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on iew florida

april/ june 2015


contents A p r i l /Ju n e

2015

Vo l . 6 , N o . 1

right: jose alvarez (d.o.p.a.), deyvi orangel peĂąa arteaga. on the cover : jose alvarez (d.o.p.a.), The Golden Butterfly #2 (detail), 2014. Images courtesy of the artist and Gavlak,

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Los Angeles, Palm Beach.

on iew FLORIDA

APRIL/ JUNE 2015

36 Hollywood

jose alvarez: as far as the I can see

In a stunning new exhibition, the internationally renowned artist, Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.), has transformed four first-floor galleries of the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood into a site-specific, multi-sensory environment that will transport viewers into a world where science, magic, and mysticism converge.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

46 Sarasota

58 West Palm Beach 68 Ocala

78 Orlando

the bringback

Love: Beth Rudin

observations

In an unfolding narrative between good and evil, Trenton Doyle Hancock’s multi-media presentation at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art expounds on the artist’s childhood fascinations with horror films and action figures.

The Norton Museum of Art presents a rare opportunity to view works from one of the world’s foremost collections of contemporary art.

emit: what brought

The Triumph of

everglades:

DeWoody Collects

wetland

real lives:

america’s

and reflections

Photographer, Mac Stone, takes us on an extraordinary journey through the Everglades in a new show opening at the Appleton Museum of Art.

by dale

kennington

The Mennello Museum of American Art puts on a captivating display of realist paintings by one of the South’s most prominent female artists.

92 Coral Springs

top (left to right):

The Art of Pop & Comics

right: Jose Delbo, Batman x 3.

Trenton Doyle Hancock, Mound #1 doll (loose), 2015;

This eye-popping presentation at Coral Springs Museum of Art taps into the pulse of American pop culture with wit and humor­—a sheer delight for the young and young at heart! OnV

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Beth Rudin Dewoody, © Harry Benson; Mac Stone, Striking Distance; Dale Kennington, the birthday party, 1995.

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contents A p r i l /Ju n e

2015

Vo l u m e

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No. 1

7

commentary

118

profile

Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami.

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Spotlight

Life’s a Beach: Photographs by Martin Parr at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg.

Reflections: Artful Perspectives on the St. Johns River at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville.

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Museum exhibitions

Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power at the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

muse

calendar

Collection

illumination: the art cloth network

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gallery

A selection of gallery exhibitions and artists. pictured: Joy Lavrencik, Abstraction: Leaves on Frozen Pond (detail).

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One of three new fiber-centric shows opening at Dunedin Fine Art Center, Illumination presents the visions and voices of a diverse group of professional artists who share a common goal—to promote the medium of cloth as an art form.

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reflections

Jim Reynolds: CityScapes at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa.


Got Art? V

on iew ART for ALL! M A G A Z I N E


V

c o m m e n t a r y

on iew

Turning Five

m a g a z i n e

Editorial

T his issue marks the 5 th anniversary of On View. A big thank you to all of our art-loving fans and supporters—this certainly wouldn’t be any fun without you! Since our inception, we’ve been all about celebrating Florida’s finest museums and visual art centers, and we’d like to send a special shout out to our fellow celebrators during this milestone year... Also turning five is Tampa Museum of Art’s new downtown waterfront home. In Naples, the Baker Museum, Artis-Naples is celebrating 15 years, while in Gainesville, the University of Florida’s Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art turns 25. Approaching it’s 40th anniversary is Dunedin Fine Art Center, and topping our list, the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg strikes gold—hitting the big 50! May we just say, “you all look marvelous!” So, let’s celebrate with a little birthday cake and a whole lotta art!...

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com Advertising

advertising.onviewmagazine@gmail.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com OnV

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Muse

Life’s a Beach: Photographs

by Martin Parr O n v i e w t hrough

Museum

of

04.26.15

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at

f i n e a rt s , S t . P e t e r s b u r g

w w w. f i n e - a r t s . o r g

n life’s a beach,

one of Britain’s most beloved photographers takes us on a color-saturated journey through the seaside, highlighting its general absurdities and local quirks. Martin Parr has been photographing this subject for many decades, documenting all aspects of the tradition, including close-ups of sunbathers, rambunctious swimmers caught mid-plunge, and the eternal Opposite: Martin Parr, Margate, UK, 1986. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.


“You can learn a lot about a country by looking at its beaches: across cultures, the beach is that rare public space in which all absurdities and quirky national behaviors can be found.” —M artin P arr OnV

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Muse sandy picnic underway. His international career could well be traced to the launch of The Last Resort, a 1986 book depicting the seaside resort of New Brighton, near Liverpool. What may be less known is that this obsession has led Parr to photograph beaches across the world. Life’s a Beach presents photos of beachgoers on far-flung shores, including in Argentina, Brazil, China, Spain, Italy, Latvia, Japan, the United States, Mexico, Thailand, and the UK. This compilation of images brings to the forefront Parr’s engagement with a cherished subject matter—that rare public space in which moments of captured absurdity and quirkiness seamlessly fuse together, immersing us in rituals and traditions associated with beach life the world over. Thomas Weski, one of Germany’s preeminent photography curators, once wrote of Parr’s work: “Leisure, consumption and communication are the conBelow: Martin Parr, Weymouth, UK, 2000. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

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Above: Martin Parr, Lake Garda, Italy, 1999; Below: Martin Parr, West Bay, UK, 1996. Š Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

cepts that this British photographer has been researching for several decades now on his worldwide travels. In the process, he examines national characteristics and international phenomena to find out how valid they are as symbols that will help future generations to understand our cultural peculiarities. Parr enables us to see things that have seemed familiar to us in a completely new way. In this way he creates his own image of society, which allows us to combine an analysis of the visible signs of globalization with unusual visual experiences. In his photos, Parr juxtaposes specific images with universal ones without resolving the conOnV

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Muse tradictions. Individual characteristics are accepted and eccentricities are treasured….Martin Parr sensitizes our subconscious—and once we’ve seen his photographs, we keep on discovering these images over and over again in our daily lives and recognizing ourselves within them. The humor in these photographs makes us laugh at ourselves, with a sense of recognition and release.” Martin Parr was born in Epsom, Surrey, UK, in 1952. When he was a boy, his budding interest in the medium of photography was encouraged by his grandfather, George Parr, himself a keen amateur photographer. He lent Martin a camera and they would go out and shoot pictures together. “We would come back, process the films and make prints,” said Parr. “Ever since this time, I have always wanted to be a photographer.” Martin went on to study photography at Manchester Polytechnic before launching a very successful career. Below: Martin Parr, Benidorm, Spain, 1997. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

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Above: Martin Parr, Miami, FL, 1988; from the series, Common Sense, 1998. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

A key figure in the world of photography, Parr is recognized as a brilliant satirist of contemporary life. “I feel I am part of a long tradition in the UK in employing irony as part of my work,” he once said. “Although I deal with serious subjects, these can be made more accessible with this element thrown in. Also, that same vulnerability that comics often deal with is very similar to the vulnerability and ambiguities I want to illustrate.” So how does he manage to get so close to his subjects? “If you photograph for a long time, you get to understand such things as body language. I often do not look at the people I photograph, especially afterwards. Also, when I want a photo, I become somewhat fearless, and this helps a lot. There will always be someone who objects to being photographed, and when this happens you move on.” Parr has published over 80 books of his own work and edited another 30. His photographs have been collected by museums worldwide, including the Getty OnV

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Museum in Los Angeles, New York’s Museum of Modern Art, and the Tate Modern, London. A retrospective of his work toured major museums around the world after opening at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, in 2002, and he was featured in Cruel and Tender, the Tate Modern’s major survey of photography in 2003. Parr is a member of Magnum Photos. On View This exhibition was organized by Aperture, a non-profit foundation that connects the photo community with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other— in print, in person, and online. Clockwise from top: Martin Parr, Rimini, Italy, Autoportrait, 1999, © Martin Parr Collection; Martin Parr, Life’s a Beach (Aperture, 2013) book cover; Martin Parr, Yalta, Ukraine, 1995; Martin Parr, Margate, UK, 1986. © Martin Parr / Magnum Photos / Rocket Gallery, London.

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{ s p e c i a l

e x h i b i t i o n s }

calendar *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

The Art of Dale Chihuly + Satyendra Pakhalé: Fish Chairs

Avon Park

SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture Thru 05.01.15

At Home: Seminole Reservations and Contemporary Native Art— Elgin Jumper and Jessica Osceola

www.fairchildgarden.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 40.) Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.mofac.org

Beauty Is Power www.bocamuseum.org

Boca Raton

(See story on pg. 122.) Fairchild

Boca Raton Museum of Art 04.21.15–07.12.15

Helena Rubinstein:

Coral Gables

Tropical Botanic Garden

04.21.15–07.12.15

Shannon Plumb: What A Character www.bocamuseum.org

Thru 05.31.15

Art in the Garden:

Thru 04.12.15

Conquest and Coexistence: The Cultural Synthesis of Spanish Colonial Art www.lowemuseum.org

Image from Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Roberto Montenegro, Helena Rubinstein in a Mexican Silver Necklace, 1941, oil on canvas, 31-1/2 x 27-12/16”, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

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Coral Gables continued...

Thru 04.19.15

Vik Muniz: Poetics of Perception www.lowemuseum.org

Coral springs

Coral Springs Museum of Art

Thru 05.23.15

Arts & Sciences

The Art of Pop & Comics

Thru Spring 2015

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

(See story on pg. 92.)

Thru 04.27.15 Thru 05.24.15

1+2: Colección Jumex in Dialogue with the Lowe Art Museum www.lowemuseum.org

Coral Springs Artist Guild

06.06.15–08.29.15

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Thru 05.23.15

Lagemann & Verbicky www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Contemporary Paintings from the MOAS Collection www.moas.org

Romero Britto

Daytona Beach

Museum of

Southeast Museum of Photography Thru 04.19.15

Colin Finlay:


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Daytona Beach continued...

Of Consequence

Japanese Gardens

www.smponline.org

Thru 05.24.15

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 10.)

Poetry in Clay: The Art of Otagaki Rengetsu www.morikami.org

Thru 05.10.15

Andy Warhol: The Photographs

Thru 05.24.15

Japanese Design for the Senses: Beauty, Form and Function

www.smponline.org Thru 05.10.15

The Growth of a Collection, Part II: 2002-2014

www.morikami.org

www.smponline.org

Dunedin Fine Art Center

Dunedin

5.22.15–8.16.15

Deland

Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida Thru 04.12.15

04.17.15–07.05.15

04.24.15–07.12.15

Peter Reginato: Eccentric Constructions

Ben Schonzeit: Brilliant Realism

Richard Anuszkiewicz: Art of Light, Perception & Movement

www.moartdeland.org

www.moartdeland.org

www.moartdeland.org

Elemental: Florida Quilt Invitational www.dfac.org

www.moartdeland.org 5.22.15–8.16.15 Delray

04.17.15–07.05.15

Beach

Rediscovering Byron Browne

Morikami Museum and

Illumination: The Art Cloth Network www.dfac.org

(See story on pg. 108.)

Image from Rediscovering Byron Browne at Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida: Byron Browne, Feeding the Birds, 1945, crayon and ink on paper, 19 x 16”.

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Dunedin continued...

5.22.15–8.16.15

Quilt National 13 www.dfac.org

Danish Avant-Garde During World War II www.nsuartmuseum.org

5.22.15–8.16.15

Tampa Bay Surface Design Guild www.dfac.org

Portrait of Olatz

06.21.15–09.13.15

From Within and Without: The History of Haitian Photography

www.nsuartmuseum.org Thru 11.01.15

Thru 05.31.15

www.nsuartmuseum.org

Kahlo, Rivera + Mexican Modern Art

Thru 11.01.15

www.nsuartmuseum.org

Pablo Picasso: Painted Ceramics and Works on Paper, 1931-71

Julian Schnabel:

Fort

www.nsuartmuseum.org

Lauderdale

NSU Art Museum / Fort Lauderdale

Gainesville

Harn Museum of Art

Thru 04.26.15

American Scene Photography: Martin Z. Margulies Collection

Thru 05.24.15

www.nsuartmuseum.org

Thru 05.31.15

Monet and American Impressionism www.harn.ufl.edu

Classical Convergences: Traditions & Inventions

05.17.15–09.27.15

War Horses: Helhesten and the

www.harn.ufl.edu

Image from Kahlo, Rivera + Mexican Modern Art at NSU Art Museum / Fort Lauderdale: Frida Kahlo, Diego on My Mind (Self Portrait as Tehuana), 1943, oil on masonite, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art, courtesy of the Vergel Foundation and the Tarpon Trust © 2015 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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Gainesville continued...

Center of Hollywood

Thru 06.07.15

Patterns Past and Present: Arts of Panama

Thru 05.24.15

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.): As Far As the I Can See

www.harn.ufl.edu 06.23.15–08.30.15

Hoppé Portraits: Society, Studio & Street Photographs, 1909-1945

www.artandculturecenter.org

(See story on pg. 36.) Thru 05.24.15

Regina Jestrow: Linens

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.artandculturecenter.org Thru 06.28.15

Copia: New Photographs in the Harn Collection

06.12.15–08.23.15

Douglas Hoekzema: Terrain

www.harn.ufl.edu

Thru 07.26.15

Thru 07.15.16

Art, Technology and the Natural World

Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection www.harn.ufl.edu

www.harn.ufl.edu

Ghanaian Fashion

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

06.13.15–08.23.15

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 138.)

Project ​LSD— organized by Rob Tufnell

Thru 08.23.15

www.artandculturecenter.org

Kabas and Couture: Contemporary

Hollywood

Art and Culture

06.13.15–08.23.15

Wayne White:

Image from Hoppé Portraits: Society, Studio & Street Photographs, 1909-1945 at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Emil Otto Hoppé, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, 1912.

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Holly wood continued...

Art is Supposed to Hypnotize You or Something www.artandculturecenter.org

Jacksonville

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Exhibition

05.16.15–08.30.15

www.mocajacksonville.org

White

Southern Exposure: Portraits of a Changing Landscape

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

05.02.15–08.30.15

Thru 06.28.15

Assemblage/ Collage

Project Atrium: Angela Glajcar

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

Thru 04.26.15

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Thru 04.22.15

Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting www.cummer.org

04.04.15–08.16.15

05.21.15–09.20.15

Art Aviators Exhibition

Whitfield Lovell: Deep River

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.cummer.org 04.25.15–08.30.15

In Time We Shall Know Ourselves: Photographs by Raymond Smith

Thru 10.04.15

www.mocajacksonville.org

Thru 10.18.15

All Together: The Sculpture of Chaim Gross www.cummer.org

Reflections: Perspectives on the St. Johns River

Thru 04.26.15

John Hee Taek Chae: Barbara Ritzman Devereux Visiting Artist

www.cummer.org

(See story on pg. 120.)

Image from Project Atrium: Angela Glajcar at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Angela Glajcar, 2013-014 Terforation, 2013, site-specific installation, paper 400 g, torn, metal mounting, 126 x 137-13/16 x 82-43/64”. Image courtesy of Angela Glajcar.

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Woodcuts from the Syracuse University Art Collection

Thru 11.29.15

British Watercolrs www.cummer.org

www.foosanerartmuseum.org Lakeland

05.30.15–08.30.15

Polk Museum of Art

Pop Art in America

Thru 04.11.15

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Fur and Feather www.polkmuseumofart.org

The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

Thru 04.18.15

Thru 04.25.15

Presence

Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org 04.18.15–07.18.15

www.polkmuseumofart.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 www.polkmuseumofart.org issue on pg. 82.) Dual Abstraction

Thru 06.27.15

African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center

Nature’s Places of Spiritual Sanctuary www.artandhistory.org

maitland

Melbourne

Art & History Museums, Maitland

Foosaner Art Museum

Thru 05.16.15

Ukiyo-e to Shin Hanga: Japanese

Thru 05.24.15

Clyde Butcher:

http://textiles.fit.edu 05.16.15–08.22.15

Southern Accents Quilt Exhibition http://textiles.fit.edu

Miami

ArtCenter/

Image from Pop Art in America at Foosaner Art Museum, Melbourne: Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger #9 (detail), 1975, silkscreen, Collection of NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Hope, 76.6.

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Miami continued...

South Florida

www.bassmuseum.org

Art + Design

Thru 06.07.15

Thru 04.26.15

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 136.)

Thru 04.26.15

Fountains & Galaxies: Recent Works by Bernard Cooper

Attitudes in Latitudes: The Northern Wild Explores the Tropics www.artcentersf.org

Bass Museum of Art

Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami Ryan Sullivan

Arrhythmic Suite: New Works by Odalis Valdivieso

MDC Museum of

AA1950AdOnView.pdf 1 3/13/2015 11:47:07 AM

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M

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CM

MY

CY

CMY

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Thru 08.30.15 Thru 05.03.15

www.icamiami.org

www.mdcmoad.org

www.mdcmoad.org

04.16.15–08.20.15

Thru 05.03.15

One Way: Peter Marino

History of (In) Curiosity: New Works by Susan Lee-Chun

www.mdcmoad.org

Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis RodriguezDuarte in Collaboration


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Miami continued...

with Tico Torres

Thru 08.15.15

Global Positioning Systems

www.mdcmoad.org

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.pamm.org

Thru 05.30.15

Eugenio Espinoza: Unruly Supports (1970–1980)

Thru 08.23.15

Alternative Contemporaneities: Temporary Autonomous Zones (TAZ)

www.pamm.org Thru 10.04.15

Gary Simmons

www.mocanomi.org

www.pamm.org

Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 05.03.15

05.29.15–10.18.15

Iman Issa

Tápies: From Within

Poetics of Relation

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

Thru 04.26.15

04.02.15–09.27.15

04.16.15–12.13.15

05.07.15–09.13.15

Thru 05.31.15

Nicolas Lobo

Shana Lutker

Victoria Gitman: Desiring Eye

Mónica Bengoa: Exercices de Style / Exercises in Style

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Mario García Torres

Thru 05.14.15

Thru 07.26.15

05.06.15–08.30.15

Waves

Diego Bianchi

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org

Contemporary Families in

www.pamm.org Thru 04.19.15

Image from Nicolas Lobo at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Nicolas Lobo, Napalm stone (Aluminium version #2), 2014, Napalm, play-dough, terrazzo, Nexcite, 20 x 20 x 72”, Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, gift of Werner and Diane Grob. Photo courtesy of the artist and Gallery Diet.

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Miami continued...

Miami: A Photo Album

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Thru 06.28.15

05.06.15–08.23.15

Thru 06.14.15

Contemporary

Museum Studies Exhibition

At Ease: Miami

Middle East and

Thru 04.18.15

Beach During

Afghanistan

Order/Disorder

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

the Second

www.wolfsonian.org

www.naplesart.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

ganda: Political

Encounter Competition & Exhibition 2015

Posters from the

www.naplesart.org

Pose and Propa-

World War Thru 05.24.15

www.wolfsonian.org

Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth

Thru 06.21.15

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Boom: Downtown

(See story on pg. 118) 06.13.15–08.23.15

06.15.15–07.17.15

naples

Miami Architecture,

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

Camera USA National Photography Exhibition and Award 2015

1920s-1930s

Thru 04.18.15

www.naplesart.org

www.wolfsonian.org

National Art

Boom, Bust,

Creole World: Photographs of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere

06.15.15–07.17.15

Pictures in Process: Photography by Naples Art Association Members

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

www.naplesart.org 06.13.15–09.13.15

The Green Machine: The Art of Carlos Luna

The Baker Museum, Artis—Naples

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 04.26.15

Image from Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Xu Bing, Tian Shu (Book from the Sky), installation view. Image courtesy of The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum.

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Contemporary

America’s Wetland

http://artisnaples.org

www.appletonmuseum.org

Florida

(See story on pg. 68.) 05.02.15–07.26.15 Weegee by Weegee:

04.11.15–06.07.15

From the Jean

Thru 05.03.15

Beyond Reality: The Many Worlds of James H. Vredevoogd

Surrealism in

www.appletonmuseum.org

Pigozzi Collection http://artisnaples.org

Belgium: The Discreet Charm of the

05.30.15–07.26.15

Thru 05.09.15

Bourgeoisie

Celebrating 15

http://artisnaples.org

Years of Collecting

Gods and Heroes:

Thru 07.26.15

Masterpieces

Divers:

Breaking Boundaries: Exploration and Collaboration at Atlantic Center for the Arts

from the

The Sculpture of

www.atlanticcenter

École des Beaux-

Rainer Lagemann

forthearts.org

Arts, Paris

http://artisnaples.org

http://artisnaples.org Thru 05.17.15

http://artisnaples.org 05.17.15–07.26.15 Jan Yoors: A Retrospective http://artisnaples.org

Ocala New Smyrna Beach

Atlantic Center for the Arts

Appleton Museum of Art 04.07.15–07.05.15

Everglades:

Orlando

Orange County Regional History Center 04.04.15–05.31.15

Long Way to the Top: Hard Rock in Orlando, 1977-1985 www.thehistorycenter.org Thru 05.03.15

And Still We Rise: Race, Culture

Image from Florida Contemporary at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: Mally Khorasantchi, Oasis X, 2014, oil on canvas, 65 x 62”, courtesy of the artist.

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Orlando continued...

& Visual Conversations www.thehistorycenter.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 96.) Orlando Museum of Art Thru 05.10.15

Maya Lin: A History of Water www.omart.org

Thru 06.14.15

www.mennellomuseum.com

French Master

Carlos Vega: See You Now

(See story on pg. 78.)

www.flaglermuseum.us

Palm beach

Panama City

The Mennello Museum of American Art

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

Thru 06.07.15

Thru 04.19.15

05.08.15–06.06.15

Real-Lives: Observations and Reflections by Dale Kennington

Bouguereau’s ‘Fancies’: Allegorical and Mythological Works by the

Florida Springs: Jean Blackburn & Margaret Ross Tolbert

www.omart.org

www.vacnwf.org


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Pensacola

Sarasota

Pensacola Museum of Art

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

04.17.15–06.13.15

Between the Layers

04.03.15–06.28.15

www.pensacolamuseum.org

www.ringling.org

Thru 04.18.15

04.17.15–09.13.15

OBJECT: Sculptures, Prints, and Drawings by Michael Boles

Trenton Doyle Hancock, EMIT: What the Bringback Brought

www.pensacolamuseum.org

www.ringling.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 140.)

(See story on pg. 46.)

Fan-Tastic!

Guy Harvey

Thru 04.17.15

www.pensacolamuseum.org

Thru 04.18.15

06.19.15–08.22.15

Sketches of Spain by Nina Fritz

Annual Members’ Juried Exhibition

Claire Kendrick & Paul Ladnier: Selected Works

www.pensacolamuseum.org

www.ccpvb.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 70.)

Thru 04.17.15

Thru 06.01.15

Jenna Alexander: Even Me

Evolution of Commercial Printing

www.ccpvb.org

www.ringling.org

Thru 05.17.15

Re:Purposed www.ringling.org

www.pensacolamuseum.org 05.09.15–08.09.15

The Lure of the Ocean: Original Works by

Ponte Vedra Beach

The Cultural Center

Image from Re:Purposed at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2008, mixed media, 94 x 35 x 35”. Inventory #NC09.014, © Nick Cave. Photo by James Prinz Photography, image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

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Sarasota continued...

On the French Coast

Minds, Machines & Masterpieces

06.03.15–09.14.15

Thru 05.03.15

From the Four Corners of the World

African American Life and Family

www.fine-arts.org

www.ringling.org

www.fine-arts.org

06.20.15–10.04.15

St. augustine

Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College Thru 04.17.15

Department of Art and Design Faculty Exhibition www.flagler.edu/crispellert

05.09.15–08.16.15

Images of the Floating World and Beyond: Japanese Woodblock Prints

www.thedali.org

Five Decades of Photography at the MFA Featuring the DandrewDrapkin Collection

www.fine-arts.org

The Dalí Museum Thru 07.26.15

Monet to Matisse:

Dalí & da Vinci:

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts 05.15.15–07.02.15

www.fine-arts.org

Thru 05.31.15

Tallahassee

The Artists’ League Annual Summer Salon www.mofa.fsu.edu

St. Petersburg Tampa

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

Thru 04.26.15

Life’s a Beach: Photographs by Martin Parr

04.03.15–06.30.15

Jim Reynolds: CityScapes

www.fine-arts.org

www.fmopa.org

(See story on pg. 8.)

(See story on pg. 124.)

Image from Monet to Matisse: On the French Coast at Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Henri Matisse, Girl by a Window, oil on canvas, gift of Alice Albright Arlen, in honor of her mother, Josephine Patterson Albright, 1994, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

04.12.15–05.03.15

Group Exhibition

AIA Architectural Photography Competition

www.spcollege.edu/museum

www.fmopa.org

Henry and Abe: Finding America

Thru 04.26.15

www.spcollege.edu/museum

05.17.15-08.16.15

Ezra Stoller: Photographing Modernism

03.01.15–05.03.15

65th Annual Florida Artists Group Exhibition

www.fmopa.org

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Tampa Museum of Art

Vero Beach

Thru 05.17.15

The Classical World www.tampamuseum.org Thru 05.31.15

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

Thru 05.31.15

06.05.15–07.25.15

Picturing Land and Sea

With Hidden Noise

www.tampamuseum.org

www.ira.usf.edu

Vero Beach Museum of Art Thru 05.17.15

Howard Ben Tré: New Sculpture www.verobeachmuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

(See story in the January/March 2015 issue on pg. 108.)

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Tarpon Springs

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

06.05.15–07.25.15

Thru 05.03.15

Museum at Work

65th Annual Florida Artists

www.ira.usf.edu

Thru 05.24.15

Environmental Photography www.verobeachmuseum.org Thru 06.07.15

Embracing Space

Image from American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell at Tampa Museum of Art: Norman Rockwell, Triple Self-Portrait, 1959. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 13, 1960. ©1960 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

& Color: Art On & Off the Wall

Norton Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Thru 05.03.15

W. Palm Beach

The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

Photographers Discover the Everglades

05.16.15–08.02.15

Marianela de la Hoz: SpeculumSpeculari

www.norton.org Thru 07.12.15

www.norton.org

Nymphéas, 1914-1917

(See story on pg. 58.)

www.norton.org

cfam.rollins.edu

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

04.08.15–05.31.15

Return to the Roof of the World: A Photographic Exhibition by Nicholas Vreeland

Thru 05.24.15

High Tea: Glorious Manifestations East and West

Thru 04.12.15

Thru 07.12.15

Cornell Fine Large Birds Arts Museum of Florida: at Rollins College The Art 04.18.15–08.02.15 of John Costin Women and www.polasek.org Abstraction

Imaging Eden:

cfam.rollins.edu

www.norton.org

www.ansg.org

Armory Art Center

Winter Park

04.19.15–04.25.15

2015 Win­ter Park Paint Out

Thru 04.14.15

Artistsin-Residence Exhibition

www.polasek.org

www.armoryart.org

Shapely Ves­sels: Gourds from Around the World

05.05.15–08.09.15

04.18.15–05.16.15

Armory Faculty Show

www.polasek.org O n V iew

www.armoryart.org

Image from The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Beth Rudin DeWoody with Mark Swanson’s Yeti. Photo: ©Harry Benson.

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New Smyrna Beach

Gallery: Arts on Douglas www.artsondouglas.net

alt_space Exhibition: Liz Gibson

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

on view 05.02–06.13.15

Deformity, adversity, and empowerment— these are the themes of Liz Gibson’s work. She combines the mediums of video, art performance, and installation to engulf the viewer in a visually intriguing as well as socially compelling experience.

Boca Raton / Miami

Gallery: Baker Sponder Gallery/Sponder Gallery www.bakerspondergallery.com

Exhibition: 25 Years 25 Artists on view thru 05.13.15

Featuring works by Barrett, Block, Boxer, Chadwick, Christensen, Dzubas, Feuerman, Hughes, Kaneko, King, Lakeman, Lalanne, Liberman, Lorenson, Lucero, Magnani, Manus, Ohlson, Olitski, Perucchetti, Reginato, Remfry, Saba, Schonzeit, Sultan, Trova Vaadia, and Van de Bovenkamp. Above (left to right): Liz Gibson, Learning 2 Tie, 8 minute performance, courtesy of the artist; Doug Ohlson, 50/50, 1993, acrylic on canvas, 66 x 128”, courtesy of the artist and Baker Sponder Gallery/Sponder Gallery.

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Boca Raton

miami

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary

Gallery: Fredric Snitzer Gallery

www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

www.snitzer.com

Exhibition: Thomas Hartmann

Artist: ridley howard

on view thru 04.25.15

This selection of new oil paintings by German Contemporary artist, Thomas Harmann, includes works based on the artist’s narrative of vast landscapes marked by the continual streaming of figures, lines, and specks in a silent flux of cause and effect.

A witty blend

of abstraction and figuration, Ridley Howard’s figures are framed by fields of abstract shapes and solid color.

miami beach

Gallery: Dean Project www.deanproject.com

Artist: Lluis Barba Lluís Barba utilizes

the language of artistic symbolism to critique both modern society and the art world through a satirical and humorous slant.

Clockwise from top: Thomas Hartmann, Das andere Ufer (The Other Shore), 2012, oil on canvas, 70.87 x 51.18”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Ridley Howard, Orange Diamond Kiss, 2013, oil on canvas, 26 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery; Lluis Barba, Travelers in Time Series, Self-Portrait, Miró, 2011, 38 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Dean Project.

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Palm Beach

Gallery: Gavlak www.gavlakgallery.com

Exhibition: Hubert Bush: Star Maps and Flying Couches on view thru 04.25.15

In Hubert Bush’s spray paintings we see what he calls “afterimages,” vibrating in the eye, once closed, resisting oblivion and ultimately coming back in the form of a déjà vu.

Miami

Gallery: Mindy Solomon Gallery www.mindysolomon.com

Exhibition: Kate MacDowell: Completely Exposed on view 04.10.15–05.22.15

“In my work this romantic ideal of our relationship to

the natural world conflicts with the reality of our current impact on the environment. My pieces are in part responses to environmental threats…I see each piece as a captured and preserved specimen, a painstaking record of endangered natural forms and a commentary on our own culpability.” —K ate M ac D owell From left: Hubert Bush, I Will Survive, 2015, gouache, spray paint, and chalk on linen, 33 x 39”, (HB2315), courtesy of the artist and Gavlak; Kate MacDowell, Lost Tribe 8, 12/2012, 16 x 24” or 20 x 30”, limited edition digital photographs, courtesy of the artist and Mindy Solomon Gallery.

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Naples

Palm Beach

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

www.trudylabellfineart.com

www.holdenluntz.com

Artist: Brooke Shaden

Artist: John Baeder 


brooke shaden’s

closely associated

passion lies in creating new worlds through photographs. Her vision extends beyond the realm of the camera, creating images that resemble paintings and speak of an era that is not our own.

with the Photorealist movement, John Baeder is best known for his detailed paintings of American roadside diners and eateries. Originally considered mere source material for his paintings, Baeder’s photographs have recently emerged as stand-alone works of art.

orlando

Gallery: Jai Gallery www.jaigallery.net

Artist: Sarolta Ban surrealistic

photo manipulation by Budapest-based digital artist, Sarolta Ban, combines ordinary elements in extraordinary dreamlike scenes from which viewers can derive their own personal narratives.

Clockwise from top: Brooke Shaden, we are infinite, photograph on fine art paper, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; John Baeder, Cafe, New Mexico (detail), 1975, digital C-type color photograph, printed 2013, 30 x 40”, signed and editioned 1/5 on recto., courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Sarolta Ban, Untitled (Garden Show), courtesy of the artist and Jai Gallery.

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Jose

alva

A s Fa r A s t h

On view thru 05.24.15 at the Art and Culture Cen


e

arez

he I Can See

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Jose Alvarez: As Far As the I Can See

In a stunning new exhibition ,

the internationally renowned artist

has transformed four first-floor galleries of the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood into a site-specific, multi-sensory environment comprised of a rich potpourri of large-scale paintings, animations, wall murals, works on paper, photographs, sculpture, and archival TV performances. The Venezuelan-born, Broward-based artist draws his inspiration from sources as wide-ranging as the materials he uses to create his works. These include scientific and cosmological theories, mathematical constructs, anthropological research, and visionary ritual practice. Opposite page (and previous spread): The Golden Butterfly #2 (and detail), 2014, acrylic, ink, colored pencil, feathers, quills, handmade paper on mica on wood panel, 72 x 60�. Images courtesy of the artist and Gavlak, Los Angeles, Palm Beach (www.gavlakgallery.com).

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Jose Alvarez: As Far As the I Can See

Opposite: Ascending #2, 2014; acrylic, gouache, ink, resin, feathers, quills, cactus spines, fabric, organdy, handmade paper, thread, and collage on canvas, 68 x 53”. Below: Jose Alvarez. Images courtesy of the artist and Gavlak, Los Angeles, Palm Beach.

He transforms these abstract and elusive points of origin into real shapes, giving tangible form to intangible ideas, concepts, and beliefs. It’s a complex intersection of science, magic, and mysticism in a long, fleshed-out investigation of the fantastic and the philosophical. The exhibition is organized to show viewers the progression of ideas from sketch drawings to finished objects.

“I always ask myself the question: If I were to die today, am I making the object that I’d like to see just before I close my eyes?”—Jose Alvarez

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New Times described Alvarez’s imagery as being “so vibrant that it threatens to dance off the canvas.” The brilliant color palette employed in many of his works invites viewers to allow themselves—in the artist’s words—“to be transported to another world, another dimension, to a mesmerizing place of profound capacity for transformation, rebirth, and unimaginable possibilities.” As Far As the I Can See is based in part on Alvarez’s longstanding dialogue with James Randi, the renowned challenger of paranormal phenomena and his own visits to Australia’s Parkes Observatory radio telescope and Houston’s NASA Space Flight Center. For Alvarez, space exploration has been “a propelling influence in my work, and how it mirrors my inner exploration—trying to find a unifying theory for both, the nature of consciousness, where we come from...” Alvarez’s creations are an extension of his early work as a performance artist when he “channeled” a 2,000-year-old shaman named “Carlos,” a character inspired by Peruvian-born anthropologist/author, Carlos


Castaneda, who wrote a series of books describing his training in shamanism. For two decades, “Carlos” appeared to international audiences, numbering in the thousands, as Alvarez explored, examined, and tested the nature of belief, charisma, and power—and how they in-

Jose Alvarez: As Far As the I Can See

tuous swells of colorful shapes with hypnotic sound. “I can’t think of another artist who is doing anything like this,” said Art and Culture Center’s curator, Jane Hart. “The depth of his work from a transcendent perspective sets him apart. Viewers will have the opportu-

“ I’d like the viewer to leave inspired. I try to provide a zone for potential self-discovery and knowledge.” —J. Alvarez tersect. “The performances were conducted with the intention of empowering people,” the artist explained, “creating the right environment to foster a more thoughtful and critical attitude towards unquestioning belief.” Inspired by Castaneda’s writings, Alvarez introduced the use of shamanistic materials such as feathers, porcupine quills, and crystals, which he melded with traditional watercolor, acrylic paint, and handmade papers in his paintings and collage works. In this exhibition, contemplative works—minimal “paintings” made of shaved mineral crystal or mica and video works composed of abstract animations—accompany the collages and paintings, coupling volup-

Opposite (and above): The Promise of a Better Tomorrow (and detail), 2014, acrylic, ink, colored pencil, organdy, feathers, crystals, and collage on watercolor paper, 30.75 x 22.25”. Images courtesy of the artist and Gavlak, Los Angeles, Palm Beach.

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Jose Alvarez: As Far As the I Can See

nity to immerse themselves in a truly transformative experience.� Alvarez has exhibited at the prestigious Whitney Biennial (2002) and The Kitchen (2007) in New York City, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach (2011), the Kemper Museum in Kansas City (2012), and The Akron Museum of Art in Akron, OH (2015), among numerous other museums and galleries. He lives in Plantation, FL, with his partner and longtime collaborator, James Randi. The Art and Culture Center will host an artist talk featuring a conversation between Jose Alvarez and Irvin Lippman, executive director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, on April 18th at 2 pm. A private VIP tour for Center members will be led by the artist on May 2nd at 11:30 am. There will also be a film screening of the documentary film about James Randi, An Honest Liar, during the exhibition. For event details, visit: www.artandculturecenter.org. To see more work by the artist, visit: www.josealvarezart.com and www.gavlakgallery.com. O n V iew


Left (and below): Consilience (and detail), 2014, acrylic, ink, colored pencil, feathers, quills, handmade paper, resin and collage on mica on wood panel, 90 x 72�. Images courtesy of the artist and Gavlak, Los Angeles, Palm Beach.

OnView Magazine

•

April/June 2015

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Trenton Doyle Hancock

EMIT: What the Bringback Brought

&

The John

Mable

R i n g l i n g M u s e u m o f Ar t 46

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emit: What the Bringback Brought

Over the past decade, Trenton Doyle Hancock has become known as one of the most inventive artists at work in America today. Storytelling is a central part of Hancock’s artistic practice. His intricate candy-colored prints, drawings, collaged felt paintings and site-specific installations work together to tell the story of the Mounds—a group of bizarre mythical creatures that are the tragic protagonist of the artist’s unfolding narrative between good and evil. Previous spread: Trenton Doyle Hancock, 2011, photographed at the Savannah College of Art and Design, courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York and Shanghai. Above (left to right): Mound #1 doll concept drawing, 2008; Mound #1 doll in packaging, 2015. Opposite: Mound #1 doll (loose), 2015. Photography by Tom Dubrock, Will Lytch, and Kale Roberts.

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emit: What the Bringback Brought

Since 1998, artist Trenton Doyle Hancock has been chronicling an ongoing saga of the Mounds— half animal, half plant mythical creatures that are the harmless protagonist at the center of the artist’s unfolding narrative. The sly and crafty Vegans are the antagonist, reeking havoc on the Mounds at every turn. The Mounds are, for better or worse, protected by a character called

Hancock is an avid collector of action figures, a passion that began for him in childhood. His new exhibition at The Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, on view from April 17 through September 13, 2015, will be the first phase in realizing a new series of action figures and dolls as well as a film in the guise of a television commercial promoting these characters. Through this project, he will circle back to his childhood fascinations with horror films and action figures—fascinations which have carried over into adulthood and influenced his multi-faceted oeuvre. Influenced equally by the history of painting as by the pulp imagery of pop-culture,

Torpedo Boy (and alter-ego of the artist), who is, in Hancock’s words, “a superhero but also a screw-up.”

Hancock transforms traditionally formal decisions—such as the use of color, language, and pattern—into opportunities to develop complicated visual narratives with many plots and sub-plots. His works are suffused with personal mythology presented at an operatic scale, often reinterpreting Biblical stories that the artist learned as a child from his family and local church community.  Born in 1974 in Oklahoma City, OK, and raised in Paris, TX, Hancock grew up in a faith-based environment. “My stepfather was a Baptist minister. There were several ministers in my family. My OnV

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emit: What the Bringback Brought mom and all of her sisters, my grandmother—they are all very, very religious. We went to church at least two times a week. That’s just how I grew up, and it was a sense of community. ...In the church, there were these beautiful stories

“‘Bringback’ is a name given to a humanoid creature covered in oscillating black and white fur bands. They generally have no mouths, and their eyes are abnormally large. Like fish, Bringbacks have no eyelids and never blink, making staring contests ‘no fun.’ Bringbacks are the minions of a Mound named Junior. Bringbacks apprehend and abduct ‘usually’ unwilling people, bringing them to the Junior Mound for his consumption.” —T.D. Hancock Right: What the Bringback Brought storyboard page, 2014. Opposite: What the Bringback Brought, GPK Style, 2014.

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involving archetypal heroes going through toil and trouble and coming out all the better for it, teaching us all a lesson, encouraging us to take a different path—I wanted to incorporate that kind of thing into the way that I tell stories.”


emit: What the Bringback Brought

Clockwise from above: I Don’t Believe He Brought Me This Far to Leave Me, 2014; Trenton Doyle Hancock being kidnapped by the Bringbacks, 2015; Skullduggery, 2014.

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His exuberant and subversive narratives employ a variety of cultural tropes, ranging in tone from comic-strip superhero battles to medieval morality plays. Text embedded within the paintings and drawings both drives the narrative and acts as a central visual component. His resulting installations often sprawl beyond canvas edges and onto surrounding gallery walls.

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In 2008, Ballet Austin in Austin, TX, debuted Cult of Color: Call to Color, a ballet based on Hancock’s story and characters. For 3 years, he collaborated closely on the piece with choreographer, Stephen Mills, and composer, Graham Reynolds. “The 50-minutelong ballet was truly like seeing my paintings come to life!” From performance, to dance, to cinema—with the mount-


ing of this exhibition at the Ringling Museum of Art, the artist has achieved a milestone. In his groovy movie, What the Bringback Brought, he has translated the characters from his imagination onto film. For Hancock, “What the Bringback Brought has moved beyond being the abstract stuff of dreams, transitioning into the realm of tangibility.� Trenton Doyle Hancock


emit: What the Bringback Brought

Below: Junior Mound structure, unedited scene from What the Bringback Brought, 2015.

earned his BFA from Texas A&M University, Commerce, and his MFA from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University, Philadelphia. The artist has been included in numerous prestigious group exhibitions— including the 2000 and 2002 Whitney Biennial exhibitions—becoming one of the youngest artists in history to participate in this prestigious survey. Hancock’s work has been the subject of one-person exhibitions at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; the Modern Art Museum of

Fort Worth; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; to name a few. The recipient of numerous awards, Hancock was selected by a national panel of museum curators as the 2013 recipient of the Greenfield Prize awarded in conjunction with The Hermitage Artist Retreat. The work in his exhibition at The Ringling has been made possible through this award. Hancock currently lives and works in Houston, TX, and is represented by James Cohan Gallery, NY. O n V iew


In these scenes from the film, What the Bringback Brought, a tile pattern is grafted to Trenton Doyle Hancock’s head. The prosthetic mask, designed and fabricated by Kale Roberts, is later sliced off with a barber’s razor, to reveal a furry Bringback head underneath. Once Hancock’s transformation into a Bringback is complete, the film turns into a toy commercial, one in which the artist presents a multitude of dolls and action figures to the camera.

Top to bottom: Bringling rubber mask production image, 2015; Bringling rubber mask atop plaster head, 2015; In the barber’s chair, unedited scene from What the Bringback Brought, 2015; Sitting across from the Master Bringback, unedited scene from What the Bringback Brought, 2015.

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ŠHarry Benson


The Triumph of LOVE

O

Over the past forty years, renowned philanthropist and art collector, Beth Rudin DeWoody, has amassed a collection of more than 10,000 contemporary artworks. The Norton Museum of Art was given the rare opportunity to select works from this distinguished collection for the exhibition, The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects, currently on view at the Museum through May 3, 2015. Beth Rudin DeWoody with Mark Swanson’s Yeti. Photo: ©Harry Benson

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The Triumph of LOVE

“Hopefully, people will see that great art exists everywhere— you just have to look for it.” —Beth Rudin DeWoody 62

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Cheryl Brutvan, Norton’s director of curatorial affairs and curator of contemporary art, calls DeWoody, “one of the most fascinating, adventurous, and passionate collectors of contemporary art.” The parttime West Palm Beach resident is also regarded as one of the world’s foremost contemporary art collectors, according to Brutvan, who clearly faced a daunting though enviable challenge in her mission to select approximately 200 works for the show. Well known for her knowledgeable choices and awareness of new and emerging genres of art and artists, DeWoody’s passion for collecting has never subsided since acquiring her first drawing, back in the ’70s. With a collection that is still very much in progress, this exhibition reflects areas of emphasis over the four decades she has been seriously engaged in looking at art. It also reveals her connoisseurship and openness to new ideas. “Hopefully,” DeWoody said, “people will see that great art exists everywhere—you just have to look for it.” DeWoody is a longtime sup-


The Triumph of LOVE

Opposite: Sylvie Fleury, White Gold, 2010, ed. 7/8, palladium leaf on bronze, 16-7/8 x 21-1/4 x 15-3/4”, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, NY. Left: Sylvie Fleury, Prada Boots, 2003, ed. 1/8, sculpture, bronze platine chrome, 18-1/8 x 10-5/8 x 10-5/8”, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, NY. Monica McGivern Photography.


The Triumph of LOVE

“What I love is buying something by an artist when I don’t know who they are or if the work ever will increase in value.”—B. Rudin DeWoody 64

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porter of the Norton, serving on its photography committee and funding the Museum’s biennial Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers, which is named after her father, the late real estate developer, Lewis Rudin. She has also donated art to the Norton’s permanent collection. With space the only limitation for the exhibition, The Triumph of Love is structured to reveal DeWoody’s enthusiasms and concentrations in her collection. Drawings and sculptures are well-represented strengths in her collecting. In fact, the exhibition title is based on a colorful, early drawing by Cy Twombly. Highlights from the exhibition include works by Bruce Connor and Sylvie Fleury. Connor’s funky assemblage sculpture, Drum (1962), is one of 10 pieces in DeWoody’s collection by this influential California-based artist and represents her interest in recent historical movements as well as the physical character of some of her choices. It is in contrast to Fleury, another artist DeWoody has pursued in depth, acquiring 15 silver- and gold-plated sculptures by the Swiss artist. Fleury’s work is

characterized by appropriating consumer culture through luxury goods as seen in the work, Prada Boots (2003). Among the remaining artists featured are Nicole Eisenman, Karl Benjamin, David Wojnarowicz, Isamu Noguchi, and Jim Lambie. All of the works on display are arrayed on tiered

The Triumph of LOVE

Opposite: Jim Lambie, Oven Ready, 2006, broken mirror, collage, gloss paint, 8 parts: 32.9 x 27.2 x 1.1” each, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody.

Left: Bruce Conner, Drum, 1962, mixed media assemblage, 30 x 11.5 x 11.5”, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody, © 2014 Conner Family Trust, San Francisco / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Monica McGivern Photography.

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The Triumph of LOVE

Below: David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (Map Head), 1984, ed. l/23, map collage and acrylic on plaster, 9.5 x 9.5 x 9.5”, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody, courtesy of the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W Gallery, NY. Monica McGivern Photography.

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platforms and stacked salonstyle on the walls. Beth Rudin DeWoody first became interested in art as a young student. She briefly entertained the notion of becoming an artist herself but ultimately realized her talents were in placing art and networking with art organizations. Her collecting is based on what she likes and she often travels from gallery to gallery seeking out her treasures. “She has supported artists when they’re young and maintained relationships with them as they’ve come into their professional lives,” said Brutvan. Discovering new talent is a joy for DeWoody. “What I love is buying something by an artist when I don’t know who they are or if the work ever will increase in value,” she said. “I just buy it because it’s great art.” Artists also appreciate that she doesn’t immediately sell their work to make a profit, instead, she curates exhibitions that mix younger and established artists. The move from collector to curator was a natural transition for DeWoody. She has curated shows for numerous art galleries, including: Inspired at Ste-

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ven Kasher Gallery, NY; Hunt & Chase at Salomon Contemporary in East Hampton, NY; and Pink Show at Gavlak, Palm Beach, FL, to name a few. When she’s not working on her own projects, DeWoody gives her time to a long list of


charities. Her board affiliations include the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Children’s Foundation, the New School University, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Design Museum Holon Israel, and Save A Child America, Inc.

She is chairman of the Arts and Culture Committee of the Association for a Better New York (ABNY), and is on the Council of Conservators of both the New York Public Library and the Library Association of MOMA. O n V iew OnV

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Above: Karl Benjamin, #4, 1967, oil on canvas, 42 x 59”, Collection Beth Rudin DeWoody, © Benjamin Artworks, reproduced by permission. Monica McGivern Photography.

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04.07.15e v e r g l a d e s :

@

A p p l e t o n

m u s e u m

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-07.05.15

e r i c a ’ s

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P ho t o g ra phs

by

Mac stone Co l lege

of

Ce ntra l

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everglades: America’s Wetland Photographs by Mac Stone

“ Showing the public the wilderness areas of the Southeast has been my greatest pleasure. When we stop seeing these wetlands as wastelands and instead see them as incredible outposts for wildlife and adventure, we’re much more likely to fight for their protection.” —Mac Stone This page: Portrait of Mac Stone by Carlton Ward. Previous spread: Midnight Mangrove. *This exhibition and educational programming was funded by the Florida Humanities Council and is sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture.

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F

From Lake Okeechobee to

Florida Bay, from inside the bonecrushing jaws of an alligator to the storms that race across the blackwa-

ter backcountry, award-winning conservation photographer Mac Stone

takes us on a visual journey through the Everglades.

Everglades: America’s Wetland,

a new exhibition at the Appleton

Museum of Art, College of Central Florida in Ocala, will be on view

from April 7, 2015, through July 5, 2015. The exhibit showcases Stone’s

striking photographs, which reveal


everglades: America’s Wetland Photographs by Mac Stone

Above: Don’t Blink. A burrowing owl stares down the camera in Homestead, Florida. Opposite: Gaze. A Doubled-crested cormorant in Everglades National Park.

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the natural beauty of this unique wetland, the amazing depths of its landscapes, the diversity of its wildlife, and the resilience of the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. Aerial views highlight the vast expanse of the River of Grass. Underwater images capture the endless wonders of the Everglades, including sharks darting through mangrove roots. Intimate close-ups

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showcase awe-inspiring flora and fauna such as the ghost orchid, the Florida panther, the endangered Everglades snail kite, roseate spoonbills, and of course, the majestic American alligator. “Everglades takes us into the lives of elusive species living far from the boardwalks and tourist trails. With the mind of a scientist, eyes of an artist, and the heart of an adventurer,


everglades: America’s Wetland Photographs by Mac Stone

Right: Striking Distance. A Cottonmouth earns its name in Big Cypress National Preserve. Below: The Swamp. American alligators congregate en masse at the height of the dry season in Big Cypress National Preserve. “I was careful while wading out in the deep mud and was surprised with each step to find hidden alligators under my feet. In this photo there are 63 visible alligators.” —M. Stone Special event: Mac Stone will be giving a talk at the Circle Square Cultural Center at On Top of the World, Ocala, FL, on April 6th from 3:30-5 pm.

Stone bears witness to the unrivaled beauty of America’s wetland,” wrote Carlton Ward Jr., author of Florida Cowboys. Growing up exploring the springs, swamps, and hammocks of North Central Florida, Stone developed a passion for photography at a young age. As a biologist for the National Audubon Society, he has traveled to the most remote areas of the Everglades. With his camera, he has explored Everglades National Park, Corkscrew Swamp, Fisheating Creek, and dozens of sites that few are permitted to visit. His stunning photographs capture the innumerable facets of this ecological marvel, while speaking to the importance of wilderness conservation and the need to protect these amazingly wild wetlands. Of the broad diversity of wildlife the Everglades holds, 56 species are endangered or threatened, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. During the past century, the wetlands have shrunk to less than half their original size due to agricultural and residential development. Other threats


to the ecosystem include invasive exotic plants, polluted runoff from agricultural operations, and algae blooms. Images from Stone’s treks have appeared in countless domestic and international publications, including National Geographic, Audubon Magazine, and National Parks Mag-

azine. Over the years, his camera has carried him to some of the most remote and imperiled areas this side of the globe. For six months, he lived in Ecuador and worked with Wildlife Conservation Society biologists in the Amazon rainforest. He moved to Honduras and lived in a small village along OnV

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the Cangrejal River. For two years, he taught photography to underprivileged youth as a way to raise environmental awareness in the region. Through photography, Stone strives to start new conversations and expose the dynamic relationship between mankind and the natural world.

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everglades: America’s Wetland Photographs by Mac Stone

Opposite: Day’s End Mangrove. Cumulus clouds tower over a red mangrove in Florida Bay. Below: The Calm. “While on Lake Okeechobee during the summer, a massive storm approached faster than I could paddle. Accepting fate, I found a composition and rode out the storm.”—M. Stone

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When he is not photographing the bottomlands and backwoods of the southeastern US, Stone is a product tester for Columbia Sportswear, a Google Trekker, an official photographer for Savage Race, a fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, and the Executive Director of Naturaland Trust. He is also the winner of the Save Our Seas Foundation Marine Conservation Photog-

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raphy Grant. In conjunction with the exhibition, Stone’s 304-page coffee table book, Everglades: America’s Wetland, published by University Press of Florida, will be on sale at the Museum. Visitors will have the opportunity to attend a lecture and book signing by the artist at the Appleton on April 7th, from 6-8pm—the exhibition opens the same day, in honor of Everglades Day. O n V iew


On view through

06.07.15

The

Mennello Museum of American Art presents...

real l

o b s e r v a t i o n s and r e f l e c t 78

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Café 2 AM, 1993, oil painting, 30 x 24”.


lives

t i o n s by d a l e k e n n i n g t o n w w w. m e n n e l l o m u s e u m . c o m


One Last Hope, 2010, oil on canvas, 40 x 48�.


real lives

O orlando’s Mennello

Museum of American Art has

opened its yearlong Storytellers of

the South: Voices of Women series

with a captivating display of realist paintings by Dale Kennington, one of the South’s most prominent female artists. An original exhibition curated by Dr. Lee A. Gray, Real Lives: Observations and Reflections by Dale Kennington, on view through June 7, 2015, engages viewers both intellectually and emotionally with charming and witty portrayals of everyday life. OnV

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real lives Born in Savannah, GA, in 1935, Dale Kennington has spent most of her life in southeast Alabama. She has lived through momentous periods in American history, and weathered them with steely Southern charm, embracing the canvas as her means of emotional expression. Everyday events and situations are the inspiration for her paintings. She records observations of mundane and common experiences which are often overlooked. By selecting these insignificant moments in time, Kennington explores personal and universal mythologies found in contemporary American society. Her imagery often depicts anonymous, passive individuals engaged in idle activities such as riding the subway, people watching, or sitting at a bar. She refers to these repetitive moments as rituals that contribute to the shared condition of humanity. “I believe that it is our everyday lives that ultimately shape who we are, not dramatic events,” Kennington once stated. “These common memories of all societies are what bind together humanity.”

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It’s a Man’s World, 1995, oil on canvas, 52 x 72”.


“I believe that it is our everyday lives that ultimately we are, not dramatic events.” —Dale Kennington 84

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real lives In the companion catalog for the exhibit, Dr. Gray wrote: “As an artist, Kennington shows us her world as she experiences it, as a participant but also an outsider, one who is interested but not quite certain how to perform. She is reflective but not judgmental, curious but not assertive. Hers is a world that feels familiar to us, yet one we seldom wish to recognize. Even the most popular person in the room occasionally notices they are alone or in unfamiliar territory and it is that moment of self-awareness that so many of Kennington’s works capture. In paintings such as Purgatory Station (2011) or World Class (1993), the viewer is literally

shape who

Opposite: Purgatory Station, 2011, oil on canvas, 52 x 74”. Below: World Class, 1993, oil on canvas, 40 x 48”.


Never Enough Time, 2005, 40 x 48�.


real lives outside of the situation. In one, a train passes us by and we have no hope of entering the inside. In the other, a group of young people sit with their backs to the viewer. We have no way of joining them, we are oblivious and unseen. Like many artists, Kennington has traveled to places that capture her interest in visual terms. For many years the artist took a yearly trip to Paris, a

“The most powerful element of [Kennington’s] work is by far the quality of light.” place that fascinated her. In all of the paintings set in Paris we sense the artist’s outsider position. Consider Never Enough Time (2005), for example. Many of these images...reference nostalgia for the past, a place where white gloves were worn by women and men smoked cigars. In these romantic settings of outdoor cafes or intimate bars, the artist morphs the character of European and Southern charm OnV

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—Dr. Lee A. Gray

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real lives into our psyche. She achieves this through color and balance. Notice how often she pairs contrasting colors such as black and white, red and green or yellow and blue. Setting complimentary colors (those across from one another on a color wheel) perceptually heightens the contrast of each and makes the pairing more dynamic.” For Kennington, creating a mood with her painting is critical, and while she employs both color and light to achieve this goal, “The most powerful element of her work is by far the quality of light,” according to Dr. Gray. As she further explains in her essay, “Extremes of light and dark are reminiscent of the 16th century Italian school of Caravaggio, or of Rembrandt in the 17th century. In their use of chiaroscuro (the use of light and shadow to create the appearance of volume), these old masters understood how to insert mood and psychological drama into their narratives. Kennington, too, uses chiaroscuro to establish mood. Hers is an unsettling tone that is haunting and disturbing for its ambivalence.

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The Bride Chose Red and Whimsy, 2000, oil on canvas, 52 x 72�.


Above: The Birthday Party, 1995, 42 x 84”.

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Yet, we are drawn into the scenes because of their visual depth and intimate sensuality.” Kennington earned her bachelor’s degree in art history and design from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa in 1956 and married her husband, Don Kennington, the same year. As a stay-at-home mom, she continued to study art and began painting portraits of children.

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As her reputation as a children’s portrait painter grew, so did her client list. By 1990, she decided to suspend her commissioned portrait painting business and focus instead on her studio work. Frequent trips to Paris and her local milieu served as the subject matter for which she is best known. Kennington’s contemporary realist paintings have achieved


real lives

Below: Dale Kennington standing in front of her painting Books and Business in the collection of the Smithsonian Museum of Art in Washington, DC.

remarkable success over her forty-year career. Since 1993, her works have been featured in numerous gallery shows as well as in 15 solo and 29 group museum exhibitions. Her paintings are held in 10 prestigious museum collections, including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown,

OH; the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN; the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, AL; the Mobile Museum of Art, AL; and the personal collection of King Carl Gustaf XVI of Sweden. In 2011, Kennington was awarded the Governor’s Arts Award by the Alabama State Council on the Arts. O n V iew


PO P

The Art of

COM

Thru

05.23.15

at

CORAL SPRINGS MUS


P&

MICS

SEUM

of

ART • w w w. c o r a l s p r i n g s m u s e u m . o r g OnV

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E

The Art of POP & COMICS

Enter the world of Comic and Pop Art as seen through the eyes of five distinguished artists­, each with their own distinctive style. Guest curator, Lenore Stern-Morris, has brought these artists together in a dynamic group show hosted by the Coral Springs Museum of Art. Featuring Jose Delbo, Charles Fazzino, Marvin Gralnick, Nelson De La Nuez, and Al Razza, this eye-popping presentation taps into the pulse of American pop culture with wit and humor­—a sheer delight for the young and young at heart! Nelson De La Nuez, Up Up And Away!;

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POP The Art o Pop Art

is an exemplary

well be found in childhood memories.

expression of creativity that knows no

Whenever I look at Charles Fazzino’s

age barrier or sexual identity. Wheth-

painting of the roller coaster at Coney

er it’s about Popeye, Mighty Mouse,

Island or of Katz’s Deli in Manhat-

Batman, Wonder Woman, Super-

tan, my mind races back to the days

man, or Spider-Man—and whether

when my parents took me there. It’s

you’re nine-years-old or ninety-

an intimate feeling that recalls the

years-young—almost anyone can

warmth and security of childhood.

relate to it. Why? The answer may 96

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And lest we forget, Pop Art 2015


The Art of POP & COMICS

PART of by Lenore Stern-Morris

draws its imagery from popular

Razza create intimate Pop Art envi-

culture—iconic film stars, dynam-

ronments drawn from those elements

ic comic strip characters, catchy

in contemporary culture that speak to

ads, classic consumer products—it

them—each is guided by their past

appeals to viewers on an emotional

while creating the future in that “for-

and experiential level.

ever” image on canvas. And isn’t that

The Art of Pop & Comics artists,

what Pop Art is about? It makes you

Jose Delbo, Charles Fazzino, Marvin

smile. It makes you recall and remem-

Gralnick, Nelson De La Nuez, and Al

ber. That’s The Art of Pop Art!

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The ART of POP & COMICS

Jose DELBO Back in the ’80s, long before the modern superhero dominated the big screen, it was Jose Delbo working for the likes of DC and Marvel Comics who penciled the published adventures of Superman, Batman, Aquaman, Green Arrow, The Transformers, and The Thundercats. Then, in the ’90s, when the focus fell on the environment, he helped the country go green when he drew the first issues of Captain Planet and the Planeteers and Brute Force. Delbo continued to be the go-to-guy for cartoon classics like Disney’s 101 Dalmations, Little Mermaid and the Mighty Ducks. Above: The Joker; Opposite: Batman x 3.

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Charles FAZZINO A graduate of the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Charles Fazzino is one of the most popular and highly-collected pop artists of all time. His unique ability to capture the entire essence of his subject matter in one brilliantly complex image explains the ease with which his artwork documents the pop culture of the times­—from entertainment icons to traditional heroes and culture-defining moments. His artworks are exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide. Fazzino is often referred to as a pop culture historian because of the breadth of his work and the way it captures the best parts of our contemporary lives.

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The ART of POP & COMICS

Above: Betti’s Boopin’ Popeye’s Swoonin’ at Coney Island; Right: Batman & Batgirl.

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Marvin GRALNICK The dynamic art of southwest Florida artist, Marvin Gralnick, draws on 20th century Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Neo-Expressionism, and Post-Modernism. In addition to experimenting with different ways of applying paint, he has perfected the depersonalized industrial technique of photo transfer. His photo silkscreen paintings contain deliberate imperfections, revealing the uneven inking of the roller, slips of the screen, and an overall graininess and partial blotting out of images. In all his work Gralnick conveys a passion for kinetic strokes of color, provocative words, and arresting images which embody the American dream filtered through the raw lens of popular culture.

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The ART of POP & COMICS

Above: Mona & Marilyn with Five Japanese Umbrellas;

“Marvin Gralnick’s mix of historic and contemporary figures really POPs! And if that doesn’t get your attention, check out his automobile art.”

Right:

—Lenore Stern-Morris

Stop, Look & Listen.

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The ART of POP & COMICS

Nelson DE LA NUEZ Included in the “Who’s Who List of the Most Collected Artists of Our Time,” Nelson De La Nuez, known as the “King of Pop Art ®,” is a born iconoclast. Using his unique juxtaposition of pop culture and surrealism, blended with America’s rich culture and history, he has created works of art that are considered timeless. The artist is known for his distinctive, trademarked style called “Art on the Edge,” where art is created on all sides of the canvas and wood. De La Nuez’s artwork hangs in some of the most prominent private collections and has been featured in countless television and high-end home design shows. He was the official 70th anniversary artist for the Wizard of Oz film and created original artwork for the celebration of the iconic movie, one of which, Ditching Dorothy, was featured on a limited edition sheet of US postage stamps. Above: Pop Alphabet; Opposite: Chanel #5: Pink; © 1998 All rights reserved. Kingofpopart.com / Nelson De La Nuez.

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The ART of POP & COMICS

Al RAZZA Razza’s work is a fun mix of Pop Art imagery and abstract design. His brightly colored and heavily textured surfaces are active and full of energy, pulling each viewer in like a magnet. Born in Providence, RI, in 1954, he received his BFA from Massachusetts College of Art and an MFA from Pratt Institute in New York. In 1991, Razza was awarded one of the first South Florida Consortium Fellowships for artistic excellence by the South Florida Art Consortium and the National Endowment for the Arts. His work has been exhibited in numerous museums and galleries, and is included in many private and public collections. A former instructor at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, he is currently the owner of Design Crafters Inc., now doing business as Razza’s School of Art in Coral Springs. O n V iew Above: Love Me True; Opposite: Showdown.

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nation t h

n e t w o r k

@

dunedin fine art center On

view

through

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www.dfac.org


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illumination:

The Art Cloth Network

Contemporary

fiber

artists delight our senses with lush, tactile creations in a variety of media. One of three new fiber-centric shows

opening at Dunedin Fine Art Center (DFAC), Illumination includes works by members of the Art Cloth

Network, a diverse group of professional artists who share a common goal—to promote the medium of cloth as an art form.

“For nearly two decades, DFAC has

shown bi-annual quilt exhibits spotlighting the latest techniques and technologies in contemporary quilt-making

and fiber arts,” said DFAC’s curator, Catherine Bergmann. “This summer series of fiber shows continues in that

tradition with an introduction to works

Opposite (and previous spread):

by the Art Cloth Network. As a cen-

Joy Lavrencik, Oak Brook, IL, Abstraction: Leaves on

ter whose mission is visual arts educa-

Frozen Pond (and detail); coffee filters,

tion, we have also greatly expanded

fibers, gut, gel medium, paint, dye; dye-painted, rusted, burned,

our fiber art classes and workshops in OnV

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collaged; 36 x 36”.

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illumination:

The Art Cloth Network

relation to the passion demonstrated for this vital, evolving media.” As it is defined, Art Cloth is cloth transformed by adding or subtracting color, line, shape, texture, value, or fiber to create a compelling surface. The beauty of this art form is that it is pure and from the heart—it’s all about experimentation and imagination. This exhibition was juried by independent curator, Bruce Hoffman, who spent 20 years as curator for the Philadelphia fine craft gallery, SnydermanWorks. In his juror statement, Hoffman observed, “I was delighted with the use of color, strong design sense and understanding of the processes. Several works have a strong sense of place and time while others resonate with an ethereal timelessness…The underlining element of the works chosen is Left (and right): Barbara Schneider, Woodstock, IL, 108 Beads, var. 3 (and detail); silk, gold lame, polyester backing, paint; dyed, over-dyed, lame fussed, silk-screened; 36 x 72”.

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illumination:

The Art Cloth Network

Right (and above): Jacque Davis, Freeburg, IL, Moon Fire (and detail); cotton, fiber reactive dye, discharge paste, thread; resist dyed, screen printed, machine stitched; 36 x 36”.

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light. The artists have achieved this with their own unique voices and artistic expression. I hope that the viewers come away from this group of work a bit more enlightened and fulfilled.” Visitors are invited to absorb and appreciate the visions and voices of the artists featured in Illumination: Jacque Davis, Linda Dawson, Dianne Koppisch Hricko, Barbara James, Sue Copeland Jones, Lisa Kerpoe, Judy Langille, Mary Ellen Latino, Joy Lavrencik, Russ Little, Barbara Schneider, Connie c om

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illumination:

The Art Cloth Network Tiegel, and Maggie Weiss. Part of a trio of fiber art exhibitions hosted by DFAC, Illumination will be on view through August 16, 2015, in tandem with: Elemental: Florida Quilt Invitational This is not your grandmother’s quilt show!...Florida Quilters were invited to submit fresh interpretations of one or more of the four Elements: Earth, Air, Fire, and Water for this

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statewide juried exhibition. Carrying the definition of quilting far beyond its traditional parameters, Elemental demonstrates the breadth of transformation taking place in the world of quilting. Tampa Bay Surface Design Guild This lively, talented and passionate group last exhibited at DFAC in 2008, with a “textural symphony” of fiber art. Surface design artisans treat


fabric, paper or other materials as canvases to be dyed, painted, stamped, bleached, stitched, embossed or otherwise manipulated. The work is not about the technique or the perfection of technique—it’s about creativity and interaction with the materials. Corresponding with these shows will be a series of special programs and events. For details, visit www.dfac.org. O n V iew

Left (and opposite): Linda Dawson, St. Petersburg, FL, Mathematics: The Queen of Science (and detail); cotton, photo manipulation; digital print by spoonflower.com; 36 x 72.


profile {Xu

celebrated worldwide

Bing}

Exhibition:

Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth On view through 05. 24. 15 at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami thefrost.fiu.edu

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for propelling contemporary Chinese art onto the global stage with his epic installations, Xu Bing’s new exhibition encompasses 5,000 square feet and features the artist’s iconic installations in addition to newer artworks. “The Frost Art Museum is thrilled to present Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth,” said the Museum’s director, Dr. Jordana Pomeroy. “We have devoted all of the space in our Grand Galleries to offer this rare opportunity to view the iconic Book from the Sky in its entirety alongside a majestic series of powerful recent installations, including an artwork created to debut at the Frost Art Museum.” Due to its massive scope and size, only a handful of museums in the world have shown the complete Book from the Sky, with all of the hundreds of original components and handmade carvings which took the artist four years to complete. “The thought-provoking artworks of Xu Bing will challenge viewers to reconsider


p r o f i l e

their perceptions about written language and cultural identity,” said the exhibition’s curator, Dr. Lidu Yi, a professor of art and art history at FIU. “This exhibition focuses on Chinese indigenous heritage, Chinese characters, and traditional landscape painting. The installation, Book from the Sky, is an iconic, epic installation. As the ancient Chinese proverb says, ‘It shocked Heaven and Earth, and made the ghosts and sages weep.’” Trained in China during the 1970s as a Master Printmaker, Xu Bing was born in Chongqing in 1955 and grew up in Beijing during the Cultural Revolution. He is recognized

globally for his work with language and text, playfully recreating the written word. This exhibition brings together Xu Bing’s Shu-related masterpieces to demonstrate the art of writing as image. In ancient Chinese, the character Shu ( ) signifies books, written characters, and the act of writing. This exhibition presents the Shu art of Xu Bing, from his Tian Shu (Book from the Sky) to Di Shu (Book from the Ground), with several installations in between. Together, they create a grand, Zen-like tranquil space that draws viewers deep into a serene atmosphere to engage with the artworks. O n V iew

opposite page: The focal installation is the complete Book from the Sky, which includes more than 4,000 illegible Chinese characters invented by the artist. this page (clockwise from top): 1. Practicing Square Word Calligraphy: experience how Chinese students learn to write by tracing characters that are actually comprised of English letters. 2. Book from the Ground is an interactive staging of two computers running chat software that lures visitors to simultaneously decode universal signs and symbols. Photo: Jia Zhang. 3. Suzhou Landscripts appear to be traditional Chinese landscape paintings but are instead comprised of Chinese logographic script writing. Photo: John Cairns. 4. the artist, Xu Bing. images Courtesy Xu Bing Studio.


spotlight {st.

john’s

in collaboration with

the Cultural Fusion Year of the River, the Cummer Museum invited Jacksonville’s top contemporary visual and performing artists to reinterpret river-themed works in the Museum’s permanent collection. The Year of the River is an initiative bringing together more than 50 institutions to raise awareness of the St. Johns River as the “cultural current” of the city and an important driver for economic development, recreation, tourism, and quality of life throughout Northeast Florida. Participating artists include: Emily Arthur, Sarah Crooks Flaire, Jim Draper, Doug Eng, David Engdahl, Brian Frus, Tiffany Melanson, Hiromi Mizugai Moneyhun, Allison

river}

Exhibition:

Reflections: Artful Perspectives on the St. Johns River On view through 10. 18. 15 at Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville www.cummermuseum.org

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s p o t l i g h t

Watson, and Barry Wilson, as well as the team of artists behind the original score, A Vision Awakening. Throughout 2015 there will be exhibitions, performances, and special events, including lectures, gallery talks, and panel discussions that will provide a platform for artists, environmentalists, and historians to engage visitors in a dynamic discussion of the St. Johns River. Among the scheduled events will be a free panel discussion on Tuesday, April 14 at 6:30 pm, comprised of artists participating in Reflections. The panel will explain how the River and the environment inspired the artwork in the exhibition, and discuss the creative process, from concept to execution, of their individ-

ual works. A performance by some of Jacksonville’s top musicians with an excerpt from a performance inspired by the Cummer Gardens, A Vision Awakening, will follow the discussion. For information on programs and events, please visit www.cummermuseum.org or call 904.356.6857. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. Martin Johnson Heade, The St. Johns River, ca.1890s, oil on canvas, Purchased with funds from Membership Contributions. 2. Doug Eng, Power Seat, 2012, archival pigment print. Photo courtesy of the artist. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. John James Audubon, Neotoma floridana (Florida Rats), 1841, pencil, ink, and watercolor on paper, Purchased with funds from Membership Contributions. 2. Emily Arthur, Blackwater with Bird (for Audubon) no. 2, 2015, screenprint with etching and lithography. Photo courtesy of the artist. 3. David Engdahl, Figure in a River Landscape, 2014, ink on drawing medium overlay of digital print. 4. Herman Herzog, Figure in a River Landscape, ca. 1910, oil on canvas, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. C. Herman Terry.


collection {helena

rubinstein}

Exhibition:

Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power On view 04.21.15–07. 12. 15 at Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

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by the time of her death,

Helena Rubinstein had risen from humble origins in smalltown Jewish Poland to become a global icon of female entrepreneurship and a leader in art, fashion, design, and philanthropy. Rubinstein was ahead of her time in her embrace of cultural and artistic diversity. She was not only an early patron of European and Latin American modern art, but also one of the earliest, leading collectors of African and Oceanic sculpture. Through more than one hundred objects—works of art, photographs, and ephemera— Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power reveals how Rubin-


c o l l e c t i o n

stein’s unique style and pioneering approaches to business challenged conservative taste and heralded a modern notion of beauty—democratized and accessible to all. This exhibition will reunite selections from Rubinstein’s famed art collection—dispersed at auction in 1966— featuring works by Roger de la Fresnaye, Marie Laurencin, Henri Matisse, Elie Nadelman, Pablo Picasso, and Andy Warhol, among others, as well as thirteen works from her peerless collection of African and Oceanic art. Several selections from Rubinstein’s fine jewelry collection will also be featured in the presentation.

Rubinstein’s savvy for selfpromotion will be seen in portraits of her made by the leading artists of her day. Also on display will be vintage advertisements, cosmetics products, and promotional films related to her beauty business. The exhibition title, Beauty Is Power, refers to one of the first slogans Rubinstein used to promote her cosmetics. The bold phrase is an early indication of Rubinstein’s distinctive blend of commercial savvy and inherent feminism. She offered women the ideal of self-invention­—a fundamental principle of modernity. One’s identity, she asserted, is a matter of choice. O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. Marie Laurencin, Portrait of Helena Rubinstein, 1934, Oil on canvas; Private collection, Stowe, Vermont; © Fondation Foujita / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2014. 2. Helena Rubinstein in front of a montage of some of the many portraits she commissioned throughout her life, 1958; Helena Rubinstein Foundation Archives, Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY, Gladys Marcus Library, Special Collections. above: Helena Rubinstein holding one of her masks from the Ivory Coast, 1934; Photo: George Maillard Kesslere; Helena Rubinstein Foundation Archives, Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY, Gladys Marcus Library, Special Collections. left (left to right): 1. A 1949 French ad for complexion powder and rouge, drawn by Bernard Villemot; © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. 2. Your Cosmetic Portrait pamphlet, 1935; Photo: Bradford Robotham.


reflections {Jim

Reynolds}

Exhibition:

Jim Reynolds: CityScapes On view 04.03.15–06. 30.15 at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa www.fmopa.org

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CityScapes is the first

solo exhibition of work by Jim Reynolds. The images from his series, A New York Point of View, capture the energy and excitement of New York City’s architecture and its everyday life. The photographs use light and its reflections to explore place, scale, and perspective in street scenes whose features often morph onto the picture plane to encompass the photograph. Most of these images display characteristics of the Photorealism art movement of the ’60s and ’70s. Each of the scenes is highly detailed with ‘reflected’ scenes often challenging the


r e f l e c t i o n s

opposite page (left to right): 1. Seagram Building, 2013. 2. Bergdorf’s Music Window, 2015. Left (top to bottom): 1. Park Ave Reflections, 2014. 2. Vuitton Building by Yayoi, 2012. below: MET Temple of Dendur, 2012.

‘real’ ones—vying for the viewer’s attention. This exhibition occurs simultaneously with National Architecture Week, April 12-18, 2015. “We are happy to support National Architecture Week with

exhibitions of Jim Reynolds and Ezra Stoller’s architectural photography” said FMoPA’s executive director, Zora Carrier, “as well as hosting the AIA Architectural Photography Contest in our community gallery.” On View


On View 04-06.2015  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum and gallery exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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