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Nathan Sawaya: The ART of the BRICK AT T H E A R T

A N D C U LT U R E C E N T E R O F H O L LY W O O D

The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 2

A Parisian Affair: The ART of André RENOUX AT T H E A L B I N

POLASEK MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDENS, W I N T E R PA R K

Vintage Photographs

The Prints of

by BRASSAÏ

Gustave BAUMANN

AT T H E F L O R I D A

MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC A R T S , TA M PA

AT C O R N E L L

FINE ARTS MUSEUM, W I N T E R PA R K


CONTENTS Ju n e /Ju l y

2012

Vo l . 3 , N o . 2

ON THE COVER : NATHAN SAWAYA, BRICK ARTIST, WITH GRAY RIGHT: NATHAN SAWAYA, YELLOW IMAGES COURTESY OF BRICKARTIST.COM

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Nathan Sawaya: The ART of the BRICK AT T H E A R T

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 2

A Parisian Affair: The ART of André RENOUX

A N D C U LT U R E C E N T E R

AT T H E A L B I N

O F H O L LY W O O D

POLASEK MUSEUM & SCULPTURE

The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

GARDENS, W I N T E R PA R K

Vintage Photographs

The Prints of

by BRASSAÏ

Gustave BAUMANN

AT T H E F L O R I D A

AT C O R N E L L

MUSEUM OF

FINE ARTS MUSEUM,

PHOTOGRAPHIC A R T S , TA M PA

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42 Hollywood

NATHAN SAWAYA: THE ART OF THE BRICK

The Art and Culture Center of Hollywood presents its third exhibition of works by New York-based artist, Nathan Sawaya, whose artistry transforms LEGO® bricks into whimsical and awe-inspiring creations. PLUS: On View interview—Nathan Sawaya: Behind the Bricks, on pg. 50

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

54 Winter Park

66 Tampa

78 Winter Park

92 Sarasota

AFFAIR: THE ART

OF THE 1930 s :

OF GUSTAVE

SHAPING ART &

A PARISIAN

OF ANDRÉ RENOUX

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens presents a nostalgic tribute to “The City of Light,” as seen through the eyes of a 20th century master.

THE SECRET PARIS VINTAGE PHOTO-

GRAPHS BY BRASSAÏ

The forbidden side of Paris is revealed in this intriguing visual documentary at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts.

THE PRINTS

DECO JAPAN:

BAUMANN

CULTURE, 1920-1945

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art hosts the first exhibition outside Tokyo dedicated to Japanese expressions of Art Deco.

Experience a sense of wonder and awe in this brilliant display of woodblock prints by Gustave Baumann, presented by Cornell Fine Arts Museum.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ANDRÉ RENOUX, CAFÉ DE FLORE À PARIS, 1998; BRASSAÏ, FILLE DE MONTMARTRE PLAYING RUSSIAN BILLIARDS, BLVD ROCHECHOUART, 1932-33, ©BRASSAÏ ESTATE; GUSTAVE

On View Destination: CHICAGO, IL

BAUMANN, OLD SANTA FE, 1924, ©NEW MEXICO MUSEUM

108 The Museums: An overview of RIGHT: NAVY PIER AND THE CHICAGO SKYLINE, © CITY OF CHICAGO / GRC

OF ART; GINGA NO UTA (SONG OF THE MILKY WAY),

Chicago’s outstanding art venues

THEME SONG OF THE MOVIE “GINGA NO UTA,” BY SHÔCHIKU

118 A Gallery Tour: A fine art gallery listing OnV

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CONTENTS 2012

Ju n e /Ju l y

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No. 2

5

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach presents Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey.

Exhibition

102

ANDY WARHOL

The Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art in Tarpon Springs, hosts an exhibition of icons from history and pop culture by the master of Pop himself—Andy Warhol. Spotlight

104

JOHN ROCCO

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

Award-winning author and illustrator, John Rocco, captivates young audiences with his fantastical illustrations.

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GALLERY

Profile

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

PICTURED: jack newman, fourth of july, 50 x 60”

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JACK NEWMAN

For Jack Newman, food is every bit as beautiful to paint as a lush landscape or an intriguing portrait. From rich desserts and boxed chocolates, to a series of entire meals, his tantalizing creations delight the senses.

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RICK BECK

A fascinating blend of industrial strength with subtle form and delicate color, Rick Beck’s glass sculptures are full of surprises, despite seeming familiar.


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on iew

Summer Delights

M A G A Z I N E

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

we’ve kicked off our summer lineup with

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick, on pg. 42, a blockbuster exhibition hosted by the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood. Sawaya’s awe-inspiring LEGO® sculptures have been featured twice before at the Center, to the delight of LEGO enthusiasts young and old, with attendance reaching record-breaking levels for each show. In this issue, Nathan Sawaya shares some of the magic behind his art in a chat with On View, on pg. 50. The magic continues as we “travel” to Paris with two striking shows presenting the “City of Light” from two highly contrasting perspectives. A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux, on pg. 54, takes us on an enchanting journey through the more intimate landmarks of daily Parisian life, while The Secret Paris of the 1930s: Vintage Photographs by Brassaï, on pg. 66, reveals the forbidden Paris of the 1930s—the sordid yet fascinating bas-monde where high society mingled with the underworld. From the color-drenched landscapes of the Southwest in The Prints of Gustave Baumann, on pg. 78, and iconic portraits from the “Master of Pop” in Works by Warhol: From the Cochran Collection, on pg. 102, to a visual feast of culinary delights in Jack Newman: The United Tastes of America, on pg. 100, there’s great summer viewing ahead! Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey O n v i e w 06.07–09.02.12 a t t h e N O RT O N M U S E U M o f A RT, We s t P a l m B e a c h

T

HE NORTON MUSEUM OF ART

opens its summer exhibition schedule with Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey. Gorey (1925-2000) is among the rare breed of artists whose work is as much beloved by children as it is by adults. Included in this delightfully enigmatic display are more than 150 drawings the artist created for many of his books, including The Gashlycrumb Tinies, The Unstrung Harp and The Gilded Bat, among others. An illuminating array of sketchbooks, illustrated envelopes, book cover ideas and theatrical costume designs are also presented in the exhibition, which was organized by the Edward Gorey Charitable Trust and Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, PA. At the mere mention of the late artist’s name, adjectives such as ghoulish, gothic

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Summer art camps are growing in popularity because of the positive experience the children are having.

Galoshes of Remorse, n.d., frontispiece for Amphigorey Again, 2006, pen, ink, and watercolor, 9.75 x 7.25�, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, Š2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust


MUSE E l e g a n t E n i g m a s : T h e A r t o f E d w a rd G o re y

Gorey himself described his work as “whimsically macabre.” and, well...gory, often come to mind. But that’s not even half the story, according to art historian, curator and author, Karen Wilkin, who was also a good friend of the artist. She has worked diligently to set the Gorey story straight and has authored, or co-authored, three books about the artist, including Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey (2009), which also serves as the catalog for the exhibition. Wilkin is scheduled to present an exhibition lecture at 6:30 pm on June 7th, during the Museum’s popular weekly Art After Dark series. On June 14th at Art After Dark, exhibition-related activities include a Gorey illustration workshop; Gorey storytelling; a Gorey Curator’s Conversation, led by Tim B. Wride, the Norton’s William and Sarah Ross Sorter Curator of Photography—and in the realm of the eerie, a demonstration by mentalist/mind-reader, Brent Gregory. One thing Wilkin hopes the exhibition accomplishes is to “lay to rest how people talk about [Gorey] as being macabre and eerie.” She attributes the enduring popularity of books such as The Gashlycrumb Tinies, published in 1963, which features the alphabetical, diverse, and sometimes diabolical demise of children, as one of the reasons Gorey is mischaracterized, misunderstood and pigeonholed as ghoulish. A book illustrating such misfortune as, “E is for Ernest who choked on a peach. F is for Fanny sucked dry by a leech,” could do that to a reputation. Books, films (of the silent sort), TV shows, art and artists, were major influences for Gorey’s work, including the absurdist theatrical works of Ionesco and the comedy of Buster Keaton. While Wilkin doesn’t dispute the macabre aspect to Gorey’s oeuvre—Gorey himself described his work as “whimsically macabre”— Mr. C(lavius) F(rederick) Earbrass is, of course, the well-known novelist. Of his books, A Moral Dustbin, More Chains than Clank, Was It Likely?, and the Hipdeep Trilogy are, perhaps, most admired. Mr. Earbrass is seen on the croquet lawn of his home, Hobbies Odd, near Collapsed Pudding in Mortshire. He is studying a game left unfinished at the end of summer. From The Unstrung Harp; or, Mr. Earbrass Writes a Novel, 1953, pen and ink, 4.5 x 3.5”, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

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MUSE


MUSE E l e g a n t E n i g m a s : T h e A r t o f E d w a rd G o re y

it’s only part of the equation. A close look at the exhibition also reveals the witty, slapstick sensibility of much of his work as well as the mind of a Renaissance man. Aside from illustrating books—his own and those by others—Gorey’s medium was also the Broadway stage, TV, and through his influence, film and literature, too. His was nominated for a pair of Tony Awards for Best Set Design and Best Costume Design (winning the latter) for the 1977 Broadway production of Dracula, which spread his reputation well beyond the world of books. His popularity expanded further in 1980, when the hit series PBS Mystery!, later renamed Masterpiece Mystery, B is for Basil assaulted by Bears. From The Gashlycrumb Tinies; or, After the Outing, 1963, pen and ink, 2-7/8 x 4”, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

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MUSE E l e g a n t E n i g m a s : T h e A r t o f E d w a rd G o re y

used his work for its opening theme. The films of Tim Burton—Beetlejuice and Edward Scissorhands, for example—and the tales of Lemony Snickett (A Series of Unfortunate Events) owe more than a little “macabre whimsy” to Gorey’s work. So, even if you’ve never heard of Edward Gorey, you’ve probably stumbled upon his work at one time or another. And younger generations continue to discover and embrace the artist’s work. Take for example, Siobhan Magnus, the 2010 American Idol contestant who was not shy about revealing the tattoo on her right shoulder, portraying a scene from—what else?—The Gashlycrumb Tinies! O n V iew After it had passed, Lord Wherewithal was found crushed beneath a statue blown down from the parapet. From The Secrets: Volume One, The Other Statue, 1968, pen and ink, 4.5 x 5.5”, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

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{S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S*

C O M P I L E D

B Y

O N

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

tic and incorporate a lot of ideas, but will also be playable for club-wielding enthusiasts. Bring family and friends for a remarkably creative, fun and slightly competitive experience!

04-05.2012 BOCA RATON Thru 10.14.12

Glass Act: The Contemporary Art Glass Movement Turns 50 Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement in America, this display showcases art glass representative of the full breadth of this defining period in contemporary glassmaking, and focuses on unique objects that

explore ideas by leading glass artists such as Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Michael Glancy, Harvey Littleton, Concetta Mason, William Morris, Jay Musler, Toots Zynsky and others.

Artist-Designed Mini Golf Boca Raton Museum of Art

BRADENTON Thru 08.26.12

Preserving www.bocamuseum.org Eden: Clyde Designed for those Butcher’s long summer months, Florida the Museum’s gallerPhotographs ies will be transformed South Florida into an interactive Museum

18-hole mini golf course. The course will not only be artis-

07.18-10.07.12

Big Art/ Miniature Golf:

www.southflorida museum.org

Using black & white

Image from Glass Act: The Contemporary Art Glass Movement Turns 50 at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Harvey K. Littleton, Ruby Orange Mobile Arc, 1982, internally decorated, hot-drawn glass, cut and polished, 14-3/4 x 18-1/2 x 2-1/4”, museum permanent collection, gift of the Estate of George Epstein

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film as his medium, Clyde Butcher creates images that look beyond the obvious and attract the viewer with the drama of light and shadow, engaging not just our eyes, but our emotions­— and hopefully, as he says—our hearts. CORAL GABLES 06.23-10.21.12

Introspection and Awakening: Japanese Art of the Edo and Meiji Period, 1615-1912 Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

porcelains from the 17th to early 20th century, which address a variety of themes, including the influence of China and Korea on Japan during this crucial timeframe; the Japanese life-style and belief structure; and the impact of the West.

Mexican Retablos from Joseph and Janet Shein Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

CORAL SPRINGS 06.09-08.18.12

Ann Deon, Jack Newman, Isabel Perez and Deborah Gregg Coral Springs Museum of Art

www.lowemuseum.org

Painted devotional images of saints, called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects Thru 09.23.12 of veneration and to Saintly Blessings seek favors, are from Mexico: on exhibit for the A Gift of first time.

www.csmart.org

Paintings, sculptures and mixed-media works by artists, Anne Deon, Jack Newman, Isabel Perez and Deborah Gregg will be on display in four distinctive special presentations. (See story on pg. 100.) DAYTONA BEACH Thru 09.02.12

www.lowemuseum.org

Featured are early examples of the various painting schools, woodblock prints and

Director’s Choice: Favorite Artworks from the Collections

Image from Jack Newman: The United Tastes of America at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Jack Newman, 22 Across, 42 x 49”

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Daytona Beach continued...

are beautifully composed, visually exciting and masterfully produced, using the centuries-old process of Ukiyo-e carving and printing. Though Paul Jacoulet used traditional processes, his images are modern and beautifully synthesize Japanese and French aesthetics. (See story in the April/May 2012 issue on pg. 110.)

as Selected by MOAS Director Emeritus Gary R. Libby Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The extraordinary quality and range of artwork at MOAS lends itself well to an exhibit that highlights the “best of the best.” Included are stunning contemporary jewels together with historic French, American and decorative pieces from across the globe—a show not to be missed! Thru 07.08.12

Havana Revisited: An Architectural Heritage Museum of Arts & Sciences

06.23-09.08.12 Thru 06.10.12

www.moas.org

Historical colored postcard images of Havana are juxtaposed with recent digital color photographs of the same views in this visual documentary, based on years of exhaustive research and investigation.

Jacoulet: Woodblock Prints from the MOAS Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The focus of this exhibition is a remarkable set of woodblock prints that

The Tsars’ Cabinet: Two Hundred Years of Russian Decorative Arts under the Romanovs Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The Tsars’ Cabinet illustrates two hundred years of decorative

Image from Jacoulet: Woodblock Prints from the MOAS Collections at Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach: Paul Jacoulet, Nuit de Neige, collection of the Museum of Arts & Sciences

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arts of Russia from the time of Peter the Great in the early 18th century to that of Nicholas II in the early 20th century. Many of the pieces in the exhibition were designed for the use of the tsars or other Romanovs. Others are indicative of the styles that were prominent during their reigns.

porcelains presented in this important exhibition were created during the progressive reign of Mutsuhito, the Meiji Emperor, who ascended the Japanese throne in 1867 at the age of 15 and ruled with the aid of Samurai advisors until his death in 1912.

Thru 06.10.12

Thru 06.16.12

Treasures of the Chrysanthemum Throne: Bronzes, Porcelain and Ivory from the Meiji Empire Museum of Arts & Sciences

Expanding Visions

D e LAND

Florida Museum for Women Artists

Jean Banas of New Smyrna Beach.

www.floridamuseumfor

06.22-08.19.12

womenartists.org

Witness to Creativity III Florida Museum for Women Artists

FMWA presents the expanded bodies of work of eight exceptional Florida artists: Amy W. Miller of Venice, Carolina Cleere of Tampa, Julia Owens of Sanford, Vivian Spencer of Pensacola, Candance Knapp of Brandon, Barbara Balzer of Tallahassee, Jo Sinclair of St. Augustine and

www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

Following the success of Witness to Creativity II, which took place in July of 2011, the Museum will once again open its doors to the public, while a group of artists prepare their works. Viewers will enjoy a rare opportunity to engage the artists about their projects, work methods and messages. This dialog between the artists and viewers is part of the resulting art installa-

www.moas.org

The exquisite Japanese bronzes, intricate yet delicate ivories and glorious

Image from Expanding Visions at Florida Museum for Women Artists, DeLand: Barbara Balzer, Make Me Laugh installation

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tions making up this exhibition.

sculptures, masks and other objects depicting a host of legendary ghosts, gods and otherworldly beings.

Thru 07.15.12

Architectural Counterpoints Museum of Florida Art

DUNEDIN

www.museumoffloridaart.org

On display are works by Roxanne Horvath, Peter Rumpel and Louise Lieber. Their sculptural creations evoke basic elements of architectural design.

Thru 08.11.12

Others, Elsewhere: Aydelette Kelsey 


 Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Thru 07.15.12

Strappo Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

Strappo is a combination of painting and printmaking, utilizing the plastic nature of acrylic paint to produce a monotype. This exhibition will feature 39 Strappo Mono

Prints by Harold Garde as well as an exhibit of area artists who work with the Strappo method.

Supernatural in Japanese Art Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

DELRAY BEACH Thru 09.16.12

Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The

www.morikami.org

Ghosts, Goblins and Gods comprises an array of paintings, colorful woodblock prints,

Aydelette Kelsey is a Florida-based artist with a wide range of talent. Spirit and emotion are common threads throughout her work. This exhibition is a photographic exploration of the artist as traveler. Thru 08.11.12

Three Islands: Bill McCarthy 

 


Image from Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach: Bairinsai Setsuzan (fl. 19th century), Courtesan Plucking Daruma’s Beard, painting mounted as a hanging scroll, ink and colors on paper, late Edo Period, mid-19th century, Clark Center for Japanese Art & Culture

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Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Maine artist, Bill McCarthy, exhibits a photographic series created at three environmentally and geographically distinct island locations: the active volcanic island country of Iceland, Bailey Island off the coast of Maine, and local barrier island, Caladesi.

varieties of sharks in the world, this exhibition contains photographs, sculptures and video as well as a section devoted to the sensational impact of the 1975 Steven Spielberg film, Jaws.

plays a selection of photographs by Anne Noggle, who became a professional photographer at age 40, after serving as one of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and as a captain in the US Air Force, during WWII. Noggle’s work explores female vitality, aging and beauty with an honest, respectful and sometimes humorous view.

GAINESVILLE 06.19.12-03.10.13

Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This installation dis-

Thru 09.09.12

Deep Roots, Bold Visions: Self-Taught Artists of Alachua County Harn Museum of Art

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 01.06.13

Shark Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

www.harn.ufl.edu

Deep Roots, Bold Visions presents paintings, sculptures and a variety of mixed-

www.moafl.org

In addition to drawings of all the known

Image from Deep Roots, Bold Visions: Self-Taught Artists of Alachua County at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Ed (Mr. Eddy) Mumma, Untitled, n.d., acrylic on Masonite, on loan from Lennie Kesl

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media works by self-taught artists, who work outside mainstream art traditions. 06.26.12-02.03.13

Souvenirs of Modern Asia: The Prints of Paul Jacoulet Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Souvenirs of Modern Asia features a remarkable set of 55 woodcuts by French artist, Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960), who lived and worked in Japan most of his life. These colorful and masterfully printed woodcuts were inspired by Jacoulet’s extensive travels in China, Japan, Korea and the South Pacific, and demonstrate a synthesis of tradi-

tional Japanese printing techniques with modern European aesthetics.

stone sculptures and jade ornaments from Ancient America— primarily Meso-America, Central America and the Andes.

Thru 11.04.12

Verdant Earth and Teeming Seas: The Natural World in Ancient American Art Harn Museum of Art

HOLLYWOOD

alters them to create whimsical, humorous, and at times, unsettling works of art. For Cloud 9, she will show pieces from her Cotton Candy Sculpture Series (20092010) as well as her Large-Scale Sculpture Series (2011-2012). 06.09-08.19.12

Nathan Sawaya: The Art of the Brick Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

The Art and Culture Karen Starosta- Center of Hollywood Gilinski: Cloud 9 presents its third Art and exhibition of the Culture Center work of New Yorkof Hollywood based artist, Nathan www.artandculturecenter.org Sawaya, whose work Karen Starosta-Gilin- transforms LEGO® ski takes provocative bricks into whimsitextured objects and cal and awe-inspiring 06.09-08.05.12

www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highlights the Museum’s collection of ceramic figures and vessels,

Image from Karen Starosta-Gilinski: Cloud 9 at Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Karen Starosta-Gilinski, The Survivor (original title), 2011, vinyl, broken closet doors, plush, crystals, 19.5”h x 54”w x 33”d

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creations. In the 2012 exhibition of The Art of The Brick, Sawaya will reveal a selection of many new works, most of which have not been seen at the Center. (See story on pg. 42.)

ing contemporary art in the 1960s,’70s, and ’80s.

woodblock prints that ReFocus: showcases this uniqueArt of the ’70s ly expressive art form Museum of and provides an extenContemporary Thru 08.09.12 sive view of the styles Art Jacksonville Beyond Ukiyo-e: and themes encomwww.mocajacksonville.org Japanese passed by this genre as MOCA examines the Woodblock well as an understand“Me Decade” that Prints and Their ing of 19th century gave rise to PhotoInfluence on Japanese culture. realism, Earthworks, Western Art JACKSONVILLE and Conceptual The Cummer Thru 07.31.12 Thru 07.08.12 Art, and expanded Museum of Art 50 Forward: Project Atrium: the boundaries of & Gardens New Additions Mark Licari Abstract Painting, www.cummer.org to the Permanent Museum of Video, Performance The Cummer Museum Collection Contemporary and Installation Art of Art & Gardens The Cummer Art Jacksonville in the second of a presents a collection of Museum of Art www.mocajacksonville.org 3-part series examin- 19th century Japanese & Gardens For his show at MOCA www.cummer.org Jacksonville, Mark The Cummer unLicari has tansformed veils new acquisitions the gallery space with made through gifts his dramatic wall drawand purchases in ings, created on-site honor of the Museum’s in the 7 days leading 50th Anniversary. up to the exhibition’s opening. (See story in 06.05-09.16.12 the February/March Miradas: 2012 issue on pg. 110.) Ancient Roots Thru 08.26.12

Image from ReFocus: Art of the ’70s at Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Jacksonville: Richard “Dickie” Landry; 1, 2, 3, 4; 1975, gift of Norman E. Fisher Collection, MOCA Jacksonville permanent collection

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

in Modern Mexican Art: Works from the Bank of America Collection The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition examines and celebrates works by artists on both sides of the border—American and Mexican-American— to reveal a variety of cultural aspects as they emerged in the years after the Mexican Revolution (1910– 1920) to the present day. Included are works by some of the best-known Mexican artists—Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, Gabriel Orozco, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Gunther Gerzso.

Thru 07.08.12

in vivid yet abstracted compositions. The Year of the Sheep illustrates the power art has to transform and heal.

Richard Chamberlain: The Year of the Sheep The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

LAKELAND

www.cummer.org

Chamberlain’s images explore the conflicts between good and evil, light and dark, and the seen and the unseen,

Thru 06.23.12

Albert Paley’s use of steel can be described as industrial poetry. His large sculptures combine an apparent heaviness with an almost lost sense of gravity as unfurled and animate forms construct massive works of art. (See story in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 68.) 06.30-10.13.12

Invisible Elephant: Theo Wujcik and Kirk ke Wang Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

The central concept for this exhibition of contemporary artworks is an ancient www.polkmuseumofart.org parable telling of six Albert Paley: Sketches & Steel 
 Polk Museum of Art

Image from Miradas: Ancient Roots in Modern Mexican Art: Works from the Bank of America Collection at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Javier Chavira, El guerrero (The Warrior), 2004, acrylic and crayon on paper, Bank of America Collection, © Javier Chavira

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blind men who encountered a large elephant and how each defined what they encountered, based on their individual perspectives. The underlying message of this parable is the diversity of interpretation. For Invisible Elephant, Wujcik and Wang have produced new works based on their different perspectives in relation to the other’s cultural background.

interest in art produced by artists living beyond the realm of popular culture. In 1972, the term “outsider art” became the official English translation of art brut. This exhibition uses pieces from the Museum’s permanent collection to initiate a conversation about the contemporary state of art brut.

3-D Polk Museum of Art

Research Studio Art & History Museums, Maitland

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.artandhistory.org

Thru 08.18.12

3-D showcases sculptures in all shapes and sizes from the Museum’s Collection.

André Smith (1880– 1959) founded the Research Studio (now called the A&H’s Maitland Art Center) in 1937. He invited artists to live and create within its walls. During its heydey (1938–1957), nearly 70 artists participated in this great experiment, including Milton Avery, Doris Lee, Ralston Crawford, and more. What was their day-to-day life like? Using artworks and newly-found color photography as documentation, the exhibition will recreate the atmosphere of that classic period.

MAITLAND 06.08-09.19.12

A Day in the Life of the

06.02-09.02.12

Outsider vs Folk Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

The term “art brut” was first coined by 20th century French artist, Jean Dubuffet. Art brut (or ‘raw art’) labeled the growing Image from Invisible Elephant: Theo Wujcik and Kirk ke Wang at Polk Museum of Art: Courtesy of Polk Museum of Art

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thoughtful and probing ways. “The afterlife” is the belief that a part of the personal identity survives the death of the body and carries on in another oblivion. Alex Heria, Franklin Sinanan and Byron Keith Byrd explore this realm through imaginative pieces of work.

MELBOURNE 07.14-09.09.12

Cuban Daydreams: Dionel Delgado Gonzalez Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Havana artist, Dionel Delgado Gonzalez, showcases his largescale paintings of magazine covers. Reminiscent of Norman Rockwell’s style, the subjects depict everyday life in Cuba. Living in Haban Vieja (Old Havana), his inspiration comes from the characters that inhabit the surrounding streets near his studio. 06.02-07.08.12

Florida Artists from the Permanent Collection

Thru 08.12.12

Charles Ledray: Bass Museum of Art Bass Museum of Art Foosaner Art Museum

MIAMI

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

06.22-07.22.12

The Museum’s permanent collection contains a number of artworks by Florida artists. This exhibition celebrates the creativity of these artists.

The Afterlife ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

The Afterlife examines the concept of religion in fanciful,

www.bassmuseum.org

Charles Ledray’s work is a poetry of material, scale and cultural resonance, rich with history and emotion. Well known for his exquisitely crafted objects, working in a range of ma-

Image from The Afterlife at ArtCenter/South Florida, Miami: Alex Heria, courtesy of the artist and ArtCenter/South Florida

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terials from fabric to human bone, Ledray’s work touches on loss, pathos and absence. This exhibition is focused on creating a unique dialogue between four individual, powerful works—a dialogue of profound intellectual and visual beauty. (See story in the April/May 2012 issue on pg. 104.) Thru 08.12.12

Erasey Page Bass Museum of Art

view in the Bass Museum’s recently renovated project room space. The interactive website encourages visitors to live an internet-free and happy life by simply deleting the World Wide Web, page by page, questioning our increasingly virtual lives (via social media, etc.) to playfully imagine a world without the Internet.

past, giving a sense Mel Finkelstein: of this larger-than-life Picturing the man and his world of Man Behind the time, place and celebCamera rity. The exhibit is full Jewish Museum of candid images of of Florida well-known personwww.jewishmuseum.com alities such as Frank Finkelstein’s ability to Sinatra, Humphrey “play the hunch” reBogart, Lauren Bacall, sulted in his capturing Jacqueline Kennedy special moments that Onassis, The Beatles, tell a story. This colJohn Travolta, Kim lection of photos from Novak, Marilyn Monthe 1950s to the 80s, roe, Sylvester Stalfocuses on iconic sym- lone and Presidents bols from our cultural Kennedy, Truman and Eisenhower. Thru 10.14.12

Thru 09.30.12

www.bassmuseum.org

Erasey Page is a newly commissioned web-based project that Jillian Mayer produced in collaboration with computer programmer, designer and creative technologist, Eric Schoenborn, which is on

Once Upon a Time in Lithuania and the Florida Connnection Jewish Museum of Florida www.jewishmuseum.com

This exhibition of paintings and prints

Image from Charles Ledray: Bass Museum of Art at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Charles Ledray, Mens Suits (installation view), 2009, mixed media, photo: John Kennard

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by English artist, Naomi Alexander, records the last remnants of Jewish heritage to be found in the country of Lithuania. Alexander traveled the country to create artwork depicting her impressions of the people and their communities. The Museum makes a Florida connection using photographs and artifacts from Floridian Jews whose origins are from Lithuania.

from the 1960s to the present, through sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography, video and performance. Thru 09.02.12

work consists of eight synchronized videos projected at large scale, each depicting a bustling area of a major metropolitan center: Cairo, Delhi, Lagos, London, Mex06.29-08.26.12 ico City, New York, Kimsooja: A Shanghai and Tokyo. Needle Woman In each projection, Miami Art the artist exemplifies Museum the perennial struggle www.miamiartmuseum.org to preserve a place A Needle Woman for the individual presents a multi-chan- within contemporary nel video installation society, while poetiby Korean artist, cally embodying the Kimsooja. This epic experience of being

engulfed within a foreign culture. Thru 06.10.12

Transcultural Pilgrim: Three Decades of Work by José Bedia Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

This major career retrospective of the work of José Bedia includes works on paper and canvas www.miamiartmuseum.org and two large-scale Bringing together installations. Bedia’s artists from around personal border crossthe world who have ings (social, racial worked with records and religious) reflect as their subject or his exploration of medium, this groundhistorical and conbreaking exhibition temporary encounters examines the record’s between cultures and transformative power, countries, which he The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl Miami Art Museum

Image from The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl at Miami Art Museum: Jeroen Diepenmaat,
Pour des dents d’un blanc éclatant et saines, 2005,
record players, vinyl records, stuffed birds, sound, courtesy of the artist

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personalizes in his artistic production.

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Thru 09.02.12

www.mocanomi.org

Ed Ruscha: On the Road Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Ed Ruscha is known for his use of language to document and comment on the shifting character of American culture. Drawing inspiration from the classic American novel, On the Road, by Jack Kerouac—in his own limited art book version of the novel—he has created a new body of paintings, drawings and photographs.

Part of MOCA’s Knight Exhibition Series, Song presents video works by Icelandic artist, Ragnar Kjartansson. The videos reflect the artist’s interest in music, theater and the personae of its performers, often coupled with extreme environments.

with the slightest shift in viewing position or the angle of light. These paintings are experiences in perception, about what happens when the viewer traverses the image.

Thru 09.02.12

Scapes: Lynne Golob Gelfman The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The works in this exhibition reference water, clouds and sand as well as aerial views of Greco-Roman ruins. The focus of the show is the dune paintings, a series of images whose surfaces change

Thru 07.01.12

The War We Have Not Seen by Juan Manuel Echavarría The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The 24 paintings included in this exhibition were created by men and women who participated in Colombia’s war. All 35 participants were rank and file soldiers who spent two years painting their personal experiences, illustrating the rural tragedy.

Thru 09.02.12

Ragnar Kjartansson: Song

Image from Scapes: Lynne Golob Gelfman at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Lynne Golob Gelfman, Dune 17, 2011, acrylic on panel, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist, photo: Richard Fendleman

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The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Thru 08.05.12

Ursula von Rydingsvard: Sculpture The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.wolfsonian.org

Witness how artists manifested in their work the most profound and mundane aspects of American life through this display of American paintings, sculptures and prints from the 1920s to the ’40s.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Ursula Von Rydingsvard is renowned for creating large-scale sculpture from cedar beams, which she painstakingly cuts, assembles, glues, clamps and laminates, rubbing powered graphite into the work’s textured, faced surfaces. Her signature shapes are abstract, drawing on a range of sources from the humble to the majestic. (See story in the April/May 2012 issue on pg. 56.) Thru 09.09.12

Graphic Intervention:

25 Years of International AIDS Awareness Posters 1985–2010 The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

gies, employed by many different countries, in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a public health emergency.

www.wolfsonian.org

Manifest and Mundane: Scenes of Modern America from the Wolfsonian Collection

This exhibition features a selection of 152 posters, which presents an insightful overview of diverse visual strate-

Thru 08.31.12

Thru 08.19.12

Visions of Victory: Picturing the SpanishAmerican War The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

This installation showcases images created by artists and printers to comple-

Image from Ursula von Rydingsvard: Sculpture at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Ursula von Rydingsvard, Halo with a Straight Line, 2010, cedar, graphite, ink, 133 x 114 x 79”, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, NY

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ment written accounts of battle from the Spanish-American War. Created in an era predating widespread photojournalism, these images—primarily periodical and newspaper illustrations, books, posters, frameable works of art, and other items—were integral to how the American and British publics formed a visual impression of the war.

vocative expressionist paintings, which explore issues of social and political realism.

representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century.

includes works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Miguel Covarrubias and José Clement Orozco.

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art

Thru 06.30.12

Thru 06.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

www.thephil.org

Selections from The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art Permanent Collection Naples Museum of Art

Thru 06.30.12

An exciting new selection of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection are on display,

The colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico are reflected in this new installation, which

www.thephil.org

Throughout the season, the Museum will feature rotating exhibitions of selections from the permanent collection, including new and recent acquisitions and art never before displayed in the Museum.

NAPLES Thru 06.30.12

Juan Genovés: A Retrospective Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

One of Spain’s bestknown contemporary artists, Juan Genovés is celebrated for his pro-

Thru 06.30.12

The Mouse House: Works

Image from Juan Genovés: A Retrospective at Naples Museum of Art: Juan Genovés, Anudado, 2011, acrylic on canvas on board, ©Juan Genovés,
 courtesy Marlborough Gallery, NY

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

members of this local art club.

www.thephil.org

Thru 09.09.12

The Mouse House is a treasure trove of intimate-sized works from some of the giants of 20th century art. This delightful exhibition recreates the environment of Hirshhorn’s art-packed home in Washington, known as “The Mouse House.” NEW SMYRNA BEACH Thru 06.16.12

The Art of Doris Leeper Atlantic Center for the Arts www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

ORLANDO

This retrospective survey includes paintings and three-dimensional works by artist, environmentalist, visionary and founder of the Atlantic Center for the Arts, Doris Leeper (1936-2001).

the flagship exhibition of The Society of Animal Artists, featuring works created by some of today’s best classically trained international artists specializing in animal subject matter.

FloridaScapes: I-4—The Exits Less Traveled Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

Documenting the cities and neighborhoods along Interstate 4 through photography, Sherri Bunye, Crealdé Studio Artist, hopes her images inspire others to take Thru 06.17.12 an exit less traveled OCALA Ocala Art Group’s and discover the unThru 06.17.12 on the Balcony expected beauty and Art and Appleton charm she captures. the Animal Museum of Art The exhibition foAppleton www.appletonmuseum.org cuses on the Orlando/ Museum of Art View more than 30 of Sanford stretch of I-4, www.appletonmuseum.org the best recent works and showcases her View 45 works from created by current newest work.

Image from FloridaScapes: I-4—The Exits Less Traveled at Orange County Regional History Center, Orlando: Sherri Bunye, Door, Window, Meter

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07.14-10.28.12

From Alice to Zeus: The Art of John Rocco Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Following a successful career within the entertainment industry, John Rocco has focused his attention on writing and illustrating numerous award-winning children’s books, including Wolf! Wolf!, Moonpowder, and Fu Finds the Way. He has also illustrated the covers for Rick Riordan’s bestselling youth literature series, Percy Jackson and the Olympians. Rocco’s exhibition at OMA features approximately 60 preparatory and finished drawings, providing

examples of how an illustration evolves, from earliest sketches to the finished work. (See story on pg. 104.) Thru 07.01.12

Jonpaul Douglass: Neighbor Orlando Museum of Art

terful lighting. Over the course of several years, Douglass has often created, and sometimes discovered, absurd sets, distinctive subjects and a variety of emotions, which has helped to foster the idea that life is an oversized neighborhood of the unknown.

www.omart.org

Douglass’ photographs bend the imagination and leave room for endless narrative possibilities. In the series, Neighbor, he spotlights the uncertain lifestyle of those around him, using unique found scenarios and mas-

Thru 06.30.12

Living in Style: African Art of Everyday Life Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Living in Style presents beautifully crafted functional objects created by both men and women from traditional African societies throughout the continent. While these objects were made to

Image from From Alice to Zeus: The Art of John Rocco at Orlando Museum of Art: ©2006 John Rocco, cover image detail by John Rocco for The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 1) , written by Rick Riordan, published by Disney Hyperion Books

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fulfill a useful purpose, they were also created to be expressive works of art and treasured possessions.

www.mennellomuseum.com

Thru 07.15.12

Reflections: Paintings of Florida 1865-1965 + Picturing My Florida Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Reflections demonstrates the importance of Florida as a location where artists drew inspiration over a sustained period. Dubbed the “Florida School,” these artists make us aware that America’s core identity is closely linked to its landscape and social history.

While Reflections presents historic paintings depicting Florida as a land of unspoiled natural beauty and quaint small town life, a companion exhibition, Picturing My Florida, takes a grassroots look at Florida today as people who live here see it in their everyday lives. These photographs vary in

subject matter and include Florida’s cities, attractions, hometowns and neighborhoods as well as the state’s celebrated natural environment. Thru 08.12.12

IMPRINTS: 20 Years of Flying Horse Editions The Mennello Museum of American Art

This interactive exhibition is a celebration of fine art book printing. It highlights the limited-edition art objects and fine art books printed by Flying Horse Editions, located at the University of Central Florida’s Center for Emerging Media in downtown Orlando. ORMOND BEACH 06.23-08.19.12

The Dog Days of Summer Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens presents a multi-artist, mixed-media tribute to “man’s best friend.”

Image from IMPRINTS: 20 Years of Flying Horse Editions at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando: Barbara Sorenson, Des Papier II, 2012, collagraph and mylar, 20 x 20 x 4”

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PENSACOLA Thru 09.01.12

Surfing Florida: A Photographic History Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

More than 25 professional surf photographers have contributed their images for this exhibition, which presents the history of Florida, surfing and surf culture.

one of Jacksonville’s prominent visual artists, Marilyn Antram, along with stone sculptures by Lurah Patrick, who combines Old World craftmanship with contemporary themes such as femininity and the fluid aspects of nature. SARASOTA 07.13-10.28.12 DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945

block prints, ranging from fine art objects made to impress the public at national art exhibitions, to goods mass-produced for the modern home. (See story on pg. 92.)

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

The nearly 200 works shown here, highlight the Levenson collection—the world’s premier collection of Japanese art in the Deco style. These pieces include spectacular examples of metalwork, ceramics, lacquer, glass, wood furniture, jewelry, textiles, graphic design on paper, painting and wood-

Thru 10.21.12

From the Vaults: John Ringling’s Asian and Cypriot Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

While John Ringling favored large, flamboyant European art, his collection of Asian art and Cypriot antiquities provides evidence that he was willing to move beyond his major interest. Some of these objects have not been on display for 30 years

PONTE VEDRA BEACH 06.01-07.13.12

Paint & Stone The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Paint & Stone presents a selection of expressive paintings by Image from Paint & Stone at The Cultural Center, Ponte Vedra Beach: Lurah Patrick, Abstract

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and others have never before been shown to the public. Important in their own right, they were also essential as a means for John Ringling to expand the Museum’s potential to feature the roots and flourishes of the world of art.

is ubiquitous within Florida’s landscape. ST. PETERSBURG Thru 10.14.12

Thru 10.14.12

Sanford Biggers: Codex The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

slavery to freedom in the 19th century, is a vibrant part of North American history.

www.ringling.org

As part of his Constellation Series, the works featured in this exhibit consist of quilts that depict “constellations” inspired by Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad conductors, whose use of the stars to navigate from

ST. AUGUSTINE Thru 06.22.12 Phillip and Mark Estlund:

Born of the Sun Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College www.flagler.edu/crispellert

Both natives of Jack-

sonville, Mark and Phillip Estlund’s works engender a type of material nostalgia to convey their respective explorations into everyday polarities and contradictions. Mark’s assemblage sculptures explore life, death and rebirth, while Phillip’s sculptures and collages deal with the clash between development and nature—a conflict that

Global + Local: Studio and Contemporary Glass on Florida’s West Coast Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Marking the 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, Global + Local reveals the range and richness of the area’s best glass from internationally renowned artists. Thru 08.19.12

Picturing a New Society: Photographs from the Soviet

Image from Global + Local: Studio and Contemporary Glass on Florida’s West Coast at Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: William Morris, Artifact: Tooth (1995), blown glass, collection of William R. and Hazel Hough, ©William Morris

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Union 1920s– 1980s Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition explores contradictions between idealistic images and life in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). TAMPA Thru 08.19.12

The Secret Paris of the 1930s: Vintage Photographs by Brassaï Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

maker, Brassaï, discovered and recorded the forbidden Paris of the 1930s—the sordid yet fascinating moments where high society mingled with the underworld. The Secret Paris of the ‘30s is one of the most remarkable photographic memories ever published. These unique pictures are accompanied by an immensely interesting text in which Brassaï reminisces and describes the extraordi-

nary conditions under which he took his photographs. (See story on pg. 66.)

design of the past century and is certain to appeal to all lovers of great design.

Thru 09.16.12

Thru 09.09.12

A Hundred Years—A Hundred Chairs: Masterworks from the Vitra Design Museum Tampa Museum of Art

Masterworks of 20th Century Sculpture from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

This show offers a view of the different periods of furniture

The latest exhibition in the Museum’s three-year partnership with the Marguiles Collection, Masterworks chronicles important developments in sculpture in the second half of the 20th century. In addition to sculptures by such 20th century luminaries as Joan Miro, Willem de Kooning and Louise

www.fmopa.org

Alone, or in the company of friends, Hungarian photographer, sculptor and film-

Image from Masterworks of 20th Century Sculpture from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection at Tampa Museum of Art: George Segal, Three People on 4 Benches, 1980, bronze and steel, Martin Z. Margulies Collection, ©The George and Helen Segal Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Nevelson, the exhibition also includes works by Isamu Noguchi, Manuel Neri, George Segal and Deborah Butterfield. An abiding fascination with the figure unites all the works in the show. Thru 09.23.12

Object Image/ Erik Levine/ Sculpture & Video Tampa Museum of Art

images, aesthetics and individual style, to form, utility and technical details. In each case, the visitor is invited to ask whether aesthetics or utility takes precedence. 06.04-08.04.12

the debut of this new acquisition and also includes two recent video works.

sional work by some of the most celebrated sculptors, installation artists and video artists of the 20th and 21st centuries.

In Residence University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

In Residence brings www.tampamuseum.org Thru 09.23.12 together the work of New York-based Sculptors on four Miami-based artsculptor, Erik Levine, Paper: Selections Thru 07.14.12 ists—Felecia Carlisle, is known for his use from the BNY Utility and Naomi Fisher, Christy of humble plywood in Mellon Collection Aesthetics in Gast and Samantha massive installations. Tampa Ancient Art Salzinger—who focus In 2011, the Museum Museum of Art Tampa artistic inquiries on the acquired one of his www.tampamuseum.org Museum of Art contested space belarge-scale sculptures, This collection of www.tampamuseum.org tween the natural and ironically titled Hand- drawings, collages Objects in this exhibit the built environment. Held (1997), for its and mixed-media have been grouped ac- These artists fold the permanent collection. works represents a cording to certain com- world around them This exhibition marks survey of two-dimen- mon features—from into complex examiImage from In Residence at University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Christy Gast, Production still from Herbert Hoover Dyke (detail), 2010, courtesy of the artist and Gallery Diet, Miami

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

nations of the history of art and an evolving understanding of landscape.

audiences young and old. It is the perfect summer event for the whole family. (See story on pg. 102.)

tures in glass, revealing their unexpected beauty. Form, Color, Light includes a range of work, from large floor pieces to small pedestal sculptures in translucent colors. (See story on pg. 106.)

TARPON SPRINGS

VERO BEACH

Thru 07.15.12

06.23-10.14.12

Works by Warhol: From the Cochran Collection Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Superman and Sitting Bull, Mickey Mouse and Mick Jagger, Donald Duck and Howdy Doody, Uncle Sam and Teddy Roosevelt— icons from history and pop culture by the master of Pop himself, Andy Warhol, will fill the galleries of LRMA this summer. The variety of the Cochran Collection will delight

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Rick Beck takes everyday shapes and transforms them into sculp-

and Joan Mitchell Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Three exceptional canvases by Joan Mitchell and Clyfford Still, each a master of late 20th century American painting, are on view.

WEST PALM BEACH Thru 09.02.12

06.21-09.02.12

American Masters at the Norton: Clyfford Still

Clubs, Joints and HonkyTonks Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition features extended bodies of work by photographers who have immersed themselves in the places, spaces and energy of concerts, shows and spontaneous live performances. Images and essays

Image from Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Rick Beck, Winged Figure, 2008, cast glass, 72-1/2 x 42 x 12”, collection of the artist, photo: David H. Ramsey

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

from photographers Jeff Dunas, David Sheinbaum, Henry Hornstein, Moby and others illuminate the worlds of country music, hip-hop, rock ‘n’ roll, and the blues.

WINTER PARK Thru 09.02.12

Best Impressions: Modern & Contemporary Prints from the Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Thru 06.24.12

Decoding Messages in Chinese Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

The subjects of all of the Chinese works featured in this exhibition are animals, which evoke symbolic associations and homonymic puns. From very early cosmology to later developments of Taoist and Confucian philosophies and ethics, Chinese animals gained new meanings

related to their historical contexts.

carry an Edwardian sophistication, while still able to impart the 06.07-09.02.12 whimsy of an invented Elegant world that was all his Enigmas: own. The exhibition The Art of features more than 170 Edward Gorey works by the master Norton artist and author, Museum of Art drawn from The Edwww.norton.org ward Gorey Charitable Edward Gorey (1925- Trust. Featured are 2000) is among the original pen-and-ink rare breed of artists illustrations, preparawhose work is as much tory sketches, unpubbeloved by children lished drawings and as it is by adults. His ephemera. (See story stories and illustrations on pg. 6.)

cfam.rollins.edu

Best Impressions provides an overview of many post-war aesthetic styles, including Photorealism, Op Art, and the Expressionism of the 1980s. The prints on view demonstrate the strength of the Museum’s modern and contemporary print holdings. Included are works by Chuck Close, Judy Pfaff, Richard Anuszkiewicz and Jacob Lawrence.

Image from Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: After it had passed, Lord Wherewithal was found crushed beneath a statue blown down from the parapet. From The Secrets: Volume One, The Other Statue, 1968, pen and ink, 4-1/2 x 5-1/2”, The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust, ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 6 o f 2 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 12.30.12

The Prints of Gustave Baumann Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This exhibition centers around Baumann’s mastery of the woodcut printmaking process and includes images of New Mexico and a series of seldom seen prints depicting the rugged coast and mammoth trees of Northern California. (See story on pg. 78.)

www.polasek.org

André Renoux (1939 -2002) captured the charm of Paris by documenting the intimate landmarks of daily Parisian life and its environs, preserving the details of its soul. (See story on pg. 54.) Thru 10.07.12

Roseville Pottery from the Morse Collection

colors and beloved patterns that made the pottery so popular in its era and contribute to its collectability today.

The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

Roseville Pottery Company (1890– 1954) of Ohio was one of the country’s most prolific and longlived art potteries. In this exhibit, the Morse presents new acquisitions of Roseville ceramic objects, which represent the rich

Thru 02.03.2013

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm, Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle Atlantic farms and forests, to ocean and river shorelines.

Thru 09.23.12

A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

On View

Image from A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: André Renoux, Café de Flore à Paris, 1998, oil, 17-1/2 x 17-1/4”

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VIERA

Gallery: Art Gallery of Viera at The Avenue www.artgallery ofviera.com

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Exhibition: ELEMENTS II ON VIEW 06.06-07.07.12

Back by popular demand, Art Gallery of Viera presents Elements II, a showcase of works based on the theme of air, earth, fire or water, presented in styles ranging from abstraction to realism—and everything in-between.

SARASOTA

Gallery: Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art www.allyngallup.com

Exhibition: Land, Sea & 3D ON VIEW THRU 06.16.12

Land, Sea & 3D features landscapes and seascapes by Jean Blackburn, James Couper, Heidi Edwards, John Hardy, Bruce Marsh and A.D. Peters; and sculpture by Leslie Fry, John Henry, Don Porcaro, Caroline Ramersdorfer, Joe Segal, John Mack and John Van Alstine. From left: Helen Wheatley, Awaiting the Storm, courtesy of the artist and Art Gallery of Viera at the Avenue; John Van Alstine, Sisyphean Circle LII, 2011, bronze, slate, pigmented steel, 19.5”h x 26”w x 6.5”d, courtesy of the artist and Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

FT. LAUDERDALE

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Artists Haven Gallery

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles

www.artistshavengallery.com

www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: Mae Jeon: Floral Perception

Exhibition: CAROL ELDER NAPOLI—WITH GUEST ARTIST GREGORY A. JONES

ON VIEW 07.01-07.31.12

By incorporating the sensuality and frailty of flowers ON VIEW 06.02-06.30.12 within whimsically synthetic environments, digital fine artist, Mae Jeon, Employing a multidepicts emotional and spiritual concepts in a vibrant contemporary style. layered process, Carol ST. PETERSBURG

Gallery: Mindy Solomon Gallery www.mindysolomon.com

Exhibition: Detailed Information

Elder Napoli, integrates color, abstracted compositional shapes and texture to form narrative themes that speak to the heart as well as bring interest and delight to the viewer.

ON VIEW THRU 07.07.12

Detailed Information showcases a group of artists whose work is meticulously crafted to exacting detail— testament to each artist’s mastery of technique—and rich with narrative content.

Clockwise from top left: Mae Jeon, Divine Tongue, print on canvas, edition of 50, 12 x 12”, courtesy of the artist and Artists Haven Gallery; Carol Elder Napoli, Living Water, 32 x 40”, acrylic on archival paper, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; John Byrd, Kid Chocolate: Tampa Tragedy No. 1, ceramic, mixed media, 24 x 12 x 21”, courtesy of the artist and Mindy Solomon Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

FT. MYERS

Gallery: Bob Rauschenberg Gallery www.rauschenberg gallery.com

Exhibition: MICHELLE WEINBERG: PICTORIAL RECORD 
 ON VIEW THRU 06.30.12

Miami Beach artist, Michelle Weinberg,

MIAMI

Gallery: Charest-Weinberg http://charestweinberg.com

Exhibition: Jacob Gossett: Olympia ON VIEW 06.08-07.31.12

works primarily in paint and collage media. Her images are infused with vivid colors, rhythmic patterns and text.

Charest Weinberg presents Olympia, a series of works by Brooklynbased artist, Jacob Gossett. Gossett’s work examines the heroic, as expressed through the body. Using creatine—a synthetic based protein—paired with contemporary images of elite bodybuilders, Gossett creates objects that slide between painting and sculpture, abstraction and representation. As the distance between viewer and object dissipates, bulging biceps and swollen chest cavities transform into tactile mounds that extrude and undulate across the surface.

From left: Michelle Weinberg, Cul de sac, 2007, gouache on paper, 68 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Bob Rauschenberg Gallery; Jacob Gossett, Untitled, 2012, creatine on panel, 96 x 160”, courtesy of the artist and Charest-Weinberg

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

PONTE VEDRA BEACH

MIAMI

Gallery: Stellers Gallery

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Gallery

www.stellersgallery.com

www.dianalowenstein gallery.com

Artist: Cat Tesla

Exhibition: DANIEL VERBIS: LOST FOR WORDS

TESLA’S WORK INCLUDES

both ethereal landscapes and abstract designs. The subjects she chooses to paint are organic, either originating from Mother Nature, or inspired by her. Through this visual vocabulary, Tesla transports the viewer into a realm of calm and respite.

ON VIEW 06.09-07.28.12

In his abstract, organic works, Verbis extends the concept of painting by exploring diverse

SARASOTA

Gallery: State of the Arts Gallery www.sarasota fineart.com

Artist: Christopher Martin “MY MOTIVE IS TO ASSEMBLE a vibration of color, movement and depth that transforms a clear surface into a powerful sensation, leaving a profound feeling of energy and clarity. If that becomes apparent, consistent and experiential, then my statement as an artist is on the wall.”

material, procedure and form. His mixed-media works involve everything from acrylic and plastic, to thread, wood and iron.

Clockwise from top: Cat Tesla, Organic Study XV, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Stellers Gallery; Daniel Verbis, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Gallery; Christopher Martin, Acei, acrylic on acrylic, 96 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and State of the Arts Gallery

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NATHAN SAWAYA: T

Facepull Images courtesy of brickartist.com

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HE

ART OF THE BRICK 06.09- 08.19.12 at the ART and CULTURE CENTER of HOLLYWOOD www.artandculturecenter.org

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NATHAN SAWAYA:

The ART of the BRICK

“I

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“I SEE THE WORLD IN

little squares,” says New Yorkbased artist, Nathan Sawaya, whose work transforms LEGO® bricks into whimsical and aweinspiring creations. His 2012 exhibition of The Art of The Brick ®, hosted by the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, features large-scale sculptures constructed exclusively with

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the toy building blocks, and is the only exhibition focused on LEGO as an art medium. Previous showcases of Sawaya’s work have been held at the Center in 2008 and 2010—both events broke all previous attendance records in the Center’s 30+ year history! Sawaya is a former New York attorney who quit his day


job to “risk it all” to pursue his passion for art, and is singlehandedly credited with elevating LEGO to a legitimate art medium. Over the years, his creations have resulted in enormous artistic and popular success. Most recently, his art was chosen by Robert De Niro’s legendary TriBeCa Film Festival as the winning art prize

awarded for excellence in filmmaking. Sawaya’s exhibitions continue to set international museum and gallery attendance records, earning him critical acclaim as well as a wide range of high-profile commissions, and have resulted in appearances on such TV shows as “The Colbert Report,” “Late Night With David Letterman,” and OnV

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Left: Untitled (Green Guy); Center: Yellow; Right: Kiss

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NATHAN SAWAYA:

The ART of the BRICK

“Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.” He was even featured on the iconic quiz show “Jeopardy!” with a category titled “The LEGO Artistry of Nathan Sawaya.” The artist’s early representational creations have included a 7-foot-long reproduction of the Brooklyn Bridge (pictured below), a life-size Tyrannosaurus Rex and a replica of photographer Joe Rosenthal’s famous Battle of Iwo Jima photograph (pictured far right), which is on permanent exhibit at Virginia’s National

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Left: Brooklyn Bridge; Center: Blue Sky; Below: Iwo Jima Replica

Museum of the Marine Corps. Sawaya’s recent work has evolved to imbue an emotional content and visual complexity that might be considered antithetical to the hard-edged simplicity of the LEGO brick. One of his iconic pieces, Yellow (pictured on previous spread), which portrays a figure tearing his chest open while bricks spill out, demonstrates the artist’s masterful depiction of emotion as OnV

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NATHAN SAWAYA:

The ART of the BRICK

well as the intricacies of the human form. His unique, oneof-a-kind creations have been commissioned by companies, charities, celebrities, museums and galleries from around the world, and his work has been featured in numerous collections, including Lancaster Museum of Art in Lancaster, PA; Flinn Gallery, Greenwich, CT; Art Museum of South Texas in Corpus Christi, TX; Lakeview Museum of Arts in Peoria, IL; Narrows Center for the Arts, Fall River, MA; Kimball Arts Center, Park City, UT; D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, MA; Agora Gallery, New York, NY; Mulvane Art Museum, Topeka, KS; and Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, NY. Sawaya’s playful, sophisticated and highly complex structures inspire a sense of wonder and astonishment, prompting the question: How does he do it? On the following pages, the artist shares some of the magic behind his work in a recent chat with On View...

Left and inset: Think!

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O N V I E W I N T E RV I E W :

NATHAN SAWAYA Behind the Bricks OV: You were introduced to LEGO at an early age. What was that experience like for you? NS: I took to LEGO bricks very easily and I used the toy to enhance my imagination. If I wanted to pretend to be a rock star, I could build myself a guitar out of bricks. If I wanted to pretend to be an astronaut, I could build myself a LEGO rocket. When I was about ten years old, I asked my parents if I could get a puppy, and when they said no, I created a life-sized dog for myself out of LEGO bricks. It was the perfect tool to lead me into my current career as an artist, where I get to create whatever I want. OV: You left behind a career in corporate law to pursue your passion for creating art. Any regrets? NS: For me, the worst day in the art studio is still better than

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the best day in the law firm. My art has always been my passion and I am so thankful that I made the decision to follow my dream. The fact that I have been able to sell my work and exhibit it in fine art museums around the world is just a blessing on top of that. OV: How does this medium continue to inspire you? NS: There are no limits to the medium, and I want to elevate this simple plaything to a place it has never been before. I also appreciate the cleanliness of the medium—the right angles, the distinct lines. As so often in life, it is a matter of perspective—up close, the shape of the brick is distinctive, but from a distance, the right angles and distinct lines translate into curves, opening up a world of endless possibilities. OV: Where do you find ideas for new projects?

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NATHAN SAWAYA:

The ART of the BRICK

NS: Inspiration comes from everywhere. Many of my works center on the phenomena of how everyday life, people and raw emotion are intertwined. My art is often a reenactment of my personal feelings. I am inspired by my experiences, emotions and the journeys I take. OV: Once you have an idea in place, how does the building process typically unfold? NS: Essentially there is a similar process for each sculpture. It starts with inspiration and an idea. Once I am inspired, I put my thoughts down on paper. I am always carrying my sketch pad so that I can record my ideas as they come to me. Before I start building, I plan out as much as possible. I try to envision in my mind what the finished sculpture will look like before I put down that first brick. Nathan Sawaya with Gray


NATHAN SAWAYA:

The ART of the BRICK

process is different for every sculpture. A typical life-sized human figure can take up to 2-3 weeks to create.

“I want to elevate this simple plaything to a place it has never been before.”

Above: The artist at work in his studio; Right: Peaces

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As I start building, I actually glue the bricks together as I go. This involves painting a little bit of glue on each and every brick. If I make a mistake, well, I’m pretty good with a hammer and chisel. Once the sculpture evolves to the point where I had originally envisioned it, I know that I’m done. The timing of this

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OV: What aspects of your work do you particularly enjoy and find rewarding? NS: I still enjoy watching people view my artwork for the first time. I love seeing their reactions to artwork created from something with which they are familiar. Everyone can relate to it since it is a toy that many children have at home. OV: What do you hope visitors may take away from this exhibition? NS: The fundamental purpose of my art is to captivate people for as long as I can keep their attention. I strive to create artwork that is interesting and that is unlike anything they have seen before. And hopefully, at the end of the day, they are at least a little bit inspired—and might even snap together a few LEGO bricks when they get home. O n V iew


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Café de Flore à Paris, 1998, oil, 17-1/2 x 17-1/4” All images courtesy of the Sebastian Collection. Photography by Douglas J. Nesbitt, www.douglasjnesbitt.com

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A of

PARISIAN AFFAIR : THE

ART

ANDRÉ RENOUX

On view through

09.23.12 at the

ALBIN POLASEK MUSEUM & SCULPTURE GARDENS, Winter Park www.polasek.org


D Left: Restaurant “Le Caveau du Palais”, 1996, oil, 27-1/4 x 23-1/2”; Right: Le 52 Faubourg Saint Martin, 1998, oil, 19 x 14”


A Parisian Affair:

The Art of André Renoux

D

DISCOVER OR REDISCOVER

the “City of Light” in A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux, presented by the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens in Winter Park, celebrating the essence of Parisian life in a nostalgic tribute to the most enchanting of cities, as seen through the eyes of a 20th century master. Offering a “flâneur’s” view of a disappearing Paris, Renoux’s canvases capture the exquisite charm of the storefronts, bistros and façades of Old Paris. A Parisian Affair is the first exhibition of original Renoux artwork to be presented in Florida since the artist’s exhibit in Palm Beach in 1979. On display is a selection of original oil paintings, OnV

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A Parisian Affair:

The Art of André Renoux lithographs and hand-painted wine bottles from the Sebastian Collection. “We are extremely fortunate to be able to exhibit A Parisian Affair: The Art of André Renoux at the Polasek Museum,” says the Museum’s Curator, Rachel Frisby. “Renoux was a master of restraint and quiet beauty. Each painting feels like a moment of anticipation, or a set before it’s crowded with actors.

Renoux’s canvases capture the exquisite charm of the storefronts, bistros and façades of Old Paris.

Restaurant “La Cafetière” a Paris, 2000, oil, 14-3/4 x 14-3/4”

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You might glimpse a solitary figure amidst the intimate table settings, shadowy alleys, courtyards and charming shop fronts but essentially, the city is yours­—and that is what is so special about Renoux’s art.” Renoux is best known as the father of the Urban Realist movement in France. The “Realist Movement” often refers to art that depicts everyday scenes and objects in a

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A Parisian Affair:

The Art of André Renoux frank, true-to-life manner, which Renoux did to perfection, using Paris as his backdrop. From Montmartre to the Latin Quarter via the Marais, Renoux’s street scenes preserve the urban dream of a city full of surprises. Since the 1960s, he has depicted its unspoilt, oldfashioned and elegant spaces. His focus was not on the city’s grand architectural monuments, but on the more intimate landmarks of daily Parisian life and its environs—a glimpse into a private courtyard, the deli-

Right: Restaurant “Les Cafetiers”, 1999, oil, 15 x 15” Opposite: Femme Balayant (Woman Sweeping), oil, 23 x 19-1/2”

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cacies for sale in a storefront display, or the table setting in an out-of-the-way bistro. His artwork captures an ambience that is timeless, emphasizing the grace of an era both past and present. Using light and shadow he projects intimacy and emotion. People are rarely included in Renoux’s images. As the artist once explained, “You must envision them yourself. People come and go. I am more compelled to preserve the antiquity of this beguiling city. I choose


Left: Brooklyn Bridge; Center: Blue Sky; Below: Iwo Jima Replica

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A Parisian Affair:

The Art of André Renoux not to depict Paris as a tourist, but rather to create works that are a tribute to this incomparable city.” Born in 1939, Renoux was raised in Nice, France. His art education included studies at L’Ecole des Arts Décoratifs in Nice and L’Ecole des Arts Modernes in Paris. Honored within his lifetime, Renoux’s award-winning work has been the subject of three mono-

“People come and go. I am more compelled to preserve the antiquity of this beguiling city.” —A. Renoux

Restaurant “L’ Echaude St Germain”, 1999, oil, 23-1/2 x 27”

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graphs, numerous film documentaries, television broadcasts, catalogues and books. His paintings and graphic works are found in public and private collections worldwide. The artist’s work has been purchased to represent such quintessential institutions as the French Ministry of Tourism and the French National Railway, and

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A Parisian Affair:

The Art of AndrĂŠ Renoux his views of Paris also enjoy an enormous popular success as postcards, of which thousands are sold each month. Since his untimely death in 2002, he has been considered a French national treasure. In addition to being a gifted painter, Renoux was also a master lithographer, a rare quality found among contemporary artists. It is more likely today for painters to have digital prints made of their images, or to employ a lithographer or printmaker to reproduce their work. The biggest advantage of lithography over other traditional printmaking methods such as relief and intaglio, is that it does not require the printmaker to etch an image into metal plates or to physically

Below: AndrĂŠ Renoux, image courtesy of Helene Renoux

carve out the image into blocks of wood. Instead, an artist uses a set of greasy crayons or pencils to draw a mirror image of the artwork, usually onto a smooth stone tablet or metal

plate. Through interactive displays, viewers to this exhibition can learn what is actually involved in this process, stepby-step, and see examples of how Renoux layered each col-


ored plate to make a complete lithograph. Visitors are also encouraged to try their hand at sketching a still-life scene from one of Renoux’s paintings. A Parisian Affair is an

enchanting journey through the history-drenched streets of Paris, and an opportunity to soak in the city as one might savor a glass of fine red wine.

Le Caveau du Palaise – 19 Place Dauphine à Paris, oil, 13 x 20” To view more works by André Renoux,

O n V iew OnV

visit: www.andrerenoux.com

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THE

Secret Pa

VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH

on view through

0

FLORIDA MUSEUM of PHO www.fm Fog, avenue de l’Observatoire, 1934, 9-1/8 x 11”, frame size: 16 x 20”, ©Brassaï Estate


aris

OF THE

1930

S

PHOTOGRAPH S b y B RA S S A Ï

08.19.12

at t h e

OTOGRAPHIC ARTS, TAMPA opa.org OnV

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‘‘D

“Drawn by the beauty of evil, the having taken pictures for my ‘voy I wanted to know what went on the façades, in the wings: bars, d bordellos, opium dens. I was eag fringe world, the secret, sinister toughs, pimps, whores, addicts,

Nude (detail), ca. 1933, 6-7/8 x 8-3/8”, frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate


The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

Vintage Photographs by Brassaï

magic of the lower depths, yage to the end of night’ from the outside, inside, behind the walls, behind dives, night clubs, one-night hotels, ger to penetrate this other world, this world of mobsters, outcasts, and [sexual] inverts.” —Brassaï OnV

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The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

Vintage Photographs

E by Brassaï

EARLY 20th CENTURY Paris was the setting for one of the great flowerings that have periodically punctuated the history of photography. As with painting and sculpture, ambitious young photographers from around the world flocked to the city, where they formed a fertile artistic milieu. Among them was the Transylvanian-born Brassaï, whose evocative, inky-black and very rare vintage photographs of Paris’s notorious creatures of the night, have been assembled for this unforgettable exhibition, presented by the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa. The Secret Paris of the 1930s ventures into a world of dark shadows and romantic interludes through the lens of this 20th century master.

Lovers, Bal Musette des Quatre Saisons, rue de Lappe, ca. 1932, 10-3/4 x 8-1/2”, frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate


The bals-musette were popular dance halls originally named after the bagpipe, an instrument later (and fortunately) replaced by the accordion.

Brassaï reported: “Most of these dance halls still had shady reputations in the thirties. There were no ‘Paris by Night’ buses unloading tourists avid to rub elbows with the underworld. No cosmopolitan breeze blew through these typically Parisian oases. The dance halls were full of poetry and dreams, but they were also pitfalls: true love came close to prostitution. In these dance halls, young pimps seduced girls and recruited the labor force for the streets and the whorehouses.” OnV

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The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

Vintage Photographs by Brassaï

Brassaï (1899-1984) was born Gyula Halász and adopted the nom de plume, Brassaï, from his birthplace, Brasso, a Hungarian (now Romanian) town in the Transylvanian region. After attending art school in Berlin, Brassaï moved to Paris in 1924 and was immediately caught up by the city’s effervescent bohemian life. Supporting himself as a journalist, he took up photography in 1930, initially to illustrate his articles. His approach, however, was at an opposite pole from the then emerging genre of photojournalism. The key to his art was patience and long exposures. Using makeshift and cumbersome tools— a wobbly tripod, a piece of string to measure the distance of objects to the camera, and the noisy, smelly bang of a magnesium flash lamp— Brassaï carefully composed each picture, turning his subjects into archetypes.
 Unlike many of his contemporaries, who were portraying the fashionable and romantic sides of Paris, Brassaï was enraptured by the seedy underworld that could only be seen after hours. It was in the bis-


Fille de Montmartre playing Russian billiards, Blvd Rochechouart, 1932-33, 11-1/4 x 8-1/4”, frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate

tros, cafes and bars that he discovered his most fascinating subjects. And it was in their backrooms and back alleys where Brassaï captured prostitutes, nightclub entertainers, transvestites and their patrons in all stages of revelry. The artist described the life of the streetwalker with great compassion: “Their life stories had been the same for centuries: unknown father, bastard child. They had known nothing of maternal or parental affection: thus the power their ‘protectors’ had over them. They preferred being exploited, even brutalized, to enduring solitude. They all lived on hope. Every one of them dreamed of a different, a better life. Beneath their surface gaiety, these girls lived in perpetual anxiety. They were fearful of raids, of becoming sick, of every stranger. What if he turned out to be a sadist, kinky, a dangerous maniac, a Jack the Ripper?” His fascination for the hidden face of the “City of Light,” as it unfolds in the dark, culminated in 1932 with the publication of his first book, the classic, Paris de Nuit (Paris by Night).

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The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

Vintage Photographs by Brassaï

“During my first years in Paris, I lived at night, going to bed at sunrise, getting up at sunset, wandering about the city from Montparnasse to Montmartre. And even though I had always ignored and disliked photography before, I was inspired to become a photographer by my desire to translate all the things that enchanted me in the nocturnal Paris I was experiencing.” Alone, or in the company of friends, including the writers Henry Miller or Jacques Prévert, Brassaï discovered and recorded the forbidden Paris of the 1930s, its brothels, whores, pimps,

At Suzy’s, fille de joie in mirror, 1932, 11-5/8 x 9”, frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate Top left: At Suzy’s, introductions, ca. 1932, 9-3/8 x 6-3/8”, frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate


Some of Brassaï’s most memorable, if controversial, photographs were taken inside the bordello named Suzy’s, which he described as a “discreet house that guaranteed the anonymity of its guests. Even priests got in and out without being seen or recognized. At Suzy’s, a bell went off as the client opened the door. The madam would clap her hands and call out, ‘Choosing ladies!’ All the girls who weren’t otherwise occupied would remove their dressing gowns, their kimonos, pell-mell, and arrive in the simplest of apparel, whereupon they would form a tableau vivant: the shortest, sometimes kneeling, in front, the others standing behind them. The visitor could thus make a considered choice among the bodies before him.” OnV

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The Secret Paris of the 1930s:

Vintage Photographs by Brassaï

opium dens and transvestites—the sordid yet fascinating bas-monde where high society mingled with the underworld. The Secret Paris of the 1930s is a remarkable photographic memoir, portraying a hidden, daring and candid subject matter. These unique pictures are accompanied by an immensely interesting text in which Brassaï reminisces and describes the extraordinary conditions under which he took his photographs. Also featured in the exhibition are five rare “Transmutation” photographs made with the clichéverre technique, a hybrid of photography (primarily of female nude subjects) and etching in which Brassaï scratched his choice of imagery onto an existing photographic glassplate negative before printing it—an experimental technique developed in collaboration with, and inspired by, Brassaï’s close friend, Pablo Picasso. O n V iew The ballerina Ludmilla Tcherina backstage, Sarah Bernhard Theater, 1945, 11-1/8 x 8-1/4”,frame size: 20 x 16”, ©Brassaï Estate


Brassaï, New York, 1976 (detail), photography by Arnold Newman, ©Arnold Newman Estate

The daughter of a French woman and an émigré Russian prince, Ludmilla Tchérina danced with all the notable European ballet companies of her day, including Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, the Paris Opera, and both the Bolshoi and the Kirov, as well as in ballet-themed movies such as The Red Shoes. OnV

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THE PRINTS OF

GUSTAVE B at

CORNELL


BAUMANN On view through

12.30.12

L FINE ARTS MUSEUM, Winter Park • cfam.rollins.edu OnV

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T

The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN

Below (and detail pictured on previous pages): Processional, ca. 1930, opaque watercolor with silver foil, 12-3/4 x 12-1/2”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. Jane H. Baumann, 1978

THE CORNELL FINE ARTS Museum is hosting The Prints of Gustave Baumann, which features a selection of color woodcut prints by one of the most accomplished and popular artists working in Santa Fe during the early 20th century—and a leading figure in the color woodcut revival in America. Gustave Baumann is best known for his timeless images depicting Southwestern landscapes and regional traditions of New Mexico.
This exhibit includes several of the artist’s finest prints, opaque watercolor studies and a sequence of blocks the artist carved and used to produce Spring Blossoms. Images of New Mexico and a series

Right: Spring—Tesuque Valley, 1953 (subsequent edition 1954), color woodcut, 13 x 12-1/2”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952 All images: ©New Mexico Museum of Art. Photography by Blair Clark

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The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN of seldom-seen color woodcut prints depicting the rugged coast and mammoth trees of Northern California, round out the show. All of the objects in the exhibit are drawn from The New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe, which houses the largest cata-

Baumann’s ingenious mastery of the color woodcut breathed new life into scenes as extraordinary as the Grand Canyon and as commonplace as one’s backyard. logued collection of Baumann’s work—over 1,700 items. A man of many talents, Baumann produced woodcuts, paintings, furniture, sculpture, toys and marionettes—and also wrote poetry and plays. He was the ultimate craftsman. He loved carving wood as well as selecting the handmade papers he used in his printmaking. Immensely patient and meticulous, he thrilled at the challenge of a demanding

Right: Redwood, 1934, color woodcut, 12-7/8 x 12-7/8”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952

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The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN

medium and, unlike the Ukiyo-e artists of Japan, his hands controlled every aspect of his craft, from the carving of the blocks and the mixing of the inks, to the actual printing of each piece. The extraordinary sculptural quality of Baumann’s woodcuts began with color sketches done in gouache, an opaque watercolor. This was the foundation from which Baumann worked and a critical part of the long, painstaking process of completing a color print. The gouaches were created on heavy brown paper and textured by pencil sketching. A final study was used to transfer the image to a block of wood and to also work out the division of colors for each block that would be used in the edition. Baumann printed an endless number of trial proofs with a combination of translucent and opaque inks to achieve his desired color scheme and tonality. The artist’s ingenious mastery of the color woodcut breathed new life into scenes as extraordinary Summer Shadows, 1916-1917, color woodcut, 9-1/2 x 11”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952


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The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN

as the Grand Canyon and as commonplace as one’s backyard. His images are each filled with a sense of wonder and infectious joy. Born in 1881 in Madeburg, Germany, Baumann immigrated to the US with his family in 1891, where they established a home in Chicago. At age 16, Baumann became an apprentice at a commercial print studio and began taking evening classes in drawing and design at the Art Institute of Chicago. By 1903, he had established his own commercial art studio and in 1905, returned to Germany to escape the commercial grind and study for a year at the Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) in Munich. While in Germany, he studied wood carving and the graphic arts—in particular, the art of relief printmaking. Upon returning to Chicago in 1906, Baumann continued his career as a commercial artist while creating an abundance of intricate woodblock Rain in the Mountains, 1925, color woodcut, 9 x 11”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952


The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN prints, which he developed from opaque watercolor studies of regional landscape scenes. In 1909, he produced his first limited edition color woodcuts and exhibited them at the Art Institute of Chicago. This successful showing enabled him to move to a small town he had discovered in Brown County, Indiana, and set about capturing it in his art. Here he depicted peaceful, familiar scenes with simplicity and directness. Baumann had an uncanny ability to transmit the flavor of a place into his art. It was also during his time in Indiana that he developed his personal seal, the image of a hand opened over the heart, which was his pledge to make his craftwork available to those who might enjoy it. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, there was a renewed interest in the craft of traditional European printmaking and in the color woodcut prints coming from Japan. Many of Baumann’s prints include asymmetrical compositions, bright colors, curving lines and patterned surfaces that appear to be influ-

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enced by the Japonisme that was in vogue at the time. He received his first significant national recognition when he took home a gold medal for his color woodcut prints at the 1915 PanamaPacific International Exhibition in San Francisco. At the encouragement of an artist friend, Baumann spent the summer of 1918 in Taos, New Mexico. Towards the end of that summer, on route back to the East Coast, he stopped in Santa Fe to see an exhibit of prints he had organized for the newly opened Art Gallery of the Museum of New Mexico (now the New Mexico Museum of Art). Enchanted with New Mexico, and Santa Fe in particular, he began planning a way to earn the money to finance a relocation to the area, but when the museum’s curator secured Baumann a small loan and studio space in the basement of the art museum, Baumann readily accepted. While Baumann had previSummer Clouds, 1925, color woodcut, 10-1/2 x 9-1/2�, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952


The Prints of

GUSTAVE BAUMANN

“Given a free choice in the matter, I would have selected the Southwest as the place to be born...” —Gustave Baumann ously incorporated touches of bright color in his prints, it was during his time in New Mexico when his color went wild with an explosion of hot golds, magentas and greens. A new-found spontaneity emerged in his work—his shapes went molten and alive in shimmering light. Here he mastered luminosity and captured the mystery of the Southwest. He once said, “Given a free choice in the matter, I would have selected the Southwest as the place to be born, I would then have learned Spanish, along with riding a horse and predicting the weather.” Baumann went on to become one of Santa Fe’s most beloved and respected artists, a standing not dimmed since his death in August, 1971. O n V iew

Above: Gustave Baumann, 1932 Right: Old Santa Fe, 1924, color woodcut, 6 x 7”, Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum purchase with funds raised by the School of American Research, 1952 *The Prints of Gustave Baumann was organized by the New Mexico Museum of Art.

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07.13-10.28.12 at THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART, Sarasota The first exhibition held outside Tokyo dedicated to Japanese expressions of Art Deco, DECO JAPAN provides dramatic examples of the spectacular craftsmanship and sophisticated design long associated with Japan, and conveys the complex social and cultural tensions during the Taishô and early Shôwa epochs (1912-1945). In these pre-war and war eras, artists and patrons created a Japanese modernism that simultaneously signaled the nation’s unique history and cosmopolitanism. The vitality of the era is further expressed through the theme of the moga, or “modern girl”, the emblem of contemporary urban chic that flowered along with the Art Deco style in the 1920s and 1930s.

DECO

Shaping Art and Culture,

1920-1945

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J A PA N


The nearly 200 works displayed, highlight the Levenson collection—the world’s premier collection of Japanese art in the Deco style. These pieces include spectacular examples of sculpture, ceramics, furniture, glass, jewelry, metal-

DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945

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work, paintings, textiles and lithography. Selected by Dr. Kendall Brown, Professor of Japanese Art History at California State University, Long Beach, these two- and three-dimensional works epitomize the contributions made by Japanese artists to


Art Deco, a global international design movement that was all the rage in the early 20th century. The selections range from fine art objects, made to impress the public at national art exhibitions, to goods mass produced for the modern home.

In contrast to previous exhibits and books on Art Deco that organize the material by medium, this exhibition is conceived in a more complex fashion to highlight the cultural, formal and social aspects of Japanese Deco. It sheds light on how, during the OnV

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Previous spread: Postcard (detail), unidentified artist Above: Kekkai or Sencha (tea ceremony screen) with Autumn Cattail Design, Nakayama Ken’ichi, 1943 All images courtesy of the Levenson Collection

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DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945

Opposite: Ginga no uta (Song of the Milky Way), Theme song of the movie “Ginga no uta,” by Shôchiku Cinema, unidentified artist, 1931 DECO JAPAN: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945* is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia. *His Excellency, Mr. Ichiro Fujisaki, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to the US, is Honorary Patron of this exhibition.

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early 20th century, Art Deco contributed to the emergence of a cosmopolitan nation, shaping global trends in visual and performing arts, architecture, fashion and design. In Japan as in Europe, the Art Deco era—which spanned roughly from World War I through World War II—constituted a time of dramatic social and technological change, combined with political and cultural turmoil. Japanese society was whipsawed by globalist values that championed western liberalism and isolationist ideologies that sought a restoration of Asian traditions. From the early 1930s, Japan’s military invasion of Asia gained pace, culminating in war with America and Britain from 1941-45. The Deco era was marked by growing totalitarianism juxtaposed with fantasies of luxury and internationalism, fed by the burgeoning advertising and film industries. In addition, a reappraisal of craft, in terms of fine art, emerged amidst an explosion

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of photography and graphic design. Art schools produced designers, and consumer culture created a demand for mass-produced goods to sell to a rising middle class, in addition to one-of-a-kind objects for those who became wealthy in the war industries. The compelling contradictions of the age are best seen in the Art Deco style, where a façade of elegance parallels a totalitarian gravity. The fundamental Deco preference for simplified geometric shapes, minimal ornamentation and fresh colors is witnessed in abstract works in a range of materials. They also attest to the Japanese desire to reinterpret a variety of crafts. The Deco adaptations of earlier styles (like Art Nouveau and Cubism) and familiar themes, is most evident in the works featuring plants, animals, birds and auspicious creatures. Among the artwork is a ubiquitous Deco motif of the flying fish—the ultimate 1930s emblem of stylish power in sea and air. Beyond design, the exhi-


DECO JAPAN:

Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945

Below: Norakuro The Dog, Okabe Tatsuo, ca. 1931-41

bition features an examination of changing lifestyles, with themes of travel, speed, consumption, luxury, exoticism and elegant distortion of form. A key focus of the exhibition is how art reflected the social transitions that faced Japan in the first half of the 20th century, including a greater visibility, prominence and freedom for women. The vitality of the era is expressed through the theme of the “modern girl,” known in Japan as the moga—a symbol of contemporary urban chic that emerged with the Art Deco style of the 1920s and 1930s. In many ways an evolution of the stylized courtesan who epitomized the ukiyo (or “floating world”) of the Edo period, the moga was carefully constructed via cosmetics and hair ornaments. Equally important was her transgressive behavior, symbolized by smoking and drinking, which encouraged elegant Deco-style cocktail glasses and smoking sets. The mod-

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ern girl’s milieu was the café and dance hall, where active movement of dance bespoke social and personal freedom. The Deco style was also linked with luxury commodities that decorated the modern “culture house,” a preeminent mark of the “culture lifestyle.” Deco-style objects made for domestic use consist of furniture and such furnishings as rugs, lamps, clocks and bowls. They also include human and animal figurines,

demonstrating both the ubiquity of the Deco style and the spread of customs like keeping pure bred dogs and cats. Lectures with specialists, Gallery Walk & Talks, and Art and a Movie evenings serve to complement the objects in the exhibition and create an enhanced cultural understanding. A catalogue accompanying the show features essays by Dr. Brown and specialists from Europe, America, Australia and Japan. On View OnV

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Above: Okimono (sculpture) of Pair of Origami Cranes, Chikueidio Eishin II, ca. 1930-40

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PROFILE {JAC K

FOR JACK NEWMAN, FOOD

N E W M A N }

Exhibition

Jack Newman: The United Tastes of America On view June 9th through August 18th at the Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

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can be every bit as beautiful to paint as a lush landscape or an intriguing portrait. His new show at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, includes a selection of large and small paintings he has completed over the last several years. From rich desserts and boxed chocolates, to a series of entire meals—even a kinetic sculpture of a hero sandwich— Newman’s tantalizing creations are sure to delight the senses. “Most people quickly glance at what’s on a dinner table. I study the nuances of colors, shades, shadows, reflections and textures from the simplest olive in a martini, to the complexities of an entire meal,” he explains. “I want the observer to ‘smell’ the aromas or be tempted to run a finger through the whipped cream in one of my paintings. Anyone can savor my work, without paying the high price of calories.” Newman paints in a modern realist style, preferring the rich colors of acrylics and the immediacy they afford him. Many sketches are made before ever


P R O F I L E

dipping his brush in paint. In to advertising. He was a Senior some cases, he will take pho- Art Director for a number of tos of an item from above, to years, before retiring as a Vice get the perspective just right. President of Ogilvy & Mather “I often find myself smiling Direct. He now resides in South as I paint,” he says. “It gives Florida, where he enjoys the me pleasure to imagine viewers freedom of pursuing his art, studying the completed work, without answering to clients’ bringing smiles to whims. His very their faces.” first juried compeNewman’s intertition, at the Palm est in art began long Beach Watercolbefore he graduated or Society Annual from the New York Exhibition, earned School of Design. him a Special Prize. “As long as I can He has won numerremember, I have ous awards since loved to draw. I’ve then, and several of Jack Newman’s always felt it a maghis papier mâché TANTALIZING ical experience to sculptures have apCREATIONS be able to render on peared on the pagare SURE paper, the images I es of The New York TO DELIGHT. see around me.” Times. He continued his studies at Jack Newman’s work has Pratt Institute and School of been included in exhibitions at Visual Arts in New York, and the Boca Raton Museum of Art, also spent a number of his for- Cornell Museum of Art & Amermative years at the Art Stu- ican Culture in Delray Beach dents League of New York. and The Society of The Four After serving two years in the Arts in Palm Beach. His sketcharmed forces, he became a book es and paintings are also held in and magazine graphic designer. a number of private collections Eventually, his career shifted in the US and abroad. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. 5 Candy Apples, 36 x 48” 2. Sharing, 48 x 36” above (top to bottom): 1. White Chocolate Crunch, 12 x 12” 2. Bloody Terror, 36 x 48” left: Jack Newman images courtesy of the artist to view more of jack Newman’s work, visit his website: www.newmanart.photoshop.com or contact him at: jacknewman1@gmail.com


EXHIBITION { A N D Y

WA R H O L }

Exhibition

Works by Warhol: From the Cochran Collection On view through July 15th at the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art, Tarpon Springs www.spcollege.edu/museum

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ON VIEW THIS SUMMER,

the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art presents an exhibition of icons from history and pop culture by the master of Pop himself—Andy Warhol. The works showcased in this eye-popping display are from the private collection of Wesley and Missy Cochran of La Grange, Georgia, who have been assembling their fine art collection for the last three decades. Among the selections included in the exhibit are acrylics and silkscreens as well as one of Warhol’s drawings. The silkscreens, which were created from 1968 to just months before the artist’s untimely death in 1987 following gall bladder surgery, are comprised of complete sets of his Cowboys and Indians and Myths series. Warhol exhibited an acute sense for the powerful motifs of his time—those images that captured the imagination as the gods and goddesses of ancient mythology once did. Warhol’s Myths series explores the idea of iconic figures from popular culture, drawn mostly from old


E X H I B I T I O N

Hollywood films or television, a feature entitled “Success is a including John Wayne and Job in New York.” The credit Howdy Doody as well as mod- accidentally read “Drawings ern day versions of classical by Andy Warhol,” which is heroes such as Superman and how he dropped the “a” in his Uncle Sam. Mickey Mouse and last name. By 1955 he was the Santa Claus represent the myth- most successful and imitated os of modern day innocence commercial artist in New York. while the Wicked Witch and In 1960 he produced the first Dracula are captivating villains. of his paintings depicting enWarhol’s series, larged comic strip Cowboys and Inimages, such as dians, shows the Popeye and Suartist’s fascination perman, for use with the mytholoin a window disgy of the American play. Warhol piowest. Images inneered the develclude a portrait of opment of the proGeronimo, General Andy WARHOL’s cess whereby an Custer, Teddy Roosenlarged photoiconic Pop evelt, Annie Oakgraphic image is MASTERPIECES ley and Sitting Bull transferred to a silk FILL the as well as Kachina screen that is then LRMA’s galleries dolls, a shield from placed on a canvas this summer. the Plains Indian and inked from the tribe and Buffalo Nickel. back. It was this technique that Andy Warhol was born An- enabled him to produce the sedrew Warhola in 1928 in Pitts- ries of mass-media images that burgh, Pennsylvania. He moved he began in 1962, incorporating to New York City and got his such iconic images as Campfirst break as a commercial artist bell’s Soup cans, dollar bills, in 1949, when Glamour mag- Coca-Cola bottles, and the facazine wanted him to illustrate es of celebrities. O n V iew

Works by Warhol: From the Cochran Collection offers visitors a chance to view iconic figures from history and popular culture, immortalized by the master of Pop himself, Andy Warhol. From Uncle Sam to Howdy Doody and Mickey Mouse to the Wicked Witch, this experience will delight audiences young and young at heart. IMAGES COURTESY OF LRMA.


SPOTLIGHT { J O H N

R O C C O }

Exhibition

From Alice to Zeus: The Art of John Rocco On view July 14th through October 28th at the Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

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JOHN ROCCO’S ILLUSTRA-

tions are well known among fans of Rick Riordan’s bestselling youth literature series, Percy Jackson and the Olympians (Disney Hyperion Books). In February 2010, Twentieth Century Fox released the motion picture, Percy Jackson and the Olympians, The Lighting Thief, based on a book from this series. This summer, the OMA is hosting an exhibition of works by the award-winning illustrator and writer, whose work has been captivating young audiences since 1992, when he published his first children’s book, Alice, an interpretation of Alice in Wonderland, as retold by actor and comedian, Whoopi Goldberg. Rocco, who grew up in Barrington, RI, and studied illustration at the Rhode Island School of Design and School of Visual Arts in NYC, worked for a number of years in the entertainment industry before fully focusing his talents on children’s books. At Walt Disney Imagineering, he designed attractions for Disney’s Epcot theme park and also served as


S P O T L I G H T

art director for DisneyQuest, an or Book in 2012, and explores interactive theme park in Down- how the absence of electricity town Disney. At Dreamworks, can reconnect families. Rocco was the pre-production Rocco’s exhibit at OMA inart director for the top grossing cludes preparatory sketches to animated film, Shrek, where he finished drawings, giving viewproduced hundreds of illustra- ers a chance to see how his iltions that helped animators cre- lustrations evolve. He believes ate the final look of the film. in encouraging young people In 2005, Rocco to be creative and to wrote and illustry new things withtrated Wolf! Wolf!,* out the fear of failwhich won several ing. This lesson can awards, including be seen in the many Borders’ Original preliminary drawVoices Award for ings that eventually best picture book. lead to a published Artwork from his book. During his John Rocco next book, MoonOMA appearance CAPTIVATES powder,* was inat noon on July young audiences cluded in the Orig14th, Rocco will WITH inal Art Show at the make a presentahis fantastical Society of Illustration demonstrating ILLUSTRATIONS. tors, NYC, and was his process, which selected for a special nationwide involves both traditional and traveling exhibition. The fall of computer-based media. He will 2009 marked the release of Fu also be available for book signFinds the Way,* a modern para- ing. A reading area with books ble full of adventure, heart, hu- featured in the exhibition and inmor—and finding joy in simple teractive gallery activities will be tasks. Blackout,* written and il- available for visitors as well. To lustrated by Rocco in 2011, was see more of the artist’s work, visit: selected as a Caldecott Hon- www.roccoart.com. O n V iew

opposite page : Cover image for The Lost Hero (Heroes of Olympus, Book 1), written by Rick Riordan, ©2010 John Rocco Above & below: 1. Cover image for The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 1), written by Rick Riordan, Published by Disney Hyperion Books, ©2006 John Rocco 2. Alice, 1991, written by Whoopi Goldberg, ©1991 John Rocco left: John Rocco, photo by Denise Rocco-Zilber *(DISNEY HYPERION BOOKS)


FOCUS { R I C K

R I C K B E C K C R E AT E S

B E C K }

Exhibition

Form, Color, Light: Cast Glass by Rick Beck On view June 23rd-October 14th at the Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

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sculptures in glass that are full of surprises, despite seeming familiar. His art often takes the form of familiar objects such as tools, kitchen implements and at times, human figures from history. He is best known for his cast glass sculptures of mechanical objects such as saws, knives and spoons, often in deep and vibrant hues—and generally a few feet larger than the objects that inspired them. By enlarging everyday forms and transforming them into sculptures in glass, he reveals their unexpected beauty. Beck’s works are a fascinating blend of industrial strength with subtle form and delicate color. While some art historians have noted parallels between Beck’s witty sculptures and works of art by Marcel Duchamp, who took everyday objects such as shovels and coat racks out of context and redefined them as art, it is the pure beauty and sensuality of Beck’s medium, richly colored glass, that marks a clear distinction between the two. Form, Color, Light, at the Vero Beach Museum of Art,


F O C U S

includes a range of work pro- TN. Following a two-year residuced by the artist over the last dency there, he moved to Pendecade, from large floor pieces land School of Crafts in North to small pedestal sculptures in Carolina for a three-year resitranslucent colors. According dency before settling in Spruce to art critic Anna Starling, Beck Pine, North Carolina, where “wants to engage the viewer he and his wife, Valerie, have with the simplicity of his subject lived and worked for more than matter, hoping to inspire further 20 years. Together they have observation and interpretation.” produced work that has been Beck begins the shown throughout process of creating the US. In 1991, the his glass sculptures Becks were among using clay forms to just 100 glass artproduce a plaster/ ists selected by the silica mold in which Corning Museum he melts recycled of Glass to be pubglass, fired to 1,650 Rick Beck’s sculp- lished in the presdegrees Fahrentigious New Glass tures REVEAL heit. Once the molReview 12. UNEXPECTED ten glass takes the The Becks’work BEAUTY in shape of the mold, has been featured everyday forms. it can take weeks to six times in Amercool to room temperature. He ican Craft Magazine, as well as then grinds and textures the sur- Glass Magazine. Their sculptures face, with little or no polishing. have been exhibited at the Mint In 1978, Beck received his BA Museum of Art in Charlotte, NC, in Art from Hastings College in the Society of Arts and Crafts Hastings, NE, and his MFA in in Boston, the Kentucky Muse1986 from Southern Illinois Uni- um of Art and Design in Louisversity at Carbondale. In 1989, ville, the Glasmuseum in DenBeck moved to the Appalachian mark, and in numerous galleries Center for Crafts in Smithville, throughout the country. O n V iew

opposite page (Left to right): 1. Indigo Icarus*, 2008, cast glass, 70.5 x 18 x 12” 2. Yellow Odalisque* (in collaboration with sculptor Bill Brown Jr.), 2011, cast glass, 63 x 13.5 x 13.5” 3. Backscratcher*, 2005, cast glass, 91 x 12 x 18.5” Above (top to bottom): 1. Reclining Monarch*, 2008/9, cast glass, 72.5 x 42 x 12” 2. Clear Composition*, 2008, cast glass, 70 x 21 x 14” *COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST; PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID H. RAMSEY left: The artist at work


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Chicago

The museums. . .

CHICAGO HAS IT ALL —from cutting-edge architecture,

legendary blues, scrumptious dining and lavish shopping, to world-class museums, lakeside views, glorious parks, majorleague baseball and side-splitting improv…oh, and don’t forget the deep-dish pizza! Chicago’s great magic lies in its mix—and although a bustling city, it is also serene, sophisticated and friendly, and it offers a stunning year-round array of things to see and do that are unique in all the world. Among its many attractions, Chicago’s great diversity is apparent in its amazing museums. It is home to an impressive range of world-class art. On the following pages On View presents a brief overview of some of the city’s premier venues including the Chicago Cultural Center, Loyola University Museum of Art, Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Museum of Contemporary Photography, National Museum of Mexican Art, Smart Museum of Art, and The Art Institute of Chicago. O n V iew

Osaka Gardens, © City of Chicago / GRC; postcards courtesy of www.ChicagoPostcardMuseum.org OnV

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Chicago Cultural Center

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A “PEOPLE’S PALACE,”

the Chicago Cultural Center celebrates the arts, education, Chicago and the world. People of all definitions, from near and far, come here to enjoy a multitude of exciting and free art exhibitions, music, dance, theatre, film and family events. The landmark building, constructed over 100 years ago as the Chicago Public Library and a Civil War memorial, features both Greek-inspired and Roman-inspired archi-

tectural elements and ornamentation. The building is most notably home to two magnificent stained-glass domes—the world’s largest Tiffany dome, measuring 38 feet in diameter, with approximately 30,000 pieces of glass as well as a Renaissance patterned dome, designed by Healy & Millet, measuring 40 feet in diameter, with approximately 50,000 pieces of glass. The building’s beauty has been preserved through the years by meticulous restoration and is considered one of Chicago’s premier destinations. O n V iew

CHICAGO CULTURAL CENTER www.chicagocultural center.org

Info

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78 E. Washington St.,
 Chicago, IL 312.744.6630

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. oculus of tiffany stained-glass dome (detail), Michael Beasley Images 2. preston bradley hall with tiffany dome, Hedrich Blessing Photographers 3. a view of the Chicago cultural center’s exterior, Hedrich Blessing Photographers images ©City of Chicago / GRC


Loyola University Museum of Art

A

A BRILLIANT GEM OF

Info

Chicago’s museum scene, Loyola University Museum of Art (LUMA), was founded in 2005 on the Water Tower Campus of Loyola University Chicago. LUMA is located on the Magnificent Mile at the Water Tower in Lewis Towers, a historic 1927 Gothic Revival building. The Museum contains eight main exhibition galleries, a lecture hall, library and museum store. LUMA is dedicated to the LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART www.luc.edu/luma 820 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 312.915.7600

exploration, promotion and understanding of art and artistic expression, and attempts to illuminate the enduring spiritual questions and concerns of all cultures and societies. The Museum displays rotating exhibitions and permanent collections, including the Martin D’Arcy Collection of medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art. Stunning ivories, enamels, painted sculpture and works by masters, such as Tintoretto and Bassano, are among the collection’s most important objects. O n V iew OnV

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE WAY TO CALVARY, 16TH CENTURY,
FOLLOWER OF HIERONYMUS BOSCH (NETHERLANDISH, 14501516),
OIL ON PANEL,
 GIFT OF SPENCER SAMUELS 2. SCENES FROM THE LEGEND OF DAVID AND GOLIATH,
 FLORENTINE, CA. 1450,
 TEMPERA ON PANEL 3. ERA & DONALD FARNSWORTH, DHARMAKAYA, 2004, JACQUARD TAPESTRY, COTTON, 116 x 79” IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

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Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. museum exterior 2. Marion Mahony Griffin, drawing of eucalyptus, ink-on-silk 3. Mary Cassatt, In the Omnibus, 1890–91, color aquatint, soft-ground, and drypoint on light cream laid paper, Mary & Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Gift of James and Anne DeNaut

MARY & LEIGH BLOCK

Museum of Art, Northwestern University, is the fine arts museum of Chicago’s North Shore. A permanent collection, consisting primarily of works on paper, distinguishes the Block as an important repository of original works of art. The museum currently has nearly 5,000 pieces in its collection, which includes a remarkable sampling of old master to 19th century prints and drawings, modern and contempo-

rary prints, photographs and architectural drawings. Stuart Davis, Albrecht Dürer, Jasper Johns and Rembrandt are just a few of the artists represented. An integral part of the Museum’s indoor and outdoor environments is the sculpture collection. A tour of the sculpture garden includes works by Hans Arp, Barbara Hepworth, Joan Miró and Henry Moore. O n V iew

MARY & LEIGH BLOCK MUSEUM OF ART www.blockmuseum. northwestern.edu

Info

Info

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40 Arts Circle Drive Evanston, IL 847.491.4000

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

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LOCATED IN THE HEART

Info

of downtown Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) has outstanding examples of visual art, from 1945 to the present, with a strong focus on surrealism, pop art, minimalism, conceptual art and contemporary painting, sculpture, photography, video, installation art and related media. Its collection includes works by Alexander Calder, Jeff Koons, Rene Magritte, Claes Oldenburg and Andy Warhol. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, CHICAGO www.mcachicago.org 220 E. Chicago Ave. Chicago, IL 312.280.2660

The MCA was established in 1967 and moved to its present location in 1996. The fivestory limestone and aluminum structure was designed by Berlin architect, Josef Paul Kleihues, and contains 45,000 sq. ft. of gallery space, making it the largest institution devoted to contemporary art in the country. An architectural highlight is the Museum’s main stairway, which combines clean lines and organic form. The museum has a shop featuring one-of-a-kind items and a café overlooking a sculpture garden. O n V iew OnV

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JEFF KOONS, RABBIT, 1986, STAINLESS STEEL, 41 x 19 x 12”, PARTIAL GIFT OF STEFAN T. EDLIS AND H. GAEL NEESON 2. A VIEW OF THE MUSEUM’S MAIN STAIRWAY 3. RENÉ MAGRITTE (18981967), LES MERVEILLES DE LA NATURE (THE WONDERS OF NATURE), 1953, OIL ON CANVAS, 30 1/2 x 38 5/8”, GIFT OF JOSEPH AND JORY SHAPIRO IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

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Museum of Contemporary Photography

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MICHAEL WOLF, THE TRANSPARENT CITY 06, (DETAIL), 2008, CHROMOGENIC DEVELOPMENT PRINT, MUSEUM PURCHASE 2. JOHN OPERA, UNTITLED (FLAME IN WATERFALL), 2006, ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT, MUSEUM PURCHASE 3. DOROTHEA LANGE, MIGRANT MOTHER, NIPOMO, CALIFORNIA, 1936, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, GIFT OF SONIA BLOCH

CHICAGO’S MUSEUM OF

Contemporary Photography is the only museum in the Midwest with a sole focus on the medium of photography. The Museum constantly seeks out local and international talent. By presenting projects and exhibitions that embrace a wide range of contemporary aesthetics and technologies, the museum promotes a greater understanding of and appreciation for the cultural, social and political implications of the image in our world today.

The Museum’s collections uniquely illustrate the diversity of regional, national and international photographic practice. The permanent collection is comprised of more than 10,000 photographs and related objects produced since 1936, including works by Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Julia Margaret Cameron, Walker Evans, Irving Penn, Aaron Siskind and Victor Skrebneski. The Midwest Photographers Project is a rotating archive of contemporary works by artists living and working in the Midwest. O n V iew

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY www.mocp.org

Info

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600 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 312.663.5554

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IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


National Museum of Mexican Art

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THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

Info

of Mexican Art (NMMA) carries the unique distinction of being one of the most prominent institutions for Mexican art and culture in the US, housing one of the largest collections of Mexican art, including textiles, folk art, paintings, sculptures, photography and more. The Museum is dedicated to stimulating and preserving knowledge and appreciation of Mexican culture from ancient NATIONAL MUSEUM OF MEXICAN ART www.nationalmuseum ofmexicanart.org 1852 W. 19th St. Chicago, IL 312.738.1503

times to the present, and showing how it has manifested itself on both sides of the border. The current collection includes more than 7,000 objects, featuring prominent works by Mexican artists and artifacts from Mexican history. The permanent exhibit, Mexicanidad: Our Past is Present, explores the history of Mexico in five stages: Pre-Cuauhtémoc Mexico, Colonial Mexico, Mexico from Independence to Revolution, Post-Mexican Revolution to Present-day Mexico and The Mexican Experience in the US. O n V iew OnV

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ALFREDO ARREGUIN, CORRIDOS DE MI TIERRA (DETAIL), 2004, OIL ON CANVAS 2. HEAD FRAGMENT WITH SMILING FACE, REMOJADAS, LATE CLASSIC (600–900 C.E.), EARTHENWARE, GIFT OF THE SNITE MUSEUM OF ART, UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME 3. ART DIRECTION BY SANTOS MOTOAOPOHUA DE LA TORRE DE SANTIAGO, EL NUEVO AMANECER (DETAIL), 2003, CHAQUIRA BEADS IN CAMPECHE WAX ON WOOD, 94 3/4 x 118 3/4”, PHOTO: MICHAEL TROPEA ALL WORKS FROM THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF MEXICAN ART PERMANENT COLLECTION

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Smart Museum of Art/University of Chicago

F

FOUNDED IN 1974 WITH

a gift from the Smart Family Foundation and designed by the renowned architect, Edward Larrabee Barnes, the Smart Museum of Art houses a permanent collection of over 10,000 objects, spanning five millennia, of both Western and Eastern civilizations. Particular strengths of the collection include European and American modern and contemporary works, East Asian art and works on paper

from all periods. Highlights from the collection include ancient Greek vases, furniture, medieval sculpture, Old Master paintings and Tiffany glass. Works by artists such as Ansel Adams, Degas, Matisse, Henry Moore, Diego Rivera, Rodin, Mark Rothko and Frank Lloyd Wright are represented. Stop off in the quaint Museum Café for a repast during your tour. In the summer, you can dine outdoors in the Eden Sculpture Garden. O n V iew

SMART MUSEUM OF ART UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO www.smartmuseum. uchicago.edu

Info

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5550 S. Greenwood Ave. Chicago, IL 60637 773.702.0200

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1.FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT (1867-1959), DINING TABLE AND SIX SIDE CHAIRS, 55 5/8 x 96 1/4 x 53 1/2”, TABLE: OAK, LEADED COLORED AND OPAQUE GLASS, CERAMIC; CHAIRS: OAK WITH (REPLACEMENT) LEATHER SLIP SEAT, UNIVERSITY TRANSFER 2. BARBARA HEPWORTH (1903-1975), CURVED FORM (WAVE II), 1959, 15 3/4 x 18”, PAINTED CAST BRONZE WITH STEEL RODS, THE JOEL STARRELS, JR. MEMORIAL COLLECTION 3. HENRY MOORE (18981986), TWO FIGURES, 1939, 22 x 15”, PENCIL, CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK, AND PASTEL ON WOVE PAPER, THE JOEL STARRELS, JR. MEMORIAL COLLECTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


The Art Institute of Chicago

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THE ART INSTITUTE OF

Info

Chicago ranks among the city’s most-visited museums and houses one of the finest art collections in the world, offering visitors a rich cultural experience that is not to be missed. The Institute was founded nearly 125 years ago and has grown through adversity, having originally been built on the rubble of the 1871 Chicago fires. Today, the Institute houses a myriad of exhibits and permanent collections which include THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO www.artinstituteofchicago.org 111 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60603 312.443.3600

prints and drawings, an internationally acclaimed collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, sculptures, photographs, Asian, African and American arts, architectural drawings, textiles and more. Highlights from the collection include such masterpieces as Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks, Grant Wood’s American Gothic, Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte and Pablo Picasso’s The Old Guitarist, to name a few. The museum also has an elegant restaurant and courtyard café (open June-Sept). O n V iew OnV

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. EDWARD HOPPER
(1882-1967), NIGHTHAWKS, 1942, OIL ON CANVAS,
33 1/8 x 60”,
S.L.R. EDWARD HOPPER,
FRIENDS OF AMERICAN ART COLLECTION 2. SALVADOR DALÍ
(1904–1989), VENUS DE MILO WITH DRAWERS, 1936, PAINTED PLASTER WITH METAL PULLS & MINK POMPOMS,
38 5/8 x 12 3/4 x 13 3/8”, THROUGH PRIOR GIFT OF MRS. GILBERT W. CHAPMAN, © 2008 SALVADOR DALI, GALASALVADOR DALI FOUNDATION / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY, NY 3. GRANT WOOD
(1891-1942), AMERICAN GOTHIC, 1930, OIL ON BEAVER BOARD,
 30 3/4 x 25 3/4”,
FRIENDS OF AMERICAN ART COLLECTION IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

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Chicago

A gallery tour. . .

BRING ON THE GAL L E R I E S ! Often called the “Second

City” to New York, Chicago has thriving gallery districts that prove this city to be anything but. From glass sculpture to black-and-white vintage photography to modern and contemporary painting and sculpture, Chicago’s art galleries feature a myriad of genres with an appeal to novice collectors as well as to the more seasoned. This so-called “Second City” demonstrates that not only is it first class when it comes to the world of art, but it has a warmer, more inviting feel for visitors who appreciate art. Chicago’s galleries present the works of some of the most important and innovative artists. From the lesser known to the renowned Masters, collectors and enthusiasts of fine art can expect the best the art world has to offer. On the following pages, On View presents a listing of Chicago’s most distinctive galleries. O n V iew

Jay Pritzker Pavilion, © City of Chicago / GRC; postcard courtesy of www.ChicagoPostcardMuseum.org OnV

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River North Area


CATHERINE EDELMAN

GRUEN

GALLERY

GALLERIES

www.edelmangallery.com

www.gruengalleries.com

ADDINGTON GALLERY

300 West Superior St.

226 West Superior St.

www.addingtongallery.com

312.266.2350

312.337.6262

DAVID WEINBERG

JEAN ALBANO GALLERY


GALLERY

www.jeanalbano-artgallery.com

ALAN KOPPEL GALLERY

www.davidweinberggallery.com

215 West Superior St.

www.alankoppel.com

300 West Superior St.

312.440.0770

806 N. Dearborn Ave.

312.529.5090

Contemporary art

704 North Wells St.

Contemporary art

312.664.3406

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

312.640.0730

Contemporary art

Contemporary art JOSEF GLIMER

ECHT

GALLERIES

ANDREW BAE GALLERY

GALLERY

www.josefglimergallery.com

www.andrewbaegallery.com

www.echtgallery.com

207 West Superior St.

300 West Superior St.

222 West Superior St.

312.787.4640

312.335.8601

312.440.0288

Contemporary Art

Masters, modern & contemporary art

ANN NATHAN GALLERY

EXPRESSION GALLERY

JUDY A SASLOW

www.annnathangallery.com

OF FINE ART

GALLERY


212 West Superior St.

www.expressiongalleries.com

www.jsaslowgallery.com

312.664.6622

708 North Wells St.

300 West Superior St.

312.274.9848

312.943.0530

FINE ART

GALERY KH

KEN SAUNDERS GALLERY

www.belloclowndes.com

http://gallerykh.com

www.marxsaunders.com

226 West Superior St.

311 West Superior St.

230 West Superior St.

312.266.2222

312.642.0202

312.573.1400

Contemporary Asian art

Contemporary art

19th & 20th century art

Contemporary art

BELLOC LOWNDES

Modern & contemporary art OnV

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Glass sculpture



River North Area continued...

LYDON CONTEMPORARY

312.266.9473

VALE CRAFT

Contemporary art

GALLERY

www.lydonfineart.com

www.valecraftgallery.com

230 West Superior St.

RICHARD NORTON

230 West Superior St.

312.943.1133

GALLERIES


312.337.3525


Contemporary art

www.richardnortongallery.com

Contemporary fine craft

612 Merchandise Mart Plaza MAYA POLSKY GALLERY www.mayapolskygallery.com

215 West Superior St.

312.644.8855

ZG GALLERY

19th & 20th century impressionist & modern art

www.zggallery.com

300 West Superior St. 312.654.9900

Contemporary art

312.440.0055

Contemporary art

ROY BOYD GALLERY


ZOLLA /

MELANEE COOPER

www.royboydgallery.com

LIEBERMAN

GALLERY

739 North Wells St.

GALLERY

www.melaneecoopergallery.com

312.642.1606

www.zollaliebermangallery.com

740 North Franklin St.

Contemporary art

325 West Huron St.

312.202.9305

Contemporary art

312.944.1990

Contemporary art

SCHNEIDER GALLERY

MONGERSON

schneidergallerychicago.com


ZYGMAN

GALLERIES


230 West Superior St.

VOSS GALLERY

www.mongersongalleries.com

312.988.4033

www.zygmanvossgallery.com

704 North Wells St.

Contemporary photography

312.943.2354

19th & 20th century and contemporary art

312.787.3300

STEPHEN DAITER GALLERY www.stephendaitergallery.com

PERIMETER

230 West Superior St.

GALLERY


312-787-3350

www.perimetergallery.com

210 West Superior St.

222 West Superior St.

20th century American & European photography OnV

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South Loop Area, Michigan Avenue, & River East .

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ATLAS GALLERIES

520 North Michigan Ave.

www.atlasgalleries.com

312.755.0300

Masters & contemporary art

535 North Michigan Ave. 800.423.7635

Master prints & contemporary art

& European art SPENCER WEISZ GALLERIES, LTD.
 www.spencerweisz.com

OGILVIE /

843 West Chicago Ave.

PERTL GALLERY

312.527.9420

COLLETTI

www.opgallery.com

GALLERY

435 East Illinois St.

www.collettigallery.com

312.321.0750

Contemporary art

102 East Oak St. 312.664.6767


Original European vintage posters VALERIE CARBERRY

Antique posters & decorative arts

POSTER

GALLERY

PLUS


www.valeriecarberry.com

www.posterplus.com

875 North Michigan Ave.

DONALD YOUNG

30 East Adams St.

312.397.9990

GALLERY


312.461.9277

Original vintage & fine art posters

www.donaldyoung.com

224 South Michigan Ave. 312.322.3600

Contemporary art

RICHARD GRAY GALLERY


Contemporary art

West Loop, Pilsen Area & The Chicago Arts District


HILDT

www.richardgraygallery.com

GALLERIES


875 North Michigan Ave.

4ART, INC.


www.hildtgalleries.com

312.642.8877

www.4artinc.com

Contemporary art

140 East Walton St. 312.255.0005

773.254.5100

19th & 20th century British, European & American art

FINE ART


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CARRIE SECRIST

3 East Huron St.

GALLERY


312.475.0700

www.secristgallery.com

20th century American

www.hilligossgalleries.com

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Contemporary art

ROSENTHAL

HILLIGOSS GALLERIES


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835 West Washington Blvd.


West Loop, Pilsen Area & The Chicago Arts District continued...

312.491.0917

Contemporary art

www.lindawarrengallery.com

THOMAS ROBERTELLO

327 North Aberdeen St.

GALLERY

312.432.9500

www.thomasrobertello.com

DOUGLAS

Contemporary art

DAWSON GALLERY

www.douglasdawson.com

MARS

400 North Morgan St.

GALLERY


312.226.7975

www.marsgallery.com

27 North Morgan St. 312.345.1886

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

North, Bucktown, & Wicker Park Area

www.grnnamdigallery.com

McCORMICK

CHICAGO

110 North Peoria

GALLERY


ART SOURCE


312.563.9240

www.thomasmccormick.com

www.chicagoartsource.com

835 West Washington Blvd.

1871 North Clybourn Ave.

312.226.6800

773.248.3100

www.kasiakaygallery.com

PETER MILLER

MADRON GALLERY OF

215 North Aberdeen St.

GALLERY

AMERICAN ART

312-944-0408

www.petermillergallery.com

www.madrongallery.com

118 North Peoria St.

1000 West North Ave.

312.951.1700

312.640.1302

www.kavigupta.com

RHONA

THOMAS MASTERS

835 West Washington Blvd.

HOFFMAN

GALLERY

312.432.0708

GALLERY

www.thomasmastersgallery.com

www.rhoffmangallery.com

245 West North Ave.

118 North Peoria St.

312.440 2322

Historic & contemporary art

1139 West Fulton Market 312.226.7808

G.R. N’NAMDI GALLERY


Contemporary art KASIA KAY

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

ART PROJECTS

Contemporary art KAVI GUPTA

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

GALLERY


Contemporary art LINDA WARREN PROJECTS


Contemporary art

312.455.1990

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On View 06-07.2012  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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