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Art of the Robot

AT A P P L E T O N M U S E U M

OF ART, OCALA

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J U LY/ S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 3

Lightscapes : Paintings by Richard Segalman AT T H E M U S E U M

OF FLORIDA ART, DELAND

AND

Faded Elegance : Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman AT TA M PA M U S E U M O F A R T

Simply Beautiful : Photographs from National Geographic AT V E R O B E A C H

MUSEUM OF ART

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings AT T H E M E N N E L L O M U S E U M

OF AMERICAN ART, ORLANDO


CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

2013

Vo l . 4 , N o . 2

ON THE COVER : Amy Flynn, Prima: FOBOT, mixed media; and Fernando: FOBOT, mixed media RIGHT: WILL WAGENAAR, GINNY–ROBOT DOG, FOUND OBJECT ASSEMBLAGE

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Art of the Robot

AT A P P L E T O N M U S E U M

OF ART, OCALA

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APRIL/JUNE 2013

Lightscapes : Paintings by Richard Segalman AT T H E M U S E U M

OF FLORIDA ART, DELAND

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings

Faded Elegance :

AT T H E M E N N E L L O M U S E U M

OF AMERICAN ART,

Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman

ORLANDO

AT TA M PA M U S E U M O F A R T

Simply Beautiful : Photographs from National Geographic AT V E R O B E A C H

MUSEUM OF ART

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ART OF THE ROBOT

Art and science fiction collide in Art of the Robot at the Appleton Museum of Art. See robot inspired creations in all mediums, shapes and sizes, marvel at their design, and engage in their stories in this spectacle of robot force. This show is sure to provide inspiration and enjoyment for all ages as it celebrates our fascination with robots and the enduring impact they have on our imagination.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

68 Tampa

78 Vero Beach

90 DeLand

100 Orlando

PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHS

PAINTINGS

THE SEMINOLE

FADED ELEGANCE: OF HAVANA BY

MICHAEL EASTMAN

Tampa Museum of Art presents a powerful series of large-scale images capturing the architecture and lush interiors of a city ravaged by the effects of time.

SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL: FROM NATIONAL

LIGHTSCAPES:

EUGENE SAVAGE:

BY RICHARD

PAINTINGS

The Mennello Hosted by the Vero Richard Segalman’s Museum of American Beach Museum of Art, lush, impressionistic Art features a selecSimply Beautiful style paintings are tion of highly stylized highlights images from on display this summer modernist paintings National Geographic’s at the Museum of portraying the life of impressive archive. Florida Art. the Florida Seminoles from the early 20th century. GEOGRAPHIC

SEGALMAN

110 Tampa

FRIDA KAHLO: PORTRAITS

OF AN ICON

RIGHT: NICKOLAS MURAY, FRIDA WITH MAGENTA REBOZO (DETAIL), CA. 1939, COURTESY OF THROCKMORTON FINE ART, NYC

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts will be hosting an exhibition of photographic portraits documenting the life of one of the most universally admired Mexican artists, Frida Kahlo, through the lens of some of the most renowned photographers of the 20th century. OnV

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TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): MICHAEL EASTMAN, MERCEDES HALLWAY #2 (DETAIL), 2002; A MONKEY COVERS ITS MOUTH WITH ITS HANDS (DETAIL), JOEL SARTORE/ NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC; RICHARD SEGALMAN, REFLECTIONS (DETAIL), 2011; EUGENE SAVAGE, SOUTH MOON UNDER, 1935

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CONTENTS Ju l y/S e p t e m b e r

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No. 2

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MUSE

Norton Museum of Art in W. Palm Beach, presents Block by Block, a showcase of landmark skyscrapers from around the world, playfully reconstructed with LEGO® toy building bricks by artist, Dan Parker.

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DAWOUD BEY: PICTURING PEOPLE

MOCA North Miami presents an expansive career survey of photographic portraits by Dawoud Bey.

CALENDAR

PICTURED: Flamenco dancer, Rocío Molina; ringling international arts festival

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Museum exhibitions

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

PLEASURE GROUNDS AND RESTORING SPACES

Spotlight

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GALLERY

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The Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg hosts a stunning exhibit of photographs of our national parks.

COMMENTARY

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Fo c u s

RINGLING INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVAL

The 5th annual Ringling International Arts Festival launches the 2014 arts season on Florida’s “Cultural Coast.” The 4-day celebration showcases a variety of dance, music and theater at Sarasota’s Ringling Museum of Art.

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TALL TALES AND HUGE HEARTS: RAÚL COLÓN

Orlando Museum of Art will display works by renowned children’s book illustrator, Raúl Colón.


C O M M E N T A R Y F lorida ’ s art venues provide a cool oasis

from the summer heat while serving up fun and inspirational shows for the enjoyment of all who venture within. And with each edition of On View, we hope to entice you with a sampling of what Florida’s art world has to offer. From fresh, lighthearted summer shows to thought-provoking explorations of nature, life and beauty, we present the wonder of art in all its forms. Viewers can now enjoy easy access to On View, issue highlights, videos, an event calendar and full archive of past editions from our newly designed website at: www.onviewmagazine.com. Go ahead, take a spin! Diane McEnaney Publisher & Creative Director dmcenaney@onviewmagazine.com

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on iew M A G A Z I N E

On View Magazine is published on-line, four times per year. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. Contact Us Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com www.onviewmagazine.com

ArtStoryBoard BRANDI PALMER

monoprints & limited editions

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Half Page Ad On View.indd 1

5/29/13 8:11 PM


MUSE

Block by Block:

Inventing Amazing Architecture on view thru

10.20.13

N O RT O N M U S E U M o f A RT, W e s t P a l m B e a c h w w w. n o r t o n . o r g

L

EGO® FANS OF ALL

ages are sure to delight in this summer BLOCKbuster of a show at the Norton Museum of Art. Block by Block features the playful re-creations of 10 landmark skyscrapers from around the world, each masterfully constructed with LEGO toy building bricks by Dan Parker, a LEGO Certified Professional—one of only a handful of master LEGO artists in the world with this qualification. From four to nine feet tall, these architectural won6

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MUSE

ders include: One World Trade Center in New York, the Seattle Space Needle, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, and Taipei 101 in Taiwan. Parker “rediscovered” LEGO in 1990, at the age of 30, while pursuing a career in engineering research and development. Since then, he has produced over 3,000 miniature, mosaic, sculpture, and mechanical works for commissions, events, and education programs—and for practically every need imaginable. Past works include a million-piece, life-sized Christmas Nativity, OnV

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MUSE B L O C K B Y B L O C K : I n v e n t i n g A m a z i n g A rc h i t e c t u re

third-scale Star Wars Speeder Bike, European palace, whimsical gingerbread houses and haunted house scenes as well as castle, science fiction and town brickscapes. “LEGO bricks are quite like musical notes,” Parker says, “and I encourage builders of all ages to take this approach with LEGO. It’s fun and very engaging, whether you are composing an original creation, arranging a display for viewing, or using it to teach with. And it can often be paired with other interests.” The broad range of Parker’s work covers all formats and styles of building, exploring subject matter in many genres, including contemporary art, ethnic or religious themes, historical pieces, the modern landscape, children’s favorites, and pop culture. Parker works with regional and national museums, local youth organizations and corporate clients across the spectrum, with multiple client-partnerships in place for more than a decade. “LEGOS are a

Dan Parker; Flat Iron Building (Fuller Building) New York, New York; height: 48”, footprint: 17 x 19”

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MUSE B L O C K B Y B L O C K : I n v e n t i n g A m a z i n g A rc h i t e c t u re

creative medium, an art, that is not just limited to kids anymore,” says Parker. In 2000, the artist formed The TbP Group, a company that produces custom LEGO displays, events and education venues. Today, TbP is an independent LEGO studio that maintains a comprehensive line of LEGO-related products and services. Parker also supports City Blocks (www.facebook.com/cityblocks), a demo studio in Tacoma, WA, which hosts other LEGO artists and is open to the public. Block by Block, is accompanied by a variety of interactive programs and activities, including a play area where visitors can create their own architectural marvels. Dan Parker will discuss the exhibition and lead a group build at the Museum on Thursday evening, August 8th. Visitors will also have an opportunity to enjoy Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum Collection, a wonderful companion exhibition of paintings and photography celebrating masterworks of architecture. O n V iew

Dan Parker; Space Needle (Seattle, Washington); height: 48”, footprint: 12 x 12”

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{S P E C I A L

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

www.bocamuseum.org

BOCA RATON Thru 07.14.13

62nd All Florida Juried Competition & Exhibition Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

An annual testament to the state’s flourishing art scene, the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s distinguished All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition highlights the breadth and creative talent of Florida’s independent artists.

07.27.13–09.22.13

Create Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Create is a major group exhibition presenting a selection of the most important works created over the past 20 years by artists involved with three pioneering non-

profit organizations: Creativity Explored, Creative Growth Art Center, and the National Institute for Art and Disabilities Art Center (NIAD). Thru 08.06.13

Mary Peck: Temples & Vistas Boca Raton Museum of Art

Mary Peck photographs natural and at times, enigmatic landscapes around the world, observing signs of geological processes, weather cycles, and traces of human activity. 07.27.13–09.22.13

Transitions: Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

The transitory nature of dreams and memory are the subjects of this two-person exhibition

Image from Create at Boca Raton Museum of Art: James Montgomery, Untitled, 2007, correction fluid, ink and acrylic on paper

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of artists, Victor Matthews and Paolo Nicola Rossini. Despite their different backgrounds and artistic mediums, both artists share an exploration of subconscious thought, time, and space. CORAL GABLES

Thru 10.13.13

Pan American Modernism: Avant-Garde Art in Latin America and the United States Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Pan American ModArtLab @ The ernism presents the Lowe: From rich visual dialogue Ancient Art to between artworks proModern Molas: duced by artists workRecurring Themes ing in North, Central in Indigenous and South America Thru 04.27.14

Panamá Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

From ancient ceramics to contemporary paintings, this exhibition focuses on the art of Panama.

during the modern and postmodern eras.

to the Pacific Islands and South America from 1768-1779.

Thru 02.09.14

Terrestrial Paradises: Imagery from The Voyages of Captain James Cook Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

CORAL SPRINGS 09.07.13–11.09.13

Breast Cancer Awareness Body Painting Project: A Fine Art & Photography Essay of Survivors Coral Springs Museum of Art

www.lowemuseum.org

Included in this historical exhibit are engrav- www.csmart.org ings featuring imagery This eloquent and from Cook’s voyages awakening collaboration is the vision of artist and photographer, Michael Colanero. The exhibit includes images by Colanero featuring breast cancer survivors who have had their bare torsos painted in the most ethereal ways by body painters, Keegan

Images from Breast Cancer Awareness Body Painting Project: A Fine Art & Photography Essay of Survivors at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Ribbon in the Sky, body painting by Keegan Hitchcock, photography and digital manipulation by Michael Colanero

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Hitchcock and Luci Ungerbuehler. The resulting images are both visually engaging and thought provoking.

09.07.13–11.09.13

Ronn Jaffe & Sandee Berman Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

The Museum will host two solo exhibitions featuring mixed-media works by Ronn Jaffe and drawings from Sandee Berman’s Americana Collection.

Thru 08.24.13

Contemporary Israeli Artists Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Featured in this group exhibition is a selection of works by Israeli artists, David Schluss, Isaac Maimon, Calman Shemi, Avi Ben Simhon, Rina Maimon, Sveta Esser, Alex Pauker, Lenner Gogli and Isaac Kahn. Visitors can explore a variety of distinctive styles—abstract, realism, collage and sculpture—with riotous color, humor, and meaningful messages.

Thru 08.24.13

Thru 08.24.13

Phyllis Sperber: The Power of My Imagination Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Sperber’s paintings are testament to her love of color and

imagery, and reflect her experiences during a time when she traveled and lived in numerous places throughout the world. This exhibit is a tribute to her life as an artist, as well as her creative imagination.

Image from Contemporary Israeli Artists at Coral Springs Museum of Art: David Schluss, Harmonious Dance

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Sid Kweller: The Odd~U~Bon Society Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Humorous adaptations of our fine feathered friends abound in the East Gallery of the Museum this summer in Kweller’s Odd~U~Bon Society exhibition.


C A L E N D A R

DAYTONA BEACH Thru 08.18.13

A Treasury of Indian and Persian Miniature Paintings Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

With saturated color and exotic imagery, Indian and Persian miniature paintings transport the viewer to an enchanted world full of delightful wonder and fantasy. Thru Summer 2013

Contemporary Paintings from the MOAS Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

This exhibition pres-

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ents colorful selections views of the North’s from the MOAS Art in rigid and ice-covered Public Places Program. mountain ranges with the tranquility Thru 08.25.13 of Florida’s limpid Drama and waterways.

poetic and restful, displaying in luminous washes of tender color the inspiration of talented artists.

Beauty in Black and White: Photographs from the MOAS Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences

Thru Fall 2013

Women Painting Florida Museum of Arts & Sciences

Thru 09.2013

The Beauty of Watercolors: From the MOAS Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences

www.moas.org

Featured in this exhibit www.moas.org are significant works Drama and Beauty in www.moas.org from the Florida Art Black and White com- This presentation Collection of Cici pares and contrasts features art that is both and Hyatt Brown, chosen as an overview of the achievements by women artists. In each of the works is a piece of the wonder that is the State of Florida. The exhibit offers a beautiful vision of Florida as it—and the women artists who worked here—developed through time.

Image from A Treasury of Indian and Persian Miniature Paintings at Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach: Ada Walter Shulz, Commissary Near Sarasota, oil on canvas, Florida Art Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown

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Southeast Museum of Photography

Thru 07.28.13

Alumni Focus 2013: Rick Lang, David Monroe and Rick Wagner Southeast Museum of Photography

www.smponline.org

This exhibition highlights Spencer’s work from the series Six Miles and Also Equivalents, both of which are reflections of life on the Florida coast.

www.smponline.org

Alumni Focus presents photographic works from distinguished alumni of the Southeast Center for Photographic Studies, a consortium with Daytona State College and the University of Central Florida. The exhibit features the work of three established photographers, all based in Florida, that specialize in landscape as an overarching theme in their work. 08.18.13–10.06.13

Critical Mass

D e LAND

Top 50 2012: Color and Light Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Presented in conjunction with Photolucida, the aim of Critical Mass is to provide participants with career-building opportunities and to promote the best emerging and mid-career artists working today.

The exhibition Color and Light celebrates Photolucida’s Critical Mass Top 50 – its ability to attract emerging talent and to have it adjudicated by a series of experts who have agreed to view and vote on the Finalists’ work. Thru 07.28.13

Steven Spencer: Recent Photographs

07.20.13–09.28.13

Annual Juried Show Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

Works by contemporary artists who were selected for this annual show through a juried process are presented in an array of materials and styles, including oil, acrylic and

Image from Critical Mass Top 50 2012: Color and Light at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Kathleen Robbins, Burning Field

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watercolor paintings, photography, clay and wood sculptures, fiber and mixed-media art.

Paintings by Richard Segalman Museum of Florida Art

09.06.13–12.29.13

www.museumoffloridaart.org

Forging an Identity: Contemporary Latin American Art Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

A display on the historical and sociological influences of the expansive Spanish culture, this exhibition reveals the impact Latin American fine art and literature has when artists relocate to Florida, precipitating a “renaissance” among the indigenous local talent.

Working with watercolors, oils, pastels and monotypes as well, Richard Segalman’s images capture the true beauty of a contemplative moment, usually in a tranquil domestic setting or an ephemeral beach scene. His subject locales range from rooftops of Man-

hattan, to the beaches of Coney Island or Naples, to the arid Santa Fe area, and the fields and forests of Woodstock, NY. (See story on pg. 90.) Thru 08.18.13

Sequined Sentinels: Haitian Flags from the Collection of Candice Russell Museum of Florida Art

Voodoo spirits come to life in Sequined Sentinels at the Museum of Florida Art. At the bare essence, they are little more than sequins and cloth. But in the hands of a believer, these glittering voodoo flags depict all the faith, horror and salvation there is. Thru 08.18.13

www.museumoffloridaart.org

Tasting Notes: The Art of Sandro Chia Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

A member of the Italian Transavanguardia art movement, Sandro Chia’s paintings and sculptures reside in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Tate

Thru 08.18.13

Lightscapes:

Image from Lightscapes: Paintings by Richard Segalman at the Museum of Florida Art, Deland: Richard Segalman, Blue, Red & White, 40 x 50”

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Gallery in London, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, and in galleries and museums throughout the world.

captured the faces of the Tanabata festival as it is celebrated in São Paulo, Brazil, home to the largest Japanese community outside of Japan.

DELRAY BEACH Thru 09.15.13

Wood Be Kindred Spirits: The Kokeshi Dolls of Bob Brokop Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Wood Be Kindred Spirits features one of the largest and neverbefore-seen collections of kokeshi in the US. These simple wooden cylindershaped forms with round heads and whimsical and kindhearted faces, bring joy and comfort to all

DUNEDIN Thru 08.11.13

those who come in contact with them. Thru 09.15.13

Tanabata: Japan’s Star Festival—Views of Tanabata in São Paulo, Brazil, by Jade Matarazzo Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Tanabata (“Evening of the 7th”) cel-

ebrates the meeting of the deities, Orihime and Hikoboshi (represented by the stars Vega and Altair, respectively), starcrossed lovers separated by the Milky Way and brought together only once a year, on the seventh day of the seventh month. In honor of Tanabata, the Morikami Museum features a selection of photographs by Jade Matarazzo, who

Betty Busby: Unseen Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Featured are works by New Mexico quilt artist, Betty Busby, whose magnified patterns from the cellular world give sight to the unseen. (See story in the April/June 2013 issue on pg. 94.) 09.06.13–10.13.13

EnCircled Dunedin Fine Art Center

Image from Betty Busby: UnSeen at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Betty Busby, Purkinje, 37 x 44”, courtesy of the artist, ©Betty Busby

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www.dfac.org

The theme of this new exhibit at DFAC is “Mandalas for the Modern World.” Thru 08.11.13

IQ Quilters: Masterpieces & Small Quilt Auction Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

DFAC’s resident quilting guild shares their challenge with us. This exhibit’s challenge theme is Art Masterpieces.

from the Dairy Barn Arts Center in Athens, Ohio. 09.06.13–10.13.13

Saints Alive! Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Icons, illuminated pages, shrines, offerings and statuaries—artists declare (and depict) their private Saints in all reverence (or not) in this juried exhibition of works in various media.

09.06.13–12.21.13

Trickster Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Trickster includes a selection of religious folk art from the private collection of Dr. Robert and Chitranee Drapkin, alongside modern day ‘tricksters’ in a variety of media. FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 10.06.13

Bunny Yeager:

Thru 08.11.13

Quilt National 11 Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

This exhibit includes selections from the finest contemporary quilts, originating

Both Sides of the Camera Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Decades ago, Bunny Yeager was one of the most-sought-after models in Miami. Later, she moved behind the lens to become one of the most popular pin-up photographers of her time, succeeding as a woman in a man’s world. Spanning her career from the 1950s to the present, and including her innovative self-portraits and a range of photos that helped define Florida lifestyles of the ’50s and ’60s, this exhibition includes new photographs from her first photo shoot in thirty years.

Image from Bunny Yeager: Both Sides of the Camera at Museum of Art /Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Photographer, Bunny Yeager, with Bettie Page at Africa U.S.A. in Boca Raton, where the two took several images that are now iconic pin-up shots (Bunny Yeager Studio / June 20, 2013).

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 09.01.13

Who Am I to You? Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

This annual exhibition of winners of South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship features the work of fourteen top artists from five South Florida counties. Juried by a national panel of experts, this exhibition is always an eye-opener and serves as a barometer of both established and emerging talent. Thru 10.06.13

Woman’s World: Contemporary Views of Women by Women

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Dating from the 1950s to the present, the photographs in this exhibition reveal how the explosive growth in numbers of women photographers since the 1950s has changed the way women are represented. Among the photographers included in the exhibition are Diane Arbus, Cindy Sherman, Barbara

Krueger, Shirin Neshat, Laurie Simmons, Annie Leibovitz, Barbara Probst and Lorna Simpson. GAINESVILLE Thru 11.17.13

All the World’s a Frame Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

An influential book, The Photographer’s Eye, by John Szarkowski, former Director of Photography at MOMA,

NY, is used as the framework from which to examine photographs from the Harn and other local collections in terms of their formal characteristics, motives, repeated tropes and expectations embedded in their making. Thru 12.01.14

Bird Mothers and Feathered Serpents: Mythical Beings of Oceania and Ancient America Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition focuses on mythological beings in art from Oceania and Ancient America, using objects from the Harn Museum’s Collection.

Image from Woman’s World: Contemporary Views of Women by Women at the Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Barbara Probst, Exposure #77, 2010, Ultrachrome ink on cotton paper, Collection Martin Z. Margulies

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Thru 08.04.13

Contemporary Art from the Harn Collection Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition features seven areas showcasing a remarkable group of international artists who work in multiple mediums, from painting and photography to installation and film, engaging a wide range of aesthetic and cultural concerns.

Europe’s most important 20th century artists, Miró was known for his paintings but also for his whimsical, playful and surrealist sculptures. Thru 09.08.13

Much Ado About Portraits Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Exploring through various perspectives the question of why we create portraits, Much Ado about Portraits displays a range of works from all areas of the Harn’s Collection as well as pieces on loan from private collections. Thru 11.17.13

Plants and Medicine:

Art and Science in Botanical Prints Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This survey of works explores the topic of plants as medicinal treatment through a selection of sixteen engravings and woodcuts drawn from the Harn’s Collection of herbal prints dating from the 16th to 18th centuries. Thru 10.27.13

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting Harn Museum of Art

Thru 12.01.13 Joan Miró Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highlights paintings from different regions of India and surrounding regions, and their

www.harn.ufl.edu

Joan Miró features three large-scale bronze sculptures by the artist. One of

Image from Much Ado About Portraits at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Maggie Taylor (b. 1961), Moth House, 2012, archival inkjet print, lent by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

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interrelationships to one another, like pearls upon a string. Inspired by musical and literary sources, historical events and varied religious traditions, they offer a glimpse into the richness of painting from India during the 17th-19th centuries.

try, layers, and movement, Francesco presents his work across a platform that transcends the diversity of the human experience. 09.20.13–10.27.13

Wong’s drawings appropriate various drug and medical diagrams, reflexology charts, and make-up kits found online.

HOLLYWOOD Thru 09.01.13

Amy Wong: Hypochondriac Series Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 09.01.13

www.artandculturecenter.org

The Hypochondriac Series reflects upon what the artist calls ‘looking up the internet doctor’– the absurd state of having too much data but not enough wisdom.

Charles M. Schulz: Pop Culture in Peanuts Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

09.20.13–10.27.13

Francesco LoCastro Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

Charles Schulz: Pop Culture in Peanuts

provides a rare opportunity to see 70 original cartoon drawings by a true American original, Charles M. Schulz. (See story in the April/June 2013 issue on pg. 154.)

www.artandculturecenter.org

Jessy Nite Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Specializing in interactive, experiential and site-specific installation, Jessy Nite’s bold narratives come alive through an array of pastel-colored typography, geometry and illustration. 09.20.13–10.27.13

Johnny Laderer Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Through the use of www.artandculturecenter.org shapes, colors, symme- Johnny Laderer’s site-

Image from Charles M. Schulz: Pop Culture in Peanuts at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Detail from Peanuts, July 28, 1966, ©1966 Peanuts Worldwide LLC, courtesy of the Charles M. Schulz Museum

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specific installations incorporate reclaimed materials both natural and artificial to form a current landscape upon which the artist builds his visual narratives. 09.20.13–10.27.13

Peter Hammar Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

This exhibit includes mixed-media collage paintings and installations by visual artist, Peter Hammar.

teach us about the www.mocajacksonville.org significance of abOver the course of straction as a vital his long career— 20th century postwar from the 1940s until American Art. his death in 2007— Goldberg reconcepThru 08.30.13 tualized the visual, Chalk It Up aesthetic and material Museum of boundaries of abContemporary Art stract painting. AbJacksonville straction over Time www.mocajacksonville.org focuses on the artist’s In this interactive exstylistic evolutions hibition, visitors will while exploring what be provided with colhis lengthy and ored chalks to interprolific career can pret a weekly theme Jacksonville

to express themselves freely on a chalkboard wall. Chalk It Up will involve the whole community, including a variety of ages, allowing anyone to participate. Thru 08.25.13

Inside/Out: MOCA Jacksonville’s Permanent Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Inside/Out features a selection of major works from MOCA’s growing Permanent Collection which spans international art of the 20th and 21st centuries, with a focus on art of the Western hemisphere, since 1960.

JACKSONVILLE 09.14.13–01.05.14

Abstraction Over Time: The Paintings of Michael Goldberg Museum of Contemporary Art

Image from Inside/Out: MOCA Jacksonville’s Permanent Collection at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Mary Ann Bryan, Charlie, 1978, gift of Elizabeth Brown Wendel, Harriet Woodward Burton, Frederick W. Woodward III, and Adalyn Quinn Woodward

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

07.20.13–10.17.13

& Gardens

Project Atrium: Heather Cox Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

www.cummer.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

This Project Atrium exhibition explores the distillation of the human figure, as envisioned by New York-based artist, Heather Cox. Her project, Crush, is composed of bodies that appear to have gone through an egg slicer and are then reassembled with missing pieces to create compelling and uncomfortable distortion of the figure. Thru 08.18.13

Traces: Recent Work by Lari Gibbons Museum of

Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Lari R. Gibbons’ meticulous renderings reflect an engagement with the natural world as it is revered and destroyed, altered by humans, and manifest in the history of art. Thru 09.08.13

Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile The Cummer Museum of Art

& Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition, comprised mainly of drawings from the collection of Frederick A. Sharf, showcases the beauty and ingenuity of American automotive design during the decades following World War II, a landmark period in car styling. Thru 10.06.13

La Florida The Cummer Museum of Art

La Florida showcases this beautiful state through the centuries. Included as part of this installation are Florida landscapes by Winslow Homer, Herman Herzog, Martin Johnson Heade and Frederick Frieseke, among others. LAKELAND Thru 11.09.13

A Silver Lining Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

This exhibition showcases PMoA’s collection of Georgian silver, which refers to the period of the consecutive reigns of four English kings: King George I (1714-1727);

Image from Future Retro: The Great Age of the American Automobile at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Cadillac Division of General Motors, Cadillac El Dorado Biarritz, 1957, convertible, courtesy of Mr. William C. Warner

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King George II (17271760); King George III (1760-1820); and King George IV (1820-1830).

of Art) by his family. The exhibit features some of the pieces from Tampa Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection.

Thru 07.20.13

C. Paul Jennewein: An Usher for a New American Style, Works from the Tampa Museum of Art Polk Museum of Art

07.27.13–10.05.13

Polk County Collects Polk Museum of Art

This exhibition showcases pieces from some private collections to give audiences a glimpse into what Polk County residents have collected over the years.

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Thru 09.08.13

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Tibor Pataky: Into Abstraction

Tibor Pataky was an obscure but notable Hungarian-American artist who lived and worked in central Florida during the middle of the 20th century. Into Abstraction consists of paintings and drawings by the artist from the collection at Florida Southern College.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

American architectural sculptor, C. Paul Jennewein (1890-1978), is widely recognized for introducing the Art Deco style into American architecture. Following Jennewein’s death, more than 2,000 works from his studio were donated to the Tampa Bay Art Center (now Tampa Museum

Thru 09.08.13

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi: Master of Ukiyo-e Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) is widely regarded as the last great master of the ukiyo-e tradition in

Image from Tibor Pataky: Into Abstraction at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Tibor Pataky, No. 9

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Japanese printmaking. The series displayed in this exhibit, 32 Aspects of Women, was produced in 1888 and remains one of his most respected bodies of work. (See story in the April/June 2013 issue on pg. 140.)

offer a glimpse of the multi-faceted community of Eatonville, the oldest incorporated African American municipality in the United States. Thru 08.04.13

Recent Acquisitions Art & History Museums, Maitland

MAITLAND Thru 08.04.13

www.artandhistory.org

André Smith: Picturing Place Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

This exhibition presents highlights from the Museum’s holdings of prints, paintings and drawings, reflecting the travels of J. André Smith in the United States and France.

08.16.13-09.29.13

Images of Eatonville: Then and Now Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Featured in this exhibit are paintings by Research Center

Recent Acquisitions celebrates the ongoing addition of important works of art to the founder, André Smith, A&H Collection, many depicting Eatonville, of which have not FL, in the 1930s been exhibited before. and ’40s in contrast with images of the MELBOURNE community today, as photographed by Thru 08.04.13 students enrolled in Pressing Print: photography at RolUniversal Limlins College in Winter ited Art Editions Park, FL. The works 2000-2010

Image from André Smith: Picturing Place at Art & History Museums, Maitland: J. André Smith, Poorhouse Road- Branford, CT, ca.1910-1920, ink and gouache, 9.5 x 7”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Angell

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Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) is an American printmaking workshop renowned for its ongoing commitment to innovative approaches and techniques in contemporary printmaking. The Pressing Print exhibition highlights the recent decade of print works created by 20th century masters of American Art.

explores the idea of conservation from dual vantage points—from artists who produce work addressing environmental issues to the care museums take of their collections. 07.02.13–09.01.13

The Way Things Go: A Film by Peter Fischli & David Weiss Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

The Way Things Go,

without narration or interviews, simply records the self-destructing performance of Fischli’s and Weiss’ most ambitious construction: 100 feet of physical interactions, chemical reactions, and precisely crafted chaos worthy of Rube Goldberg or Alfred Hitchcock.

Behavior ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Unpredictable Patterns of Behavior presents 12 artists, architects and composers that relate to patterns in very unique and distinctive ways. Thru 11.03.13

Eve Sussman/ Rufus Corporation Bass Museum of Art

MIAMI Thru 07.28.13

Unpredictable Patterns of

www.bassmuseum.org

This exhibition presents two major video installations, including an entirely new exploration of her noted film, Rape of the Sabine Women, a contemporary reinterpretation of the eponymous Roman legend, and 89 Seconds at Alcázar, a film based on the Diego

08.10.13–10.13.13

The Art of Conservation(ism): Works from the Permanent Collection Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

The Art of Conservation(ism)

Image from the exhibition Eve Sussman/Rufus Corporation at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Installation view, photo by Silvia Ros

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Velazquez’s enigmatic Las Meninas, 1656. Thru 07.21.13

From Picasso to Koons: The Artist as Jeweler Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

From Picasso to Koons includes some 200 works of wearable art created by some of the greatest artists of recent times. (See story in the April/June 2013 issue on pg. 56.) 08.10.13–10.13.13

Mat Collishaw Bass Museum of Art

dark and subversive subject matter, often dealing with issues that are morally and politically charged. Thru 10.20.13

Fryd on Fire by Carol Fryd Jewish Museum of Florida–FIU http://jmof.fiu.edu

ing from realism to abstract expressionism to portraiture, but it is the combination of bright, fiery colors that dominate the works in this show. Thru 09.08.13

Carol Fryd’s varied www.bassmuseum.org techniques combine Mat Collishaw’s wide- digital art, collage, ranging practice indrawings, photogracludes sculpture, phophy, objects, and paint tography and new me- to produce grounddia. Collishaw explores breaking work, rang-

Dawoud Bey: Picturing People Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

This exhibition is an expansive career survey of Chicagobased photographer,

Dawoud Bey, whose work ranges from street photography to formal studio portaiture, and is distinguished for its commitment to portraiture as a means for understanding contemporary society. (See story on pg. 124.) Thru 09.08.13

Open Systems: Works in MOCA’s Permanent Collection Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Coinciding with Dawoud Bey’s exhibition, Picturing People, MOCA, North Miami presents a selection of work that embodies the irregular results of seemingly routine commands.

Image from Dawoud Bey: Picturing People at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Dawoud Bey, Kali-Ashet Amen and Geshe Ngawang Phende, 2010, pigment print, 40 x 50”

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09.18.13–01.05.13

Alberto Baraya: The Fable of the Birds The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

For this exhibition at the Frost Art Museum, Baraya will present a project inspired by Florida’s original native fauna. He will research local collections, as well as the work of John James Audubon, the wellknown painter and naturalist who charted Florida’s bird species 150 years ago.

Through his paintings, French-born artist, Robert Einbeck, raises gun violence awareness in an attempt to inspire a world where the act of killing belongs to the past.

gerated depictions of the new continent and its offerings persisted through the 19th century, satisfying the appetites of curious Europeans hungry for tales of mysterious, lost paradises and evolving primiThru 08.25.13 tive worlds. Borders Borders of of Paradise includes Paradise: In the maps, etchings and Eyes of Explorers engravings which The Patricia helped to reinforce & Phillip Frost and shape the Old Art Museum World’s skewed perhttp://thefrost.fiu.edu ception of life in the Imagined and exagNew World.

Thru 08.30.13

Bang! by Robert Einbeck The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Thru 09.29.13

José Manuel Ballester: Concealed Spaces The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Prize-winning Spanish photographer, José Manuel Ballester, is known for his largescale works that are connected by key concepts such as space, light and time. Many use historical images associated with the old masters that are deconstructed to become current comments on the world of art. (See story in the April/June 2013 issue on pg. 116.) Thru 09.08.13

Six Degrees of Seperate Nations: Ebony

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Image from José Manuel Ballester: Concealed Spaces at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: José Manuel Ballester, Site for a Birth, 2012, photograph printed on canvas, 106.3 x 90.55”

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Patterson and Peterson Kamwathi The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

vey of the aesthetic pluralism embraced by the Italian government in the 1920s and 1930s.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 08.18.13

Two artists from different parts of the world investigate identity. The exhibition features a collaborative installation where the artists meet for the first time and respond to each other’s work.

Modern Meals: Remaking American Foods from Farm to Kitchen The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Thru 08.25.13

Spanish Colonial Art: The Beauty of Two Traditions The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

from Spain with that of the Americas, and embodies the blending of native traditions with those of Europe.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Colonial Art of the 16th through the 18th centuries represents a synthesis of imagery

Opening 09.27.13

Echoes and Origins: Interwar Italian Design

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

A selection of furniture, ceramics, graphic and product design, and industrial objects offer a sur-

Images and artifacts illustrate the movement of food from the field to the factory, supermarket, and kitchen table in order to explore how modern technology, design, and business practices created new meanings for food and eating in this era.

Image from Echoes and Origins: Interwar Italian Design at The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami: Giuseppe Riccobaldi, Lloyd Sabaudo, 1927

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Thru 08.18.13

Women in Motion: Fitness, Sport, and the Female Figure The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Artwork, advertisements, magazine covers and political propaganda in the early 20th century celebrated the athletic and healthy woman as a source of sex appeal, a basis of national vigor and at times, as a figure of individual self-fulfillment.

Exhibition Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Now in its third year, the Camera USA exhibition features recent work in color and black & white photography from photographers across the US.

Photographers Part 2 Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

Artist Members Show of Shows Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

www.naplesart.org

www.naplesart.org

This show features captivating images by photojournalists, David Albers, William DeShazer, Dania Maxwell, Scott McIntyre, and Corey Perrine.

Thru 08.02.13

09.09.13–11.09.13

Capturing Our World: Naples Daily News

The Sixth Annual Non-Juried All

This annual showcase features artwork in all media by Naples Art Association members. Thru 07.07.13

Inner Worlds of Domestic Violence Survivors III Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The artists in this exhibit give shape and form to extreme emotions that they squeeze out of their experience of abuse, and in so doing, they transmute it, like alchemists, into an aesthetic experience.

NAPLES Thru 08.23.13

Camera USA: National Photography Award and

Image from Camera USA: National Photography Award and Exhibition at Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center: Tony Hertz, Pismo Beach, California, Gnarled Wave, 2012, black & white photograph, edition of 15, 24 x 30”

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Peña, Mario Rangel, Armando Romero, Santamaria Guillermo Silva and Leticia Tarragó.

Thru 07.07.13

Multiplicity Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The concept of multiplicity has been integral to printmaking since the earliest prints were pulled from woodblocks and metal plates in the 15th century, with each impression considered an original artwork. The artworks in this exhibition, drawn from the Smithsonian’s Permanent Collection, challenge the viewer by presenting multiple angles, perspectives and meanings. Thru 07.07.13

Revelation: Major Paintings by Jules Olitski Naples Museum of Art

OCALA Thru 09.22.13

www.thephil.org

Jules Olitski (19222007) has received international acclaim for his Color Field paintings of the 1960s, however, the larger arc of his career remains to be fully appreciated— an opportunity addressed by Revelation. This exhibit draws together more than 20 monumental canvases spanning his career. Thru 07.07.13

Searching for Meaning:

Explorations of Joy, Despair and War Through the Work of Latino Artists Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This exhibition is drawn from the Museum’s modernist and contemporary Latin American holdings, to coincide with the ArtNaples World Festival 2013, showcasing work of Alfredo Falfán, José Chavez Morado, Felipe Saul

Art of the Robot Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Through paintings, prints, found object sculptures, photographs and other materials, each of the artists invited to participate in this exhibit has a unique way of portraying their robot creations. (See cover story on pg. 50) Thru 09.08.13

Edge to Edge: Vintage Panoramic Photography

Image from Revelation: Major Paintings by Jules Olitski at Naples Museum of Art: Jules Olitski, With Love and Disregard: Splendor, 2002, acrylic on canvas, 68 x 92”, collection of Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto, image ©Jules Olitski Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, photo: Michael Cullen

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of Florida Appleton Museum of Art

www.omart.org

Larson and Shindelman use publicly www.appletonmuseum.org available embedded Presented are more geotag information than 100 vintage pan- in Twitter updates to oramic photographs track the locations and original postcards of user posts and that focus on the make photographs fascinating history of to mark the location this unique style of in the real world. photography shot Their act of making during Florida’s tour- a photograph anchors ism and real estate and memorializes boom years in the the ephemeral online early 1900s. data in the real world and also probes the expectations of ORLANDO privacy surrounding 07.04.13–09.01.13 social networks.

the Seminole: Selections from the Collection of I.S.K. Reeves V & Sara W. Reeves The Mennello Museum of American Art

08.24.13–11.03.13

Tall Tales and Huge Hearts: Raúl Colón Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Featured in this show is the work of Raúl Colón, a popular awardwinning artist who has illustrated more than 30 books for children. (See story on pg. 126.)

Art and Artifacts of the Seminole includes clothing, dolls, jewelry and photographs that tell the story of the Seminole Indians.

Thru 01.05.14

07.05.13–01.05.14

Art and Artifacts of

Earl Cunningham’s Everglades The Mennello Museum of American Art

www.mennellomuseum.com

Geolocation: Tributes to the Data Stream/ Works by Nate Larson & Marni Shindelman Orlando Museum of Art

www.mennellomuseum.com

The Permanent Collection by selftaught artist, Earl Cunningham (18931977), is enhanced by

Image from Tall Tales and Huge Hearts: Raúl Colón at the Orlando Museum of Art: Doña Flor: A Tall Tale about a Giant Woman with a Great Big Heart, ©2005 by Raúl Colón

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paintings and artifacts that reflect Cunningham’s fascination with the Everglades and native tribes.

show, curated by The Mennello Museum’s Executive Director, Frank Holt. Thru 01.05.14

08.16.13–01.05.14

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

American artist, Eugene Francis Savage, created perhaps the most extensive painted record of the Florida Seminoles from the early 20th century. Capturing the natural rhythms of the Everglades, these works present a vision of Seminole life and seek to awaken the imagination and inspire the spirit. (See story on pg. 100.)

Thru 01.05.14

Thru 08.09.13

Living Traditions: Seminole Chickee Hut The Mennello Museum of American Art

Mysterious Muses: A Selection of Southern Folk Art The Mennello Museum of American Art

www.mennellomuseum.com

Living Traditions, presents an authentic Seminole chickee hut built in the Museum’s Sculpture Garden, where a variety of storytelling and educational outreach programs will be held.

www.mennellomuseum.com

Alyne Harris, Brian Dowdall, Sybil Gibson, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, Kurt Zimmerman, Ronald Lockett, Jesse Aaron, Benjamin Perkins, Gary Yost and Tim Lewis are among the chosen artists in this

Never No More: Storter’s Southwest Florida The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

The Mennello Museum is the first venue to showcase this new traveling exhibition based on the memoirs of Rob Storter (18941987), a self-taught artist who sketched pictures of his rural lifestyle and environment, and annotated them with stories often bemoaning the wilderness that was being lost to development.

Image from Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings at The Mennello Museum of American Art: Eugene Savage, Scherzo, 1953, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 21 x 29.5”, purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.9

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Thru 01.05.14

Southern Folk Masters The Mennello Museum of American Art

www.ormondartmuseum.org

The mixed-media work of Antuco Chicaiza & the fiber art of Pat Kumicich are presented in this new exhibit.

Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

PENSACOLA 07.02.13–08.31.13

Landscapes by William Lee Golden Pensacola Museum of Art

www.vacnwf.org

The VAC presents www.mennellomuseum.com an exciting summer Out of the permanent show celebrating collection and beyond, our county’s past PANAMA CITY this show presents a century of growth, selection of works by 07.12.13–09.06.13 featuring a unique legends in the folk 100 Years of Bay: combination of phoart world, including A Centennial tography, artwork, William Edmondson, Exhibit and artifacts. Nellie Mae Rowe, Raymond Coins, Gertrude Morgan, Edgar Tolson, Howard Finster, Mose Tolliver, Purvis Young and Clementine Hunter.

www.pensacolamuseumofart.org

In celebration of the arts, and in commemoration of Viva Florida 500, the Museum presents an exhibit of works by country music star, The Oak Ridge Boys’ William Lee Golden. Golden’s simple yet evocative paintings feature rich, and sometimes dreamlike, images inspired by his colorful 200 plus days of life on the road.

ORMOND BEACH 07.06.13–08.30.13

Mixed Messages Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

06.27.13–08.03.13

Members’ Annual Juried Exhibition

Image from Landscapes by William Lee Golden at Pensacola Museum of Art: William Lee Golden, Bush Gardens (detail), 2007, George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, College Station, TX

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Pensacola Museum of Art

Moderns, 1910–1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.pensacolamuseumofart.org

A tradition at the Museum for 59 years, The Members’ Show celebrates the artistic endeavors of its many active members in an eclectic showing of a wide range of media. PONTE VEDRA BEACH 09.06.13–10.19.13

Barbara Cornett & Gene Roberds The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Mixed-media assemblages by artist, Barbara Cornett, will be featured with landscape paintings by Gene Roberds. 07.19.13–08.31.13

Lucy Clark

www.ringling.org

& Karlene McConnell The Cultural Center

Center www.ccpvb.org

www.ccpvb.org

This exhibition presents hand built pottery by Lucy Clark and abstract reflections of nature by painter, Karlene McConnell. Thru 07.13.13

Reality and Revisions: Mary Atwood & Jim Smith The Cultural

Love, family, nature, and connective spirituality are frequent topics explored by photographer, Mary Atwood. Jim Smith, enjoys photographing environments in which repetition and composition are often key elements. SARASOTA Thru 09.08.13

American

American Moderns presents 57 artworks from the collection of the Brooklyn Museum in an exploration of the myriad ways in which American artists engaged with modernity. Thru 09.16.13

Circus Moderns The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

A selection of colorful lithographs, dating from the 1910s through the 1940s, reflect the evolving styles of circus acts, wardrobe and the

Image from American Moderns, 1910–1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Stuart Davis, Pad No. 4, 1947, oil on canvas, 14 x 18”, Brooklyn Museum, bequest of Edith and Milton Lowenthal, 1992.1.5, ©Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Sarasota continued...

designs of the advertisements as well as the transition from the youthful energy of the Jazz age and its Art Deco stylings to the flat colors and simplified shapes inspired by abstract art.

Featured in this display are photographs from the late 19th century of some of the most picturesque aspects of Ceylon (now called Sri Lanka), including the natural beauty of its people and landscapes.

Thru 07.28.13

10.09.13-10.12.13

Mythic Creatures of China The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Ringling International Arts Festival The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

This exhibition aims to explore the symbolism behind animal motifs popular in Chinese ceramics throughout the ages.

www.ringling.org

The fifth annual Ringling International Arts Festival, October 9th12th, 2013, launches the 2014 arts season on Florida’s “Cultural Coast.” The four-day festival showcases a variety of dance, music and theater, presented in intimate performance venues at The Ringling Museum of Art. Tickets can be purchased through The Ringling Historic Asolo Theater Box Office at 941.360.7399,

10am- 4pm daily. (See story on pg. 120.) Thru 10.27.13

Witness to War: WWII Photographs from the Collections of Veterans The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Witness to War honors US veterans through a gripping visual account of WWII via the lenses of soldier-photographers who documented their first-hand experiences at war alongside signature images by well-known war photographers.

08.16.13–01.05.14

Picturing Ceylon The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

ST. AUGUSTINE 09.07.13–10.18.13

Liz Rodda Crisp-Ellert

www.ringling.org

Image from Picturing Ceylon at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Scowen & Co., Kandyan Chiefs, late 19th century, promised gift of Dr. Helga Wall-Apelt, TR2007.2823.422

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 7 o f 3 6 }

St. Augustine continued...

Art Museum, Flagler College www.flagler.edu/crispellert

Rodda uses sculpture and video as a means to investigate our notions of fate, personal control, and the future.

ST. PETERSBURG

Thru early 10.2013

Color Acting: Abstraction Since 1950 Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Restoring Spaces: Photographs of our National Parks Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.fine-arts.org

www.fine-arts.org

www.thedali.org

07.06.13–09.22.13

Color Acting brings together works that exhibit the fluctuating properties of color and its effects on visual perception. Thru 10.06.13

Pleasure Grounds and

Dalí in Color: Selected Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection The Dalí Museum

Comprised primarily of photographs depicting National and State Parks, this exhibit explores the relationships between photographers and the American landscape. (See story on pg. 122.)

Dalí in Color reveals various methods in which the artist worked with colored media on paper. Included are works completed for competition, studies for possible publications, a rare example of

his work with pastel, conversions of preexisting images, studies for monumental canvases, and spontaneous experimentation with powdered pigments. There are also works created for advertisements, costume and furniture designs, and elaborate festivals. TALLAHASSEE Thru 07.19.13

Artists’ League Summer Annual Salon Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

Paintings, sculpture, jewelry, photography and pottery are among the many works that will be showcased in this annual exhibition.

Image from Pleasure Grounds and Restoring Spaces: Photographs of our National Parks at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Ansel Adams, Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park, California, ca. 1940, gelatin silver print, Museum Purchase with funds from National Endowment for the Arts and Fine Arts Council of Florida grants; photo used with permission of The Trustees of The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust; All Rights Reserved

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 8 o f 3 6 }

Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Generations Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

the Collection of Deli Sacilotto Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.mofa.fsu.edu

www.fmopa.org

Thru 07.12.13

Generations is based on an unusual theme— the means of artistic legacy. The exhibition features legacy via four routes—family member to family member, teacher to student, first generation of an art movement to the second generation of an art movement, and artist to the culture at large—and presents a mix of international, national, regional, and local artists.

This new summer exhibition features vintage photographs of American Indians by Edward Curtis.

Arts www.fmopa.org

A selection of 50 photographic portraits examines the great Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo, through the lens of the most renowned photographers of the 20th century. (See story on pg. 110.)

09.12.13–11.17.13

Frida Kahlo: Portraits of an Icon Florida Museum of Photographic

09.12.13–11.17.13

New Visions: Contemporary Artist Series Florida Museum

TAMPA Thru 09.08.13

Edward S. Curtis: Photogravures from

of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Works by featured artists, Jim Reynolds, Edmund Fountain and Sissi Farassat will be on display. Thru 09.15.13

Faded Elegance: Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Over more than a decade, Michael Eastman captured Havana’s changing cultural landscape in his images of the city’s architecture and lush interiors, ravaged by the effects of time, while shedding light on the harsh economic realities faced in present day Cuba. (See story on pg. 68.)

Image from Faded Elegance: Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman at the Tampa Museum of Art: Michael Eastman, Portrait, Havana (detail), digital C-type print, ©Michael Eastman

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 9 o f 3 6 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Cuba’s, where civil society has been supplanted by the State.

Thru 09.15.13

Miradas: Ancient Roots in Modern Mexican Art/ Works from the Bank of America Collection Tampa Museum of Art

Thru 08.03.13

www.tampamuseum.org

This unique survey examines and celebrates work by artists on both sides of the border—American and Mexican-American— to reveal a variety of cultural aspects as they emerged in the years after the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) to the present day. Thru 07.27.13

National Sculpture Society Annual Awards Exhibition

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

The Annual Awards Exhibition is National Sculpture Society’s (NSS) most popular show. The sculpture on display ranges from classical to contemporary, and is composed of portrait busts, basreliefs and figures ranging in all sizes and dimensions. Thru 08.03.13

Occupying, Building,

Thinking: Poetic and Discursive Perspectives on Contemporary Cuban Video Art (1990-2010) University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

Nineteen videos by Cuban artists working worldwide pose the question of how to reinvent a language for imagining what is public, private and intimate in a culture like

Paul Robinson: The Form of Absence x-rays | paintings | reliquaries University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

Architect Paul Robinson’s exhibit, The Form of Absence, is a narrative structure referencing the work of architect, Jose Plecnik, known for his abstracted classical forms of architecture built in Prague and Ljubljana in the 1920s and ’30s. The exhibit proposes that the accessible evidence found in the aftermath

Image from Occupying, Building, Thinking: Poetic and Discursive Perspectives on Contemporary Cuban Video Art (1990-2010) at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Grethel Rasúa, Cubiertas de Deseos /Covered with Yearnings, 2008

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 0 o f 3 6 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

of occupation is not always what it seems.

TARPON

08.26.13–12.07.13

Thru 07.07.13

SubRosa: The Language of Resistance University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Françoise Gilot: A Print Retrospective from the Patrick and Jackie Terrail Collection + Picasso In Print

right, Gilot has had a long and distinguished www.spcollege.edu/museum career as a painter At age 92, Françoise and printmaker. This Gilot has had a fasciexhibition presents 47 nating life. Mistress of Gilot’s prints. of Pablo Picasso from To provide a context 1943 to 1953, she bore for the Françoise Gilot two of his children, exhibition, Picasso In Claude and Paloma. Print—a small exhibAn artist in her own it of prints, posters and printed material— reflects the period of Pablo Picasso’s life from the mid-1930s to the 1950s. Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

SPRINGS

www.ira.usf.edu

SubRosa examines the art and language of artists in response to social, political and environmental repression. Covering continents and cultures, these artists share a desire to question dominant political systems and the prevalent status quo, sometimes covertly and dangerously. Works include video and sculpture installations, painting, photography, artist books and graphic novels.

07.14.13–09.08.13

Lin Carte: A Tribute Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

Lin Carte-Anderson (American, 19472012) was a wellknown licensed art therapist in the Tampa Bay area. Lin was also an artist and long-time

Image from Françoise Gilot: A Print Retrospective from the Patrick and Jackie Terrail Collection at the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art: Françoise Gilot (French, b. 1921), My Family in Brittany, 1974, 35 x 29”, color lithograph, ed. 33/50, on loan from the Patrick and Jackie Terrail Collection

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 1 o f 3 6 }

Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

member of PAVA (Professional Association of Visual Artists). She is best known for her Serene Women series of prints created in her own Atelier Intaglio workshop. This exhibition is a tribute to her legacy.

09.28.13–01.05.14

Simply Beautiful: Photographs from National Geographic Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

ments and decorations The Whimsy of have been a staple in IsDino Kotopoulis: abelle’s Museum Store A Retrospective for years. To honor his Leepa-Rattner involvement, the MuMuseum of Art seum presents a retrowww.spcollege.edu/museum spective of his two and Dino Kotopoulis is afthree-dimensional crefectionately a self-pro- ations. claimed “artist-in-residence” at the LeepaVERO BEACH Rattner Museum of Art. His large-scale whimThru 09.28.13 sical Art Cat sculptures Along the Road: have been shown in Paintings of the the Challenge of Mod- Highwaymen ern Art gallery and his Vero Beach © Flat and Happy series Museum of Art of small metal ornawww.verobeachmuseum.org 07.14.13–09.08.13

Summer visitors to Vero Beach will enjoy this exhibition by many of the original Highwaymen, a legendary group of young black painters, largely self-taught, who painted colorful Florida scenes during the late 1950s, through the 1960s and into the 1970s, and sold their paintings from the trunks of their cars to travelers and residents along US Highway 1, around Fort Pierce.

Simply Beautiful: Photographs from National Geographic will take visitors on a visual journey through variations on the universal theme of beauty. Featuring the work of some of the most famous National Geographic photographers, the exhibition includes remarkable images from the Society’s impressive archive. (See story on pg. 78.) Thru 09.08.13

Visual Systems: The Quilter’s Eye Vero Beach Museum of Art

Image from Along the Road: Paintings of the Highwaymen at Vero Beach Museum of Art: George Buckner, Moonlight Scene Over the Indian River, ca. 1992, oil on canvas, 24 x 30”, collection of the Vero Beach Museum of Art, gift of Anne and Paul S. Morgan

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 2 o f 3 6 }

Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Visual Systems: The Quilter’s Eye includes traditional quilts such as two 19th century Log Cabin pattern quilts and a crazy quilt from 1922, as well as contemporary variations on traditional patterns and constructed quilts reminiscent of abstract paintings. WEST PALM BEACH

09.20.13–11.09.13

Mark Cohen: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

This survey of work includes Mark Cohen’s recent series of large-scale abstract portraits of prominent contemporary and historical figures. 09.13.13–10.26.13

Red Morgan:

Witness— Gospel by the Cane Fields Armory Art Center

Thru 10.20.13

www.armoryart.org

This exhibition features recent photographs that represent an intimate look into the religious practices by the New Zion Holiness Church’s bishops, pastor, gospel singers, gospel band and congregation.

09.20.13–11.09.13

African Diaspora Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

Armory Art Center hosts a Harlem Renaissance style art exhibition showcasing visual and literary artists of African Diaspora.

Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Presented in conjunction with the Norton’s Block by Block LEGO summer exhibition, and featuring works by Stuart Davis, Andreas Feininger, John Marin, Addison Mizner and Vic Muniz, Architecture in Detail celebrates the aesthetics and achievements of the man-made environment. Thru 10.20.13

Block by Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture

Image from Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum Collection at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Colin Campbell Cooper (American, 1856–1937), Columbus Circle, New York, ca. 1923, oil on canvas, gift of Elsie and Marvin Dekelboum, 2005.57

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 3 o f 3 6 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Norton Museum of Art

Thru 10.20.13

Lucian Freud: Paintings and Prints Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

Norton Museum of Art presents an exhibition of 10 landmark skyscrapers from around the world, each masterfully constructed with LEGO® toy building bricks by Dan Parker, LEGO® Certified Professional. Ranging from four to nine feet in height, the architectural sculptures include One World Trade Center in New York, the Seattle Space Needle, Burj Khalifa in Dubai, and Taipei 101 in Taipei. (See Muse on pg. 6.) Thru 10.28.13

Circa 1960: Figure and Form Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

www.norton.org

Showcasing important recent acquisitions and loans to the Norton, Circa 1960: Figure and Form considers the ways midcentury artists such as Richard Diebenkorn, Fairfield Porter and Wayne Thiebaud used elements of abstraction to suggest the world around them. Thru 07.14.13

Doris Duke’s Shangri La:

Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibit brings together objects from Doris Duke’s remarkable collections within the context of Shangri La, her extraordinary Hawaii residence, and her personal role in collecting and commissioning works.

This rare presentation of portraits by one of the most important painters of our time includes his masterpiece, The Brigadier (2003-2004), a lifesized portrait of Andrew Parker Bowles; a self-portrait, and a selection of prints from private collections. Thru 10.13.13

Masterpiece of the Month Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

The Norton spotlights major works by iconic artists borrowed from private collections:

Image from Circa 1960: Figure and Form at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Richard Diebenkorn (American, 1922–1993), Landscape with Figure, oil on board, 15 x 16.5”, gift of Anne Berkley Smith, 2012.185

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 4 o f 3 6 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

July 4-28: Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936; August 1-31: Salvador Dalí’s Portrait of Marquis George de Cuevas, 1942; September 18-October 13: Court Portrait of Yinli, Prince Guo, 1717.

Reclaiming the Galerie Stern, Düsseldorf Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

forts through the courts in America and Europe of works forcibly sold at the instruction of the Nazi regime.

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru 09.01.13

This presentation coincides with the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht (November 9–10, 1938). Thru 10.27.13 Focusing on the case The Middle East of Max Stern’s Berlin and the Middle gallery, the exhibition Kingdom: Islamic addresses the issues of and Chinese Nazi looted art and the Artistic Exchange on-going restitution ef-

tributed, over time, to making the Cornell’s Collection the gem that it is today. 09.17.13–12.08.13

Collecting for the Cornell Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Diana Beltran Herrera: Birds of Florida Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

cfam.rollins.edu

cfam.rollins.edu

Collecting for the Cornell is an overview of the many gifts and acquisitions, large and small, that have con-

Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This installation highlights Chinese works with ties to the Islamic world. WINTER PARK 09.17.13–12.08.13

Auktion 392:

Herrera’s work seeks to explore the chillingly disengaged relationship between humans and nature in modern society. Using paper as her primary medium she is able to present notions of temporality and change, emphasizing the process of transformation that continuously occurs in nature as well as humankind. The exhibit includes eight sculptures, made completely

Image from Diana Beltran Herrera: Birds of Florida at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Diana Beltran Herrera, Common Starling, 2013, paper sculpture; photo by Diane Beltran Herrera

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 5 o f 3 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

of paper, featuring local bird species.

cfam.rollins.edu

09.17.13–12.08.13

From Albrecht Dürer to Claes Oldenburg: Collecting at the Cornell, 1990-2010 Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This exhibition serves as a sequel to Collecting for the Cornell. The project will chronicle the varied origins of the Museum’s several designated purchase funds and the acquisitions that resulted from difficult choices and considered deliberations. Works by such renowned artists as Dürer, Cézanne, and Picasso

will be included. Thru 08.04.13

Jeffrey Gibson: Tipi Poles Performing as Lines Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Acclaimed Native American artist, Jeffrey Gibson, debuts four new assemblages that he has created

specifically for CFAM. His work encompasses themes of appropriation and empowerment as well as the speed of modern life, and utilizes traditional Indian motifs in surprisingly contemporary ways. Thru 12.08.13

Questions of Travel Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Elizabeth Bishop’s poem, Questions of Travel, provides the focus for this installation. Since the beginning of recorded history, artists and writers have used the road trip—however long and whatever the destination—as source material. The works selected for display are the product of journeys, whether created by an American in Italy, a Cuban in St. Barts, or an Italian in Egypt. Thru 12.08.13

Studio Malick Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

As Mali gained independence from France in 1960, the youth culture of music,

Image from Studio Malick at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Malick Sidibé, Here is My Watch and My Ring, 1964, ©Malick Sidibé, Gwinzegal / diChroma photography

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 6 o f 3 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

dancing and fashion exploded in this West African nation, and Malick Sidibé’s ubiquitous lens chronicled it all. Through the use of props, posing, and a deft attention to personality, he developed a distinct style and achieved international recognition.

mate­ri­als used, stages and mod­ifi ­ ­ca­tions involved, and the ful­ filled vision. 07.30.13–10.27.13

Awak­en­ing: The Art of Ursula Schwartz The Albin Polasek Museum

work. Her paint­ings reflect the com­plex www.polasek.org nature of mod­ern Born in Nel­spruit, fem­i­nin­ity and por­tray South Africa, Ursula an ele­gant jux­ta­po­ Schwartz expresses her si­tion of power and unique South African vul­ner­a­bil­ity. per­spec­tive through bold col­ors, energetic Thru 10.06.13 brush strokes, inti­mate Watercolors por­traits and fig­u­ra­tive by Otto Heinigke— & Sculpture Gardens

A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

Thru 07.21.13

From Start to Fin­ish: The Florida Sculp­ tors Guild Annual Exhi­bi­tion The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

www.morsemuseum.org

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm, Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes of Middle Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines.

www.polasek.org

Through photographs, sketches and mod­els, vis­i­tors can see how a sculpture devel­ops from the orig­i­nal con­ cept, the meth­ods and

On View

Image from Awak­en­ing: The Art of Ursula Schwartz at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: Ursula Schwartz, image courtesy of The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Baker Sponder Gallery www.bakersponder gallery.com

Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Artist: HARALD SCHMITZSCHMELZER SCHMITZ-SCHMELZER’S

cast acrylic works bridge the gap between painting, sculpture and science. The artist’s studio, like an experimental lab, is where he stretches the limits of color perception through his uniquely layered creations. CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Cernuda Arte www.cernudaarte.com

Artist: Manuel Mendive

MENDIVE’S WORKS ARE INSPIRED by “free-flying thoughts,”

African spiritual practices and symbols of tribal worship.

From left: Harald Schmitz-Schmelzer, Atoll 2, 2011, cast acrylic, 22-5/6 x 22-5/6 x 7-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Baker Sponder Gallery; Manuel Mendive, El Equilibrio (The Equilibrium), 2006, acrylic on canvas, 39 x 51”, courtesy of the artist and Cernuda Arte

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries

www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

www.virginiamiller.com

Artist: Robert Cottingham

Artist: FLORIAN DEPENTHAL

ONE OF THE GREAT LUMI-

IN THE WORDS OF

naries of the Photo Realism movement, Cottingham encourages the viewer to focus on the play of light and the passage of time through his images of the American 20th-century urban landscape. PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Studio E Gallery www.studioegallery.com

Artist: Kathryn Freeman

art critic, Janet Batet: Depenthal’s “dazzling canvases…are loaded with powerful expression. Each emphatic stroke… evidences a trace of mood, the vivid feeling invading the canvas before being tempered by reason.”

“IN MY PAINTINGS, I TRY

to create harmonious order out of the confusion and randomness of everyday existence—order in which form and content merge to create a convincing world and a believable narrative.”—K. Freeman

Clockwise from top: Robert Cottingham, Star Suite, Art, 2009, silkscreen on paper, 32 x 31-3/4”, edition of 100, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Florian Depenthal, Untitled, 2004, oil on canvas, 30 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Kathryn Freeman, Rabbit Summer, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

VIERA

Gallery: Art Gallery of Viera www.artgallery ofviera.com

Artist: CASSANDRA MYER 
 “MY RECENT EXPLORA-

tions have lead me to using a kiln for creating glass fusions for my mosaics. I am obsessed with combining materials and techniques to create new mosaic mash-ups. The exploration of mosaics and glass as a medium is the most satisfying adventure that I have ever undertaken.” –C. Myer

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Artist: Barbara Wagner

“M Y P A I N T I N G S A R E A B S T R A C T E X P L O R A T I O N S O F

color, texture, line, shape and space. I frequently work in a series to explore different variations of a particular concept. I like to contrast organic and linear elements, favoring suggestiveness—and above all, I love color.”­ —B. Wagner From left: Cassandra Myer, Slip Slide, courtesy of the artist and Art Gallery of Viera; Barbara Wagner, Waterscape Series #10 (detail), oil on linen with mixed media, 30 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

MIAMI

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Gallery

www.holdenluntz.com

www.dianalowenstein gallery.com

Artist: Jo Whaley

WHALEY PRODUCES HER

images by staging sets, painting backdrops, and manipulating lighting. She juxtaposes organic and man-made elements to reflect the issue of environmental degradation, with an imaginative twist. The products fuse the language of photography with that of painting, and rely on an expressive use of color. SARASOTA

Gallery: Dabbert Gallery www.dabbertgallery.com

Artist: Beatrice del Perugia

Artist: CHARLES CLARY “I USE PAPER TO

create a world of fiction that challenges the viewer to suspend disbelief and venture into my fabricated reality. These constructions question the notion of viral outbreaks, transforming it into something more playful and inviting.” ­–C. Clary

A NATIVE OF FRANCE,

del Perugia, has garnered awards for her work, which includes explorations in watercolor, acrylic, pastel, mixed media, print media and collage. “My offbeat way of seeing things makes me laugh. I hope it makes you wonder and smile.” –B. del Perugia

Clockwise from top: Jo Whaley, Ornithoptera Priamus, Sea Debris, chromogenic color photograph, 2003, 24 x 20”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Charles Clary, Necrotic Radimafungle Movement #7, 2011, acrylic and hand-cut paper on panel, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Gallery; Beatrice del Perugia, Trois Chapeaux, watercolor, 21-1/2 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Dabbert Gallery

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ART

ROB of the

at the

APPLETON MUSEUM of ART

College of Central Florida, Ocala

06.22.13– 09.22.13 w w w. a p p l e t o n m u s e u m . o r g


Pictured (left and below):

BOT Amy Flynn,

Prima: FOBOT, mixed media; and Fernando: FOBOT, mixed media

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A Art of the Robot

ART AND SCIENCE FICTION

collide in Art of the Robot at the Appleton Museum of Art. The Museum’s new summer show is sure to provide inspiration and enjoyment for all ages as it celebrates our fascination with robots and the enduring impact they have on our imagination. See robot inspired creations in all mediums, shapes and sizes, marvel at their design, and engage in their stories in this spectacle of robot force, on view through September 22nd. The exhibit also features a Create Your Own Robot area and a special Robot Family Day is planned for Saturday, August 10th, from 10am to 4pm. “People, of all ages, are fascinated with robots, the way they move, and the

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Will Wagenaar, GINNY – robot dog, found object assemblage

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Art of the Robot

materials they are made of,” says the Appleton’s Director, Cindi Morrison. “My hope is the exhibit will inform, inspire and reinforce the concept that robots have been, and will always be, a part of human history, and have become a popular mode of expression for artists confronting fundamental issues and contradictions in our advanced industrial culture.” Early examples of robotic art and theater existed in ancient China as far back as the Han Dynasty (third century BC), with the development of a mechanical orchestra, and

Each of the artists invited to participate in this exhibit has a unique way of portraying their robot creations.

Opposite page (left to right): Mark Brown, Oz Robot, 2012, 25 x 11 x 6”; Olympic Green Robot, 2012, 31 x 19 x 10”; Photography by John Polak bossbrownart.com

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other devices such as mechanical toys. These included flying automatons, mechanized doves and fish, angels and dragons, and automated cup-bearers— all hydraulically actuated for the amusement of Emperors by engineer-craftspeople whose names have mostly been lost to history. Robots, like Rosie in The Jetsons, can be autonomous or semi-autonomous

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and range from humanoids to industrial robots, collectively programmed ‘swarm’ robots, and, as in the Star Trek series, be as small as microscopic nano robots. Artists use their artwork to reflect the world around them, so it is only natural to find that robots have become a part of the reflection. Each of the artists invited to participate in this exhibit has a unique way of portraying their robot creations through paintings, prints, found object sculptures, photographs and other materials. The Art of the Robot exhibit features works by 14 artists from 7 different states and Florida, and include: Mark Brown, Easthampton, MA; CyberCraft Robots, St. Petersburg, FL; Brian Despain, Seattle, WA; Amy Flynn, Raleigh, NC; Nemo Gould, Oakland, CA; Heather Heilman Loercher and Howie Hartman, Wrightsville, PA; Don L. Jones, Pittsburgh, PA; Eric Joyner, San Francisco, CA; Richard Muller, Altadena, CA; Lisa Grothman Ryan, Wilmette, IL; Donna SophroniaSims, Birmingham, AL; Will Wagenaar, Port Richey, FL; and Tim Warchocki, Winter Garden, FL.


Mark Brown INSPIRED BY THE

Japanese robots and space toys of the 1950’s, Mark Brown began building his robot sculptures over a decade ago. He finds most of the components for his extraordinary, one-of-a-kind pieces at tag sales and flea markets. Within an endless stream of metal containers and jar lids lies a wonderful array of colors, textures and forms. Objects of daily life—plates, food tins, thermoses, hand tools, letters and numerals are all transformed into an ever expanding cast of characters. OnV

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Below: CyberCraft Robots, Stowaway aboard the Orbiting Laboratory, mixed material 3D wall sculpture with lights, 16 x 16 x 4.5”

In addition to having a retro, sci-fi, metal groove, CyberCraft Robots relay emotion and movement, and speak to issues of humanity. Left:

CyberCraft Robots

CyberCraft Robots, The SpiderBorg, mixed metal and glass sculpture with lights, 14 x 14 x 14”

CYBERCRAFT ROBOTS

cybercraftrobots.com

creates sculptural artifacts from the future. These Spaceships, Robots, and Raygun sculptures are composed of a variety of metals and glass, using cold connections. Each sculpture has a story. The narrative becomes part of the piece, and no piece is complete without it. CyberCraft Robots work aboard an Orbiting Laboratory, under the leadership of their Primary Robot Creator, Sarah Thee Campagna.

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Art of the Robot

Brian Despain A HUGE FAN OF

Above: Brian Despain, The Escape,

despainart.com

oil on wood panel, 16 x 20”

“I’ve always enjoyed the idea that the robots I paint are all part of a series—a series of robots constructed on some long forgotten factory floor.”—Brian Despain Right: Brian Despain, Revelations, oil on panel, 8 x 10”

Star Wars (specifically, the original trilogy), Brian Despain became fascinated not only with the robots themselves, but their whole history— who produced them, the various pros and cons of each model, how much they cost, who owned them, etc. This desire to look a little deeper and to explore a little further is what compels him to continually push his robot universes a little further and his stories a little deeper.


Amy Flynn AMY FLYNN’S “FOBOTS”

(Found Object roBOTS) were born from her love of flea markets and robots. She likes to tell people that they combine two of her favorite passions—making stuff, and shopping. Flynn also loves the irony of taking really old things and creating robots, which have always been so symbolic of the future. Each of her FOBOTS has its own story, its own personality, and—like the tin man— its own heart inside.

This page (left to right): Amy Flynn, Royce Rolls: FOBOT, mixed media; Buzzbee Berkeley: FOBOT, mixed media ifobot.com

“I love finding a cool vintage item that was once someone’s treasure, and making it special again.” —Amy Flynn


Art of the Robot

Nemo Gould A SELF-PROCLAIMED

“compulsive collector of things,” Nemo Gould found a creative excuse for his condition—building kinetic robot sculptures with found materials he gathers from all around the San Francisco Bay area. Each piece, constructed using a variety of building techniques such as welding, machining, woodwork and furniture/antique restoration, is a direct reflection of Gould’s strong belief that art should be both meaningful and enjoyable.

Below: Nemo Gould, Inward and Onward, 2011, 70 x 16 x 16” nemogould.com

“ My work appeals to a seven-year-old boy’s mind because I still have one… I take silly very seriously.” —Nemo Gould Above (and right): Nemo Gould, Doubtful (and detail), 2010, 64 x 27 x 25”

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Heather Heilman Loercher & Howie Hartman STEADFAST TO A

mission of reuse, assemblage sculptor, Heather Heilman Loercher, creates works with an intention of reinvented symbolism, often speaking to issues of environment, emotion and self evolution. Photographer, Howie Hartman, captures the imagery and energy of the subject, utilizing a source of light applicable to the intention of the work.

“I have an interest in discovering, uncovering and reclaiming objects from the rust and dust of our surroundings.”—Heather Heilman Loercher Heather Heilman Loercher & Howie Hartman, Hunfree (above) and Mizabel (left), BOT series, digital capture, hh.project, 2013


Art of the Robot

Don L. Jones’ lively cast of robot assemblage sculptures embody the reincarnation of discarded scraps of humanity.

Don L. Jones

This page (left to right): Don L. Jones, Fly Me To The Moon,

SINCE CHILDHOOD,

wall sculpture; Prince Albert, assemblage

Don L. Jones has enjoyed creating art. At age 9, his father introduced him to arc welding, brazing, woodworking, construction and shop principles. This training, combined with a profound admiration for art, nature and science fiction, inspired him to create a variety of sculptures throughout his childhood. Following a 20-year career in advertising, Jones decided to professionally promote his works, which include a lively cast of robot assemblages.

robot sculpture jonesrobo-works.com

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Art of the Robot

Eric Joyner IN THE YEARS

following World War II, the major export from Japan wasn’t electronic equipment, but toys— specifically, tin toys—and one of the most popular motifs was toy robots. Capturing this period in history has become a passion for painter, Eric Joyner, who celebrates this bygone era with images marrying the metal creations with images plucked from his imagination. Eric Joyner, Moon Rise, 2008, Courtesy of Corey Helford Gallery ericjoyner.com


Richard Muller FOR RICHARD MULLER,

working in the aerospace industry in Los Angeles, where he builds his robots, has provided an extremely fertile terrain from which to mine his raw robot materials. Muller learned the enjoyment of tinkering and fixing things in a workshop from his grandfather, who collected vast stores of itemized “junk” he would refer to as “gold when you need it.” Each of Muller’s creations is packed with personality and irresistible charm.

This page (left to right): Richard Muller, Bongo; and Jacques; photos by: Richard Muller guyrobot.com

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Art of the Robot

Lisa Grothman Ryan AFTER SEEING A TOY

robot exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, artist, Lisa Grothman Ryan, fell in love with the colors and personalities of the robots, and knew she had to start painting them. Since then, she’s started her own toy robot collection and enjoys bringing their marvelous characters to life in her paintings.

“ I hope when visitors look at these robots they will create their own stories about the paintings.” —Lisa Grothman Ryan This page (above and left): Lisa Grothman Ryan, Eternal Optimist, oil, 24 x 30”; and Fired Up, oil, 24 x 30” lisaryansgallery.com

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“Discovering the hidden artistic essence of the most common objects is an exciting revelation.” —Donna Sophronia-Sims Below and right: Donna Sophronia-Sims, ETA; and Calvin castofcharacters23.etsy.com

Donna SophroniaSims DONNA SOPHRONIA-SIMS

had never thought of making art with found objects until she took a metal fabricating class at Sloss Furnaces in Birmingham, AL. There she learned how to weld and use other equipment to assemble metal, skills she now uses to transform common objects into something beyond what they were intended—something surprising and often amusing and whimsical.


Will Wagenaar IN 2008, WILL WAGENAAR

established his first on-line art business, Reclaim2Fame, recycling and repurposing old stuff creatively into works of art and functional objects. Each piece is hand crafted from recycled items found in thrift stores, flea markets, and “your grandma’s attic”—all reflect his passion as an artist, concern for the environment and his desire to delight his customers.

Above and left: Will Wagenaar, MORTY, found object assemblage; and VALOR – The Steampunk Dragon Prince willwagenaar.tumblr.com


Art of the Robot

Tim Warchocki’s creations are fittingly deemed, “Robotki,” a combination of the word “robot” and “Warchocki.”

Tim Warchocki,

Robotki Neesta Robot

Tim Warchocki TIM WARCHOCKI’S

whimsical-looking, “foundart robots” are fashioned from arbitrary yet recognizable, modified objects. The creation of each robot begins by dumping the “found” parts onto the floor and playing with the resulting chaos until the “Robotki” manifests itself. Warchocki calls this practice “the configuration of confusion.” Each component is handpicked and repurposed from various sources, including thrift stores, swap meets and even dumpsters.

Tim Warchocki, Robotki DomeBot Robot coroflot.com/warchocki

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y FADED ELEGANCE

P H O T O G R A P H S

M I C H A E L E A S T M A N

09.15.13 o n

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y M

FADED ELEGANCE:

Photographs of Havana

by Michael Eastman

MICHAEL EASTMAN HAS ESTABLISHED HIMSELF

as one of the world’s leading contemporary photographic art-

ists. Over more than a decade, he captured Havana’s changing cultural landscape in his images of the city’s architecture and lush interiors, ravaged by the effects of time. The exhibition,

Previous spread: Mercedes Hallway #2, 2002, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72” Left: Fidel’s Stairway, 1999, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72” Photographs by Michael Eastman, ©Michael Eastman, courtesy of Barry Friedman Ltd. Right: Michael Eastman, Photograph by Tuan Lee

Faded Elegance: Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman, on view at the Tampa Museum of Art through September 15th,

features twenty-nine, 6 x 7.5 ft.

photographs taken by the art-

ist between 1999 and 2010.

Organized by the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, this is

the first exhibition to explore the depth and range of Eastman’s Havana photographs. OnV

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FADED ELEGANCE:

Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman

According to Los Angeles Times Art Critic, Leah Ollman, “Walker Evans’ legacy is evident throughout Eastman’s work: a love of the vernacular, a consistent, frontal approach, and a fondness for… time and neglect. Photographs keep a subject alive and, at the same time, mark its passing. The friction between a photograph’s perpetual now and its memorial then can saturate an image with poignancy.…This dynamic plays out powerfully in Michael Eastman’s photographs.” While in Havana, Eastman photographed a number of subjects, from the interiors of homes along Ambassador Way, to stairwells and music schools, to abstract patterns found on the exteriors of buildings. His large-scale photographs evoke the nostalgia and wealth of a bygone era, while shedding light on the harsh economic realities faced Blue Facade, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72”

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FADED ELEGANCE:

Photographs of Havana

by Michael Eastman

in present day Cuba. Visitors to the exhibit will be captivated by these images. Though mostly devoid of people, the portraits manage to capture contemporary Cuban life through suggestion—an

self-taught shooter, he has traveled to the world’s great cities to document his choice of building façades and interiors. “What I do, in a sense, is help the people who see my work, see the world,” East-

Eastman’s photographs of Havana reveal a world where triumphant past and vanquished present collide. empty chair, an ancient car, or a line of hanging laundry make this experience personal and evoke a sense of wonder for the viewer. Michael Eastman began his career as a fine art photographer over thirty years ago. A

man said. His explorations of architectural form and the textures of decay, create mysterious narratives about time and place. His richly colored images are unified by their visual precision, monumentality and painterly quality. “I see things OnV

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Above: Cine Avenida, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72” Left: 167 Havana, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72”

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FADED ELEGANCE:

Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman

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Left: Red Bathroom, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72” Right: Three Fans, Digital C-Print, 90 x 72”

much the way a painter does,” said the artist, “I’m very interested in texture, patina, surface, and light.” Eastman uses a large format camera and prefers to shoot his images on film, using natural light. “By scanning my negatives myself and using Photoshop as my digital darkroom,” he said, “I am able to make prints that I never could have made with traditional methods. The amount of control is unmatched.” Eastman’s photographs have appeared in Time, Life and American Photographer, and

Painterly in quality, these richly colored photographs are dramatically lit and exquisitely detailed. can be found in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the International Center of Photography, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and other prestigious

institutions. His books include Havana (2011, Prestel), Vanishing America (2008, Rizzoli) and Horses (2003, Knopf), which is now in its fifth edition. Eastman currently lives in St. Louis. O n V iew OnV

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SIMPLY BE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM N

On view

09.28.13-01.05.14

A bird dries its wings. Josh Exell/National Geographic

at VERO BEAC


EAUTIFUL ATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

H MUSEUM of ART

www.verobeachmuseum.org

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SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL:

Photographs from National Geographic

T

THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Image Collection, which holds imag-

es dating back to the late 1800s, is

an amazing visual repository in size, subject matter and range of pho-

tographic mediums. What sets the

collection apart as one of the most

valuable in the world is the artistry, personal vision and skill that Nation-

al Geographic photographers have brought to the photographic art form for more than a century.

Simply Beautiful, hosted by the

Vero Beach Museum of Art, on view

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Bee-eater birds. Joe Petersburger/National Geographic


SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL:

Photographs from National Geographic

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A monkey covers its mouth with its hands. Joel Sartore/National Geographic

from September 28th-January 5th, plumbs the depth of National Geographic’s Image Collection to highlight the loveliest and most appealing photographs from this impressive archive. The result is an experience of visual delight, which takes visitors on a visual journey through variations

Simply Beautiful makes one ponder what creates beauty in a photograph. on the universal theme of beauty—from stunning landscapes and magnificent wildlife to fascinating people and quaint locales. Assembled by award-winning National Geographic photographer, Annie Griffiths, Simply Beautiful makes one ponder what creates beauty in a photograph, and illusOnV

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A sailfish rounds up sardines. Paul Nicklen/National Geographic

trates how photographers can compose an image that provides visual proof that there is beauty, often overlooked, in nearly everything. In the following excerpts from the book Simply Beautiful, which accompanies the exhibition, Griffiths writes of the importance of composition in the making of a great photograph: “...Photography is a constant attempt to put a frame around something pleasing or important, to pluck one meaningful instant from the river of life and isolate it for eternity. Composition is nothing more than an arrangement of elements within a chosen frame. But it is a crucial structure that can allow us to see something for the first time or blind us with the obvious. Composition can turn familiar objects into abstract patterns, or draw attention to a single voice in a chaotic moment.... A photographer’s goal is to try to fill the frame, edge to edge, with

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SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL:

Photographs from National Geographic

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SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL:

Photographs from National Geographic

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Pelicans in Mississippi Delta. Annie Griffiths/National Geographic

elements that contribute to the whole picture, leaving out anything that distracts. In an active situation, the photographer may find himself focusing on a particular subject, but with radar awareness of what is happening in the background—an anticipation that something unpredictable will

“Geometry in a beautiful photograph creates balance.” —A. G riffiths make or break this image.... The Greeks sought perfect proportion in art—the harmonious relation of parts to each other or to the whole. They believed that the two most important shapes in a picture were a long, serpentine line and triangular forms....Geometry in a beautiful photograph creates balance. It can be OnV

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A gorilla plays with water plants. Ian Nichols/National Geographic

found in compositional elements such as the location of the horizon, the placement of color, or a beam of light....A geometrically balanced composition can be enigmatic or crystal clear, witty or threatening, energizing or calming, or tender. We make these compositional choices because it pleases our eye, it awakens our inner mathematician. We are moved by the geometry of perfection.” —A nnie G riffiths The photographs speak mostly for themselves, enhanced by lyrical quotes from scholars and poets, making this gorgeous collection a pleasure to look at again and again. O n V iew

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SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL:

Photographs from National Geographic

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LIGHTSCAPES PAINTINGS by

RICHARD

SEGALMAN

through

08.18.13

at t h e

MUSEUM O F F L O R I D A A RT, DeLand

www.museumoffloridaart.org Yellow Bandana, 2006, oil, 34 x 40”; Image courtesy of Harmon-Meek Gallery, Naples, FL


LIGHTSCAPES:

Paintings by Richard Segalman

RICHARD

SEGALMAN’S

lush impressionistic style conveys the atmospheric play of light and shadow

on his subject matter, which ranges

from breezy beaches to the streets of New York City. A selection of works

by the artist is currently on display at

the Museum of Florida Art, in DeLand. Lightscapes: Paintings by Richard Segalman, guest curated by William

Meek III, Director of the HarmonMeek Gallery in Naples, FL, will be on view through August 18.

Blue, Red & White, 2011, oil on canvas, 40 x 50”; Image courtesy of Harmon-Meek Gallery, Naples, FL

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LIGHTSCAPES: Paintings

by Richard Segalman

Richard Segalman was born in 1934 in Coney Island, NY, and attended Parsons School of Design, the Art Students League, and the New School for Social Research in New York. He began his career in the early 1960s, working primarily with watercolors and oils. His first exhibition was

dicate a close relationship between individuals, even though details and facial expressions are only suggested. Gesture and spontaneous reflection are unmistakable hallmarks of the artist. There is an alluring intimacy that permeates his work as it draws the observer into a world of ele-

“I remember seeing the beach for the first time...the light, color and romance of it overwhelmed me. Every time I stand at the water’s edge, I return to that first moment of wonder.” —Richard Segalman actually held in Naples, FL. Although an accomplished draftsman, Segalman prefers to suggest emotion and movement through textural brush strokes and a superb sense of composition. Many of his works inLeft: Reflections, 2011, oil, on loan from Cici and Hyatt Brown; Image courtesy of Museum of Florida Art Right: Blues for Rosemary, 2012, pastel, 22 x 30”; Image courtesy of Harmon-Meek Gallery, Naples, FL

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LIGHTSCAPES: Paintings by Richard Segalman

gant design and atmosphere. One feels a sense of uncomplicated harmony emanating from each piece. Segalman’s subjects are frequently associated with sunny beaches, aquamarine surf and women in flowing attire, engaged in quiet con-

This exhibition offers those unfamiliar with Segalman’s Lightscapes, an opportunity to be captivated by their directness and sensuality. versation. In contrast to these scenes are dynamic “bird’s eye view” images of New York City street scenes, the deserts around Santa Fe, NM, and pastoral landscapes from the Woodstock, NY, area. In addition to oil painting, Segalman is a true master of pastel, watercolor and monotype. These mediums augment each other and reinforce his significant body of work. This exhibition offers those unfamiliar with Segalman’s

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Opposite: Woodstock Sun Shadows, 2011, pastel, 30 x 22” Left: Romantic Decision II, 2010, oil on canvas, 30 x 24” Images courtesy of Harmon-Meek Gallery, Naples, FL

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LIGHTSCAPES: Paintings by Richard Segalman

Right: Richard Segalman at the opening of his Lightscapes exhibition at the Museum of Florida Art, with his oil painting: Glow of Winter Light, 2012. Image courtesy of the Museum of Florida Art Below: The book, Richard Segalman: Reflections on Light, is available for purchase in the Museum’s bookstore and through Harmon-Meek Gallery at www.harmonmeek.com

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Lightscapes, an opportunity to be captivated by their directness and sensuality. For those already familiar with this work, it is a chance to further their appreciation and insight into the artist’s contribution to American art. Richard Segalman is represented in many museum permanent collections, including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Tampa Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In 2011, he was awarded a prestigious Pollock-Krasner Grant. Segalman has been represented by the Harmon-Meek gallery since 1982, where he continues to unveil new works each year in an annual exhibition. O n V iew

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ES

E U G E N E SAVA G E: THE SEMINOLE PAINTINGS

08.16.13-01.05.14 at THE MENNELLO MUSEUM of AMERICAN ART, Orlando www.mennellomuseum.com Above: Portrait of Eugene F. Savage at age 32 (detail), ca. 1915, photograph, Courtesy of Eugene and Virginia Crawford, Left: Eugene Savage, Cypress Colonnade, 1952, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 30 x 21.5”, Purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.11. Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings was organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville, FL.

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10 1


ES

EUGENE SAVAGE:

The Seminole Paintings

This article contains excerpts from “Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings”, by Elizabeth B. Heuer, published by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, in association with D Giles Limited, London. Right: Eugene Savage, South Moon Under, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum on wood, 20 x 20”, Purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.1.

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IN 1935, AMERICAN ARTIST,

Eugene Francis Savage, made the first of many journeys into the Florida Everglades to study the Seminoles. Accompanied by two Indian guides, Savage was led through the mosquito-infested swamps and dense tropical hammocks to an interior Seminole camp. There, amidst the quiet solitude of the cypress swamps strewn with thick swags of Spanish moss, he caught glimpses of Seminole life. Impressed by his observations, Savage created perhaps the most extensive painted record of the Florida Seminoles from the early 20th century. Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings, presented by The Mennello Museum of American Art in Orlando, includes a series of works that reflect his concern for the plight of Native culture as tourism, land development, and environmentalist debates threatened their traditional way of life. While providing a unique window into Seminole culture, and calling critical attention to the portrayal of Seminoles in American art, this exhibition offers new insights into Savage’s career. Combining bold color with shifting perspectives and rhythmic patterns and movement, these theatrical visualizations represent the artist’s experiments

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EUGENE SAVAGE:

The Seminole Paintings

Right: Eugene Savage, Orchid Pavilion, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum on wood, 30 x 30”, Purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.5. Following pages: Eugene Savage, Scherzo, 1953, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 21 x 29.5”, Purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.9.

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with modernism. “Savage’s strong ‘modernist’ approach to the subject matter allows him to create a mood of serenity by eliminating nonessential details to tell the story,” says The Mennello Museum’s Executive Director, Frank Holt. This presentation­—the latest in a tour that originated at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville and then traveled to The Frost Art Museum in Miami— includes preparatory watercolors, which provide an important opportunity for viewers to follow the compositional development of specific works within the series. From the devastating effects of urbanization on Seminole life, to tourism’s exploitation of the Indians, Savage’s compositions tell a tragic and moving story. Following his initial journey to the Everglades, he returned regularly to south Florida for nearly two decades and produced a series of more than three dozen paintings and countless studies that feature a carefully constructed perspective of the Seminoles. Capturing the natural rhythms of the Everglades, these works present a vision of Seminole life and seek to awaken the imagination—and inspire the spirit. continued on pg. 108

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EUGENE SAVAGE:

The Seminole Paintings


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EUGENE SAVAGE:

The Seminole Paintings

Eugene Savage, Study for Orchid Hunter, 1935, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 13�, Purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust, AP.2007.2.6.

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continued from pg. 104 Eugene Savage was born in Indiana in 1883. He attended the Corcoran School of Art, the Chicago Art Institute, and later, the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. In 1912, Savage entered and won the competition for the Prix de Rome, a three-year fellowship in painting at the American Academy in Rome. While in Italy, he studied works by the masters of the early Renaissance, such as Giotto, Piero della Francesca and Masaccio. Following his graduation from the American Academy in 1915, Savage returned to the US. He taught painting at Cooper Union in NY and later, at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh and the College of the City of New York. In 1924, Savage was elected to the National Academy of Design. That same year, he joined the art faculty at Yale University and would be named Dean of Fine Arts in 1931. He was subsequently appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to serve on the Commission of Fine Arts, a position he held until 1941. Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings was organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens in Jacksonville, FL. O n V iew

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FRIDA KAH LO PORTRAITS OF AN ICON

On view

09.12.13 -11.17.13 a t t h e

FLORIDA MUSEUM

o f

PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS,

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O

FRIDA KAHLO:

Portraits of an Icon

ONE OF THE MOST UNIVERSALLY ADMIRED MEXICAN

artists of the 20th century, Frida Kahlo is perhaps best known for her self-portraits, filled with the colors and forms of Mexican folk art. Her work is celebrated in Mexico as

emblematic of national and indigenous tradition, and by

feminists for its uncompromising depiction of the female experience and creativity.

Since her death in 1954 at the age of 47, Kahlo’s fame as

an artist has only grown. In the last decade in particular, she has been a great ambassador of Mexican art and culture. Her

life was the subject of the 2002 motion picture, Frida, starring

Salma Hayek as the artist. The complexity and depth of her human and esthetic dimension have made her a universal sym-

bol. Her paintings sell for millions of dollars at auctions, and her face is an international icon.

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Previous spread: Nickolas Muray, Frida with magenta rebozo (detail), ca. 1939 Opposite: Bernard Silberstein, Frida with Flowers in her hair, ca. 1940 All photographs courtesy of Throckmorton Fine Art, NYC

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FRIDA KAHLO:

Portraits of an Icon Frida Kahlo: Portraits of an Icon, hosted by the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa, examines the great Mexican artist’s life through photographs. The images follow Kahlo’s transition from a child to a famous artist, as documented by Kahlo’s relatives, lovers and friends— many of whom were also professional photographers. The selection includes both black

strate invigorating drama.” The portraits bring into focus the painter, the paintings, the patient, the wife, the daughter, the lover, and the friend. They permit us to peer into Kahlo’s bedroom, sit at her table, visit her hospital room, wander into her garden, view her collections, and play with her pets. Some of these photographs conceal as much as they reveal about the woman who

Some of these photographs conceal as much as they reveal about the artist. and white images, and some works in color. “Frida Kahlo is one of the most important artists of the 20th century,” says Jane Simon, Director of the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts. “Adventurous and inquisitive, she made her mark on the history of art by infusing her exploration of culture with her own story. She was also a magnetic personality who befriended artists, philosophers, and socialites. The photographs we will show demon-

described herself as “la gran ocultadora,” the great concealer. While most of the images provide us with a glimpse of the woman behind the façade, others, though perhaps not so revealing, allow us to view one of the most intriguing of the artist’s creations—the construction of a self-image as carefully crafted and conceived as any of the painter’s works of art. The display brings together the work of some of the most highly regarded photographers OnV

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Juan Guzman, Frida Kahlo with two birds, ca. 1950s

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FRIDA KAHLO:

Portraits of an Icon

of the time, including Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham, Manuel Álvarez Bravo and Martin Munkácsi. Portraits of Kahlo by photojournalists on assignment in Mexico for various publications include those by Gisèle Freund, Bernard Silberstein and Fritz Henle, as well as photographs by those who knew Kahlo well—Guillermo Kahlo (her father), Nickolas Muray and Lola Álvarez Bravo. One of four daughters born to a Hungarian-Jewish father and a mother of Spanish and Mexican Indian descent, Kahlo not only battled polio as a

Kahlo not only battled polio as a young child, but was also seriously injured, at the age of 18, in a horrific bus accident. young child, but was also seriously injured, at the age of 18, in a horrific bus accident that left her with fractures to her spine, collarbone and ribs, a shattered pelvis, and shoulder and foot injuries. It was dur-

ing her convalescence that she began to focus on painting. Mostly self-portraits and still lifes, her paintings are filled with the colors and forms of Mexican folk art and reflect the debilitating effects she endured OnV

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Above: Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Frida seated with Globe, Coyacan, Mexico, 1938 Opposite: Florence Arquin, Frida Kahlo wearing plaster cast corset decorated with Hammer & Sickle, ca. 1941

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FRIDA KAHLO:

Portraits of an Icon throughout her lifetime—35 operations, body casts, metal corsets, constant pain and the inability to bear a child as well as her numerous love affairs and a turbulent marriage to the famous Mexican muralist painter, Diego Rivera, 20 years her senior. In 1953, when Kahlo had her first solo exhibition in Mexico, a local critic wrote: “It is impossible to separate the life

cious and often black sense of humor, as well as a sharp command of wit and metaphor. She took great pride in keeping a home for Diego and loved fussing over him, cooking for him, and bathing him. She delighted in pets—mischievous spider monkeys and dogs—and adored children, who she treated as equals. She loved nonsense, gossip and dirty jokes. She abhorred pretension. She

“Frida Kahlo embodied alegría—a lust for life. She valued honesty, especially to self.” and work of this extraordinary person. Her paintings are her biography.” As noted in the background material for the film, The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo, featured on www.pbs.org, “Often volatile and obsessive, Frida was alternately hopeful and despairing. She loved dancing and crowds and flirtation and seduction—and was often miserably lonely, begging friends and lovers to visit, not to “forget” her. She had a fero-

treated servants like family and students like esteemed colleagues. Frida Kahlo embodied alegría—a lust for life. She valued honesty, especially to self.” The photographs included in the exhibition are from the collection of gallerist and specialist in Latin American photographs, Spencer Throckmorton. His dynamic collection was initiated more than two decades ago and includes more than one hundred images of Frida Kahlo, many of them unique. O n V iew OnV

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Martin Munkácsi, Frida & Diego, ca. 1934

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PERFORMANCE { T H E AT E R ,

M U S I C

&

THE FIFTH ANNUAL

DA N C E }

5th Annual

Ringling International Arts Festival October 9-12, 2013 at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota www.ringling.org

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Ringling International Arts Festival launches the 2014 arts season on Florida’s “Cultural Coast.” Under the artistic direction of the Baryshnikov Arts Center, the four-day celebration showcases a variety of dance, music and theater, presented in intimate venues at Sarasota’s Ringling Museum of Art. Since its inception in 2009, the Festival has thrilled audiences with many sold-out performances and continues to attract the best and brightest minds shaping the art of today in contemporary dance, music, theater and film. With yet another surprising range of productions, the 2013 Ringling International Arts Festival is poised to touch all the senses, appealing to a broad range of interests and tastes. An opening night fundraising gala will take place October 9th with a reception prior to a performance by Spain’s Rocío Molina, followed by dinner in the galleries of The Ringling Museum. RIAF performances include: Rocío Molina, Danza Oro: One of the most brilliant baila-


P E R F O R M A N C E

oras of our time, Spain’s Rocío formed with the Aeolus Quartet. Molina is the recipient of her Leev Theater Group: From nation’s most coveted award in Iran comes a humorous and unthe arts, the national Prize for usual rendition of William ShakeDance. Her energized display speare’s Hamlet. Written by Moof Flamenco, classical bolero, hammed Charmshir, the work is and traditional popular dance, performed by Afshin Hashemi creates a “danceable universe” in Farsi (with English subtitles) with its own unique language and employs an imaginative and meaning. menagerie of plasTere O’Connor tic toy characters. Dance: Viewing Belarus Free dance as an abstract Theatre, Minsk documentary form, 2011: Minsk 2011 Tere O’Connor’s celebrates and bold and individmourns a city where ualistic approach sexuality is met by to choreography government oppresThe 2013 Ringling explores the comsion. (Performed in International plex coexistence Russian with Engof time, metaphor lish subtitles.) Arts Festival is and memory. Jazz Sunsets on poised to touch all Stephen Prutsthe Bay: Enjoy a the senses. man and the Aeodifferent jazz band lus Quartet: The mystique of each evening as the sun sets on the silent-film era is captured, and Sarasota Bay. updated, with a screening of BustRIAF Closing Night Party: er Keaton’s 1924 comedy, Sher- Raise a toast to RIAF 2013 and lock, Jr., accompanied by a live bid a fond farewell to the visiting performance of the jazzy, eclectic artists. Live entertainment and and inventive score for piano and fireworks. Reserve tickets now string quartet composed by pia- by calling 941.360.7399, 10amnist, Stephen Prutsman, and per- 4pm daily. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Flamenco dancer, Rocío Molina 2. poem by Tere O’Connor Dance; PHOTO BY IAN DOUGLAS above (top to bottom): 1. belarus free theatre, minsk 2011: A reply to Kathy acker 2. leev theater group, hamlet, prince of grief left: stephen prutsman, sherlock Jr. images courtesy of the ringling museum of art


FOCUS { T H E

A M E R I CA N

AT O N C E S E E M I N G LY

untouched and ripe for development, the American landscape has always fueled the imagination of artists. In the face of rapid industrialization, President Theodore Roosevelt (1858– 1919) and naturalist John Muir (1838–1914) led the urgent call to protect America’s bounty. A dramatic image of Teddy Roosevelt on Glacier Point, Yosemite (1903), presents him as a rugged outdoorsman aligned with American power and promise. Photography not only inspired conservation, but also popularized new tourist sites. Many photographers like Ansel Adams, who is represented by four of his most stunning and famous photographs, have been very influential in defending our environment. Pleasure Grounds and Restoring Spaces, presented by the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, features images depicting national and state parks and landmarks. The earliest date from the 1860s, including albumen prints by Carleton Watkins, Timothy H. O’Sullivan and Wil-

L A N D S CA P E }

Exhibition

Pleasure Grounds and Restoring Spaces: Photographs of our National Parks On View through October 6th at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

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F O C U S

liam H. Jackson, and an ambroFloridian Clyde Butcher’s type of Niagara Falls by Platt D. two large-scale photographs Babbitt. These images were cre- in the exhibition spotlight the ated to elicit and satisfy the curi- state’s wild beauty—a beauosity of the public and for gov- ty always under pressure from ernment and commercial topo- developers. His magnificent graphical surveys. For the first Ochopee #2 (1985) is of the time, spectacular Western sites greater Everglades, which has were seen by a wide audience inspired some of his best and largely unable to best-known work. travel to these desIn addition to tinations. Yosemite and the Iconic vistas by Everglades, there Ansel Adams and are photographs of Eliot Porter urged Yellowstone, the viewers to heed the Grand Canyon, call of conservation. Mesa Verde NationAaron Siskind and al Park, the Grand The majesty of Brett Weston abTetons, and more. nature is revealed Huntington Withstracted elements of the landscape, erill’s Dune Form by some of our narrowing the fo#4, Death Valley most gifted cus and offering a (1986) is one of the photographers. modernist perspecmost unique imagtive. Jerry Uelsmann, who es- es in the exhibition. It is technitablished the photography pro- cally accomplished, gorgeous, gram at the University of Flori- spare, and ultimately unforgetda, and John Pfahl impose their table. Among the other leadown style rather than recreate ing photographers represented popular views. Florida meets are Edward S. Curtis, Margathe West in Uelsmann’s richly ret Bourke-White, Don Worth, imaginative Flamingos Visit William Clift, Laura Gilpin and Yosemite (1985). Linda Connor. O n V iew

opposite: Ansel Adams, Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park, California, ca. 1940, Gelatin silver print, Museum Purchase with funds from National Endowment for the Arts and Fine Arts Council of Florida grants, Photo used with permission of The Trustees of The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust, All Rights Reserved above: After Underwood and Underwood, President Theodore Roosevelt on Glacier Point, Yosemite, 1903, Hand-tinted gelatin silver print, Gift of Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection left: photo portrait of photographer, Ansel Adams, from the 1950 Yosemite Field School yearbook. photo by J. Malcolm Greany


SPOTLIGHT { DAWO U D

T H E M O C A , N O RT H M I A M I

B E Y }

Exhibition

Dawoud Bey: Picturing People On view through September 8th at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

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presentation of Dawoud Bey: Picturing People is an expansive career survey of the Chicago-based photographer, which ranges from street encounters to formal studio portraits. Dawoud Bey is distinguished for his commitment to portraiture as a means for understanding contemporary society, first gaining notoriety as a photographer for his acclaimed series, Harlem U. S. A., exhibited at The Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. The 50 images in Picturing People, organized by The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, represent the evolution of Bey’s work in the three decades since, during which time he continued his portraiture of primarily AfricanAmerican subjects. Over the years, Bey continues to investigate numerous photographic methods to increase his engagement with his subjects, switching from black and white to color, shifting between street photography and studio work, and now working with large-format cameras. His


S P O T L I G H T

earliest small camera pictures cluded in the permanent coldemonstrate a spontaneous or- lections of the Art Institute of chestration and choreography Chicago; the Museum of Conof human interactions within a temporary Art, Chicago; the specific location, and the fleet- Brooklyn Museum; the Detroit ing social tensions embedded Institute of Arts; The Fogg Art in them. Bey’s street portraits Museum at Harvard Universiexplore moments of consensual ty; the Museum of Modern Art collaboration between the art- in New York; the San Francisist and the subjects. co Museum of Modern Art; the With his Polaroid Museum of Conphotographs, Bey temporary Art, began his introducNorth Miami; the tion of young peoWhitney Museum ple as a central subof American Art, ject. His most recent New York; and series is Strangers/ others. He has Community, conbeen featured in sisting of large-fornumerous exhibiDawoud Bey uses mat photographs of tions worldwide, portraiture as two individuals that, including a midalthough members a means for under- career survey, Dastanding conof the same sociowoud Bey: Porgeographic commutraits 1975-1995, temporary social nity, are unknown organized by the circumstances. to one another. CaWalker Art Center sually positioned side-by-side, in Minneapolis. Bey holds a between them are differences MFA degree from Yale Univerin age, race, comportment, gen- sity School of Art and is currentder, etc.—differences which call ly Professor of Art and a Distininto question the terms on which guished College Artist at Columcommunity is defined. bia College Chicago, where he Dawoud Bey’s works are in- has taught since 1998. O n V iew

opposite: Stuart Hall (detail), 1998, Internal dye diffusion transfer prints, 30 x 44” above (top to bottom): 1. Kali-Ashet Amen and Geshe Ngawang Phende, 2010, Pigment Print, 40 x 50” 2. Chris, 2002, Chromogenic print, 40 x 50” left: dawoud bey, photo: JASON SMILKE/Mainstream images courtesy of the artist


PROFILE { R A Ú L

OMA’S NEW SUMMER SHOW,

C O L Ó N }

Exhibition

Tall Tales and Huge Hearts: Raúl Colón On view August 24th through November 3rd at Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

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Tall Tales & Huge Hearts, includes a selection of wonderful illustrations by award-winning artist, Raúl Colón, who has illustrated more than 30 books for children, including Doña Flor: A Tall Tale About a Giant Woman with a Great Big Heart by Pat Mora, which won the prestigious Pura Belpré Medal; My Mama Had A Dancing Heart by Libba Moore Gray; and José! Born to Dance: The Story of José Limon by Susanna Reich, winner of the Tomas Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award. Among Colón’s most recent picture books is Don’t Forget: God Bless Our Troops by Jill Biden. Colón’s work has a soft, almost surreal appearance, but upon closer inspection, viewers can get a glimpse of the artist’s painstaking process. Starting with watercolor paper, Colón applies a golden wash of watercolor paint followed by layers of washes. He uses pencil to draw his images, and adds further detailing and texture with colored pencils and litho pencils. He also uses a “scratcher” tool to draw down through


P R O F I L E

the different layers. the experience, he also came to Born in NewYork City in 1952, realize that illustration was his Colon moved with his parents to true passion and in 1988, he dePuerto Rico in the ’60s. Accord- cided to move to New York to being to the artist, what seemed a gin a freelance career. New York disadvantage in his childhood City became Colón’s loyal paturned out to be just the oppo- tron, from illustrated New Yorksite: “As a child, I had chron- er covers and a MTA mural at the ic asthma and would frequent- 191st St. subway station, to work ly be so ill that I could not leave in the New York Times and Time the house for days Magazine. or even weeks at a Along with all time. But all those of his ‘grown-up’ times I spent locked work, Raul Colón up inside, I spent is a prolific and popfilling up dozens of ular children’s book composition noteillustrator. Each of books with all kinds his characters have of drawings....I a larger-than-life Raúl Colón would read comic presence and his has illustrated books and then draw books share impormore than 30 books them—that’s where tant messages for for children. I learned to draw the children—even his human figure and movement.” tall tales tell the importance of As a tenth-grade student, Colón working hard to succeed. received his first real training in Tall Tales & Huge Hearts will photography and advertising art. include fun interactive gallery acIn 1978, he moved to Fort Lau- tivities to engage young visitors derdale, where he found a job as well as a reading area filled working at an educational tele- with books featured in the show. vision center, designing everyThere will also be a free, pubthing from puppets to short an- lic presentation by the artist on imated films. While he enjoyed September 28th. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Orson Blasts Off!, ©2004 by Raúl Colón 2. Doña Flor: A Tall Tale about a Giant Woman with a Great Big Heart, ©2005 by Raúl Colón above (top to bottom): 1. Doña Flor: A Tall Tale about a Giant Woman with a Great Big Heart, ©2005 by Raúl Colón, 2. Rise the Moon, ©2003 by Raúl Colón, left: Raúl Colón images courtesy of the artist

On View 07 09 2013  

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