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EAST/WE ST:

Visually

Speaking

AT T HE PATRICI A & P H ILLIP F R O ST ART MUS E U M, M I A MI

+ It’s

Always

& ROLL : ROCK

The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska AT T HE CORNELL F I N E ARTS MUSEUM, W I N TER PARK

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 1


CONTENTS Ju n e /Ju l y

2011

Vo l . 2 , N o . 2

ON THE COVER : SUN PING, ACUPUNCTURE A78 (LAOCOÖN), 1992-2009, COPPER, PROPYLENE AND ACUPUNCTURE NEEDLES RIGHT: LUO BROTHERS, WELCOME THE FAMOUS BRANDS TO CHINA, 2002-2008, PAINTED COPPER (DRAGON)

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J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 1

EAST/WE ST:

Visually AT T H E PAT R I CIA

Speaking

& PHILLIP F R O S T A R T M USEUM , MIAMI

+ It’s

& ROLL : ROCK

The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska AT THE CORNE L L FINE ARTS MU S E U M , WINTER PARK

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EAST/WEST: VISUALLY SPEAKING

An eye-popping display of two- and three-dimensional contemporary Chinese art, featuring twelve Chinese artists whose unique and innovative works reference Western stylistic history, is on view at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

46 Delray Beach

54 Fort Lauderdale 62 Daytona Beach

72 Maitland

CONTEMPORARY

CARING: A LOOK

LINE: HENRY

SOARING VOICES: JAPANESE WOMEN CERAMIC ARTISTS

The beauty of Japan is revealed through the artistic accomplishments of twenty-five leading female figures in contemporary Japanese ceramics, from post-World War II to present day, at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens.

THE ART OF

AUDUBON! SELEC-

AT LIFE THROUGH

JAMES AUDUBON’S

PHOTOGRAPHY

Pivotal moments in life and history are celebrated through remarkable imagery at the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale.

THE CONFIDENT

TIONS FROM JOHN

PATRICK RALEIGH

Maitland Art Center hosts an exhibition of expressive works by an artist whose rich and fluid illustrations created a portrait of American aspirations during the “Golden Age of American Illustration ”.

BIRDS OF AMERICA

The Museum of Arts & Sciences presents more than thirty superb art plates by the revered naturalist-artist.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): YASUKO SAKURAI, WHITE FLOWER, 2000, PORCELAIN, PHOTO: ©TAKASHI HATAKEYAMA;

Winter Park

WILLIAM WEGMAN, MOTHER’S DAY,

IT’S ALWAYS ROCK AND ROLL: THE WORK RIGHT: JANET MACOSKA, PAUL McCARTNEY, 1989, COURTESY OF THE PHOTOGRAPHER

1989, CHROMOGENIC PRINT,

OF PHOTOJOURNALIST JANET MACOSKA

COURTESY WILLIAM WEGMAN

84 A veritable Who’s Who of rock & roll,

WEGMAN; JOHN JAMES AUDUBON,

STUDIO, NY, NY, ©WILLIAM KEY WEST DOVE; HENRY PATRICK

dating from the ’70s to today, awaits at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College. OnV

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RALEIGH, COURTESY OF THE HENRY RALEIGH ARCHIVE, COLLECTION OF KATE AND CHRIS RALEIGH

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CONTENTS 2011

Ju n e /Ju l y

Vo l u m e

2,

No.

5

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

Artists spread the word to promote peace.

Christina addresses the idea of the human object as toy with nearly lifesize porcelain and fabric “dolls”.

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists

Insight Fo c u s

PICTURED (TOP TO BOTTOM) :

94

1. Rivane Neuenschwander, Rain Rains*, 2002, Aluminum

RIVANE NEUENSCHWANDER

buckets, water, steel cable, ladder 2. Rivane Neuenschwander, I Wish Your Wish*, 2003, Silkscreen on fabric ribbons *images from Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other,
courtesy New Museum, NY. photos: Benoit Pailley

Ma

Through her method of appropriation, Sandra takes images from well-known contexts and makes them her own.

CHRISTINA WEST

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Rivane’s work, which merges painting, photography, film, sculpture and installation, is based on social situations and frequently involves viewer interaction. .

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RYAN HUMPHREY

Ryan’s exuberant, large-scale installation incorporates BMX bikes in dynamic two- and three-dimensional works.


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on iew

Summer Picks

M A G A Z I N E

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney

Marketing Interns

Abigail Adkins, Christina C. Grass Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

E a s t m ee t s w e s t i n t w o e n g a g i n g s h o w s topping On View’s summer lineup. Our cover story, East/West: Visually Speaking, on pg. 38, showcases the works of twelve contemporary Chinese artists whose unique visions play on Western culture, while Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists, on pg. 46, elegantly conveys the artistry of twenty-five leading female ceramicists who have broken through the barrier of the once maledominated field of Japanese ceramics. Additional highlights include: The Art of Caring: A Look at Life Through Photography, on pg. 54, a powerful and moving photographic presentation reflecting pivotal moments in life and history; Audubon! Selections from John James Audubon’s Birds Of America, on pg. 62, a rare opportunity to view more than 20 superb art plates by the revered naturalist-artist, John Audubon; The Confident Line: Henry Patrick Raleigh, on pg. 72, which captures the style and opulence of America’s elite during the “Golden Age of Illustration”; and It’s Always Rock and Roll: The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska, on pg. 84, a veritable Who’s Who of rock and roll, dating from the ’70s to today...rock on! Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

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Peace

W

A RT I S T S S P R E A D T H E W O R D . . .

ITH DAILY REPORTS

of violent conflicts, we are constantly reminded of the ravages of war and its toll on humanity. Now more than ever, the desire for peace has become the inspiration behind recent actions taken by artists to initiate a dialogue on peace, challenge people to reconsider their ability to influence change and question the fragility, value and priority given to concepts such as peace. With labels that read “Fragile, Contains: Peace, Hope or Freedom”, artist Franck de Las Mercedes abstractly paints seemingly empty boxes which he sends to anybody, anywhere in the world, for free! The “Priority Boxes” project is a public art series. Each box, sent by mail to anyone who requests one, is both a canvas for a unique abstract painting and a platform for communication


MUSE

There was never a good war or a bad peace. —B e n j a m i n F r a n k l i n

through art. A mixture of art and activism, the boxes are sent free to convey that something of such priority as peace should not have a price and that art can be both inclusive and accessible. The project, which started in 2006 as an experiment—

and is self-funded by the artist and donations from supporters—has evolved into a movement that has been embraced by popular culture, the mainstream media, schools and art educators across America. From his small New Jersey studio, the artist has sent over 9,000 boxes around the globe to countries in every continent. (For more information on the boxes and how to request one, go to: http://fdlmstudio.com/PriorityBoxes.html) In Miami, artist Luis Jimenez uses his metal wielding skills to make a statement as well. He has been perfecting his craft as an artist-in-residence at Area 23 Galeria in Miami’s Wynwood Design District and is known for his public art “Peace” sculptures situated both around town, in Miami’s Design District, and at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts in Naples. His work infuses residents and visitors alike with a daily dose of peace and positive energy. When asked what inspired the public installations, the artist responded with one word: “war”. “Mankind has a long track record of turning its most innovative discoveries, often born from natural resources and the Earth’s

PICTURED (TOP TO BOTTOM): Franck de Las Mercedes, Priority Box; Luis Jimenez, Peace sculpture images courtesy of the artists

ores, into weapons of war,” the artist said. “Now people everywhere are taking a stand for what they believe in.” O n V iew OnV

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CALENDAR Current

06-07.2011 BOCA RATON Thru 09.11

Art for the People: 20th Century Social Realism Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

A selection of more than 100 paintings, drawings and prints, representative of American art between

Exhibitions

the 1920s and 1960s, includes examples of American urban and rural scene painting, and political and social realism. Thru 06.19

Robert Vickrey: The Magic of Realism Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Using the same labor-intensive techniques practiced by Renaissance artists, Giotto and Botticelli, Vickrey (1926-2011) became America’s leading modern master of tempera painting.

C O M P I L E D

This exhibition presents approximately 70 works from the artist’s 60-year career. (See story in the April/May 2011 issue on pg. 88.)

B Y

O N

V I E W

Fine prints have been admired for their great artistic diversity and technical virtuosity since their origin in the 15th century. Examples by masters of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries include works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Francisco de Goya

Thru 06.19

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

and Pablo Picasso, each of whom is celebrated for his pioneering experiments in graphic art.

1. Richard Florsheim, Poles in a Landscape, 1936, egg tempera on paper board, 14-1/2 x 21-1/4”, Museum Permanent Collection, gift of the Richard A. Florsheim Art Fund 2. Robert Vickrey, Sea Breeze, 1985, egg tempera on board, 20 x 30”, Permanent Collection, gift of the artist 3. Pablo Picasso, Faune dévoilant une dormeuse (Jupiter et Antiope, d’après Rembrandt), [Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt)], 1936, etching with aquatint on paper, 12-3/8 x 16-3/8”, Permanent Collection, bequest of Isadore and Kelly Friedman

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CORAL GABLES

06.18-10.23

Sacred Stories, Timeless Tales: Mythic Perspectives in World Art from the Permanent Collection Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

the Lowe’s Permanent Collection, which spans 5,000 years and represents the artistic traditions of both western and non-western cultures. CORAL SPRINGS Thru 08.20

Tools in Motion: Works from the Hechinger Collection Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

www6.miami.edu/lowe

Tools in Motion is an exhibition of witty, light-hearted works by emerging and prominent contemporary artists. The 47 motionrelated and visually intriguing works selected for this exhibition were chosen with children, families and school groups in mind, to foster educational programming opportunities. In addition, works by artists such as Arman, Claes Oldenburg and Jim Dine are sure to attract contemporary art lovers of all ages.

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

John James Audubon painted nearly threequarters of the North American species of birds, of which the museum holds more than 30 superb examples. Audubon set

a standard by which all other naturalistartists can be judged. His understanding of American birds reflected his years of traveling and living in the wilderness, cheerfully accepting constant discomfort and danger.

DAYTONA

Featuring some 100 paintings, drawings, ceramics, glass and sculptures, this exhibition explores thematic connections between mythic traditions in world art drawn from

BEACH 06.10-02.27.12

Audubon! Selections from John James Audubon’s Birds of America

1. Bali, Bima in Underworld, from Bima Swarga, early 20th century,ink and paint on muslin, 34-1/4 x 40”, gift of Estelle Shaw 2. Edgar Soberon, The Kiss, 1989 3. John James Audubon, Ruby-throated Hummingbird

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Daytona Beach continued...

The beauty of his Birds of America is equaled by its scientific value as a part of our nation’s natural heritage. (See story on pg. 62.) Thru 06.05

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

HEYDAY offers a glimpse into the most dynamic period of the American circus through the rarely seen photographs of Frederick W. Glasier (18661950), who served as the official photographer for the Barnum & Bailey Circus. The exhibition features several dozen photographs that depict the circus coming to town, perfor-

mances of spectacular feats and the behindthe-scenes life of circus members. (See story in the April/May 2011 issue on pg. 90.)

working in a variety of media and styles are represented through the Collections of Ed Harris, Judy Thompson, Linda Pinto, Margery Pabst and Charlotte Everbach. The show also includes insight from the collectors on how

D e LAND Thru 07.10

they got started and how they select art.

Through the Collector’s Eye Florida Museum for Women Artists

07.16-09.03

www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

Selected works from 5 important Florida collectors are on display. Multiple artists

Witness to Creativity II Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

Following the success of Witness to Creativity, which took place in July of 2010, the Museum once again opened its doors to the public while a group of artists prepared their works. Viewers enjoyed a rare opportunity to engage the artists about their projects, work methods and messages. This dialog between the artists and viewers is part of the resulting art installations making up this exhibition. DELRAY BEACH Thru 06.05

Kimono: Art, Fashion and Society Morikami Museum

1. Frederick W. Glasier, Pete Mardo, 1923, Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 2. Image courtesy of the Florida Museum for Women Artists

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women artists. The shape of the forms and the individual artist’s choice of subject matter, use of materials and technical process, reveal a wide range of artistic innovations that will delight the senses. (See story on pg. 46.)

and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Presented in this exhibition is an array of kimono and fashionable accoutrements. The garments are displayed alongside various

06.21-10.02

Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

woodblock prints and paintings reflecting a broad range of kimono fashions and time periods, including those worn by geisha and courtesans in the late Edo Period (1600-1868).

Master Pastelist, Brooke Allison, shows her life’s work in an exhibition of drawings, paintings and pastels spanning over 40 years of creative study. 07.08-08.21

DUNEDIN Thru 06.26

Women in Japan have been involved in the production of ceramics for thousands of years, but only a few have ever been recognized. Soaring Voices includes ceramic works created by 25 exceptional contemporary

Brooke Allison: A Retrospective Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

New Quilts from an Old Favorite 2010: Sunflower and Portals Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Two exhibitions of original quilts from

1. Adolescent Girl’s Ceremonial Kimono with Floral Motifs and Crest-like Emblems of Wisteria and Mandarin Orange Motifs, stencil-printed (kata-yuzen) design on figured silk (rinzu), Japan, Showa Period, 1960s, 56-1/2” h, 43-1/4”w, 1/2”d, gift of Eisha Nakano 2. Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 03-III, 2003, stoneware and glass, photo: ©Taku Saiki 3. Brooke Allison, Hammock Palm 4. Image courtesy of Dunedin Fine Art Center

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the US and Canada provide a wonderful look at the skills, techniques and remarkable creativity of today’s quiltmakers. FORT LAUDERDALE

Thru 09.04

An Intimate Look at William Glackens and The Eight Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

temporaries as well as a special installation of landscapes created by Glackens from 1908 through the 1930s.

are celebrated and how pivotal decisions are made by different cultures throughout the world. The exhibition is organized into 7 thematic sections: 06.05-09.25 Children and Family, The Art of Love, Wellness, HealCaring: A Look ing, Disaster, Aging at Life through and Remembering. Photography The 200 photographs Museum of Art / in the exhibition have Fort Lauderdale, been lent by artists, Nova Southeastern museums, private University collectors and from www.moafl.org the holdings of the Through the use of Time/LIFE Picture photographs and film, Collection. (See story The Art of Caring exon pg. 54.) amines how key events

www.moafl.org

This highly unique special exhibition

features 9 installations created by 11 of South Florida’s leading contemporary artists. Visitors are encouraged to give positive or negaThru 09.04 tive feedback about Sight Specific: the installations Explorations in via social media, artSpace, Vision ists’ websites, etc., and Sound to expand the converMuseum of Art / sation about the Fort Lauderdale, arts in the local comNova Southeastern munity and within University the larger society.

www.moafl.org

Included in this exhibition are works by Glackens and his con-

1. William Glackens, Sledding, Central Park (detail), 1912, oil on canvas 2. Annie Leibovitz, Rebecca Denison, Founder of WORLD (Women Organized to Respond to Life-threatening Diseases), San Francisco, 1993, archival pigment print, courtesy Leibovitz Studio, NY, NY; ©Annie Leibovitz 3. Gavin Perry, Cluster F***

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 12.31

Associations and Inspiration: The CoBrA Movement and the Arts of Africa and Oceania Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

This lively and thought-provoking installation juxtaposes paintings, sculpture and works on paper by artists of the CoBrA

Pacific island of New Guinea and on the continent of Africa.

ing historical myth and narrative. 06.18-08.14

Michael O’Brien: Impact Zone Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

HOLLYWOOD Thru 06.05

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

artandculturecenter.org

Michael O’Brien loves the water—specifically, the ocean. Lisa Rockford: A surfer for 35 years, The She-Monster O’Brien has a unique Sideshow connection to the Art and ocean. His work is an Culture Center expression of 20 years

artandculturecenter.org

Ryan Humphrey is a New York-based contemporary artist who incorporates BMX bikes in dynamic 2and 3-dimensional works. Fast Forward features a large-scale, floor-to-ceiling installation in which BMX bikes are attached to the gallery wall. The installation includes a massive wraparound rug created by Humphrey with designer, Todd Old-

of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

The She-Monster Sideshow presents a series of large-scale banner paintings representing mythical females. These “shemonsters” are drawn movement with masks, from pre-existing totems and carvings pop culture imagery, created on the South humorously referenc-

with a camera in the impact zone. 06.18-08.14

Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward

1. Melanesia, New Guinea, Papua New Guinea, Abelam people, Abelam mask, 20th century, rattan with tied fiber, polychrome, earth pigments, Collection of the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University, gift of Mr. Robert Thornton 2. Lisa Rockford, She-Monster #24 (Judith) [detail], oil on Taracloth banner, 52 x 70”, courtesy of the artist 3. Michael O’Brien, C-Print, 1992-2010 4. Ryan Humphrey, Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward, installation view, photo by Brian Barnhart

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ham, a collection of bike-inspired paintings and mixed-media pieces, and 3 versions of Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel (1913) set against BMX bike ramps. (See story on pg. 100.)

Howard Finster was responsible for introducing millions to “outsider art,” a term often applied to include self-taught or Naïve art makers. From pop culture icons, like Elvis Presley, to historical figures, such as George JACKSONVILLE Washington, to reThru 08.28 ligious images, like The Works of The Devils Vice and Reverend John the Baptist, to his Howard Finster own visions, Finster’s Museum of “sacred art” paintings Contemporary incorporate colorful, Art, Jacksonville detailed, flat picture www.mocajacksonville.org planes, often covered with Bible verses.

Artist, Christina West, builds an enigmatic narrative in What a Doll: The Human Object as Toy, an installation of threequarters life-size clay figures permanently frozen in mid-gesture. Stripped from the context of previous actions, the figures’ Thru 08.14 personalities, motives On the Silk Road and the High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture, and Commerce The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

and intentions are What a Doll: malleable and unfixed The Human in the viewers’ minds. Object as Toy Who they are is in a Museum of state of flux, depenContemporary dent on the stories Art, Jacksonville viewers create. (See www.mocajacksonville.org story on pg. 98.) Thru 08.28

www.cummer.org

The superb examples of Chinese ceramics featured in this exhibition were treasured at home and abroad, and considered rarities until the mid-18th century. Specific

1. Howard Finster, Emages of Visions of Other Worlds Beyond (3077), n.d., tractor enamel on plexiglas, courtesy of the Arient Family Collection 2. Christina West, What a Doll: the Human Object as Toy (detail), 2010, glazed ceramic and stuffed fabric 3. Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount, Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796–1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century, porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamel-on-biscuit decoration, 17 x 10-1/4 x 6-3/4”, gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

styles and innovations that arose as a result of cross-cultural exchanges are highlighted.

home, to recreate the the most important domestic sphere in collection of Meissen which their collection in the US. was originally displayed.

Thru 12.31

Thru 12.31

Thru 06.26

Re-opening of the Tudor Room The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain

Annie Leibovitz: Women Polk Museum of Art

www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer has unveiled a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnishings, a fireplace and a selection of art from the Cummers’

traits from a broad spectrum of society. Among the recognizable faces are Betty Ford, Gloria Steinem, Toni Morrison and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

LAKELAND

Thru 10.08

Figuration Polk Museum of Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Annie Leibovitz is one of the most famous photographers working today. Her photographs have been featured on the cover of Rolling The Cummer Stone magazine and Museum of Art in the often imitated & Gardens “Got Milk?” adverwww.cummer.org tising campaign. In More than 3 years of this exhibition of planning and research more than 60 phoculminate with a new tographs, Leibovitz reinstallation of The focuses on the AmerWark Collection of ican woman—at Early Meissen Porthe turn of the milcelain, recognized as lenium—with por-

www.polkmuseumofart.org

This exhibition focuses on artworks from the Permanent Collection that feature the human figure.

1. Interior of Cummer Home (detail), ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives 2. Tea Caddy from the Queen

Marie of Hanover Coffee and Tea Service, ca. 1730, porcelain with painted decoration Johann Gregorius Höroldt, 4-1/3” 3. Harrison Covington, Face to Face, 1990, acrylic and collage on canvas, PMoA Permanent Collection, purchased through the Kent Harrison Memorial Acquisition Fund

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will be displayed according to how its form relates to its intended function.

ing the “Golden Age of American Illustration.” His “confident line” created a portrait of American aspirations. (See story on pg. 72.)

MAITLAND 07.02-09.10

Thru 09.11

Form/Function: Decorative Arts from the Permanent Collection Polk Museum of Art

The Confident Line: Henry Patrick Raleigh Maitland Art Center

bring together the worlds of art, history and science, include such outstanding volumes as The Way Things Work, Cathedral, Castle, City, Mill,

MELBOURNE 07.02-10.09

www.artandhistory.org

Henry Patrick Raleigh www.polkmuseumofart.org (1880-1944) spent deThe correlation becades navigating high tween artistic design society and portrayand functionality has ing opulent life as one always been a defining characteristic of Decorative Art. Decorative Art objects from various cultures and time periods will be presented, from Georgian silver to Asian porcelain to Pre-Columbian ceof America’s highest ramics. Each artwork paid illustrators dur-

Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay Brevard Art Museum www.brevardartmuseum.org

David Macaulay is an author and artist who has helped us to understand the workings and origins of everything from gadgets to gargantuan buildings. He has an extraordinary gift for conveying complex concepts in ways that are fun and engaging. The artist’s classic books, which

Pyramid, Ship, Building Big and Mosque. Thru 06.19

Elements of Nature: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation Brevard Art Museum www.brevardartmuseum.org

This exhibition, cu-

1. Italian, Urbino, Plate depicting Piove la Manna (“It rains manna”), ca. 1550-1575, Majolica (tin-glazed earthenware), Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Dr. Jane Carver Holmes 2. Henry Patrick Raleigh, photo courtesy of the Henry Raleigh Archive, Collection of Kate and Chris Raleigh 3. David Macaulay, from Cathedral, ©1999 David Macaulay, courtesy of Norman Rockwell Museum

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(al mismo tiempo) Bass Museum of Art

www.bassmuseum.org

rated by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation director, Billie Milam Weisman, examines, through a diverse range of works and perspectives, the varying ways in which the earth and its elements continue to inspire artists to create works of art that have meaning in our lives. MIAMI

An Invitation to LOOK brings more than 40 works from the Bass Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection together in a presentation that takes a brief pause from the conventional museum approach of arranging works according to

art historical or theoretical systems.

Thru 07.03

Thru 06.19

An Invitation to LOOK Bass Museum of Art

Come Together: Frances Trombly and Leyden Rodriguez-

www.bassmuseum.org

Peruvian artist, Sandra Gamarra, takes images from well-known contexts and makes them her own. Included in her exhibition at the Bass Museum are paintings based on

Casanova Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Frances Trombly uses trompe l’oeil effects in her work to recreate mundane objects, making labor-intensive pieces through weaving, embroidery, cross stitch, and crochet. Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova challenges the absoluteness of psychological and utilitarian narratives associated with our utilization and memory of everyday objects.

photographs she has taken of visitors looking at works of art in the Museum’s galleries. (See story on pg. 96.) Thru 08.28

Anchor Gallery: Mark Dion Miami Art Museum

07.02-10.16

Sandra Gamarra: At The Same Time

1. Roger Brown, Saguaro’s Revenge, 1983, oil on canvas, 72 x 48”, courtesy of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation 2. George Romney, Mrs. John Charnock, oil on canvas, gift of John and Johanna Bass 3. Frances Trombly, Mop, 2008, hand-spun silver wool and cotton, wooden mop handle, 52 x 14 x 13”, courtesy of the artist and David Castillo Gallery, Miami 4. Sandra Gamarra, Santos, 2008, oil on canvas, 63-3/4 x 76-3/4”, image courtesy of Galería Leme, São Paulo, Brazil

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and materiality. All that is Solid Melts into Air is a two channel video installation with images screened on opposite walls of a room. In www.miamiartmuseum.org the projected images, Interweaving the the corporate colonidiverse disciplines of zation of Nigerian oil art, science, ecology, resources creates the history and archeoloccasion for a contrast ogy, Dion’s large-scale of cultures and beliefs. installation, South Florida Wildlife Rescue 07.17-10.16 Unit, explores human Rivane Neuenattempts to rationalize schwander: and control Florida’s A Day Like Any Everglades. Other

merges painting, photography, film, sculpture, installation and participatory actions. In her work, which is always based on social situations and frequently involves viewer interaction, Brazilian artist, Neuenschwander, acts as creator, editor, collaborator, social organizer, and commissioning agent. The exhibition surveys Neuenschwander’s work of the past deMiami Art cade and will include Museum 3 of her incredibly www.miamiartmuseum.org immersive, viscerally Rivane Neuenbeautiful installations. schwander’s practice (See story on pg. 94.)

Thru 07.31

Focus Gallery: Mark Boulos Miami Art Museum

exhibition explores the topic of tamed versus untamed nature through a focused selection of film and sculptural installations. The exhibition grapples with competing definitions of “wildness,” pitting traditional conceptions of a chaotic, primordial realm that awaits human subjugation

against the idea of a self-regulating order that courses through the natural world.

Thru 06.26

www.miamiartmuseum.org

Artist, Mark Boulos, works with documentary film to investigate the relationship between ideas, ideology

The Wilderness Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

This thematic group

Thru 06.05

At Capacity: Large-Scale Works from the Permanent

1. Mark Dion, The South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit: Mobile Laboratory, 2006, mixed media installation, 18’ 11” x 7’ 7” x 8’ 11”, Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Lin Lougheed, reproduced with permission of the artist, photo: Tim McAfee 2. I Wish Your Wish (detail), 2003, silkscreen on fabric ribbons, dimensions variable, from Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other, courtesy New Museum, NY, photo: Benoit Pailley 3. Christy Gast, Batty Cave, 2010, three-channel HD video installation, dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist and Gallery Diet, Miami Dade County

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Collection Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.mocanomi.org

Thanks to the outstanding generosity of local and international collectors and patrons to MOCA’s acquisition fund, the current museum facility is “at capacity.” In addition to its growth in size, the Collection’s impressive monumental works and installations have become one of the museum’s hallmarks. MOCA is featuring a selection of these works by John Baldessari, Dara Friedman,

Thomas Hirschhorn, Jene Highstein, Edward and Nancy Kienholz, Louise Nevelson, Dennis Oppenheim and others.

and Collection, and receive professional guidance as they research and create new projects within the context of the museum. 

Thru 06.05

06.24-09.04

Open Process: New Work by Miami Artists Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Ryan Trecartin: Any Ever Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.mocanomi.org

Open Process is an exhibition featuring new work by young Miami artists commissioned by MOCA. The featured artists are given access to resources provided by MOCA, including the museum’s archives

Thru 09.18

David and Hi-Jin Hodge: Who’s Counting and Temporal State of Being The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This multi-media exhibit consists of 2 works that look at modern life and ex-

www.mocanomi.org

Seven new video installations produced in 2009, during Ryan Trecartin’s yearlong research-based residency in Miami, are presented. Trecartin has established a singular video practice that, in form and function, advances understandings of 21st century technology, narrative and identity—and also propels these matters as expressive mediums.

plore the idea that 21st century life is lived, to a surprising degree, in a context of boxes of our own making. Thru 09.11

East/West: Visually Speaking

1. Ed and Nancy Kienholz, Soup Course at the She-She Café, 1982, mixed media, variable dimensions, Collection of Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, gift of Irma Braman 2. Autumn Casey, Somewhere Between Here and Las Vegas, 2011, video still 3. David & Hi-Jin Hodge, Who’s Counting (Dining 11 items), 2011, photo mounted aluminum, 48 x 32”, courtesy of the artist

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Japanese War of 1894-95 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Splendor: The Art of the Temari The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This exhibit features 20 woodblock print triptychs depicting the http://thefrost.fiu.edu first major conflict of East/West: Visually Imperial Japan after Speaking highlights the Meiji Restoration 12 contemporary Chi- of 1868 and the rapid nese artists who have westernization of adapted Western ideas Japan. These woodand art forms to creblock prints were ate new styles of art. made by important In some works, the artists and used in reference to Western Japan as both propaculture seems adorganda and for the deing, while in others, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values. (See story on pg. 38.) The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

06.08-08.14

Rise of an Empire: Scenes of the Sino-

piction of places the Japanese were only able to read about in newspapers.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 08.21

South Florida Cultural Consortium Exhibition The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The recent works of the recipients of the 2010 South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship are presented. 06.08-08.14

Tribute to Japanese

Temari is the centuries old tradition of handcrafting embroidered balls. Artist, Sharon Thieman, creates these

beautiful objects with a modern sensibility. Thru 08.14

Art for All: British Posters for Transport Organized by the Yale Center for British Art The Wolfsonian– Florida

1. Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China, 2002-2008, painted copper (dragon), 65-3/4 x 22-7/8 x 30-1/4”, courtesy of the artist 2. Ogata Gekko, Ryojun no sankan ni roei shoshi nikko o haisu zu (Picture of Officers and Men Worshiping the Rising Sun While Encamped in the Mountains of Port Arthur) [detail], triptych woodblock print, ink and colors on paper, Meiji Period, dated 1894, 14 x 28”, gift of private donor, photo © Alex Garcia, The Frost Art Museum 3. Michael Genovese, 13 reasons, 2010, aluminum, silver leaf, toner, enamel on paper, 18 x 24”, courtesy of OHWOW Gallery 4. Temari balls created by artist Sharon Thieman, photo ©Carlos Aristizabal

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International University

painting, sculpture and technology. It is work that demands repeated visits, as the more time one spends with it, the more possibilities it reveals.

NAPLES

www.wolfsonian.org

In 1908, the London Underground began an aggressive campaign that became one of the most successful, adventurous and best sustained branding operations ever attempted. The more than 5,000 works produced include some of the greatest achievements of poster art. Art for All features outstanding posters executed for both the Underground and the British railways.

have spent a lifetime at their craft, together with an exciting array of new artists that visitors can “discover” for themselves. Thru 06.30

Thru 06.30

Thru 06.30

Bold Statements in Light: Stephen Knapp, Lightpaintings Naples Museum of Art

Florida Contemporary 2011 Naples Museum of Art

Louise Nevelson: Dawn’s Forest Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Dawn’s Forest consists of a series of sculptures by Louise Nevelson (18991988), one of the most important and influential figures in postwar American art, and the most internationally

www.thephil.org

Deriving inspiration from his studies of light, color, dimension, space and perception, artist, Stephen Knapp, has been creating art that interacts with light for over 30 years. Ingeniously crafted with light, treated glass and stainless steel mounts, Lightpaintings exist at the intersection of abstract

www.thephil.org

From realism to abstraction—and everything in between— the 3rd annual edition of this popular invitational exhibition features familiar photographers, painters, sculptors and graphic artists, who

celebrated woman artist of her time.

1. Poster: To Summer Sales by Underground, 1926,
designed by Horace Christopher Taylor,
lithograph,
Yale Center for British Art, gift of Henry S. Hacker,
Yale College, class of 1965,
©TfL from the London Transport Museum Collection 2. Stephen Knapp, Solstace Begat, 2004, light, glass and stainless steel,
13’ x 16’ x 10”, © Stephen Knapp 3. Michael Vasquez, It’s All Mine, 2010, acrylic on watercolor paper, 33 x 25-1/4”, © Michael Vasquez, image courtesy of Fredric Snitzer Gallery. 4. Louise Nevelson, Dawn’s Forest (detail), 1986, painted balsa-plywood,
Collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of GA-Met, a joint venture Georgia-Pacific, LLC,
© 2010 Estate of Louise Nevelson /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

that communicate the beauty, warmth and lifestyle that make Tuscany so appealing. (See story in the April/May 2011 issue on pg. 96.)

Thru 06.30

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org Thru 06.30

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

The land of Tuscany has inspired artists for centuries. During several extended visits, made from

Silent Frontier: Icons of Montana’s Early Settlements Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

OCALA Thru 06.12

Out West: The Art of Theodore Waddell Appleton Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

This jewel of an exhibition recreates the atmosphere of Olga Hirshhorn’s art-packed house in Washington, DC, known as “The Mouse House,” and features intimatesized works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Giacometti, de Kooning and many others.

Thru 06.12

The nostalgia of earlier times in the Old West is captured in this exhibition

www.appletonmuseum.org

Included in this exhibition are more than 40 paintings and original illustrations

1999-2001, photographers, Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee, traveled the back roads of Tuscany in search of the source of that inspiration. The resulting black-andwhite photographs are captivating works

of 55 black-and-white images by photographer Richard Buswell. ORLANDO Thru 06.12

by noted Montana artist, Theodore Waddell.

Florida in the Civil War Orange County Regional History Center

1. Image courtesy of Naples Museum of Art 2. Paula Chamlee, Cortona, Tuscany, 1999,
© Paula Chamlee 3. Theodore Waddell, Beaverhead Paints 4. Richard S. Buswell, silver gelatin print, © Richard S. Buswell

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www.thehistorycenter.org

In a special 10th anniversary exhibit, Florida in the Civil War acknowledges Florida’s important role in the “War between the States.” Highlights include rare artifacts, a Colt revolver and letters exchanged between a soldier and his wife. Children can also try on uniforms and other clothing. Thru 06.30

explores how artists have represented American life and culture over the past century. Works by Ansel Adams, Richard Estes, Malcolm Morley, Earl Cunningham

and many others are included.

sculptures by artists from the mid-19th century to the present and explores themes that have continued to interest artists over time. The exhibition includes paintings

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Aztec to Zapotec II features more than 180 works drawn from the OMA’s comprehensive Art of the Ancient Americas Collection and gives a rare glimpse into the life and culture of numerous civilizations from the North, Central and South American regions.

by George Inness, Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, April Gornik, Joseph Raffael and Frank Moore, in addition to sculpture by Thomas Ridgeway Gould, Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Bryan Hunt.

Thru 06.30

Aztec to Zapoctec II: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection

American Visions: Changing Viewpoints Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 06.30

Common Ground: Art of the American Landscape Orlando Museum of Art

06.18-07.03

www.omart.org

Common Ground: Art of the American Landscape brings together paintings and

www.omart.org

American Visions

Contemporary American Graphics Collection

1. Occupation of Jacksonville, from the Collection of Richard J. Ferry 2. Jane Hammond, Untitled, 1993, oil on canvas with metal leaf, 70 x 80”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1993 3. Seated Figure Urn, AD 300-600, Zapotec; Oaxaca, Monte Alban, Mexico, ceramic, 12”, gift of Howard Phillips 4. Georgia O’Keeffe, Datura and Pedernal, 1940, oil on board, 11 x 16-1/8”, gift of the Dorothy Meigs Eidlitz Foundation, © 2010 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artist Rights Society (ARS), NY

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Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Contemporary American Graphics Collection features more than 150 limited edition lithographs, etchings, silk-screen prints and woodcuts from the

OMA’s Permanent Collection. Included are examples of major traditional printing techniques, as well as new and innovative processes. The works vary from realism to abstraction and reflect a variety of techniques and styles associated with the revolution in

fine art printing that has occurred in the last 55 years. More than 120 of America’s most renowned artists are represented, including Jim Dine, Katherine Bowling, Christopher Brown, Lesley Dill, Elizabeth Murray, Robert Rauschenberg and Edward Ruscha.

popular media. Among the artists represented are Ursula von Rydingsvard, John Chamberlain, Frank Moore and Chuck Close.

Thru 06.12

Thru 06.30

Currents in Contemporary Art: Process and Materials Orlando Museum of Art

Life Stories: American Portraits Past and Present Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

www.omart.org

A hallmark of contemporary art is its diversity and acceptance of varied approaches to creating art. Additionally, artists have borrowed styles and imagery from the past, other cultures and

Life Stories explores how styles and purposes of portraiture have changed over time, reflecting changing social values and the shift of emphasis from formal to casual representations of the individual. Paintings, photographs and sculpture spanning a period of over 200 years are on display, including works by Benjamin West, Rembrandt Peale, John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam, Robert Henri and Cindy Sherman. Thru 07.03

Noelle Tan: Sense of Place Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Noelle Tan’s work challenges customary

1. Robert Kushner, Fire Opal, 2009, lithograph on paper, edition: 11/30, 30-1/4 x 30-1/8”, purchased with funds provided by the Council of 101 2. John Chamberlain, Lazzarini’s Pie, 1990, painted metal, 46 x 70 x 46”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1991, © 2010 John Chamberlain /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Robert Henri, Rosaleen, 1928, oil on canvas, 28 x 20”, on long-term loan from Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc.

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expectations of photography. Presenting three series of work, Untitled (2000-2001), Drawings (20022005) and from here to the Salton Sea (2006), the artist has created a body of work based on the

American landscape yet purposefully, bravely, and beautifully rejects the rules of photography, with its recommendations for shutter speeds and exposure ranges..

nent & Private Collections The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

FLA.ART features a diverse selection of works from the collections of The Mennello Museum of American Art, The City of Orlando and several public and private collections. The exhibit will be altered over the upcoming months, allowing the museum to show the evolu-

tion and changing face of Florida art, as represented by such artists as Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, John Chamberlain, Barbara Sorensen, Cheryl Bogdanowitsch, Purvis as well as the sculpture Young and Anna Tom- of Jen Torres. czak, to name a few. 06.24-08.07

Surf ’s Up 2011 Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

ORMOND BEACH Thru 06.05

Adopting the Pace of Nature Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Archival surf images, collections, surf boards, stand-up paddle boards, original films and arti-facts from area collectors,

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Vibrant Florida landscapes and watercraft sculpture are on display in this exhibition featuring paintings by Gary Borse and Karlene McConnell,

Thru 09.25

FLA.ART: Art by Florida Artists from the Perma-

1. Noelle Tan, Untitled #12, 2001, silver gelatin print on paper, 20 x 24”, edition 5/10, Collection of the artist 2. Cheryl Bogdanowitsch, Doberman, mixed media 3. Gary Borse, Amazing Grace, 2010, Acrylic on canvas, 36 x 36” 4. Image courtesy of Volusia County Beach Patrol

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artists and enthusiasts are all on display in this fun and nostalgic summer exhibition. PENSACOLA

screens, conduct symphonies and, through the use of video, insert themselves into one of his paintings.

SARASOTA

Thru 06.26

Chagall for Children Pensacola Museum of Art

Selections from the Permanent Collection Pensacola Museum of Art

www.pensacola

www.pensacola

museumofart.org

museumofart.org

Thru 09.04

Reproductions of over a dozen Chagall masterpieces, all accompanied by hands-on interactive elements, allow children to create mosaics, weave tapestries, alter Chagall’s masterpieces using digital touch

Thru 10.30

Crosscurrents of Design: Asian Export Ceramics The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Thru 08.14

The Museum annually exhibits highlights from its Permanent Collection. The 2011 exhibition includes a selection from the over 300 accessioned works in the Collection. Noted artists displayed in past years have been Miriam Schapiro, John James Audubon, Emil Holzhauer, Alexander Calder, Pablo Picasso and more!

Beyond Bling: Voices of Hip-Hop in Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Hip-hop has become a dominant part of popular culture and its influence can be seen in contemporary art. Beyond Bling takes a look at the work of a diverse mix of artists who all operate within and are also informed by hip-hop culture.

Asian export ceramics were created in areas that are now known as Thailand, Vietnam, China and Japan. Combining indigenous traditions and borrowed designs, these decorative and practical objects document the crosscultural exchange of material goods and

1. Image courtesy of Kohl Children’s Museum of Greater Chicago 2. Sofia Maldonado, Concrete Jungle Divas (detail), 2010, courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery, NY 3. Japanese, early Meiji (1868-1912) period, painting 1868-1870, Montgolfier Balloon with Enameled Decorations, porcelain

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artistic motifs that began centuries ago and still continue today. 07.14-09.30

DECO JAPAN: Shaping Modern Culture, 1920-1945

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

The first exhibition dedicated to Japanese Art Deco held outside Tokyo, DECO JAPAN

not only provides dramatic examples of the spectacular craftsmanship and sophisticated design long associated with Japan, it conveys the complex social and cultural tensions in Japan during the Taishô and early Shôwa epochs (1912-1945). The nearly 200 works include spectacular examples of metalwork, ceramics, lacquer, glass, wood furniture, jewelry, textiles, graphic design on paper, painting and woodblock prints. Thru 10.30

The Art of Jade The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

ST. PETERSBURG Thru 06.12

Familiar and Fantastic: Photographs from the Dandrew-Drapkin Donation Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.ringling.org

Jade has been shaped for human purposes for thousands of years. Its hardness makes it almost impossible to carve— instead, it must be worn away, abraded, and drilled— presenting challenges far beyond those faced by sculptors of more compliant materials. This exhibition features objects that were fashioned chiefly during the late Qing dynasty (1644-1912), and reflect ancient traditions, though occasionally reveal a glimpse of a more modern spirit.

www.fine-arts.org

Familiar and Fantastic spans more than 100 years and features over 100 images from The Ludmila Dandrew

1. Image courtesy of and used under license from The Levenson Collection 2. Image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 3. Fémina,
Child in Eastern Costume, 1910,
autochrome,
gift of Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

and Chitranee Drapkin Collection. Highlights include historic images which document the building of the Paris Opera, construction of the Panama Canal, the American West, and Egypt and its antiquities. Thru 09.04

New Folk: Contemporary SelfTaught Art from the Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

as new acquisitions by many of America’s best-known folk artists, including Howard Finster, Nellie Mae Rowe, Juanita Rogers, Mose Tolliver, Jimmie Lee Sudduth, Lonnie Holley, Buddy Snipes, Ned Cartledge and Carlton Garrett. The works explore religion, spirituality and the visionary; nature; popular culture; politics and current events; and much more.

www.fine-arts.org Thru 09.04

New Folk contains old favorites as well

www.thebrogan.org

www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition showcases 50 masterpieces of Lombard baroque painting, covering the years from the mid16th century to the end of the 18th century—a fundamental period in Italian art history that has been absent for many

The Human Touch: features 46 largescale paintings, prints, works on paper and photographs that give insight into the human psyche, while helping us to understand the human condition. years from American museums. TALLAHASSEE

The Human Touch: Contemporary Art from the RBC Wealth Management Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Thru 07.24

Baroque Painting in Lombardy from the Pinacoteca di Brera The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science

TAMPA Thru 07.06

Classic Images: Photography by Ansel Adams Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

1. James “Buddy” Snipes,
THE HOUSE OF SHAME, 1995,
acrylic, wood, bone, plastic and metal,
gift of George and Nancy Ellis 2. Hung Liu,
 Baby King II, 1996,
oil on canvas and painted wood,
RBC Wealth Management Collection 3. Vincenzo Campi, La Fruttivendola

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

as he explored form and movement.

www.fmopa.org

Classic Images includes 54 exceptional photographs that Ansel Adams personally printed for his daughter. The 15 sections of the exhibition encompass the artist’s work throughout the country from 1921 through 1968. His devotion to the American wilderness is evident in his photographs of several national parks, especially images of his beloved Yosemite. (See story

in the April/May 2011 issue on pg. 72.)

presents a selection of Snitzer’s worldfamous jazz images.

Thru 06.19

Herb Snitzer: A Jazz Memoir Tampa Museum of Art Thru 06.19

Thru 07.17

Realism: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

St. Petersburg resident and former

Degas: Form, Movement and the Antique Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

Realism provides a compelling view of the realist tendencies in the visual arts of the last 30 years. The exhibition juxtaposes stellar examples of the Photo-

www.tampamuseum.org

In the first ever exhibition of works by Degas in the Tampa Bay region, Degas: Form, Movement and the Antique brings together a selection of this French genius’s bronze sculptures with a selection of paintings and drawings to demonstrate the close relationship between his sculptures and two-dimensional work

photojournalist for Life, Look and Fortune magazines, Herb Snitzer has spent nearly 5 decades capturing the world around us. Upon the publication of a new collection of his images, Glorious Days and Nights, the TMA

1. Rose And Driftwood, San Francisco, CA, ca. 1932, photograph by Ansel Adams, ©2011 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust 2. Edgar Degas, The Little Dancer (Petite danseuse de quatorze ans), ca. 1880-1881 (cast ca. 1919-32), Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; State Operating Fund and The Art Lovers’ Society, photo: Katherine Wetzel, © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 3. Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir by Herb Snitzer, published by University Press of Mississippi 4. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Realist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural installations by leading contemporary artists. Thru 11.20

Worlds Apart: Myth & History, Gods & Mortals, Heroes & Hybrids Tampa Museum of Art

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

www.tampamuseum.org

www.ira.usf.edu

Worlds Apart explores the many

intersecting spheres of the world of classical antiquity.

outdoor sculpture collection. The works include welded sculpLe Cirque (The Cirture by John Henry cus) is considered Lé- and David Hayes, ger’s master graphic kinetic sculpture by work and represents Jerome Kirk, bronze almost half of Léger’s work by Thomas total graphic output. A Ostenberg and the limited edition portMuseum’s most recent folio of printed text, sculpture acquisition, illustrated with 63 lithographs, is on display for the first time at the Museum.

Deville Cohen, Leepa-Rattner Kate Gilmore, Museum of Art Mary Reid Kelley www.spcollege.edu/museum

The artists in Stagecraft work across the fields of sculpture, theater, performance, cinematography and animation to re-imagine and re-script our relationships to everyday objects and characters. TARPON SPRINGS

VERO BEACH Thru 12.11.11

Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

06.10-09.10

Thru 07.17

Stagecraft: Brian Bress,

Fernand Léger: Le Cirque

Celebrating 25 Years presents an engaging look at the Museum’s

Hanneke Beaumont’s Bronze #56. Thru 08.07

Curator’s Choice: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection

1. Image courtesy of Tampa Museum of Art 2. Deville Cohen, Grayscale (A video in three acts), 2009/10, HD video, paper, 18 minutes 3. Joseph Wesner, Pherein Shaprea, 1990, welded steel, sandstone, paint and wax, 71 x 31 x 22”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Samuel A. Burns, II Memorial Fund

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Vero Beach Museum of Art

A selection of 12 works from the Museum’s Permanent Collection asks viewers to create their own narrative.

hibition challenges the viewer’s perceptions of reality and the ability of art to create an altered and transformative

highlights works of art from the great ancient culture of China. The installation also explores important discoveries of mummies and renowned tombs.

www.verobeachmuseum.org

This exhibition features a selection of 10 significant paintings from the Museum’s Permanent Collection by noteworthy American artists, including Athena Society acquisitions by Andrew Wyeth, Charles Burchfield, Janet Fish, and James Redfield.

WEST PALM

Thru 07.17

BEACH

From A to Z: 26 Great Photographs from the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art

Thru 07.17

Altered States: Jose Alvarez, Yayoi Kusama, Fred Tomaselli and Leo Villareal Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Through the unapolThru 09.25 ogetically beautiful What’s the Story? collages, paintings Vero Beach and light installations Museum of Art by a select group of artists, including Jose Alvarez, Yayoi Kusama, Fred Tomaselli and Leo Villareal, this ex-

experience. (See story in the April/ May 2011 issue on pg. 52.)

www.norton.org

From A to Z acknowledges the work of some of the most

Thru 07.17

Eternal China: Tales from the Crypt Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Eternal China

1. Andrew Wyeth, The Wales Farm, 1967, watercolor on paper, 22 x 29-1/2”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Athena Society 2. Romare Bearden, Jazz I, n.d., lithograph on paper, AP 6/12, 28 x 38”, gift of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gibson 3. Jose Alvarez, The Arrival, 2008, feathers, porcupine quills, crystals, paint, ink, paper collage, and acetate on paper, 72 x 44”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach 4. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas, Juchitan, 1979, gelatin silver photograph, 24 x 20”, purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art, courtesy of the artist and Rose Gallery

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 5 o f 2 6 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

notable photographers of the 20th and 21st centuries, ranging from such seminal figures as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston to a younger generation of photo-based artists. 06.04-09.04

Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

sion programs, such as Star Wars, Terminator, Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica and Batman. The exhibit examines how costume design helps performers and audiences engage with the characters being portrayed.

Creem, Rolling Stone, People, 16, Entertainment Weekly, the New York Times and the

WINTER PARK

London Times.(See story on pg. 84.)

07.02-10.09

It’s Always Rock and Roll: The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Out of This World features more than 30 costumes and related objects from science fiction films and televi-

Thru 06.12

07.02-10.09

E. Brady Robinson: Transfer Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

E. Brady Robinson uses the camera to

www.rollins.edu/cfam

Janet Macoska has captured some of rock and roll’s most legendary performers through the lens of her camera. Her images have appeared in

examine her environment and record fleeting moments of existence.

Juxtaposing History: Salvador Dalí, the Hebrew Bible, and the Formation of Israel Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

Juxtaposing History includes a selection of works from 2 series of prints by Salvador Dalí. Aliyah (1968) represents important moments of Jewish history as well as traditional symbols and customs. Our Historical Heritage (1975), portrays prominent figures and passages from the Hebrew scriptures.

1. George Clooney’s costume from Batman & Robin, image courtesy of the Paul G. Allen Family Collection 2. Janet Macoska, Tina Turner, 1985,
 courtesy of the photographer 3. E. Brady Robinson, Above Virginia, 2011, inkjet print

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 6 o f 2 6 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 06.12

Sharaku Interpreted by Japan’s Contemporary Artists Cornell Fine Arts Museum at

April/May 2011 issue on pg. 94.)

Apopka was to be flooded.

Thru 06.12

07.02-10.09

The Last Harvest: A History and Tribute to the Life and Work of the Farmworkers on Lake Apopka Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

Sharaku Interpreted is an engaging report of the personal reinterpretation of Sharaku, an 18th century Japanese master printmaker, by today’s contemporary Japanese graphic designers and artists. (See story in the

The Last Harvest is a powerfully photographed documentary project tracing the life of farmworkers who were left jobless when, in 1997, the Florida legislature declared the land surrounding Lake

Thru 07.10

Two Generations— Two Visions: Arthur Jones & Sam Jones The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Artists, Arthur and Sam Jones (father and son respectively), share the same bloodThe Velvet Years: line and the same 1965-1967, artistic spirit. Their Warhol’s Factory
 distinctly different Photographs by approaches to art are Stephen Shore highlighted in this Cornell Fine dual exhibit. On View Arts Museum at Rollins College www.rollins.edu/cfam

This collection of photographs captures a time when Andy Warhol was emerging as a prominent visual artist and avant-garde filmmaker.

1. Miran Fukada, Otani Oniji III As The Servant Edohei, 1996, acrylic on cotton on panel 2. Farmworkers on Lake Apopka, ©Crealdé School of Art 3. Andy Warhol and Lou Reed, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter of the Velvet Underground;
photograph by Stephen Shore,
courtesy of the photographer 4. Arthur Jones, Stuttering Parrot, courtesy of the artist

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

Artist: ERIN PARISH ERIN’S ABSTRACT

paintings contain rich worlds of pattern, texture and depth created with a repeated use of circles and bubbles, layers upon layers of oil paint and a shimmery resin glaze.

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery www.jjohnsongallery.com

Artist: Yolanda Sánchez

“MY WORK, IN GENERAL, IS A SEARCH FOR RE-ENCHANTMENT...

It attempts to evoke an experience through the relationship of surface marks, the material of the paint itself and color, alluding to an abstract garden—a place set apart...where awareness is expanded and the senses enriched.” From left: Erin Parish, Winter Has Been Conquered, 2010, oil and resin on canvas, 36 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Yolanda Sánchez, Zoe , 2006, oil on canvas, 60 x 96”, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

SAINT AUGUSTINE

Gallery: Butterfield Garage Art Gallery www.butterfieldgarage.com

Artist: Sam Dee Thomas

SAM FINDS INSPIRA-

tion in the developing forms of the natural world. Through his style of CORAL GABLES painting, often referred to as Biomorphic Abstraction, he transforms Gallery: such common organic objects as fruits, vegetables and flowers into ArtSpace/Virginia unique abstract still lifes. Miller Galleries www.virginiamiller.com ST. PETERSBURG

Artist: DWIGHT POGUE

Gallery: Mindy Solomon Gallery

DWIGHT LOVES FLOWERS —

and he is always on the lookout for unusual specimens. Once he has captured their beauty in a photograph, he uses his finely honed skills as an artist to create exquisite lithographs and silkscreens that live on in a timeless display of color and form.

www.mindysolomon.com

Artist: Gareth Mason

INTENSELY EXPRESS-

ive and energetic in character, Gareth’s work reflects his eagerness to capture the dynamics and the mysteries of creation.

Clockwise from top left: Sam Dee Thomas, Temptations And Secrets, oil on canvas, 24 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Butterfield Garage Art Gallery; Dwight Pogue,
Christmas Cactus, 2000, silkscreen on paper, 19 x 27”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Gareth Mason, Moths, 23”h x 18”w x 18”d, porcelain, celadon, jun, luster, copper cable, courtesy of the artist and Mindy Solomon Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebaker gallery.com

Artist: JOHN LLOYD YOUNG TONY AND GRAMMY

winner John Lloyd Young (“Jersey Boys”, “Glee”) is also a sculpture artist who transforms everyday objects into extraordinary manifestations, BOCA RATON

Gallery: Karen Lynne Gallery www.karenlynnegallery.com

Artist: David Langley

“THE HUMOR AND DRAMA OF THE HUMAN CONDIT I O N

which shimmer amidst the aura of popular culture.

has always been the nucleus of my work…My art primarily uses realism, like road signs, to help you navigate through its story, and surrealism to make the journey entertaining, by assembling a collage of landmarks into one compact amusement park. When a medium like pre-formed metal restricts levels of realism, I use scale to infuse the subject with greater perceived psychological importance.”

From left: John Lloyd Young, Got Milk?, 2010, mixed media, 17 x 15 x 8”, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; David Langley , Broadway, paint on polished aluminum, 48 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Karen Lynne Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art www.cjazzart.com

Artist: Chris Fennell

CHRIS CONSTRUCTS

his works using thousands of small-scale pieces, which are collaged in repetitive patterns. N A P L E S His designs reference physics, mathematics, metaphor, the organic Gallery: architectures of nature and metaphysical questions about the boundaries Trudy Labell Fine Art between form and spirit. www.trudylabellfineart.com Artist: GABRIELLE MAYER

MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts

GABRIELLE’S LIFE SIZE

renderings from her series of bag dresses are painted on a canvas with trompe l’oeil precision. These creations, which play with color, form and texture, also explore the significance and impact of clothing and style in our culture.

www.dlfinearts.com

Artist: Alejandra Padilla

THROUGH HER ART, ALEJANDRA EXAMINES OBJECTS,

shapes and the notion of originality. Utilizing collage techniques, she seizes printed images, strips them of their identity and gives them new interpretations.

Clockwise from top: Chris Fennell, A Ringing in the Ears, 2011, acrylic and paper collage on linen over panel, 11 x 14”, courtesy of the artist and Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art; Gabrielle Mayer, Metro Museum, oil on canvas, 49 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Alejandra Padilla, Poliscopía �106, “nadadores II”, 2006, collage on canvas, 39 x 58”, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts

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EAST/

Ê Visually Visually S ON VIEW through

09.11.11 38

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WESTÊ:

Speaking at THE PATRICIAÊ & Ê PHILLIP

FROSTÊ ARTÊ MUSEUM http://thefrost.fiu.edu


EAST/WEST:

Visually Speaking

A

A N EYE-POPPING DISPLAY

of contemporary Chinese art, featuring twelve Chinese artists

whose works reference Western stylistic history, is on view

at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, in Miami.

“This exhibition focuses on

artists with innovative methods and unique viewpoints

that clearly think outside of the established confines,” said Carol Damian, the Museum’s director and chief curator. 40

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previous pages & above: Luo Brothers, Welcome the Famous Brands to China, 2002-2008, Painted copper (Hamburger & dragon)


EAST/WEST:

Visually Speaking

Images of Mao Zedong, mixed with western religious symbols and commercial icons, such as the McDonalds Big Mac, are among the more thought provoking pieces featured, as is a sculpture of the Dying Slave by Michelangelo, covered in acupuncture needles. All bring together familiar symbols of China’s cultural heritage and iconic Western images. The works include two- and threedimensional pieces where there is an obvious merging of Eastern and Western visual languages. While in some works the reference to Western culture seems adoring—especially to the visual culture lexicon—in other works, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values. Each participating artist presents a multifaceted view of contemporary China as it struggles to define itself in the post-cultural revolution as a dominant player in the world economy. Many of the artists in the exhibition were born during the period of opposite: Shen JingDong, Hero Series 90, 2007, Oil on canvas

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EAST/WEST:

Visually Speaking

the Cultural Revolution and came of age during a time of enormous change in Chinese culture—they are the link to China’s past, its present and its future—and the first, in many years, to experience a connection to the West. In several ways, the evolution of contemporary Chinese art parallels that of American arts after WWII. Like their American coun-

terparts in the 1960s and 70s, Chinese artists of the 1980s challenged social conditions in China and questioned established rules of social order and morality.

 While East/West highlights the increasing prominence of contemporary Chinese art on the world stage, it also provides a bridge of understanding between distant cultures. O n V iew

above (left to right): Shi Liang, Confusion 2 (detail), 2009, Oil on canvas; Zhong Biao, Olympics Free, 2007 opposite: Sun Ping, Acupuncture A78 (Laocoön), 1992-2009, Copper, propylene and acupuncture needles

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06.2

SOARING VOICES: CONTEMPORARY J

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21-10.02 APANESE WOMEN CERAMIC ARTISTS

at the

MORIKAMI MUSEUM AND JAPANESE GARDENS, DELRAY BEACH w w w. m o r i k a m i . o r g

Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 04-Y’IV, 2004, stoneware and glass, Photo: ©Taku Saiki

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T Soaring Voices

THE MORIKAMI MUSEUM AND

Japanese Gardens celebrates a revo-

lution in clay, led by women who broke through the barrier of the once

male-dominated field of Japanese ceramics. With eighty-seven signature works, including vessels, sculpture and several large-scale installa-

tion pieces, Soaring Voices surveys the accomplishments of twenty-five

leading female figures in contempo-

rary Japanese ceramics from postWorld War II to present day.

Yasuko Sakurai, White Flower, 2000, porcelain, Photo: ŠTakashi Hatakeyama

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Soaring Voices

For thousands of years, women have been highly active in the production of ceramics but their names have largely been unknown. Soaring Voices demonstrates the shift in Japanese society toward individual women artists becoming recognized in an artistic realm traditionally held by men.

The exhibition provides contemporary interpretations of a traditional art form, through the work of women artists, using a range of methods, materials and motifs—many inspired from the natural world. Other sources of inspiration pay tribute to Japan, such as NĹ? Theater dance movements (a form of classic Japanese musical

Fuku Fukumoto, Moon Shadow, 2003, por

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drama that has been performed since the 14th century) and kimono patterns of the Edo period (1600-1868). Commentary on themes such as beauty defined and an exploration of East vs. West is threaded throughout the works. Soaring Voices features pioneering ceramicists spanning gen-

rcelain, Photo: ŠTakashi Hatakeyama

erations, including members of the founding generation of Japanese female potters, such as Asuka Tsubio, Kiyoko Koyama and Takako Araki, whose colorful works are innovative in form and concept. Other artists, including Eiko Kishi and Fuku Fukumoto, incorporate elements of ancient literature and


Soaring Voices

traditional Nō Theater, while others reveal a deep connection with nature, a significant motif in the work of Japanese artists. “The women featured in this exhibition catalyzed contemporary Japanese clay,” said Diana L. Daniels, Associate Curator at the Crocker Art Museum, an earlier venue for this presentation. “This exhibition is the most extensive effort to date to recognize their innovative and provocative production.” Until women seized new opportunities to be artists during the 1950s, clay was unacceptable for women. For centuries, men threw on the potter’s wheel while women were strictly relegated to supporting their efforts. The gender divide could only be bridged during the 1950s, when the concept of the studio potter as a creative individual working alone, apart from tradition, was introduced. In this period

of societal transformation, not only did the look of Japanese ceramics radically change, but also its makers. In Japan, clay became a medium of expression accorded the regard given to painting. While Japan is highly respected for its rich history and traditions in the visual arts, including ceramics, the work by women artists in this survey are largely nontraditional. Although many of the objects are based on nature, the contemporary ceramic works are decidedly more innovative and experimental in form and concept. Soaring Voices comes together as a stimulating encounter with twenty-five distinctive and highly creative artistic personalities, and while the exhibition focuses on the sensitivities of these artists, it also reveals the beauty of Japan. O n V iew

opposi

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above: Shoko Koike, Shell Vessel, 1997, stoneware, Photo: ŠTakashi Hatakeyama ite: Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 03-III, 2003, stoneware and glass, Photo: ŠTaku Saiki


THE

ART

Caring OF

A

LOOK AT LIFE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY

06.05-09.25 at the

MUSEUM of ART/Fort Lauderdale Nova Southeastern University w w w. m o a f l . o r g 54

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XX-XY / Gender

Representation in Art


T THROUGH A SERIES OF photographs, spanning slightly more than a 60-year time period, the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale’s exhibition, The Art of Caring: A Look at Life through Photography, examines the moments that shape our being and how key events in life are celebrated and honored. It also explores how pivotal decisions are made by different cultures throughout the world. More than 200 photographs have been organized into seven thematic sections: Children and Family, Love, Wellness,

The Art of Caring

Healing, Disaster, Aging and Remembering. The show opens with a group of compelling images by Annie Leibovitz, personally selected by the artist to represent all seven themes. Inspired in part by the legendary photography exhibition, The Family of Man, organized in 1955 by Edward Steichen for New York’s Museum of Modern Art, The Art of Caring is entertaining, thought-provoking and inspiring. The selected works have been lent by artists, museums, private collectors and from Continued on pg. 60

ALFRED EISENSTAEDT, V-J DAY, TIMES SQUARE, NEW YORK CITY, 1945, INKJET PRINT, ©2009 TIME INC., USED WITH PERMISSION, TIME LIFE COLLECTION

PREVIOUS PAGES: WILLIAM WEGMAN, MOTHER’S DAY, 1989, CHROMOGENIC PRINT, COURTESY WILLIAM WEGMAN STUDIO, NEW YORK, NY; ©WILLIAM WEGMAN OPPOSITE: ALBERT CHONG, AUNT WINNIE, 1995, INKJET ON CANVAS, COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST, ©ALBERT CHONG

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The Art of Caring

“The Art of Caring provides a compelling opportunity to reflect upon how art reflects life.” —I r v i n L i p p ma n , E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r , M u s e u m o f A r t / F o r t L a u d e r da l e

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ, REBECCA DENISON, FOUNDER OF WORLD (WOMEN ORGANIZED TO RESPOND TO LIFE-THREATENING DISEASES), SAN FRANCISCO, 1993, ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT, COURTESY LEIBOVITZ STUDIO, NY, NY; ©ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

the holdings of the Time/LIFE Picture Collection, which includes a number of classic images by legendary photographers, such as Alfred Eisenstaedt, Gordon Parks, W. Eugene Smith and Margaret Bourke-White. From pictures taken at the conclusion of World War II, to intimate family scenes, to a surprising photo of a dog with a brood of hungry young puppies, the images are memorable, insightful and beautiful. Photos by well-known contemporary artists, such as Tina Barney, Nan Goldin, Sally Mann, Duane Michals,

Nicolas Nixon and Neal Slavin are combined with works by many younger artists, including Elinor Carucci, Albert Chong, Loretta Lux, Walter Martin and Eliza French. Additional acclaimed contemporary photographers featured in the exhibition are Jessica Todd Harper, Catherine Opie, Peter Granser and William Wegman. The Art of Caring transports viewers to many of the great events that shaped the last half-century, while presenting an opportunity to witness those events that are shaping the new millennium. O n V iew

PREVIOUS PAGES: ELLIOTT ERWITT, YALE/NEW HAVEN, 1955, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART, NEW ORLEANS, LA; GIFT OF DR. BARRY LEON, ©ELLIOTT ERWITT OPPOSITE: LAURA GILPIN, FRANCIS NAKAI AND FAMILY, 1950, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART, NEW ORLEANS, LA; MUSEUM PURCHASE THROUGH THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GRANT, ©LAURA GILPIN

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Audubon! Audubon!

Selections from JOHN JAMES AUDUBON ’ s

Birds of America

06.10-02.27

at the Museum of

Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach w w w. m o a s . o r g

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Audubon!

J

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON

combined his love of nature with a formidable artistic talent to produce

some of the most beautiful and lifelike depictions

of birds ever committed to paper. He painted nearly three-quarters of North America’s species, set-

ting a standard by which all other naturalist-artists are judged. His contribution to ornithology was so great that today, his name is synonymous with birds,

nature conservation and education. Audubon! Selections from John James Audubon’s Birds of America,

at the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach, presents a grouping of more than 30 of Audubon’s superb art plates from the Museum’s holdings. 64

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PREVIOUS SPREAD: YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON; JOHN SYME, JOHN JAMES AUDUBON, 1826, OIL ON CANVAS, THE WHITE HOUSE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OPPOSITE: RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD


VIRGINIAN PARTRIDGE


Audubon!

John Audubon’s story is one of triumph over adversity. He was born in Haiti in 1785, the illegitimate son of a plantation-owning sea captain and his French mistress. He was raised in France by his stepmother and took a lively interest in birds, nature and drawing. To avoid enlistment into the army, Audubon was sent to America in 1803. He lived on the familyowned estate at Mill Grove, near Philadelphia, where he hunted, studied, drew birds and met his future wife, Lucy Bakewell. John and Lucy had two sons, Victor Gifford and John Woodhouse, as well as a daughter who died in infancy. Audubon spent more than a decade in various trades and continued to draw birds as a hobby, amassing an impressive portfolio. When hard times hit, he was briefly jailed for bankruptcy in 1819. With no other prospects, Audubon set off on an epic quest to depict America’s avifauna with nothing but his artist supplies, a young assisOnV

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Audubon! tant and a gun for protection. Floating down the Mississippi, he lived a rugged hand-tomouth existence, while Lucy earned money as a tutor back home in Kentucky. Audubon’s dream of recording every native bird of North America consumed nearly 20 years of his life. He drew birds from life whenever possible, observing them in meticulous detail, taking note of their food and habitat preferences, their movements, interactions and behaviors. He also strove for action and reality in his work—a new

approach to the representational painting of birds. His attempt to position specimens as they moved in the wild, using wire armatures, was truly revolutionary. In 1826, Audubon took his compilation of highly dramatic, life-sized bird portraits, along with his embellished descriptions of wilderness life, to England, where he felt he would find greater interest in his work. After reaching an agreement with a London publisher in 1827, the first volumes of “Birds of America” began to appear and Audubon OnV

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Audubon!

became an overnight success. It took 11 years in all for the publication and reprintings of all the volumes. The mammoth edition was issued in 87 parts of five plates each. When completed, in 1838, the work featured 435 hand-colored engravings of 1,065 birds representing 489 species. By this time, Audubon had become a celebrated figure in the US and in Europe and finally attained the financial and professional security that had alluded him for so long. Today, the “Birds of America” plates and the brilliant watercolors upon which they are based are admired not only for their ornithological accuracy, but also for their vitality and keen sense of design. Audubon! Selections from John James Audubon’s Birds of America is a rare opportunity to see these remarkable works—each is a reflection of Audubon’s love and fascination with the beauty and dynamics of birds, their lively action virtually flying from the pages. O n V iew

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KEY WEST DOVE


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L

THE CONFIDENT

ine

Henry Patrick Raleigh on view through

09.11 at the

Maitland Art Center w w w. a r t a n d h i s t o r y. o r g

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The Confident Line:

Henry Patrick Raleigh

T

THE CONFIDENT LINE,

,

hosted by the Maitland

Art Center, presents

the work of renowned

illustrator, Henry Patrick Raleigh. The exhibition

is comprised of a selection from the Henry Raleigh Archive, courtesy of collectors Kate and Chris

Raleigh. Chris, the artist’s grandson, started the collection with a wedding present of several works. It has since grown to include a wealth of material by

and about the artist, featuring 84 original illustrations,

drawings, etchings, lithographs and a personal HPR scrapbook.

Continued on pg. 78

Photos courtesy of The Henry Raleigh Archive, Collection of Kate and Chris Raleigh

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The Confident Line:

Henry Patrick Raleigh

Henry Patrick Raleigh began and ended his life in poverty and despair but, in-between, spent decades navigating high society and portraying opulent life, as one of America’s highest paid illustrators, during the “Golden Age of American Illustration”—a period during the late 19th and early 20th centuries when photography was still in its infancy and improvements in printing technology enabled illustrators to experiment with color and new rendering techniques. During this time, there was a huge demand for illustrators and a small group of them became very rich and famous. Born in 1880, into a broken and destitute family in Portland, OR, Raleigh moved to San Francisco with his mother and sisters in 1888. He began working at a very early age to help support his family. A knack for drawing led to his later studies at the Mark Hopkins Art Institute, from 18961901, and shortly after com-

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pleting his education, he took his first job as a newspaper artist for the San Francisco Examiner, where he sketched some of the seamiest and most gruesome aspects of the city, including executions, fires and fatal accidents. He also learned about human anatomy at the morgue, rendering “promising looking corpses.” While at the Examiner, Raleigh’s talent attracted the attention of publishing mogul, William Randolph Hearst. At Hearst’s urging, Raleigh moved to New York City in 1913, where his assignments gradually progressed from newspapers to top magazines, such as Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, Colliers and the Saturday Evening Post. His trademark became his depictions of glittering parties and fashionable society life—and he was sought after by some of the greatest writers of his day, including William Faulkner and F. Scott Fitzgerald, who Continued on pg. 83

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The Confident Line:

Henry Patrick Raleigh

wrote a fan letter saying, “Honestly, I think they’re the best illustrations I’ve ever seen!” The focal point of Raleigh’s work often consists of a few sensitive, well placed lines, which define the “essential elements” of a scene, surrounded by loose and broad marks that create a general tone but offer few distracting details. The artist once explained in a 1923 interview: “The most beautiful picture is one which the observer is left free to complete for himself. The illustrator should be able to select the essential elements in any subject which will convey, to the layman, the entire scene in the simplest and most direct way, avoiding mere details which tend to cause either monotony or confusion.” Through his wonderfully fluid and seemingly effortless sense of stylishness, Raleigh’s “confident line” created a portrait of American aspirations. He, in turn, realized an unprecedented level of success. OnV

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American Artist magazine once wrote of the artist: “With distinction came affluence. In his best years, Raleigh’s annual take was in the neighborhood of $100,000. Considering the then value of the dollar and the relatively insignificant tax on income, he probably had more cash in hand at the end of the year than any other illustrator before or since.” But Raleigh squandered his wealth, giving away thousands of dollars to friends. He also traveled lavishly, owned and maintained a yacht, a mansion and a large studio in downtown Manhattan. As styles changed, and the new popularity of photography replaced illustration, he soon found himself out of work. Bankrupt, bitter and unable to adapt, Raleigh committed suicide in 1944. Thankfully, his artistic genius lives on through a legacy of rich and expressive works that have left an indelible impression of a pivotal era in American illustration. O n V iew .

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IT’S A LW A Y S

ROCK & ROLL: THE WORK OF PHOTOJOURNALIST JANET MACOSKA

0 7. 0 2 -1 0 . 0 9 at the

CORNELL FINE ARTS MUSEUM, Winter Park w w w. r o l l i n s . e d u / c f a m OnV

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I

It’s Always Rock and Roll

INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED

photojournalist, Janet Macoska, developed a passion for rock and roll music as a child, growing up in

Cleveland, OH. At the age of eight, she discovered her parents’ Kodak

twin-lens reflex camera and began

shooting everything around her, including neighbors and the family

dog. She soon realized photography would be her ticket to getting

Continued on pg. 90

previous spread: Tina Turner, 1985 this page: Annie Lennox, 1984 (top); David Bowie, 1983 (bottom) opposite: Bruce Springsteen, 1984. all images courtesy of the photographer

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It’s Always Rock and Roll

closer to the music she loved and the musicians she idolized. At the age of 12, Macoska was hanging out at WKYC Radio, in the DJ’s lounge, answering fan mail for Cleveland disc jockeys Jerry G. and Big Jack Armstrong. They rewarded her with boxes of records and, when rock stars came by to appear on their TV or radio shows, Macoska was there with her

At the age of 23, Janet Macoska became one of a small group of photographers who made their living capturing rock and roll on film. It’s Always Rock and Roll includes of some of Macoska’s favorite photographs, a veritable Who’s Who of rock, dating from the ’70s to today—many of these musicians had their beginnings in Cleveland or

“Photography is not just my job, it is still very much my passion and joy.” —J a n e t M a c o s k a

previous spread: Debbie Harry of Blondie, 1978 opposite: Alice Cooper, 1986. all images courtesy of the photographer it’s always Rock and roll is organized by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

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camera. She was just 13 when her first published rock and roll photograph, a shot of Sonny and Cher, taken in 1966, as they answered calls in the studios of WKYC Radio, appeared in Teen Screen Magazine. On her first trip to England in 1977, friend and mentor Alex Harvey, of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band, introduced Macoska to the top British rock photographers and, with their help, she soon found an agent for her work.

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found early notoriety there. The legendary faces of rock and roll icons, such as Bruce Springsteen, David Bowie, Madonna, Billy Joel, Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Eric Clapton and Paul McCartney, can all be found in Macoska’s archive. VH1 and other TV and film productions regularly use her vast archive for their “rockumentaries”. David Bowie, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC and The Kinks are just some of the artists who have used her


Paul McCartney, 1989, courtesy of the photographer


It’s Always Rock and Roll

work on their CDs. Macoska’s images have been featured in Creem, Entertainment Weekly, People, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, American Photo and The London Times. Her photographs are held in the permanent collections of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland, OH; the National Portrait Gallery, London; and in Hard Rock Cafe restaurants, casinos and hotels around the globe. Reflecting on her career in an interview with Black & White Magazine, Macoska said, “I know a lot of my photographs are going to be the images that will define what was going on at this important time in musical history. Hopefully, people will see my photographs and feel some of the emotion and energy that the audience was hearing and seeing with me in those memorable moments.” Janet Macoska is a rock fan who has succeeded in capturing the history, passion, noise, rage, energy and grandeur of rock—and if rock and roll is the sound track of your life, these are the visuals. O n V iew OnV

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FOCUS { R I VA N E

RIVANE NEUENSCHWANDER

N E U E N S C H WA N D E R }

Exhibition

Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other On view July 17th through October 16th at Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

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is arguably one of the most unique contributors to Brazilian Conceptualism. Her work, which merges painting, photography, film, sculpture and installation, is based on social situations and frequently involves viewer interaction. A Day Like Any Other is comprised of several works by the Brazilian artist, including I Wish Your Wish, First Love, Walking in Circles and Rain Rains. Games figure heavily in much of Neuenschwander’s art, especially those meant to make the viewer a participant in a work. She also draws from her country’s folk traditions. I Wish Your Wish is inspired by a tradition popular among pilgrims to the Church of Nosso Senhor do Bonfim in Bahia, Brazil, who bind ribbons to their wrists or the church’s front gate in the belief that when the ribbons fall off or disintegrate, their wishes will be granted. Neuenschwander’s variation involves a display of colorful silk ribbons printed with the wishes of past participants. Visitors are invited to remove a


F O C U S

ribbon, tie it to their wrist and about creating new geographies replace it with a new wish writ- for new explorations. ten on a slip of paper. Much of Neuenschwander’s The importance of literary oeuvre is also about measuring sources can be seen in Neuen- the passing of time. The instalschwander’s adaptation of Sam- lation Rain Rains is comprised uel Beckett’s novella First Love. of an array of buckets, suspendIn Neuenschwander’s work, a ed from the ceiling, which drip forensic sketch artist recreates water into companion buckets the face portraits of visitors’ positioned on the floor below. first loves, based on The steady drain their descriptions. necessitates a refill These portraits are every four hours, then displayed on reprising Neuenthe gallery walls for schwander’s chrothe duration of the nographic theme. exhibition. Born in 1967 in Circles and ovals Belo Horizonte, GAMES are often utilized in Brazil, where she figure heavily the artist’s work— currently resides, IN Rivane drops of water, bubNeuenschwander Neuenschwander’s bles, hole-punched received her BA in WORK. confetti and cascadFine Art at the Feding zeros all play a role, some- eral University of Minas Gerais, times as soundtracks or sym- Brazil, in 1993 and MA from the bols of fragility, trail markers or Royal College of Art in London life sources. In Walking in Cir- in 1998. She has had solo exhicles, small adhesive halos are bitions at numerous venues, inapplied to the floor, which pick cluding the Serpentine Gallery up the grit from visitors’ shoes in London, the Irish Museum and serve as a temporal map of of Modern Art in Dublin, New the foot traffic patterns from Museum in New York and the the exhibition. These maps are St. Louis Art Museum. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Rain Rains*, 2002, Aluminum buckets, water, steel cable, ladder Dimensions variable 2. I Wish Your Wish*, 2003, Silkscreen on fabric ribbons, dimensions variable *Installation view: New Museum, NY Above (top to bottom): 1. first love (detail), 2005, pencil on paper, forensic artist, table and chairs 2. walking in circles (detail), 2000, Permanent glue, dimensions variable 3. I Wish Your Wish (detail) images from Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other;
courtesy New Museum, NY; photos: Benoit Pailley left: Rivane Neuenschwander, photo: Ananda Sette Camara, Courtesy of the artist


SPOTLIGHT { S A N D R A

G A M A R R A }

Exhibition

Sandra Gamarra: At The Same Time (al mismo tiempo) On view July 2nd through October 16th at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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THROUGH HER PAINTING,

Peruvian artist, Sandra Gamarra, takes images from well-known contexts and makes them her own. Her method of appropriation has raised questions about authenticity and the status of replicas. “My work is being divided between two vertices: that of the own imaginary and that of the utilization of the imaginary of other artists,” she once explained. “I had to notice that my own imaginary was also within that of others. When I use it, its all reproduction of my own imaginary, therefore, I am my own artist.” Gamarra is best known for instigating the fictional Lima Museum of Contemporary Art (LiMac) in 2002, an imaginary collection of paintings based on her hand-painted reproductions of works by her contemporaries.“I play with truth, which is a hard game,” she once replied, when asked about her experience creating an imaginary museum. Gamarra is fascinated by the parallels between artistic and mystical experiences. In ongoing series of paintings enti-


S P O T L I G H T

tled The New Worshipper and The Flight of Lot and His FamiThe Apostles, Gamarra demon- ly from Sodom, is replaced with strates that art museums are sites a legend taken from photojourfor pilgrimage and worshipful nalism, such as Palestinians fled contemplation. their home Wednesday near the For her upcoming exhibition Gaza airport after the Israeat the Bass Museum, the artist li military moved into Rafah in has made new paintings based the Gaza Strip. on photographs she has taken of Sandra Gamarra was born visitors looking at in Lima, Peru, in works of art in the 1972 and lives in Museum’s galleries. Madrid. Her work For Gamarra, more has been featured than understanding in such exhibitions and appreciating, as There is Always a spirit of witnessa Cup of Sea to Sail ing predominates. in, XXIX São PauThe spectators sitlo Biennial (2010); OBSERVING uate themselves in Pipe, Glass, Botworks of front of works of art tle of Rum: The Art ART is an ACT with the intention of of Appropriation, OF FAITH. making contact with MoMA, NY(2008); a truth that sometimes dodges and Emergencies, MUSAC, and, at other times, is impene- León, Spain (2005). Her work trable. Observing works of art is in the collections of MoMA; is, before any political or philo- MUSAC, León; Tate Collection; sophical reality, an act of faith. MALI, Lima...and, of course, The artist has also engaged LiMac (www.li-mac.org)! The in an intervention on the label artist is represented by Galería of works from one of the Muse- Leme, São Paulo, Brazil; Galería um’s adjacent galleries, where- Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid, by, for instance, the information Spain; and Galería Lucía de la of Peter Paul Rubens’ painting, Puente, Lima, Peru. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. santos, 2008, oil on canvas, 63-3/4 x 76-3/4”, courtesy of Galería Leme, São Paulo, Brazil 2. Fatima, 2008, oil on canvas (triptych), 76-3/4” x 127-1/2”, courtesy of Galería Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid, Spain above (top to bottom): 1.Triptico de las Estaciones*, oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm, 2009 2. San Sebastián*, 2008, Oil on canvas, 195 x 195 cm *images courtesy of the artist left: untitled, courtesy of the artist


PROFILE { C H R I S T I N A

CHRISTINA WEST IS AN AVID

W E S T }

Exhibition

What a Doll: The Human Object as Toy On view through August 28th at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

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people watcher with a dry sense of humor, active imagination and an innate impulse to create with her hands. If you meet her and she stares at you a bit too long, she’s probably just picturing you naked. “My work gives me permission to stare,” says West, “We are told not to stare because the act is rude. It might make someone else, the one upon which our gaze is fixed, feel uncomfortable. So we steal glimpses, don’t let our eyes linger too long, pretend not to see and are encouraged to retreat within ourselves. But the moments when I am compelled to stare are the moments when I feel most alive. My curiosity, awe and questioning make me alert. The stare signals an intense engagement with a reality outside of myself.” Working exclusively with the figure, West is known for her arrangements of mostly nude and slightly smaller than life-size sculptures, which create visual stories in space that walk the line between pleasure and pain. What results are stirring psychological scenarios about the com-


P R O F I L E

plexity of being human. of previous actions, the figures’ For her exhibition, What a personalities, motives and intenDoll: The Human Object as Toy, tions are malleable and unfixed West addresses the idea of the in the viewers’ minds. Who they human object as toy with near- are is in a state of flux dependent ly life-size porcelain and fabric on the stories viewers create.” “dolls” created with surprising West’s studio is in Atlanta, anatomic specificity. Draped, GA, where she is an assistant hung and piled within the room, professor of ceramics at Georgia the doll-like figures transform State University. She received the space from a galher MFA from New lery to a place of unYork State College settling, interrupted of Ceramics at Alplay. Rich with metfred University and aphor, her work inher BFA from Sievites associations of na Heights Univerchildhood, sexualisity in Adrian, MI. ty and the vulneraShe has received nubility of the body, merous grants and Christina’s work allowing viewers fellowships from EXPLORES the to apply their own such organizations complexity of personal narratives as the Archie Bray BEING HUMAN. to an emotionally Foundation for Cecharged sculptural tableau. ramic Arts, MT; Mary L. Nohl “My sculptures do not pro- Fund,WI; New York Foundavide answers or assertions, but tion for the Arts; and Southeastembrace uncertainty through the ern College Art Conference, NC. provocation of more questions,” Her work has been exhibited at the artist explained. “The figures The Museum of Contemporary are permanently frozen mid-ges- Art of Georgia and West Tampa ture in a moment that encourages Center for the Arts. She is reprethe generation of ambiguous nar- sented by Mindy Solomon Galratives. Stripped from the context lery, St. Petersburg. O n V iew

opposite page and above: works from the exhibition What a Doll: the Human Object as Toy, 2010, Glazed ceramic and stuffed fabric left: the artist “at work” photography by colin conces


INSIGHT { R YA N

H U M P H R E Y

C O N T E M P O R A RY A RT I S T,

}

Exhibition

Ryan Humphrey: Fast Forward On view June 18th through August 14th at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

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Ryan Humphrey, incorporates BMX bikes in dynamic 2- and 3-dimensional works in Fast Forward, a large-scale installation featuring customized BMX bikes attached to the gallery wall, a massive wrap-around rug created by Humphrey with designer, Todd Oldham, a collection of bike-inspired paintings and mixed-media pieces, including three versions of Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel (1913)—all set against BMX bike ramps. Humphrey will attend the opening reception with BMX pioneer and special guest, Dizz Hicks. Born in 1971, in Ashtabula, OH, Humphrey spent his childhood riding bikes, skateboarding and building things in his yard. His love of BMX developed into a passion early on. “BMX kinda saved my life,” the artist explained. “We lived in a small, burned-out industrial town. I fell into that demographic. I should have slipped through the cracks. For me, BMX was a release, a way out, be it from a bad day at school


I N S I G H T

or a tough time at home.” five years of planning went into After high school, Humphrey the show’s production. Humbecame a freestyle BMX in- phrey hopes the exhibition will structor in Woodward, PA. He help the sport gain recognition then moved to Pittsburgh to and that some of the magic will work at The Carnegie Muse- rub off on a new generation of um of Art, where he obtained competitors. a commercial art degree and Fast Forward was included developed an interest in con- in the Queens International 4 temporary fine art. He received exhibition at the Queens Musea scholarship to um of Art, NY. His attend Ohio Uniwork has been feaversity, where he tured in solo shows earned his BFA in at the Kemper MuSculpture in 1996 seum of Contemand then moved porary Art, Kanto New York City, sas City, MO, and where he received In “Fast Forward,” DCKT Contempohis MFA fromHuntrary, NY, as well Ryan Humphrey er College in1999. as in the traveling BRINGS the In 2001, Humphrey group exhibition ENERGY of BMX attended The SkowWill Boys be Boys?: and freestyle hegan summer resQuestioning AdoINTO his WORK. idency program in lescent Masculinity Maine and later participated in in Contemporary Art, curated by the Whitney Museum’s Inde- Shamim M. Momin of the Whitpendent Study Program, which ney Museum of American Art. he completed in 2006. The artist was also a contestant In Fast Forward, the artist on season one of Bravo’s reality explores connections between show, Top Design. Humphrey is bikes and art, bringing the ener- represented by DCKT Contemgy and thrill of BMX and free- porary, NY. He lives and works style into his work. More than in New York City. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Fast Forward, 2009, installation view (detail), photo: Brian Barnhart 2. Duchamp Freestyle Bikes (Red, Black, White), 2005, mixed media, 45 x 21 x 14” Above (top to bottom): 1.Untitled, 2008-2009, mixed media, 60 x 60” 2. Through Black Days, 2008-2009, mixed media, 60 x 60” 3. Wedge, 2008-2009, mixed media, 36 x 48” left: the artist in action, all images courtesy of Ryan Humphrey

On View 06-07.2011  

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