling.org & Remembrance (See story in the www.pensacolamuseum.org

BEACH

Hunting for Slonem

www.ringling.org

www.pensacolamuseum.org

PONTE VEDRA

08.01.14–10.11.14 PENSACOLA

the Permanent Collection

In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces

The Cultural Center

April/June 2014 issue on pg. 80.) Thru 08.24.14

Science and the Spectator www.ringling.org

07.11.14–08.15.14

Big Cats and Wolves: Paintings by Diane Travis

Thru 09.07.14

www.ccpvb.org

www.ringling.org

Beth Lipman: Precarious Possessions

Image from The Art of the Brick: LEGO® Brick Sculpture by Nathan Sawaya at Pensacola Museum of Art: Yellow, by Nathan Sawaya. Photo courtesy of brickartist.com

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 4 }

Sarasota continued...

Thru 09.08.14

Curiosity: Lithographs of American Traveling Circus Shows www.ringling.org 07.11.14–10.26.14

Thomas Chimes from the Permanent Collection www.ringling.org 07.25.14–12.07.14

Danny Lyon: The Bikeriders

ST. PETERSBURG

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

and Childhood Objects from the 18th Century to the Present

The Dalí Museum Thru 10.12.14

Marvels of Illusion

www.fine-arts.org

Thru 07.20.14

www.thedali.org

Aaron Siskind’s Harlem Document www.fine-arts.org

Thru 09.28.14

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists

TALLAHASSEE

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

www.fine-arts.org Thru 09.2014

Collection Conversations: Childhood— Western Representations of Children

07.26.14–11.09.14

Building the Panama Canal: Photographs by Ernest Hallen

Thru 07.11.14

Artists’ League Summer Annual Salon

www.fine-arts.org

www.ringling.org

www.mofa.fsu.edu 08.15.14–02.28.15

Seeing the Unseen: Photographic and Video Works by Famous Living Chinese Artists

08.25.14–10.05.14

www.ringling.org

www.mofa.fsu.edu

In the Streets Photographing Urban Spaces from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Image from My Generation Young Chinese Artists at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Liu Di, Animal Regulation Series No. 4, 2010

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 4 }

Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

08.25.14–10.04.14

09.26.14–12.12.14

The 29th Annual Tallahassee International

Making Sense: Rochelle Feinstein, Deborah Grant, Iva Gueorguieva, Dona Nelson

www.mofa.fsu.edu

TAMPA

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.ira.usf.edu

TARPON

Thru 08.31.14

SPRINGS

New Visions: Polly Gaillard & Allison Hunter

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art Tampa Museum of Art

www.fmopa.org

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Thru 08.31.14

An Arts Legacy: George Inness, Jr. in Tarpon Springs

Thru 08.31.14

Thru 09.28.14

Portraits and Places: Selections from FMoPA’s Permanent Collection

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists

www.fmopa.org

Thru 11.30.14

(See story on pg. 108.)

Thru 09.06.14

Ruth Bernhard: Body and Form

Poseidon and the Sea: Myth, Cult and Daily Life

Richard Beckman: Outside the Curve of Reason

Mystères de l’aquarelle: Works on Paper by Jack Barrett

www.fmopa.org

www.tampamuseum.org

www.ira.usf.edu

www.spcollege.edu/museum

09.05.14–11.31.14

www.tampamuseum.org

Thru 09.06.14

A Different Frame of Mind

www.spcollege.edu/museum

www.ira.usf.edu Thru 08.31.14

Image from Richard Beckman: Outside the Curve of Reason at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Richard Beckman, Song of Kabir (detail), ca. 2000, photo: Will Lytch/USF Graphicstudio

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 4 }

Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 08.24.14

Otok Ben-Hvar: Patriotic Performance Artist www.spcollege.edu/museum

VERO BEACH

Vero Beach Museum of Art Thru 09.07.14

Glass and Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection www.verobeachmuseum.org

W. PALM BEACH

Norton Museum of Art Thru 07.13.14

The Richman Gifts: American Impressionism and Realism www.norton.org

07.17.14–09.07.14

Living Legends: The Montage Portraits of Robert Weingarten

Wheels and Heels: The Big Noise Around Little Toys

WINTER PARK

(See story on pg. 134.)

Thru 08.31.14

cfam.rollins.edu 09.13.14–01.04.15

Fractured Narratives: A Strategy to Engage

Thru 08.31.14

www.norton.org

cfam.rollins.edu

Recent Acquisitions

www.norton.org

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Thru 10.26.14

from the Permanent Collection

Allure of Ancient Rome: Selected Old Masters Prints and Drawings

cfam.rollins.edu

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Thru 09.28.14

Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic

Thru 08.24.14

Behind the Cur­tain: MicheLee Pup­pets and the Art of Pup­petry

www.verobeachmuseum.org

(See story in the April/June 2014 issue on pg. 140.)

www.polasek.org O n V iew

Image from Living Legends: The Montage Portraits of Robert Weingarten at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Robert Weingarten, Don Shula, COACH, 2007, archival pigment print, gift of Steven and Catherine Fink, 2013.115.10

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MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Gallery www.dianalowenstein gallery.com

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Exhibition: ALEX TRIMINO ON VIEW 09.11.14–10.31.14

Alex Trimino’s illuminated fiber-based sculptures recontextualize the traditional use of colloquial, low-tech crafts; crochet, knittings and weavings exploring social views on civilization, technology and gender. MIAMI

Gallery: Emerson Dorsch www.emersondorsch.com

Exhibition: Michael Jones McKean: we float above to spit and sing ON VIEW THRU 07.31.14

Best known for his large-scale installations, Michael Jones McKean presents new sculptures, collage, and low-relief wall works in this solo exhibition. Above (left to right): Alex Trimino, LUMINOUS, 2012, installation view, Art and Cultural Center of Hollywood, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Gallery; Michael Jones McKean, courtesy of the artist and Emerson Dorsch

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

CORAL GABLES

MIAMI

Gallery: ArtSpace/ Virginia Miller Galleries

Gallery: Zadok Gallery www.zadokgallery.com

www.virginiamiller.com

Exhibition: LUCAS DAVIDSON

Exhibition: Panoply: Paintings, Photographs and Sculpture

ON VIEW 09.13.14–10.2014

ON VIEW THRU 07.31.14

This exhibition includes works by Bassmi, Trevor Bell, Bruce Checefsky, Michele Concepción, Carlos Garcia, Aaron Karp, Aureliano Parra, José Rosabal, Linda Touby, José Angel Vincench, and Suzan Woodruff. VIERA

Gallery: Art Gallery of Viera www.artgalleryofviera.com

Exhibition: Tropical Daze

Lucas Davidson’s work explores the transitory nature of self. Using a technique that dissolves photographic emulsion in water, a portrait photo becomes a transparent flexible form that represents the fluidity between the conscious and unconscious state.

ON VIEW 08.08.14–09.06.14

Celebrating Florida’s palms, sunsets, ocean and birds, Art Gallery of Viera presents its “hottest show” featuring tropically themed artwork by local artists. The gallery will also hold a month long ‘Peoples Choice Award,’ where visitors can vote for their favorite piece of art.

Clockwise from top: Suzan Woodruff, The Color of Heat (detail), 2011, acrylic on panel, 60 x 45-7/8”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Lucas Davidson, Outskirts I, 2012, pigment print, 23-9/16 x 23-9/16”, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery; Jeanette Drake, Attitude in Red, watercolor, framed size: 27”h x 29”w, courtesy of the artist and Art Gallery of Viera

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Baker Sponder Gallery www.bakerspondergallery.com

Exhibition: Season Preview ON VIEW THRU 09.30.14

Baker Sponder Gallery presents a season preview of paintings and photography by Max-Steven Grossman, Patrick Hughes, David Remfry, Richard Saba, and Hunt Slonem.

ORLANDO

Gallery: Jai Gallery www.jaigallery.net

Exhibition: Monte Olinger / Radiance ON VIEW 07.11.14–08.01.14

Painter-cum-architect/designer, Monte Olinger, finds inspiration in the cultural and natural world, the inner child in all of us, and his own challenges coping with lifelong disability. His work exudes harmony and peace, and is spiritually and culturally enlightening. Above (top to bottom): Patrick Hughes, In Tents, 2005, ed. 31/45, hand-painted multiple with lithography, 17-1/2 x 37-3/4 x 6”, HUGH_P0007, courtesy of the artist and Baker Sponder Gallery; Monte Olinger, Untitled (Golden Sand), courtesy of the artist and Jai Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

FORT MYERS

Gallery: Bob Rauschenberg Gallery www.rauschenberggallery.com

Exhibition: ELEVEN: The John Erickson Museum of Art (JEMA) 10-Year Retrospective ON VIEW THRU 07.25.14

NAPLES

This exhibit presents portable miniature JEMA galleries, each hosting site-specific and solo projects by established and emerging artists.

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

www.trudylabell fineart.com

Exhibition: DIRECTOR’S PICKS 


Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

ON VIEW

Exhibition: Endless Summer

THRU 08.2014

ON VIEW 08.02.14–08.30.14

Trudy Labell Fine Art Director, Lynn Pitochelli, has selected some of her favorite paintings, sculpture and glass art to be exhibited through July and August. Visit the gallery and see if you agree!

Celebrating the magic, wanderlust, and possibilities of the summer season, Endless Summer features a selection of works by Arts on Douglas artists ranging in style, approach, and media.

Clockwise from top left: Image courtesy of Bob Rauschenberg Gallery; Stephen Coyle, The Call, alkyd on linen, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Image courtesy of Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles

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I Have Seen the Future:

NORMAN

09.28.14

ON VIEW THRU

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BEL GEDDES

4@

Designs America

WOLFSONIAN-FIU, MIAMI www.wolfsonian.org

Norman Bel Geddes, Motor Car No. 9 (without tail fin), ca. 1933; Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center


Norman Bel Geddes’ model for a revolving, 25-story Aerial Restaurant for the 1932 Chicago World’s Fair. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center; Photo: Maurice Goldberg


I Have Seen the Future

V isionary designer , N orman B el G eddes (1893-1958), expressed

his dynamic vision of America’s future in innovative, streamlined designs for everything from household appliances to urban utopias. He played a significant role in shaping not only modern America but also the nation’s image of itself as innovator and leader into the future. In the first major exploration of the theater and industrial designer whom The New York Times dubbed “the Leonardo da Vinci of the 20th century,” Miami’s Wolfsonian-FIU presents I Have Seen the Future:

Norman Bel Geddes Designs America, organized by the Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin. Bringing together some 200 never-before-seen drawings, models, photographs and films OnV

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Above: Bel Geddes’ Streamlined Railway Train design, ca. 1930-1933. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation/Harry Ransom Center; Photo: Maurice Goldberg

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Above:. Vandamm Studio, “Travel Smartly in Tweed,” Norman Bel Geddes’ window display for the Franklin Simon department-store chain, circa 1929. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

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of theater sets and costumes, housing projects and appliances, airplanes and automobiles, the exhibition underscores what Bel Geddes believed— that art, as well as architecture

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and design, could make people’s lives psychologically and emotionally richer. The exhibition reflects the broad range of Bel Geddes’ interests and work, and dem-


I Have Seen the Future

The exhibition underscores what Bel Geddes believed— that art, as well as architecture and design, could make people’s lives psychologically and emotionally richer.

onstrates how he shaped and continues to influence American culture and lifestyle. A polymath who had little academic or professional training in the areas he mastered, Bel

Geddes had the ability to look at trends and the contemporary environment, and envision how they could affect and alter the future. “When you drive on an interstate highway, attend a multimedia Broadway show, dine in a sky-high revolving restaurant or watch a football game in an all-weather stadium, you owe a debt of gratitude to Norman Bel Geddes,” said exhibition organizer, Donald Albrecht, an independent curator and curator of architecture and design at the Museum of the City of New York. “It was Bel Geddes, more than any designer of his era, who created and promoted a dynamic vision of the future with an image that was OnV

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Above: Norman Bel Geddes’ costume design for Gypsy Woman in “The Miracle,” ca. 1924. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

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I Have Seen the Future

“It was Bel Geddes, more than any designer of his era, who created and promoted a dynamic vision of the future with an image that was streamlined, technocratic and optimistic.” —Donald Albrecht, exhibition organizer and curator streamlined, technocratic and optimistic.” A paradoxical figure of equal parts visionary and pragmatist, serious inventor and inveterate promoter, naturalist and industrialist, democrat and egoist, Bel Geddes sought nothing less than the transformation of modern American society

Right:. An ad for Shell Oil that Bel Geddes created in the mid-1930s, which helped inspire the “Futurama” exhibit. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

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through design. The exhibition is organized into five sections that highlight some of the diverse work of Bel Geddes: “Setting the Stage, 1916-1927;” “Industrious Design, 1927-1937;” “A Bigger World, 1937-1945;” “Futurama, 1939-1940;” and “Total Living, 1945-1958.”


After studying art at the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago, Bel Geddes started out working as a set designer in Los Angeles, adapting the American stage to the principles of the New Stagecraft movement in Europe and creating immersive theater experiences. A multitalented theatrical genius, Bel Geddes designed shows’ costumes, lighting

and scenery—often taking complete control of the audience experience. In the late 1920s, Bel Geddes was one of the leading practitioners and founders of the new field of “industrial design,” and popularized “streamlining” as a design concept with his publication, Horizons (1932). He produced designs with streamlined aesthetics for products and ideas OnV

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Above:. Bel Geddes’s signature contribution to the 1939–40 New York World’s Fair was the “Futurama” exhibit he designed for General Motors. Here we see him with one of Futurama’s dioramas of the “City of Tomorrow”; Richard Garrison, Bel Geddes with Futurama Diorama, ca. 1939. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

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Right: Visitors to “Futurama” looked out over a vast model of America as Bel Geddes predicted it would be in 1960, complete with an extensive highway system; General Motors, Futurama Spectators, ca. 1939, General Motors LLC. Used with permission, GM Media Archives

Above:. “I Have Seen the Future” button, 1940. Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

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as diverse as home appliances, flying cars and floating airports. He also designed factories, offices and nightclubs. “Bel Geddes played a seminal role in shaping the expectations and behavior of American consumers and helped to transform both the industrial design and theater design professions into modern businesses,” said Albrecht. Believing that communication was key to shaping the

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modern world, Bel Geddes popularized his vision of the future through drawings, models, and photographs. Of his utopian predictions, Bel Geddes’ best-known project was the “Futurama” exhibit in the General Motors “Highways and Horizons” pavilion at the 1939–1940 New York World’s Fair. The installation was a dramatic visualization of a future American city that gave Depression-era Ameri-


I Have Seen the Future

Bel Geddes’ “Futurama” exhibit at the 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair gave Depression-era Americans genuine hope for a better future within their lifetimes. 10,000 of which moved. At the end of the exhibit, visitors exited with a pin proclaiming “I Have Seen the Future.” Bel Geddes later moved from designing individual products to designing com-

Below: The General Motors “Highways and Horizons” building, which housed Bel Geddes’ “Futurama” exhibit, courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center

cans genuine hope for a better future within their lifetimes. Visitors sat in “soundchairs” fastened to a moving conveyor as they peered down on an immense model of America, circa 1960, which included more than 35,000 square feet, with detailed scale models of highways, 500,000 individually designed miniature buildings, 1 million trees of 13 different species, and 50,000 scale model cars and buses— OnV

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Bel Geddes remained a visionary who was involved in virtually every field that defined Cold War America. Left: “Futurama” car; courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation; Photo: Pete Smith

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I Have Seen the Future

Far left: Unidentified photographer, Walter Kidde Soda King Seltzer Bottles, 1939 Left: Prototype case for Emerson Patriot radio, ca. 1940-1941 Images courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation / Harry Ransom Center. Below: Edited by Donald Albrecht, Norman Bel Geddes Designs America (Abrams) accompanies the exhibition with more than 20 scholarly essays.

plete systems, such as urban utopias and national highway plans. He also designed a never-built suspended roof or allweather, all-purpose stadium for the Brooklyn Dodgers during 1948-52. In the 1950s, Bel Geddes conceived of a tropical wall-less house that could be open or closed to the elements as weather dictated. He remained a visionary who was involved in virtually every field that defined Cold War

America, from television to suburbia to urban renewal. Accompanying the exhibition is the publication Norman Bel Geddes Designs America (Abrams). Edited by Donald Albrecht in association with the Ransom Center and the Museum of the City of New York, the 400-page publication includes 20 essays by scholars that cover Bel Geddes’ life, career, and specific projects. On View OnV

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Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

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History Center’s exhibition, Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real, commemorates the 75th anniversary of one of the most popular films ever made. At the time of its release in 1939, Gone with the Wind was the longest sound movie ever shown in theaters (3 hours, 45 minutes, with an intermission) and among the first widerelease films shot in Technicolor. Produced by David O. Selznick on a then-whopping $3.7 million budget (the film grossed nearly $192 million), it would go on to win an unprecedented 10 Academy Awards. 52

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Clark Gable was the early favorite for the role of Rhett Butler, but he was not the only actor considered. In the end, he was cast over Gary Cooper, Errol Flynn and Ronald Colman. Expecting the film to be “the biggest flop in Hollywood history,” Gary Cooper reportedly said at the time: “I’m just glad it’ll be Clark Gable who’s falling on his face and not Gary Cooper.” This page and previous spread: See Gone with the Wind (1939) on TMC. TM & © 2007 Turner Classic Movies. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. tcm.com


Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

Left: Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American to be nominated for, and win, an Academy Award. It was also the first time an AfricanAmerican attended the awards as a guest. None of Gone with the Wind’s black actors were allowed to attend the film’s Atlanta premiere.

The exhibition relives the magic of the iconic novel and film all thanks to one collector, James Tumblin, who has amassed the largest privately held Gone with the Wind collection with more than 300,000 authentic items. The show opens in Orlando on August 16 with several never-before displayed pieces and will run through November 30, 2014. Both Margaret Mitchell’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and the movie depicting America’s South around the turbulence of the American Civil War (1861-1865) have helped define our impressions of the South—from racial stereotypes of African Americans to Southern belles to Yankee scoundrels—shaping our memories throughout the 20th century and into the 21st century. To explore these contradictions and our impressions of the novel, the movie, and this conflicted time in American history, the History Center is planning a series of programs and special events throughout the exhibition’s stay. “We are excited to have the opportunity to host Mr. Tumblin’s collection of Gone with the Wind memorabilia. What better way to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the film’s premiere

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Right: It took two years and 1,400 interviews to cast the role of Scarlett O’Hara but Vivien Leigh knew she’d get the part. “I’ve cast myself as Scarlett O’Hara,” she told a journalist after reading Margaret Mitchell’s novel, when the film was in its initial planning stages. “I shall play Scarlett O’Hara,” she remarked, “Wait and see.” See Gone with the Wind (1939) on TMC. TM & © 2007 Turner Classic Movies. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. tcm.com


Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

“Mr. Tumblin’s collection is a must-see and a great way to find out the story behind one of the few movies to have shaped our culture and how we think about history.” than to bring this exhibition to Central Florida,” said Michael Perkins, Orange County Regional History Center’s Curator of Exhibitions. “We know our guests will be thrilled to discover the history behind the making of the movie and see all of the costumes and items from Gone with the Wind. Mr. Tumblin’s collection is a must-see and a great way to find out the story behind one of the few movies to have shaped our culture and how we think about history.” A former head of Universal Studios’ makeup and hair department, Tumblin started his collection in 1962 when he accidentally came across the dress that had been worn by actress, Vivien Leigh, during the attack at Shantytown scene. It is one of several original costumes featured in the exhibition. Among the 120+ items from Tumblin’s collection to be featured at the event are costumes worn by Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara, Clark Gable as Rhett Butler, Olivia de Havilland as Melanie Wilkes, Leslie Howard as Ashley Wilkes, Ona Munson as Belle Watling and Cammie King as Bonnie Blue Butler. Also on display

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Right: On the original poster, the leads were listed as: Clark Gable, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland, and “presenting” Vivien Leigh. The order was changed when Leigh won the Oscar. Left: Vivien Leigh worked for 125 days in the film and received about $25,000. Clark Gable worked for 71 days and received over $120,000. See Gone with the Wind (1939) on TMC. TM & © 2007 Turner Classic Movies. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. tcm.com


Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

Left: Leslie Howard (Ashley Wilkes) thought he was too old for the role. His character was about 21 at the start of the film, while Howard was in his mid-40s. He eventually agreed to the role but he still

will be storyboards created by William Cameron Menzies; the script used by Hattie McDaniel, who won an Academy Award— the first awarded to an African-American—for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Mammy; furniture used in the film; and three Oscars won by cast members—including Vivien Leigh’s Best Actress Oscar which Tumblin purchased in 1993 in New York at a Christie’s auction for a then-record $500,000. The trophy is now valued at roughly $2.6 million (in exhibitions, it often has its own security guard). In a recent interview with On View, James Tumblin had no shortage of anecdotes about his collection and the exhibition Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real. The following pages offer edited extracts from the conversation...

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wore extra makeup and a hairpiece to make him look younger. Right: Once filming ended, many of the costumes were re-used in other films. Scarlett’s famous drapery dress was worn almost 10 years later by Anna Lee in “Bedlam,” with Boris Karloff. © Selznick Properties, Ltd.


ON VIEW Interview

JAMES TUMBLIN amassed a collection of more than 300,000 treasured objects from the film, GONE WITH THE WIND ...and it all started with a dress.

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writer, Janet Kersnar, caught up with James Tumblin at his home in Oregon to find out more about the collector, his collection, and the fate of that first dress from one of the most pivotal events of Hollywood’s golden era. A natural raconteur, Tumblin readily admitted: “I always love talking about this crazy collector hobby of mine.” 60

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Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

JK: The fabled beginnings of your collection are almost as legendary as the collection itself. Can you walk us through its evolution? JT: This collection started back in the 1960s when I was a department head at Universal Studios and I was doing some research over at Western Costume, a company which still exists today that did all the costumes dating way back to the silent era. There was a dress lying on the floor and I was always taught by my mother to be respectful of things, so I went looking for a hanger for it. A Western Costume employee saw me and said, “Don’t bother; we’re culling inventory.” I was thinking, what a shame. I had never collected anything before but I asked if they would sell it to me. They said, “We’ll sell you this costume plus the other rack over there for $20.00.” So I bought them, and noticed the dress label said “Selznick International, Scarlett.” I realized I was holding a dress that had been worn by Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind. OnV

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JK: From a start of one dress to a collection of more than 300,000 items—how did that happen? JT: The second really important piece I acquired was when I was working in Italy, and a friend called me to say they were going to auction off Scarlett’s “barbeque bonnet.” I asked if he would just go and bid on it, and I ended up winning it. Some friends—Fred Crane, who was in Gone with the Wind [playing Brent Tarleton, one of the redheaded twins who flirts with Scarlett in the barbecue scene at the beginning of the film] and

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Below: James Tumblin with three Oscars won by cast members— including Vivien Leigh’s Best Actress Oscar which Tumblin purchased in 1993 in New York at a Christie’s auction for a then-record $500,000; Photo: The Shaw-Tumblin Collection

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Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real

his wife, Anita—went to the auction house to pick up the hat for me, and when I got back to California, they threw a party for Scarlett’s hat. That’s how things were back then in Beverley Hills. And that’s how it started— auctions, word of mouth, and even these exhibitions. One or two people always come up to me saying they have this or they have that, asking if I’d be interested in buying it—and I’m still buying things.

Right: The typewriter used by screenwriter Sidney Howard appears in the exhibit Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real. (The original Gone with the Wind typed

JK: Why do you think the film, and your collection, continue to resonate with the American public? JT: The year it was made, 1939, was considered the golden year of Hollywood, and to make a movie out of Margaret Mitchell’s wonderful book—with Clark and all these wonderful actors—it’s no wonder it is still popular 75 years later. Also, it was only the 11th Technicolor film ever made.

of Herbert Kalmus, the cofounder of the Technicolor Corp., was sort of a pain in the neck. She had the final say in the colors that were used in the movie and she had a lot of clout. As a matter of fact, her daughter played Bonnie Blue Butler [Scarlett and Rhett’s daughter] in the film. So she was deeply entrenched in the production. People used to shudder when they’d see her coming....Obviously, she was right on so many points. The colors in the film are beautiful. JK: Another character influencing the film was cos-

manuscript pages are in the typewriter case.) Photo: The Shaw-Tumblin Collection

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tume designer, Walter Plunkett. You knew him during your days in Hollywood, but do you feel you’ve become closer to him the more you collect some of the 5,000 costumes he designed for the movie? JT: Walter was so gifted in so many areas, not just costume design. He was a genius....He did over 500 films. We have a lot of his original costume designs from Gone with the Wind. He set the standard. They’re still OnV

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talking about him, 30 years after his death [in 1982]. Walter’s research would drive people crazy. With Gone with the Wind, they were having trouble with finances; they kept going millions of dollars over budget. Ann Rutherford [Scarlett’s younger sister, Carreen O’Hara] said, “You’re designing these petticoats with real lace, having shoes made in Italy for us and all this, but I could wear my own underpinnings and my own shoes because my g a z i n e

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Above: Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real includes Bonnie Blue Butler’s velvet dress from her final scene. Photo: N.C. Museum of History

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Above: The dress that launched Tumblin’s Gone with the Wind collection: Vivien Leigh wore this dress during the attack at Shantytown scene in Gone with the Wind. It is featured in the exhibit Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real. Photo: N.C. Museum of History

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feet aren’t seen.” Walter and Selznick said, “Look, you’re the daughter of the wealthiest landlord, and you’re going to dress like that. It does make a difference.” JK: But is it correct that many of the costumes have had a longer history stretching beyond Gone with the Wind? JT: Once filming ended, the costumes went back to WestMa

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ern Costume, where they were reused. One of the costumes we’ll be bringing to Orlando is the Shantytown costume. I have photographs of it being worn in at least three Westerns afterwards. We’ll be bringing one of the jackets worn by Belle Watling [the brothel madame], designed by Walter, and that was worn in a Joan Blondell / John Wayne movie called Lady for a Night. Even Scarlett’s famous drapery dress was worn almost

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Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real 10 years later by Anna Lee in Bedlam, with Boris Karloff. To have any of these costumes look as they did back in 1939 is just amazing. They were really nothing more than an income-producing commodity. They’d take them back, rent them out and made money off of them again. That happens today, but people are realizing the value of these costumes, thanks to auctions and collectors like myself, and so they don’t tamper with the costumes made for the lead actors as much as they once did.

becomes more and more tattered as the film goes on. There were 11 different versions of it as it ages in the film. I got a call from an auction house in London, asking me if I could identify a costume that had possibly been worn in Gone with the Wind. I had them send me Polaroids of the piece, not just of the outside but of the inside. I wanted to see how it was constructed. Sure enough, this was the lilac bodice Vivien Leigh had worn. They were very happy with what I told them and asked me how much I’d

“To have any of these costumes look as they did back in 1939 is just amazing.” JK: Is it even possible to have a favorite in your collection? JT: I would say the Shantytown dress because that was the costume I picked up off the floor and rescued from the furnace. That’s sort of my lucky costume—I take it everywhere. But I also like a costume that Vivien Leigh wears in the picture—a lilac bodice. It OnV

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like to be paid. I said, “Don’t pay me, just give me credit in the auction catalogue and give me an opportunity to bid on it.” I put my money where my mouth was and got the costume for several thousand dollars. A couple of years later, one of the distressed versions of the costume came up for auction. This one was literally in rags and sold for over $95,000. g a z i n e

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JK: What other “star attractions” will be at the Orlando exhibition? JT: There’s something that we’ll be exhibiting for the first time in Orlando. Back in April of 1936, a few weeks before Gone with the Wind was published, there was a lot of buzz around Atlanta about this local lady who wrote a book about the Civil War that was going to be published. [Margaret Mitchell] was invited by a local amateur writers guild to talk about her book. They asked if she could provide a one-page autobiography about her family and her book, which they would publish in the next month’s

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newsletter. So she typed up a bio, but for a cover letter, her husband, John Marsh, wrote: “I don’t know if any of the enclosed will be of any interest because up until now my wife’s literary career has been rather uneventful.” And then of course, a year later, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. I also just recently acquired a call sheet from the very first day of filming of Gone with the Wind that will be on display. The call sheet lists everybody who has to be on the set, what costumes they have to wear, the extras, the stand-ins, if they are using animals, which ones are needed, the location, etc.

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Above (and right): A behind-the-scenes shot at the Atlanta bazaar of Clark Gable as Rhett Butler and Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara being watched by dancers and director, George Cukor, who was fired shortly after filming had begun and was replaced by Victor Fleming. (For the closeup shots, the two actors were placed on a spinning platform so they could stand still but appear to be dancing.)


Gone with the Wind: Reel to Real JK: Just like everything in the art world, there are fakes, and it’s not always easy to determine the provenance of something. Any advice for future or novice collectors? JT: First of all, it doesn’t hurt to know your subject. I know Hollywood. I know what costumes created for the movies looked like. There were certain standards they would have to meet. I am asked to authenticate things quite often. Sometimes I have good news; sometimes I have bad news. Bonhams recently asked me to authenticate a jacket that was supposed to have belonged to Clark Gable. I told them to look in

the pocket and tell me what the label said. I knew it wasn’t authentic because all of Clark Gable’s clothing for Gone with the Wind was made by Eddie Schmidt, his personal tailor. JK: So what’s missing from your collection? JT: A permanent home. These things are getting old, and like myself, it gets harder and harder every year to travel. I would like a permanent home for the collection, so people can travel to see it. Any good museum would be a perfect home for it. I’ll just wait for the phone to ring—I’m always open to suggestions. O n V iew

This page and opposite: See Gone with the Wind (1939) on TMC. TM & © 2007 Turner Classic Movies. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. tcm.com


BEATRIZ MILH

JARDI BOTÂN 0 9 .1 9 .1 4 – 0 1 .1 8 . 1 5 a t t h e P É R E Z A


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Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico

nown for her colorful, kaleidoscopic collages, prints, paintings, and installations, Brazilian abstract artist, Beatriz Milhazes, is inspired by Latin American and European traditions. The reoccurring arabesque motifs present in her work are inspired by Brazilian lacework, carnival decoration, music, and Colonial baroque architecture. The balance of harmony and dissonance in her work references work by Tarsila do Amaral, Oswald de Andrade, Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian, Vassily Kandinsky, and Robert Delaunay. On September 19, Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) will present the first major US survey of works by Milhazes. On view through January 18, 2015, Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico will feature over 40 large-scale paintings, collages, and screenprints from the past 25 years of her career.

Opposite page (and previous spread): Beatriz Milhazes, Popeye (and detail), 2007-2008, acrylic on canvas, 199 x 139 cm; Photography: Jason Mandella; © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York / Shanghai

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Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico

“I am seeking geometrical structures, but with freedom of form and imagery taken from different worlds.” —Beatriz Milhazes

Above: Beatriz Milhazes at her studio in Rio de Janeiro (detail), 2013; Photo: Vicente de Paulo; Courtesy Beatriz Milhazes Studio Opposite: Beatriz Milhazes, Chiclete com banana (Chewing gum and banana), 2011-2012, acrylic on canvas, 220 x 180 cm; Photography: Manuel Águas & Pepe Schettino, © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York/Shanghai

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The exhibition will, for the first time, trace the development of her distinct painting style, which is characterized by her use of bold colors, the layering of geometric and decorative forms and motifs from a broad range of art historical movements, including Colonial Baroque, European Modernism, and North American Pop Art. Jardim Botânico will feature works never before seen in the Unit-

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ed States, as well as two new paintings made specifically for PAMM’s presentation. The exhibition highlights Milhazes’ one-of-a-kind artistic process in which she collages with paint to explore movement and materiality. The exhibition’s title, Jardim Botânico, references both the neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro, home to her studio, and the dichotomy in Milhazes’ work between structure and rational order, and sensuality, expression, and emotion. Organized by PAMM Chief Curator, Tobias Ostrander, the exhibition follows a loose chronological order, with sequential sections focused around formal investigations. The works flow from Milhazes’ fascination in the 1990s with carefully rendered lace, ruffles, and decorative roses and pearls, to her interest in bold colors, stars, hearts, and diagonal lines, through to her incorporation of horizontal and vertical stripes in her large-scale paintings of the 2000s. Her more recent works show an


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Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico increased use of interlocking, pure geometric forms that reference early European Modernism. “Milhazes’ practice has been largely unexamined in the United States, and this exhibition offers an exciting opportunity to bring her energetic and visually compelling paintings to new audiences. Jardim Botânico is also

forward to sharing it with our community and those traveling to Miami.” Milhazes’ paintings, with their exuberant colors and decorative elements, parallel Miami’s tropical environment, art deco architecture, and vibrant atmosphere—bringing the experience of the city to PAMM’s galleries. Milhazes’ signature paint-

“ …this exhibition offers an exciting opportunity to bring [Milhazes’] energetic and visually compelling paintings to new audiences.” —PAMM Director, Thom Collins particularly resonant in the Miami area, which is home to one of the largest populations of Brazilian-born Americans in the country,” said PAMM Director, Thom Collins. “The exhibition connects the experience of art, architecture and nature, and we are looking

ing technique creates highly textured surfaces that give her paintings grit and physicality which she contrasts with the use of bright colors and geometric forms. By painting individual figurative elements in acrylic onto clear plastic sheets, she is able to test their

Beatriz Milhazes, Brinquedos populares (Popular toys), 2009-2010, acrylic on linen, 100 x 112 cm; Photography: Manuel Águas & Pepe Schettino; © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York/Shanghai

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Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico

Milhazes sets up an engaging play between figurative and abstract elements. placement and layer them on the canvas—manipulating the elements as collage materials. The sheets are glued to the canvas one at a time, creating layers of “decals.” As the glue

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dries, she rips each “decal” off to reveal the paint’s “back side,” with the image presented in reverse. This process removes some pieces of paint, giving her paintings a prema-

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turely aged look and defying the expectation of a smooth canvas surface. “The tension between order and emotive abstraction in Beatriz’s composi-


tions invigorates her body of work, simultaneously engaging the viewer and the space,” said Ostrander. “The scope of Jardim Botânico provides an opportunity to not only exam-

Beatriz Milhazes, Gamboa Seasons, 2010, acrylic on canvas, installation view from the exhibition Meu Bem at the Centro Cultural Paço Imperial – IPHAN/MinC, Rio de Janeiro, August-November 2013; Photography: Manuel Águas & Pepe Schettino; © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York/Shanghai

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Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico ine the arc of her oeuvre, but to explore how her investigations into decorative and geometric abstraction have inspired work by younger generations of artists. The exhibition emphasizes Beatriz’s important artistic contributions and highlights the continued relevance of her practice.” Milhazes’ process emerged from a desire to reinvigorate painting, a seemingly static medium that was considered by many to be out of touch with contemporary life. An abstract painter, she is part of a generation of Brazilian artists who became known in the late 1980s, among them, Daniel Senise and Adriana Varejao, for revitalizing painting through references to the medium’s history. Milhazes draws the basic motifs of her oeuvre from the history and culture of her homeland as well as from Western art history. Serving as sources of inspiration are the Brazilian movements of Tropicalismo and Modernismo, in which folkloric elements coalesce with influences

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Beatriz Milhazes, Dancing, 2007, acrylic on canvas, 97 x 137�; Collection of the artist


Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico from the Americas and Europe, as well as Henri Matisse, Piet Modrian, Sonia DelauneyTerk, and Bridget Riley. Born in 1960 in Rio de Janeiro, Milhazes has been exhibiting her work in Brazil since she was in her early twenties, and made her debut in the US at the Carnegie International in 1995. Soon after, she began exhibiting with Edward

do Estacao, Sao Paolo; Ikon Gallery Birmingham, England and Birmingham Museum, Alabama. Her work can be found at the Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Museum of Modern Art, all in New York City; the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; The Museo Nacional

Beatriz Milhazes is internationally recognized as one of Brazil’s most important contemporary artists. Thorpe in New York to rave reviews by critics and curators. Milhazes has since exhibited widely throughout the world, including solo exhibits at PACO Imperial, Rio de Janeiro; Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon; MALBAFundacion Costantini, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Beyeler Foundation, Basel; the Fondation Cartier, Paris; Pinacoteca

Centro de Arte Reina Sophia, Madrid, Spain; the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan; and the Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, Massachusetts. Milhazes is represented by James Cohan Gallery, New York; Galeria Fortes Vilaça, Sao Paulo; Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin; and Stephen Friedman, London. O n V iew

Beatriz Milhazes, Chora, menino, 1996, acrylic on canvas, 71-27⁄ 32 x 75-13 ⁄ 64”; Colección Patricia Phelips de Cisneros, Caracas and New York; © Beatriz Milhazes

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Image: Rick Herzog, Creeping Ivy, 2013, hand-cut vinyl, laser-cut acrylic mirrors, wood, steel, 20’ x 56’ x 1.5’ (dimensions variable)

O

UTSIDE the BO INSTALLATIO

On view 0 7.1 9 .1 4 – 1 0 .1 9 .1 4 at APPLETON MUS 00

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Rick Herzog, Sarasota, FL

My current work explores botanical forms, the lack of interaction between man and nature, our disconnection from this environment, and the ‘artificialization’ of nature, natural spaces and all things living. These sculptures talk about organization and the chaotic nature within natural and man-made forms. I look at how items are composed and their many parts, then abstract their elements—keeping true to their inherit qualities.

2014

BIENNIAL

OX : N by F L O R I D A A R T I S T S EUM of ART , Ocala OnV

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OUTSIDE the BOX:

INSTALLATION by FLORIDA ARTISTS

2014

BIENNIAL

F or

its third

B iennial

celebration, The Appleton Museum of Art presents the juried exhibition, Outside the Box: Installation by Florida Artists, which opens July 19, 2014 and runs through October 19, 2014. Putting a new spin on a centuries-old concept, the show brings together large-scale works by eight installation artists selected from more than thirty

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entries submitted by some of the best Florida artists working in this innovative and thought-provoking medium.

Patricia Schnall Gutierrez, Miami, FL

My work remains focused on the exploration of the contemporary feminine character based on traditional, political, and personal circumstances. The work, post-minimal and conceptual in nature, ranges from two-dimensional and installation to performance and collaborative projects. The content reveals an intimate commentary on a variety of issues of the modern world, the role of women, and personal life stories. The choice of execution and materials is essential to accentuate the intent of each particular piece: plastic garbage bags hung on shower hooks, draped washing machine tubing with sounds of home, intimately photographed domestic portraits, drawings, paintings, and interactive public works—all contributing to the larger collective dialogue they are inspired by. Patricia Schnall Gutierrez, Erased In The Wash!, 2013, 200’ washing machine hose, brass hardware, audio, 14’ x 14’ x 4’

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2014

OUTSIDE the BOX:

BIENNIAL

{

INSTALLATION by FLORIDA ARTISTS

The inspiration behind the Appleton’s decision to focus the Biennial on installation art rather than follow a more traditional format is due in part to a desire to break from convention and try something different. The event also presents the perfect opportunity to fully maximize the Appleton’s spacious Edith Marie Appleton Gallery, with it’s bright walls, blond floors and soaring ceilings. “The Appleton’s collection is generally encyclopedic and traditional, but once every two years, we get to celebrate big, wonderful and expressive contemporary art,” said Ruth Grim, Appleton curator of ex-

hibitions.“And when artists have a space that doesn’t limit them, it’s amazing what they can do. This is the type of art that really blossoms and comes alive in the space.” As Grim pointed out, installation art is one of the fastest growing areas of 21st century artistic production, stretching the boundaries and definition of art. “It is conceptual, interactive and often represents the cutting edge of art of our time. And Florida installation artists are producing some of the most dynamic, thought-provoking and beautiful works of art today.” The juror for this year’s Biennial is Matthew McLendon,

Zach Gilliland, Sarasota, FL

Sometimes the smallest details can have as big of an impact on our future as a major life event. What happens to the rest of those moments, all the ones that slip through the cracks in our memory? So much of what shapes our lives goes unnoticed or seemingly disappears. “Brokedown Palace” is a reflection on the first 16 years of my life, with each sculpture representing a year filled with all the incredible and insignificant moments engrained, stained, and twisted into the day to day. Just as unconventionally shaped and blended the first half of my life was, so too was my process for creating a visual representation of that path. From utilizing the scrap cypress wood from a local table maker, to stacking and ultimately shaping the forms one foot at a time on the spindle sander, I gave new life to this otherwise disregarded yet perfectly beautiful wood. Zach Gilliland, Brokedown Palace, 2014, Cypress wood and Briwax, 16 individual pieces with height ranges from 4’ to 10’ and widths of between 2 to 4”

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Ph.D., the Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota. McLendon is faculty at Florida State University where he teaches graduate seminars in contemporary art and museum practice, and is adjunct faculty at New College of Florida, the State Honors College. As juror, McLendon was also charged with the selection of ‘Best of Show,’ ‘Second Place,’ and ‘Honorable Mention,’ but these results will be held until after ‘The People’s Choice Award’ is determined by museum visitors and announced at the conclusion of the exhibition— allowing viewers to process and evaluate the works on their own throughout the exhibition’s run, without any outside influences. “Because it is difficult to package, to store, to display and to sell, [installation art] holds a tenuous place in the proving ground of contemporary

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Michael J. Bauman, Kate Helms, Temple Terrace, FL

The recent collaborative projects of Michael Bauman and Kate Helms gleefully celebrate the painfully obvious fact that any paradise is not wholly indigenous but more of a bionic hybrid of natural and constructed elements. In vibrant fashion, the works layer bizarre, highly exoticized mythologies onto the ‘native’ subtropical landscape with almost worshipful reverence. The artists exploit a landscape that is both the subject of national ridicule (e.g. @_FloridaMan) and the object of deep desire (South Beach, yachts, tanlines) to present concise narrative alternatives to traditional representations of tropical culture.

Michael J. Bauman, Kate Helms, FL2907EL, 2014, vintage boat, cast silicone alligator skins, wood, moving blankets, rope, t-8 florescent lights, plastic stake, extension cord, 9’ x 12.5’ x 10’


OUTSIDE the BOX:

Image:

INSTALLATION by FLORIDA ARTISTS

2014

Mikaela Raquel Williams, Rainbow, 2014, Video installation and extended media; Couch and Space Shuttle Area

BIENNIAL

Rug - fabric and LEDs, Extends out approx. 31’ by 26’ across, Couch: 2” x 54” x 25”

art—the market,” McLendon explained in his statement. “For this reason, programs such as the Appleton’s Biennial for installation art are essential to enabling artists who specialize in this type of work, artists who may find it difficult to find other outlets for their practice because of competing market forces. The Appleton Biennial gives them space and a platform.” Viewers will be fascinated with the creativity and detail with which these artists have realized their visions. “People usually respond to installation art,” added Grim. “If you can open your mind, you can understand and appreciate the fact that art does not have to have boundaries. This work spreads throughout the space, both physically and figuratively, exploring interesting pathways of thinking and creating ‘outside the box.’” The artists selected for this year’s Biennial are: Michael

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Mikaela Raquel Williams, Tampa, FL

My video, installation, performance, photography and collage work coalesces in the video installation, “Rainbow” (2014). The work is an exploration of assorted personae culled from science fiction and comedic tropes in the context of music videos, talk shows, stand-up comedy and commercials to address themes of habitat and technology through absurdity and play.

Bauman & Kate Helms, Zach Gilliland, Rick Herzog, Terri Lindbloom, Judith Salmon, Patricia Schnall Guttierez, and Mikaela Williams. As McLendon stated: “In considering each of the works entered, I took particular interest in the level of realization of the work, the concept underpinning the work, and the thoroughness of presentation of the work. Each of the selected works showed particular strength in these areas. I have also attempted to include a broad array of works that are representative of wider trends in contemporary art practice. Beyond these criteria, two sub-themes seemed to be brought forward by the majority of the work submitted. These related themes are environment and identity, both used in the broadest senses possible. By its very nature, installation art acts as an interjection into a space, an environment that is familiar—in this case, the OnV

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Terri Lindbloom, Tallahassee, FL

As an artist, I take an inter-disciplinary approach, working predominantly within multi-media installations—both site-specific and non site-specific. My work is very conceptual and at times, minimal and terse. The idea, and working out the best solution for the idea with whatever materials are appropriate, is what I am most concerned with. Viewer interaction is also important for the work to succeed. Above: Terri Lindbloom, Untitled, 2014, wood panels, plaster, steel forms, 3-d printed forms, magic marker, Plexiglas

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gallery—but through the work of art, that space is recast into the role of the unfamiliar. As we engage with the work, we are forced to engage in a reconsideration of the space it inhabits; our environment becomes a construction, or at the very least, an extension, of the artist’s will. The deconstruction of identity plays out through many of the selected works as well. This is a Florida biennial; the artists are a part of, and impacted by, the particular—some might say


peculiar—nature of this state. Nothing in Florida happens on a small scale. Our particular brands of hyperbolic tourism, nature, and general spectacle, each find their way into the discourse produced by these works in varying degrees of subtlety. As with any curatorial project, my concern is not if the viewer ‘likes’ the work presented, but rather that while viewing the installations, and hopefully long after, viewers will find themselves asking new questions, perhaps find themselves looking at their world in a new way. A new perspective, after all, is the greatest effect of art.” O n V iew

OUTSIDE the BOX:

INSTALLATION by FLORIDA ARTISTS

{

2014

BIENNIAL

Judith Salmon, St. Petersburg, FL

Many dimensions of personal and collective history are embedded with this installation. Imprints of my own feet speak of the now and then, the presence and the void—those spaces in our history made empty by departures of many kinds. In a 3 minute video, a single earthen clay foot is created on an outline of the artist’s foot and tenderly carried to the edge of the river where it is given back to the elements. The clay is transmuted, transported to create new origins. Below: Judith Salmon, Recollections, 2013,

wax, seeds, fabric, video, 12’ x 8’ (floor); 8’ x 8’ (wall projection)

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N S U M us e um

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I m a g i n a t i o n and th

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O n v i e w 0 8 .0 3 .1 4 – 2014


r t L au d e r d al e

presents. . .

Kara Walker, 8 Possible Beginnings, or the Creation of African-America; a Moving Picture by Kara E. Walker (video still) (detail), 2005, video, black and white, sound, TRT 00:15:57. © 2005 Kara Walker. Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York

Begin to Fall :

he A m e r i c a n S o u t h

– 1 0 .1 2 . 1 4

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I When the Stars Begin to Fall

n a wild and vibrant new show at the Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, “outsider” art masterpieces explore and challenge our perceptions of “black art.” When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South, organized by The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, and curated by Thomas J. Lax, considers the category of outsider art in relationship to contemporary black art and life in the American South. The exhibition opens on August 3, 2014 and runs through October 12, 2014. John Outterbridge, Untitled, ca. 1974–76, canvas, thread, metal (tin faucet for the head, aluminum for belt), rag cloth, leather, wood, polyester glue, shoe dye and acrylic paint, 26 x 17 x 19”, Collection of Dr. Vaughn Payne. Photo: Marc Bernier

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When the Stars Begin to Fall

When the Stars Begin to Fall considers “outsider” art in relationship to contemporary black art and life in the American South.

Above:

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Right:

Xaviera Simmons,

Kerry James Marshall,

The Favorable Outcome of

Bride of Frankenstein, 2009,

Every Navigation, 2014,

acrylic on PVC, 85 x 61”,

acrylic on wood, 120 x 72”.

Collection of David Zwirner.

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Courtesy the artist

Courtesy the artist and

and David Castillo Gallery

Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

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Situating itself within current art historical and political debates, When the Stars Begin to Fall features work by selftaught, spiritually inspired and incarcerated artists, as well as by some of the best-known artists of African descent working today. Inserting a “gutbucketfunky aesthetic” into classical, sometimes overwrought, tropes of African Americana— the folk, the downhome, the hailed—narratives of racial authenticity are presented alongside forms of abstraction, embracing the role of experimentation in an ongoing discourse about black aesthetics. “This exhibition raises some of the most important issues about art today,” says NSU Museum of Art Director and Chief Curator, Bonnie Clearwater. “In an art world that increasingly seeks out under recognized or ‘marginalized’


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When the Stars Begin to Fall

artists, this exhibition explores the relevancy of the characterization of ‘outsider art.’ As art becomes increasingly global, the regional becomes global, and the global becomes local.” Since the beginning of the 20th century, artists of African descent have looked to and constructed the American South as a site of origin and a

“...As art becomes increasingly global, the regional becomes global, and the global becomes local.” —NSU Museum of Art Director and Chief Curator, Bonnie Clearwater place of continued possibility. Imbued with a sense of memory and newfound hope, the “South” is an idea that is at once a stand-in for history and a harbinger of restitution. Freighted in the cultural imagination with a sense of loss, a gothic responsibility and irrefutable pastness, the South has OnV

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Benny Andrews, Heaven, 1967, oil on canvas, 44 x 50”. Courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York. Art © Estate of Benny Andrews/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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When the Stars Begin to Fall nonetheless been conceived by artists as a futuristic stronghold in which the history of America’s historical wrongdoing might be reconciled. Borrowing its title from an AfricanAmerican spiritual referenced by artist Romare Bearden and scholar W. E.B. Du Bois, When the Stars Begin to Fall alludes to the day’s dawn: a transition, a morning and mourning, an end and a new beginning. The thirty-five intergenerational American artists whose works are included in the exhibition share an interest in the South as a location both real and imagined. Many share a graphic sensibility, an interest in the creation of myths, a fascination with the past, and a commitment to the use of found materials and detritus. With

Henry Ray Clark, On Our Planet Name Yahoo We Are Called Destiny Childs We Sing and Dance to We do Know One Thing For Sure We Will Never Separate Are Be Apart, 2003, ink and marker on manila envelope, 13-1/2 x 20-1/2”. Courtesy Jack Massing

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When the Stars Begin to Fall

...the exhibition explores how identification and belonging shape our experience of art and meaning. the majority of works made between 1964 and 2014, When the Stars Begin to Fall looks at the history of self-taught artists in influencing and defining what black art can be, as well as the significance of regional culture across time and space. Bringing together work that cites and plays with ideas of origin, the exhibition explores how identification and belonging—national and racial, artistic and institutional—shape our experience of art and meaning. The artists represented in the exhibition include: Benny Andrews, Kevin Beasley, McArthur Binion, Beverly Buchanan, Henry Ray Clark, Courtesy the Artists, Thornton Dial, Minnie Evans, Theaster Gates, Deborah Grant, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Bessie Harvey, David Hammons, Lonnie Holley, Frank OnV

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Works by James “Son” Thomas (clockwise from top left): Black Woman, ca. 1986, mixed media, 8-1/2 x 5-1/2 x 6”, courtesy Ronald and June Shelp. Photo: Marc Bernier; Untitled, 1989, mixed media, 10 x 6 x 9”, The William Arnett Collection of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation; Untitled, 1987, mixed media, 9-1/2 x 8 x 8-3/4”, The William Arnett Collection of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation; Untitled, 1987, mixed media, 9 x 7 x 7”, The William Arnett Collection of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation

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When the Stars Begin to Fall Albert Jones, Lauren Kelley, Ralph Lemon, Kerry James Marshall, Rodney McMillian, Joe Minter, J.B. Murray, John Outterbridge, Noah Purifoy, Marie “Big Mama” Roseman, Jacolby Satterwhite, Patricia Satterwhite, Rudy Shepherd, Xaviera Simmons, Georgia Speller, Henry Speller, James “Son” Thomas, Stacy Lynn Waddell, Kara Walker, Carrie Mae Weems and Geo Wyeth. When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South is accompanied by a catalogue featuring entries by the exhibition’s organizer, Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, along with leading scholars, Horace D. Ballard Jr., Katherine Jentleson, Scott Romine and Lowery Stokes Sims, who write on notions of spirituality, the ethics of selftaught art and the idea of the South in the American consciousness. On View

Ralph Lemon, Untitled, 2013–14, archival pigment print, 24 x 30”, courtesy the artist

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TAMPA’S

&

FLORIDA MUSEUM

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PHO

PORTR ON VIEW THRU

P

08.31.14 The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts (FMoPA) is a cultural gem in Tampa. Now settled in its new home, the Cube at Rivergate Plaza, the museum is situated in the core of the Downtown Tampa Arts District—a stunning and appropriate setting for this innovative organization. With important exhibits by such esteemed artists as Platon, Dorothea Lange, Mario Algaze, Vivian Maier, and Brassaï, the Museum is greatly enriching Tampa’s artistic landscape. FMoPA is dedicated to exhib1 08

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& TOGRAPHIC ARTS

PRESENTS...

RAITS

Places NS

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FM O PA’ S

PERMANENT COLLECTION W W W . F M O P A . O R G

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Portraits & Places iting important photographic art. The museum collects, preserves and exhibits historic and contemporary works by numerous nationally and internationally known artists. To date, the museum has mounted 53 major photographic exhibitions. Since the museum’s inception in 2001, FMoPA’s permanent collection has been developing as a representation of photographic art central to contemporary life and culture. With an expanding acquisition base, ranging from the photojournalism of Jamie Francis and James Borchuck, to the iconographic portraiture of Len Prince, FMoPA remains committed to evolving its collection and celebrating the history and the progress of photography as an art form. The Museum’s current show, Portraits & Places: Selections from FMoPA’s Permanent Collection, will be on view through August 31, 2014. “The images on display are meant to represent FMoPA’s permanent collection as a whole,” says FMoPA’s Interim Director, Zora Carrier. “We feel

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Bud Lee is a Florida based photojournalist and artist. His photography has been published in Life, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Town & Country, and The New York Times Magazine. After joining the US Army, Lee began working as a photographer in 1965 for the Stars & Stripes (newspaper). This led to a job as a photojournalist with Life magazine where, during the summer of 1967, Lee captured images of the civil rights movement in Detroit and Newark. His photograph of a boy wounded in the Newark riots won him Life magazine’s 1967 “Photographer of the Year” award. In 1972, while working for the photography department at the University of Iowa Journalism School, Lee founded the Iowa Photographers’ Workshop. Lee later directed his attention to teaching art and filmmaking. After receiving a National Endowment for the Arts grant, he began the Artist Filmmaker in the Schools program in Tampa, and became an influential and driving force in the Tampa art scene. Lee founded the Artists and Writers Trust and the Florida Photographer’s Workshop, and co-founded the annual Artists and Writers Ball.

Bud Lee, Easter Parade, New York, 1976


In Vibrant Color

Len Prince has extensive experience in both fine art and commercial photography and has produced an impressive body of work over a career that spans four decades. Born in Detroit, he moved to New York in the early 1970s, where he studied with Jerry Uelsman at the School of Visual Arts. Prince excels at portraiture and is known for his work with celebrities such as Debbie Harry, Eddie Izzard, Alan Cumming, and Penelope Cruz. His portraits, as well as his photographs of male and female nudes, display his skill at crafting visually striking images through composition and lighting. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including Vanity Fair, Interview, Essence, and InStyle magazines, and he has had one-man shows at the Tampa Museum of Art, the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, the Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago, the Fay Gold Gallery in Atlanta, Danziger Projects in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Portraits & Places

that the theme of Portraits & Places gives a broad definition to FMoPA’s all-encompassing selection of photographic art.” The north side gallery displays mostly black and white selections, with images from photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Len Prince. The south gallery exhibits images of vibrancy, ranging

All of the images on display exhibit either the people which inspire these artists or the places which they felt the need to document. from photojournalist, Jamie Francis, to Tampa Bay local, Bud Lee. All of the images on display exhibit either the people which inspire these artists or the places which they felt the need to document. Among the artists featured are: Bud Lee, Len Prince, Bruce Albert Dale, Burk Uzzle, Jamie Francis, Charles “Teenie” Harris, Robert Hartman, Dianora Niccolini, and Hugh Shurley. OnV

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Bruce Albert Dale is a former National Geographic photographer, who worked for the publication for 30 years until 1994. During his career with National Geographic, over 2,000 of his images appeared in their publications. His assignments varied from undersea to aerial photography and from people to complex science subjects while working in over 75 countries, including 10 trips to China. His many awards and honors include being twice named the National Geographic “Magazine Photographer of the Year,” “White House Photographer of the Year” in 1989, and more recently, his innovative work with digital imaging brought him honors from the Smithsonian Institution. In addition to many other awards, one of his photographs now journeys beyond the solar system on board NASA’s Voyager Spacecraft, as testimony about planet Earth. Dale left National Geographic to pursue a blend of editorial, corporate, and advertising photography. His book, The American Southwest, was published by National Geographic in January 1999.

Bruce Dale, North Window at Arches (detail), 1999


Burk Uzzle grew up in the south, began working at the age of 14, got his first full-time job as a photographer at age 17, became LIFE’s youngest contract photographer at age 23, and has twice been elected president of Magnum. In spite of, or because of, his intrepid nature—he has traveled throughout American and Europe many times—he has said it is the small towns and ordinary places that interest him most. His unique view of the persons, places, and oddities that define the singular and diverse character of America, fills five monographs; Progress Report on America, Chrysler Museum, 1992; All American, Aperture, 1985; Landscapes, Magnum, 1973; A Family Named Spot, Five Ties, 2006; and his first book of color photographs, Just Add Water, Five Ties, 2007. His work has been published and exhibited internationally and is represented in many private and museum collections. Now an independent photographer based in Florida, he spends several months of each year traveling and photographing throughout the United States.

Burk Uzzle, Woodstock (detail), 1969


Portraits & Places

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Jamie Francis is a lifestyle and travel photographer. He has worked on assignment in more than 40 countries and often says that the best education he ever got was the gift of travel. Francis grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, but his work as a visual storyteller has taken him all over the world. His essays about Iraq enduring world sanctions and Afghans emerging from war earned international awards. Jamie has worked on extensive documentary projects in the US, including life along a small street in St. Petersburg, FL, riders of the public bus system in Columbia, SC, and families who lost a loved one in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2000, Francis won Photographer of the Year in the Region Six National Press Photographers Association competition. In 2003, he received Cliff Edom’s New America Award from the National Press Photographers Association. O n V iew

Jamie Francis, Pakistani Bride (detail), 2001


Museum of Art – DeLand Downtown at 100 North Woodland Boulevard. Photo courtesy of Museum of Art - DeLand


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DeLand, Florida: How Fine Art Became Local By Richard Reep

Fine art resides not only in the cosmopolitan cities. It lived, as we saw in the recent movie, “The Monument Men,” in the many villages of Europe. Right now, we are seeing it living on the periphery of Orlando, Florida. Home to Stetson University, DeLand is forty minutes north of the regional core of downtown Orlando. It is one of those delightful, off-the-beaten-path towns that tourists love to stumble upon and explore; the largely intact, century-old strip along Woodland Boulevard is vibrant, bohemian, and alive...

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ELAND FLORIDA DELAN 122

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : DELAND, FLORIDA

Florida’s archipelago of cities compete for the hip and the cool, and it is easy to dismiss places like DeLand. Cities and towns in this state have, for the most part, yet to grow the kind of institutions that speak of maturity, sophistication, and worldliness. The draw of DeLand is not sidewalk urban hipsters sipping lattes; instead, it speaks of a new age of curiosity, individuality, and appreciation for experience outside of the roaring din of the city. The newly re-named Museum of Art – DeLand signifies a powerful future for this part of Central Florida. Formerly called the Museum of Florida Art, the museum’s new name (as of Sept. 2013)— no qualifiers, no excuses— befits a mission that brings world-class art to its patrons. “First and foremost, we serve our community,” said George Bolge, the Museum of Art – DeLand’s Chief Executive Officer. Bolge, retired from the Boca Raton Museum of Art, was asked to head up this museum and expand its scope and its reach. “At the same OnV

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time, we are participating in the broader conversation about what art is, and where it is going. Our voice is being heard loud enough that people in New York are talking about what we are doing.” Recent exhibitions like Forging an Identity: Contemporary Latin American Art drew patrons to exciting international artists who have helped shape Florida’s cultural and social ideas. In the official story of urban triumphalism, a museum executive should take his vicJ

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Above and right: The Museum of Art - DeLand at 600 North Woodland Boulevard features a large atrium, five galleries (pictured: the Dorothy Johnson Gallery), three classrooms, the Evans C. and Betty Drees Johnson Children’s Art Center and a Museum Store.


Above George Bolge, CEO, Museum of Art - DeLand with Samuel and Donna Blatt (see Collector’s Choice: Blatt Collection on pg. 126)

tory lap in Manhattan or Paris. Bolge, however, chose not to follow the herd. He was beckoned to DeLand by the opportunity to take an arts institution from good to great. The museum has its own building, a tan, prismatic form just north of downtown. Its exterior is a windowless enigma which belies a wonderful, light-filled volume within, one suited for showing world-class art. Its multifunction lower level has an atrium space and gallery, and an upper level gallery and classrooms. It’s a flexible facility that does its job by putting the art first, staying in the background, and being accessible to all. Even more interesting is the Museum of Art – DeLand Downtown, at the corner of Woodland and New York, six OnV

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blocks south of the main gallery. This space, with a wood floor and the rough-brick feel of a Chelsea loft gallery, recently exhibited Small Masterworks borrowed from the Butler Institute of American Art. Ascending the stairs, one is greeted by a free-flowing series of galleries which take you from a sunlit-filled reception area to a deep, introspective space that cleverly maximizes the art viewing experience. This is the new story of Florida which is just now being written. While local art lovers are enriched by such an institution, it is drawing more and more attention from the surrounding metropolitan areas. With this museum, DeLand is now exporting culture to the city, in a reversal of the trend,

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : DELAND, FLORIDA

signifying a maturation of the Florida arts scene. The Butler, in Ohio, is another example of this reversal. Nearly a century old with multiple locations today, The Butler is a solid institution with an international reputation. Something interesting is happening. As we have become used to mobility and flexibility, our world is no longer limited to where we live and work. With the internet, we are becoming increasingly connected. This favors DeLand, and places like it, with a new

Above: Photo by Kathleen Rasche

equity of distance—cuttingedge ideas are now a few clicks away. People in farflung areas are less isolated. DeLand has a college vibe— OnV

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a built-in art appreciation population—and with the rise of retiree enrollment, expect this population to go up. It’s affordable, walkable, and fun, with few of the big-city evils, like crime and congestion, that can scare away newcomers. No longer a tropical wilderness out of which man once carved a crude existence, Florida may now be settling down and becoming a more civil and aesthetic experience for its citizens. Towns like DeLand offer something


Left and above: Photos by Lisa Yetter Photography DeLand is affordable, walkable, and fun. Along with it’s museums, shops and parks, the town holds an ongoing Sculpture Walk, and its annual Fall Festival of the Arts (November 22-23, 2014) transforms Woodland Boulevard into an artist’s garden—a must-see event just in time for holiday gift-giving.

that big cities like Orlando and Miami cannot: a high quality, human-scale lifestyle. “In DeLand,” Bolge stated, “I’ve noticed that people have a pretty high opinion of their town...there is a spirited investment into making its art museum into a great institution.” Bolge sees this museum as a conduit to channel the story of Florida art into the broader flow national artistic energy. “We continue to show what the Florida art patron likes, too,” he OnV

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said, “so this year, you will also have a chance to see what more than one Floridian does with a world-class collection of artists....We are here for the local community, but it doesn’t hurt that we have a profile outside the community as well.” Richard Reep is an architect with VOA Associates, Inc., and an artist who has been designing award-winning urban mixed-use and hospitality projects, domestically and internationally, for the last thirty years. He is Adjunct Professor for the Environmental and Growth Studies Department at Rollins College, teaching urban design and sustainable development, and is president of the Orlando Foundation for Architecture. He resides in Winter Park, Florida with his family. (This story originally appeared in New Geography.) /S

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : M U S E U M O F A RT — D E L A N D

Special exhibitions The Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida, is dedicated to the collecting, preservation, study, display and educational use of the fine arts. In addition to the permanent collection, the Museum is host to several rotating exhibits, gallery talks and receptions, educational programming, master artist workshops and special events throughout the year. Visitors to the Museum can explore a diverse selection of worldclass art. Current and upcoming special exhibition highlights include:

From the exhibition Collector’s Choice: Blatt Collection: Andre Bouquet, Serteuil (detail), 1974, oil on canvas, Museum of Art DeLand

EXHIBITION:

COLLECTOR’S CHOICE: BLATT COLLECTION

From the exhibition Karl Zerbe: Works on Paper: Karl Zerbe, Still Life with Tulips, 1938, gouache, on loan from the estate of Karl Zerbe, Museum of ArtDeLand

On View through 08.24.14 The Blatt Collection features outstanding European paintings, drawings and prints from the mid-19th to the early 20th century. More than 30 artists, OnV

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including Picasso, Dufy, Miró, Lacombe and Vuillard will be represented. The collection is distinguished by its fine exemplars of the works of ClaudeÉmile Schuffenecker, a colleague of Gauguin and Bernard and a disciple of Seurat.

EXHIBITION:

KARL ZERBE: WORKS ON PAPER

On View through 08.24.14 Distinguished German-born American painter, Karl Zerbe (1903–1972), was one of the founding members of the abstract expressionism movement. Zerbe’s work favored the conceptual over the perceptual. Although his images dealt with recognizable themes from the “real” world, they were not produced directly from models, but rather from sketches or, sometimes, his imagination. A technical expert, Zerbe was a student of materials and methods of painting and excelled in the


ELAND FLORIDA DELAN

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : M U S E U M O F A RT — D E L A N D

Special exhibitions use of paint as an expressive medium in itself. This exhibit features experimental collages and mixed-media works primarily from the late 1960s, but also from the 1940s.

EXHIBITION:

STEVE TOBIN: ROOTS

On View through 08.24.14 Steve Tobin’s magnitude as an innovator and explorer of process, color and form has made him the sole proprietor of his own dynamic and unique sculptural methods. His oversized steel sculptures, glassworks and bronzes fill the Museum Atrium and lower gallery. His vast body of work chronicles an epic journey from cast glass installations to assemblages of industrial detritus; from welded steel constructions and cast bronze forest floors to ceramic explosion pieces; and onward to massive bronze termite mounds and looming bronze roots.


EXHIBITION:

STEPHEN ALTHOUSE: PERSONAL SYMBOLS, PRIVATE TOTEMS* On View through 10.05.14

Artist-photographer Stephen Althouse utilizes the language of still life to highlight antique tools and fabricated objects into cryptic assemblages and then presents them onto large format black and white film. Fine Art Curator and Art Historian Wendy M. Blazier wrote in 2009 that “Althouse’s images can be read as metaphors for the interconnectedness of secular and spiritual life, combining the practical and symbolic, weaving a relationship between tools and textiles as venerated symbols of work and faith. Like medieval devotional relics and honorific textiles, Althouse’s tools and shrouds (represent) power and reverence, engaging the viewer in a dialogue about history, humanity, tradition and spirituality.”

From the exhibition Steve Tobin: Roots: Steve Tobin, Door 4, glass

From the exhibition Stephen Althouse: Personal Symbols, Private Totems*: Stephen Althouse, Clamp and Shroud (detail), 2013, 42 x 31,” pigment print *This exhibition is on view at Museum of Art - DeLand Downtown at 100 N. Woodland Blvd.

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FOCUS {RICHARD

THE POLK MUSEUM OF ART

SEXTON}

Exhibition:

Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast On view through 09. 13. 14 at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland www.polkmuseumofart.org

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hosts an exhibition of blackand-white photography by renowned photographer and author, Richard Sexton. The exhibition, Terra Incognita: Photographs of America’s Third Coast, is on loan from the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans, LA, and will be on view through September 13, 2014. Latin for “unknown land,” Terra Incognita comprises 57 photos taken over a 15-year span along the Gulf Coast. Photographs depict marsh, scrub lands, dunes, beaches, swamps and forests from the mouth of the Mississippi River to the Florida Panhandle. R.C. Baker of the Village Voice wrote: “Nothing in these extremely fine-grained prints resembles a ‘snapshot.’...Sexton’s spare compositions coalesce into a portrait of nature as the ultimate abstractionist.” Sexton was born in Colquitt, GA, and was introduced to the Gulf Coast on family vacations to the Florida panhandle during the 1950s and 1960s. After graduating from Emory Uni-


F O C U S

versity, he moved to California nificant...school of painting had to pursue a career as a profes- coalesced around the low-lying, sional photographer. He moved watery landscapes of the reto New Orleans in gion,” Sexton wrote 1991, intending in the foreword to to photograph the his book, Terra city’s architecture. Incognita.“The artNot long after reists portrayed “the locating, he toured swamp as a place the home of Roger of mystery and melOgden and found ancholy, using it in himself drawn to a symbolic way, to 19th century landconvey a certain Richard Sexton scape paintings of mood.” Thus began captures the the South’s swamps his work documentvulnerability, and coastal areas in ing the changing resilience, and Ogden’s collection, environment along which was later do- splendor of Ameri- the Gulf Coast. nated to the UniverThe exhibition ca’s third coast. sity of New Orleans will be celebrated Foundation to establish the Og- with a reception and lecture by den Museum of Southern Art. the artist, beginning at 6pm on “It was an epiphany that a sig- August 22. O n V iew

opposite: Ascension, 2005, from Terra Incognita, quadtone pigment print, © Richard Sexton this page (clockwise from above): the book, Terra Incognita. Photographs of America’s Third Coast; Chronicle Books, San Francisco, 2007 Etienne De Boré Oak, New Orleans, Louisiana, 2000, from Terra Incognita, quadtone pigment print, © RICHARD SEXTON Richard Sexton, © Jonathan Traviesa 2014


CELEBRATION {50th

THE BASS MUSEUM OF ART

EXHIBITION}

ANNIVERSARY

Exhibition:

GOLD On view 08.08. 14–01. 11. 15 at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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celebrates its 50th anniversary with all that glitters in GOLD. Curated by Bass Museum’s Curator of Exhibitions, Jose Carlos Diaz, the exhibition explores how gold has been used in the past, present, and how it is referenced today by contemporary artists. “This is a very special exhibition for the Bass Museum of Art because it is our golden jubilee,” says Diaz. “Gold is one of the most expensive mediums, yet artists continue to utilize and emulate gold in their work, often becoming modern day alchemists.GOLD examines how the metal has been used in contemporary art and explores its future, both conceptually and as a material.”


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Historically, gold has been a idea. The exhibition includes much-sought-after metal, despite painting, sculpture, video, phoits relative uselessness for utilitar- tography, and installation. ian purposes. Some Exhibiting artof the most signifists are: Olga de icant artists of the Amaral, Eric Baud20th and 21st centuart, Carlos Betanries have used gold court, Chris Buras a material or as den, James Lee a conceptual means Byars, Dario Escoof exploring ideas bar, Sylvie Fleury, of taste, value and Patricia Hernandez, power. This exhibiGlenn Kaino, AlicBass Museum of tion presents works ja Kwade, SherArt celebrates its made of, or referencrie Levine, Kris 50th anniversary ing, gold by a numMartin, Fernando with all that glitters ber of major artists. Mastragelo, John in “GOLD.” Moreover, it features Miller, Martin Oppieces by a selection pel, Ebony G. Patof younger contemporary practi- terson, Todd Pavlisko, Robin tioners who also choose to work Rhode, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, with gold as a color, material and and Rudolf Stingel. O n V iew

opposite: Fernando Mastrangelo, Medallion, 2013, Crystal sugar, sugar, and dragées, 72 x 72 x 6”, Collection of Isabelle Kowal, Miami this page (clockwise from top): Dario Escobar, Untitled (McDonald’s Cup), 1999, cardboard, plastic, gold and pigments, 9 x 3-1/2”, Collection of Vivian and Ken Pfeiffer Ebony G. Patterson, Shrubz, (detail), 2014, Mixed media jacquard tapestry with flowers and toy guns on floor, 106 x 82”, Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery Alicja Kwade, KOHLE (1T Rekord), 2010, Bronze, gold leaves, 39-1/3 x 35-1/2 x 47-1/4”,  3 + 2 AP, Courtesy of the artist and Johann König, Berlin, Photo: Roman März


POP CULTURE { I C O N I C

T H E N O RTO N M U S E U M ’ S

summer exhibition, Wheels and Heels, is a real toy story, reflecting the enduring popularity of Barbie dolls and miniature cars. Some 55 years after arriving on store shelves, Barbie dolls, Matchbox cars, and (a decade later) Hot Wheels cars, remain not only popular, but relevant. That’s quite an accomplishment in this digital era. The companies that created these successful toys began by examining how children play. They offered improved toys based on these observations, and then carefully monitored success and failure to develop future designs. The triumph of these efforts created a longevity rarely achieved in the toy industry. No toys have better tested toy makers, and no toys have better satisfied or more delighted our parents, ourselves and our own children. Wheels and Heels: The Big Noise Around Little Toys will fascinate audiences of all ages while looking at the history and impact of these beloved toys, which first found popularity

T OYS }

Exhibition:

Wheels & Heels: The Big Noise Around Little Toys On view through 10. 26. 14 at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach www.norton.org

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P O P

C U L T U R E

in the years following World desire to have or collect these War II. “In many ways, these toys. Visitors young and old will toys helped teach Boomers to enjoy the nostalgia that this stobe consumers,” says Guest Cu- ry invokes. As cultural icons, rator, Matthew Bird, Associate these toys are not uncontroProfessor of Industrial Design versial; the exhibition will also at the Rhode Island School of look at their impact on society, Design. “The first car or dress contemporary art, and media. that a child fell Visitors will in love with was be able to view a miniature, but hundreds of rethe thrill of ownlated objects, inership was endurcluding Barbie’s ing, and informed 1964 theater, 1964 how that child becollege dorm, and came an adult. Ala number of her though we accept houses, horses, and these toys as fadogs. There are al“Wheels & Heels” miliar parts of our so Matchbox racetakes a playful look cultural landscape, tracks from the at iconic toys they were nothing ’50s,’60s, and’70s. and their impact short of revolutionAs with last on society, ary at the time they summer’s popucontemporary art, lar LEGO® exhiwere created.” To tell these toy bition, Block by and media. stories, Bird has asBlock: Inventing sembled nearly 1,000 items, Amazing Architecture, Wheels including numerous editions and Heels will feature an interof the toys themselves, vintage active playroom. To add to the advertisements, design draw- excitement, Museum admission ings, television commercials, will be free to Florida residents and the marketing publications every Thursday from June 5– that helped fuel the feverish September 4, 2014. O n V iew

Opposite and above: wheels and heels examines two creations that redefined what toys could be to children: the miniature car, epitomized by “Matchbox” and “Hot Wheels” brands, and the teenage doll, “Barbie.”

above: Wheels and Heels Guest Curator, Matthew Bird, Associate Professor of Industrial Design at the Rhode Island School of Design.


On View 07-09.2014  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum and gallery exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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