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on iew FLORIDA

APRIL / JUNE 2014

Gravity and Grace:

Monumental works by EL ANATSUI AT B A S S M U S E U M O F A R T , M I A M I B E A C H

Wangechi

PLUS

MUTU: A Fantastic Journey AT M O C A , N O R T H M I A M I

Intent to

DECEIVE:

Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World AT T H E J O H N & M A B L E R I N G L I N G M U S E U M O F A R T , S A R A S O TA

AND

The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring IN PIECES AT A R T A N D C U LT U R E C E N T E R O F H O L L Y W O O D


CONTENTS A p r i l /Ju n e

2014

Vo l . 5 , N o . 1

ON THE COVER : El Anatsui, Drifting Continents (detail), 2009, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister RIGHT: EL ANATSUI, RED BLOCK, 2010, ALUMINUM AND COPPER WIRE, 222 x 175”, INSTALLATION AT THE AKRON ART MUSEUM, COLLECTION OF THE BROAD ART FOUNDATION, SANTA MONICA. PHOTO: JOE LEVACK, COURTESY OF THE AKRON ART MUSEUM

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on iew FLORIDA

APRIL / JUNE 2014

Gravity and Grace:

Monumental works by EL ANATSUI AT B A S S M U S E U M O F A R T , M I A M I B E A C H

Wangechi

PLUS

MUTU: A Fantastic Journey AT M O C A , N O R T H M I A M I

Intent to

DECEIVE:

Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World AT T H E J O H N & M A B L E R I N G L I N G M U S E U M O F A R T , S A R A S O TA

AND

The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring IN PIECES AT A R T A N D C U LT U R E C E N T E R O F H O L L Y W O O D

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GRAVITY AND GRACE: MONUMENTAL WORKS BY EL ANATSUI

Part of the Bass Museum of Art’s 50th anniversary celebrations, Gravity and Grace presents 12 monumental metal wall and floor sculptures by acclaimed artist, El Anatsui, in his first solo show to tour the United States. The exhibition highlights Anatsui’s recent work, widely considered to represent the apex of his career to date.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

68 Miami

80 Sarasota

96 Hollywood

112 Miami

A FANTASTIC

FAKES AND

NATHAN SAWAYA

THE LATINO

WANGECHI MUTU: JOURNEY

INTENT TO DECEIVE: FORGERIES IN THE

MOCA, North Miami hosts a major retrospective featuring Brooklyn-based artist Wangechi Mutu’s most innovative and exhilarating artworks, including her provocative collages with female forms and fantastical landscapes.

ART WORLD

THE ART OF

OUR AMERICA:

FEATURING

Several ingenious art forgers are profiled in this ground-breaking exhibition at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art.

PRESENCE IN

“IN PIECES”

AMERICAN ART

LEGO artist, Nathan Sawaya, has teamed up with photographer, Dean West, in this new show at Art & Culture Center of Hollywood.

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum presents a major exhibition drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection of Latino art.

®

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ON VIEW

INTERVIEW WITH ROD FAULDS

RIGHT: PORTRAIT OF ROD FAULDS BY TEODORA DAKOVA, © TEODORA DAKOVA, HTTP://TEODORADAKOVA.COM

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

Art museum administrator, educator, curator, exhibition designer and artist, Rod Faulds, talks with On View about exhibition design and his revived interest in art making. His new work will be featured in an upcoming show at Art and Culture Center of Hollywood. OnV

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WANGECHI MUTU, RIDING DEATH IN MY SLEEP (DETAIL), 2002, © WANGECHI MUTU; JOHN MYATT, GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING (DETAIL), 2012, PHOTO: WASHINGTON GREEN FINE ART; HOTEL, FROM IN PIECES, 2012, BY NATHAN SAWAYA AND DEAN WEST, COURTESY INPIECESCOLLECTION.COM; OLGA ALBIZU, RADIANTE, 1967, SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF JP MORGAN CHASE

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CONTENTS A p r i l /Ju n e

2014

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5,

No. 1

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8

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The Baker Museum of Artis–Naples, presents Museum to Scale 1/7, a collection of diorama museum galleries devoted to Belgian artists and art movements.

138

ELAINE REICHEK: THE EYE OF THE NEEDLE

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

Fo c u s

THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE PHOTOGRAPHS

134

MOCA Jacksonville hosts a stunning survey of photographic works that reflect The New York Times Magazine’s distinctive position as a leading venue for visual storytelling.

PICTURED: Fred R. Conrad (with Paul Myoda and Julian LaVerdiere), Phantom Towers, Photo-collage. Courtesy the New York Times.

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HENNING HAUPT: DRAWING LINES— MAKING SPACE

Profile

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GALLERY

136

Coral Springs Museum of Art presents a series of spatial compositions of line and color by Henning Haupt.

COMMENTARY

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Showcase

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Elaine Reichek’s abstract knitted and embroidered works will be featured in a new show at Boca Museum of Art. Spotlight

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WALTER WICK: GAMES, GIZMOS AND TOYS IN THE ATTIC

Walter Wick’s interactive art comes to Vero Beach Museum of Art.


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C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew M A G A Z I N E

is full of transformations and so it appears fitting that our spring edition opens with an elegant body of transformative work. Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui, on pg. 56, invites viewers to question where art comes from and marvel in the beauty and splendor of what can be created from the discarded detritus of human consumption. In Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey, on pg. 68, the transformative experience continues as we enter into a fictional, sci-fi world filled with beautiful and grotesque figures and fantastical landscapes designed to encourage cultural, psychological, and socio-political conversations. Additional highlights include a provocative new exhibit, Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World, on pg. 80, which spotlights some of the world’s most notorious con artists; The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring “In Pieces,” on pg. 96, which combines unique LEGO® brick sculptures with modern photography techniques in what can only be described as a purely delightful, one-ofa-kind experience; and in an exclusive On View Interview, on pg. 124, exhibition designer, educator and artist, Rod Faulds, provides behind-the-scenes insight into the makings of great exhibition design. Finally, we want to remind all those with young budding artists at home to take advantage of the summer art camps at your local museums and art centers. Creativity is a terrible thing to waste! the spring season

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

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You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. There are thousands of teens in foster care who would love to see you waiting for them. 1-888-200-4005 • adoptuskids.org


MUSE

Museum to Scale1/7 On view through 07.06.14 at

T H E B A K E R M U S E U M , A rt i s – N a p l e s h t t p : / / a r t i s n a p l e s . o rg

M

USEUM to Scale 1/7 is a project initiated by renowned Belgian art collector and scholar, Ronny Van de Velde, developed by the artist, Wesley Meuris, and organized by The Baker Museum. Consisting of a collection of close to 70 diorama museum galleries devoted to Belgian artists and art movements, the installation recalls the 17th, 18th and 19th century Wunderkammern (the cabinets of curiosities/wonder), Opposite: Frank Maieu, L’Art belge, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, ten different terracotta sculptures, painted. Courtesy Ronny Van de Velde.


Inspired by the concept of the Wunderkammern and Marcel Duchamp’s Boîte-en-valise, this installation makes the “museum” both the subject and the object of focus. OnV

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and was conceived as homage to Marcel Duchamp and his Boîte-en-valise, and to J.J. Grandville’s illustrations for Gulliver’s Travels, the famous novel in which scale assumes an important role. In accordance with a firmly established postmodern tradition, the “museum” is at the same time the subject and object of an intervention that operates as a mise en abyme—

Above (top to bottom): Boy En Eric Stappaerts, Conflict paintings on Conflict painting, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, metal construction with enamel paint, polished and with 10 small conflict paintings; Paul Van Hoeydonck, Space Museum, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, twelve planetscapes, Fallen Astronaut (sculpture, 1971). Courtesy Ronny Van de Velde.

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that is, the representation of an object using the object itself as a frame of reference. As the exhibition title suggests, the installations are scaled down to a 1:7 ratio, with each diorama coming in at just over three feet long. (If blown up to 1:1, these galleries would be roughly 22 x 15 x 13 feet.) Each is depicted as an art gallery, complete with lighting, ceiling and flooring, mini benches

Above (top to bottom): Koen Vanmechelen, In-Vetro-C.C.P., 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, neon, with three photographs, polyamide, silver and glass Lambda print on glass; Stefaan Van Akoleyen, Cave drawings of a tree, 2013, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, canvas tape and aluminum tape. Courtesy Ronny Van de Velde.

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and meticulously curated art, perfectly arranged. Museum to Scale features thematic and historical ensembles devoted to symbolism, surrealism, photography, the Cobra movement, abstract and minimal art, and then progresses to a section in which Belgian contemporary artists have each decorated a room in their own original way. The historical galleries include works by artists such as RenĂŠ Magritte (1898-1967), Felix De Boeck (1898-1995), and Marcel Broodthaers (1924-1976). Among the contemporary artists represented are Jan De Cock, Pierre Alechinsky, Koen Van Mechelen, Ann Veronica Janssens, Angel Vergara, Johan Muyle, Luc Deleu, Luc Tuymans, and many more. A website augments the visitor experience by integrating an interactive component. Visitors can select their favorite museum galleries by scanning the QR

Above (top to bottom): Geoffrey De Beer, La reproduction Interdite, 2013, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, mixed media; Lieven De Boeck, Let us be us, 2012, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, neon sign and mirror; Opposite (top to bottom): Rinus Van De Velde, Dear, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, wall drawings and texts; Jan Vanriet, Ceremonie, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, three oil paintings and one drawing by Erich Heckel (1883-1970). Courtesy of Ronny Van de Velde

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codes on the object labels with a smartphone. This selection is then sent to the website, www.museumtoscale.com, and is registered there. The individual viewing behavior is tracked by the platform of the website and thus the visitor becomes a curator. In doing so, he or she creates his or her own ‘ideal’ exhibition. Museum to scale 1/7 is also accompanied by a catalogue. O n V iew

Above (top to bottom): René Magritte, Marcel Mariën, Leo Dohmen, Paul Magritte, Geert Van Bruaene. Museum of Belgian Surrealism, 1929-1950, 2 Drawings, 2 collages and 7 photographs, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm; Nick Ervinck, Sumnim, 2012, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, mixed media. Courtesy of Ronny Van de Velde.

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This page (clockwise from top): Koen Theys, Tout le monde NapolĂŠon, 2013, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, video installation on large screen with scale-model Napoleons; Xavier Mellery, Salle Symbolisme, 1890, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, eight drawings; Tamara Van San, Big Red Lobster, 2013, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, sculpture. Courtesy of Ronny Van de Velde.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

rary Art of Central Asia Boca Museum of Art

AVON PARK Thru 05.02.14

Florida’s Ancient Islands SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture

www.bocamuseum.org

www.mofac.org

A group exhibition featuring artists who have been working in the Lake Wales Ridge area is presented. Artists include Maija Baines, Reed Bowman, Mollie Doctrow, Cathy Futral, Tom Freeman, Anne Malatesta, Allen McPherson, and David Price.

Thru 05.02.14

Wild and Places Between: Dennis Aufiery SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture www.mofac.org

For painter Dennis Aufiery, social and cultural issues, identity, and the individ-

Traveling for the first time to museums in North America, Afghan Rugs: The Contemporary Art of Central Asia features ual human condition over 40 exquisitely are all subjects mixed woven works of art in his work. These designed with thorconcepts flow conoughly untraditional currently with ideas motifs. about color and form. 05.03.14–07.27.14 BOCA RATON 05.03.14–07.27.14

Afghan Rugs: The Contempo-

Elaine Reichek: The Eye of the Needle Boca Museum of Art

Image from Florida’s Ancient Islands at SFSC Museum of Florida Art and Culture, Avon Park: Anne Malatesta, After Death

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Boca Raton continued...

www.bocamuseum.org

Thru 04.23.14

The Boca Museum of Art presents an elegant exhibition of knitted and embroidered works with a conceptual twist by Elaine Reichek. (See story on pg. 138.)

Pop Culture: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation Boca Museum of Art

Thru 04.13.14

Fascination: The Love Affair Between French and Japanese Printmaking Boca Museum of Art

www.bocamuseum.org

The works on view demonstrate conceptions of Pop art as they emerged in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as the ways that contemporary artists today have extended

and elaborated upon visual representations of mass culture and consumerism. CORAL GABLES Thru 05.31.14

Art in the Garden: Hugo França Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Hugo França’s work is showcased in the

2013-2014 season of Design at Fairchild, part of the annual Art at Fairchild exhibitions held in the Garden. Based in Brazil, França uses all natural materials to create functional and sustainable design pieces, often tables and seating. Each piece uses reclaimed wood from felled, burned or dead trees found in Brazil. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 92.)

www.bocamuseum.org

Thru 04.27.14

Drawing on the Museum’s collection of French lithographs and Japanese colored woodblock prints, Fascination is a study of the impacts that the “cult of Japan” had on late 19th century French printmaking.

ArtLab @ The Lowe: From Ancient Art to Modern Molas: Recurring Themes in Indigenous Panamá Lowe Art Museum,

Image from Elaine Reichek: The Eye of the Needle at Boca Museum of Art, Boca Raton: Elaine Reichek, Painted Blackfoot, 1990, knitted wool yarn and oil on gelatin silver print, 79 x 73”, courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery, New York

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Coral Gables continued...

stallations. (See story on pg. 136.)

University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

From ancient ceramics to contemporary paintings, this exhibition focuses on the art of Panama. Thru 07.13.14

Terrestrial Paradises: Imagery from The Voyages of Captain James Cook Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Included in this historical exhibit are engravings featuring imagery from Cook’s voyages to the Pacific Islands and South America from 1768-1779.

05.31.14–08.23.14

Pablo Cano Coral Springs Museum of Art www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Pablo Cano’s primary work today continues to center around the marionettes that he fashions from found objects, and the which evoke emoperformance pieces CORAL tions reminiscent of he composes to showSPRINGS childhood innocence. case these protagoThru 05.17.14 nists. Cano employs Craig Carlisle: Thru 05.17.14 numerous art forms in Big Heads & The Henning Haupt: his work including oil Peaceful Valley Drawing Lines– and watercolor paintPaintings Making Space ing, fine drawing, Coral Springs Coral Springs charcoal and ceramic Museum of Art Museum of Art sculpture, and is acwww.coralspringsmuseum.org www.coralspringsmuseum.org complished in each of Infused with serene Henning Haupt’s these areas. happiness and optiwork explores spatial mism, Craig Carlqualities within draw- Thru 05.02.14 isle’s paintings articu- ings, paintings and Scott Draves: late indelible images three-dimensional in- Electric Sheep

Image from Henning Haupt: Drawing Lines–Making Space at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Henning Haupt, 18349 White between Chinacridone (detail), 2013, 58 x 38”, oil on canvas

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Coral Springs continued...

urban life in expressionist images drawn www.coralspringsmuseum.org from his own experiScott Draves is a ences as a musician, software artist and performer, and artist. inventor who created the original Flame Thru 05.17.14 algorithm in 1991, the Sylvia Tarshis: Bomb visual-musical Florals instrument in 1995 Coral Springs and the Electric Sheep Museum of Art in 1999. Draves’ www.coralspringsmuseum.org software artworks Sylvia Tarshis has are released as open been described as a source and have been “romantic poet with used for two decades a paint brush.” This by many other artists and designers in their own work. Coral Springs Museum of Art

exhibition features her beautiful floral compositions painted in oil on canvas. DAYTONA BEACH

of preview exhibits for the new Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, this exhibit focuses on the different ways artists represented America’s oldest city.

Thru fall 2014

Images of Historic St. Augustine Museum of Arts & Sciences

Olympus BioScapes Museum of Arts & Sciences

www.moas.org

www.moas.org

The second in a series

Olympus BioScapes honors the world’s most exciting, beautiful and significant life science images, as captured through light microscopes. These fascinating photos tell important stories that shed light on the living universe, showing the intimate structures and dynamic processes of life in ways we cannot ordinarily see.

Thru mid-May 2014

05.31.14–08.23.14

Stewart Nachimas Coral Springs Museum of Art www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Stewart Nachimas creates cast paper woodcuts that celebrate the energy of Image from Sylvia Tarshis at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Sylvia Tarshis, Untitled (Florals)

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Daytona Beach continued...

nia’s Central Valley, a region known for its agricultural plenty— and the marginalization of its people.

Thru 05.25.14

El ojo fino (The Exquisite Eye) Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

El ojo fino / The Exquisite Eye features the photography of great women photographers of Mexico, including works by Lola Álvarez Bravo, Kati Horna, Mariana Yampolsky, Graciela Iturbide, Flor Garduño, Yolanda Andrade, Alicia Ahumada, Ángeles Torrejón, and Maya Goded. Thru 05.25.14

Mujeres Mexicana (Mexican Women Photographers) Southeast Museum of

D e LAND 04.01.14–04.30.14

Bunnies of Hunt Slonem Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

Photography www.smponline.org

This exhibition presents photographs by six of the most prominent female photographers associated with Mexico. Thru 04.20.14

Valley of Shadows and

Dreams: Ken and Melanie Light Southeast Museum of Photography

Expressionistic oil paintings of rabbits by world renowned contemporary artist, Hunt Slonem, will adorn the atrium of the Museum of Art–DeLand for the month of April.

www.smponline.org

05.23.14–08.24.14

Valley of Shadows and Dreams is the result of a five-year photographic and literary exploration of Califor-

Collectors Choice: Drawings from the Samuel Blatt Collection

Image from Bunnies of Hunt Slonem at Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida: Hunt Slonem, Chinensis Rabbit 5, 2012, oil on canvas

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DeLand continued...

Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

Samual Blatt’s collection features outstanding European drawings in a variety of mediums from the mid-19th to the early 20th century. Artists such as Picasso, Matisse, and Vuillard are represented.

retrospective, Cannady’s hot and cold wax paintings, drawings, and sculptures fill the galleries of the Museum of Art-DeLand, Florida. 05.23.14–08.24.14

Karl Zerbe: Works on Paper Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

Thru 05.11.14

Distinguished painter,

Karl Zerbe, was one of the founding members of the abstract expressionism movement.This exhibit features experimental collages and mixed media works primarily from the late 1960s, but also from the 1940s.

Totems Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

Artist-photographer, Stephen Althouse, utilizes the language of still life to highlight antique tools and fabricated objects into cryptic 05.30.14–08.05.14 assemblages and then Stephen Althouse: presents them onto Personal large format blackSymbols, Private and-white film.

Jill Cannady: Idea & Medium Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida

05.23.14–08.24.14

Steve Tobin: Steel–Glass–Clay Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida

www.moartdeland.org

One of Florida’s most recognized worldclass artists, Jill Cannady, established Florida as a legitimate contributor to the national arts scene in the ’60s and ’70s. In this

www.moartdeland.org

Monumental steel outdoor sculptures and smaller glass works will be on exhibit and will include a glass installation.

Image from Jill Cannady: Idea & Medium at Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida: Jill Cannady, Sybil Informed, 2010, Encaustic on panel, 30 x 30”

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Japan, such as lacquer writing boxes, ink stones, brushes, elegant papers, and other stationary implements.

DELRAY BEACH 06.03.14–08.31.14

From a Quiet Place: The Paper Sculptures of Kyoko Hazama Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

06.03.14–08.31.14

www.morikami.org

www.morikami.org

Thru 05.18.14

Featured in this exhibit are Kyoko Hazama’s magnificent paper sculptures—delicate, intricately detailed, and highly personal paper sculptures that she describes as “symbolic self-portraits.”

The Tale of Genji, the first novel in the world, was written over 1,000 years ago by the Japanese court lady, Murasaki Shikibu. Shikibu’s epic novel was a popular source of inspiration for woodblock print and illustrated book artists in the 19th century. This exhibition features over 50 such woodblock prints and books depicting the scenes from Shikibu’s masterpiece.

Keeping in Touch: The Culture of Letter-Writing in Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Thru 05.18.14

Genji’s World in Japanese Woodblock Prints Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

www.morikami.org

This exhibition presents a variety of letter-writing forms from poems to postcards, and explores the myriad art forms that letter-writing brought about in

Samurai Culture: Treasures of South Florida Collections Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

An array of samurai suits of armor and weapons fashioned during the Edo period (1600–1868), and a variety of paintings and prints depicting samurai life made during both the Edoand Meiji period (1868–1912) will be on display.

Image from Genji’s World in Japanese Woodblock Prints at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach: Utagawa Kunisada, “Five” (Go), from His Figure: Related Copies of Other Pictures (Sono sugata yukari no utsushi-e), 1850, ink on paper, horizontal oban, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, gift of Paulette and Jack Lantz

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DUNEDIN 05.30.14–08.17.14

In a Dark Time, the Eye Begins to See… Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

DFAC presents a juried all-media exhibit by artists visually interpreting a single line from a poem of their choosing.

and Civil Rights Era Photography Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

05.30.14–08.17.14

Word UP Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Word UP is an audio/ visual celebration of www.moafl.org the WORD in contem- This exhibition porary art-making. commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights FORT Act of 1964 by preLAUDERDALE senting approximately Thru 05.17.14 100 photographs, The Movement: both black-and-white Bob Adelman and in color, by

05.30.14–08.17.14

The Poetics of Space Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Artists examine the poetics of space, those intimate spaces—attics, basements, forests, nests­—that we seek and create, where daydreaming is possible.

world-renowned photojournalist and South Florida resident, Bob Adelman. Thru 05.18.14

Spirit of CoBrA Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Spirit of Cobra focuses on the unique meeting of a group of young artists from several European countries from 1948 to 1951, brought together by a desire to start over after the war and an interest in the legacy of the prewar avantgardes, especially Surrealism. Thru 06.01.14

William Glackens

Image from Bob Adelman: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement at Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Bob Adelman, Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King, Selma to Montgomery March, 1965, © Bob Adelman

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Moonrise, Hernandez, NM Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

William Glackens’ oeuvre is examined through more than 85 of the most important paintings and works on paper by this pivotal figure in the history of American art. Several works will be on view to the public for the first time since 1966. Thru 05.17.14

Zachary Fabri: Forget me not, as my tether is clipped. Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Zachary Fabri’s videos are scattered

Inaugurating the Harn’s “Masterpiece Series,”Ansel Adams: Moonrise, Hernandez, NM features three examples of Adams’ throughout the muse- Southwest masterpiece plus a um as stepping stones Florida Museum facsimile of the negafor the viewer’s of History tive and video—each passage through time www.swflmuseumofhistory.com a unique example of and space. Fabri This award-winning the photographer’s explores the movetraveling exhibit, com- interpretation of the ment and politics of prised of 84 rare phonegative. the body and uses tographs, documents humor as a subverthe Beatles’ first televi- Thru 07.27.14 sive tool that entices sion performances and Cosmopolitan: viewers to engage concert tour in North Envisioning his work. America in 1964, Global marking the launch of Communities the British Invasion. Harn Museum FORT MYERS

of Art

Thru 04.26.14

The Beatles! Backstage and Behind the Scenes

GAINESVILLE Thru 06.08.14

Ansel Adams:

www.harn.ufl.edu

Artists from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the US work at the inter-

Image from Zachary Fabri: Forget me not, as my tether is clipped. at the Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Zachary Fabri, still from Forget me not, as my tether is clipped., 2012, 16 mm transferred to video, 14:50 min, courtesy of the artist

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section of ethics and aesthetics, affirming notions of individual difference and communal coexistence. Thru 05.04.14

Getting to Know Europe: A Study in Gender Roles, He, She, Me Harn Museum of Art

Art and literature featuring the Tokaido Road were immensely popular in Japan and inspired an American culture of virtual tourism. In particular, woodblock prints in the ukiyo-e tradition functioned as visual memorabilia depicting travel-related scenes along the road.

www.harn.ufl.edu

This presentation is part of a project that invites a reflection on a wide range of femininities and masculinities in contemporary Europe.

Thru 06.08.14

Private Dramas, Public Dreams: The Street Photographs

of Helen Levitt & Friends Harn Museum of Art

Thru 09.14.14

www.harn.ufl.edu

Vintage photographs by the acclaimed street photographer and filmmaker, Helen Levitt, are presented in this exhibition along with WPA graphic prints from the Harn Collection, and photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, and Walter Rosenblum.

04.29.14–08.17.14

Life is a Highway: Prints of Japan’s Tokaido Road Harn Museum of Art

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

String of Pearls offers a glimpse into the richness of painting from different regions of India and surrounding areas during the 17th to 19th centuries. Thru 07.06.14

The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps by Karen Glaser Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition of 38 large, color photographs by landscape photographer, Karen Glaser, is made “inside” Florida’s springs

www.harn.ufl.edu

Image from The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps by Karen Glaser at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Karen Glaser, Edge of Orange Grove Sink, 2006, courtesy of the artist

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and swamps, providing a unique and personal interpretation of these distinctive environments.

www.artandculturecenter.org

Juan Erman Gonzalez presents a mixedmedia installation consisting of a variety of works continuing his thematic concentration of migration, transculturism, exile, and displacement.

HOLLYWOOD Thru 05.25.14

Agustina Woodgate: Rugs Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

06.07.14–08.17.14

www.artandculturecenter.org

Miami based painter and sculptor, Johnny Robles, presents a www.artandculturecenter.org new body of work that Agustina Woodgate’s www.artandculturecenter.org repurposes familiar hand-sewn rugs are A selection of imobjects that now ocmade from recycled ages by award-winning cupy a nostalgic yet stuffed animal skins. photographer, Allen mystifying space in Woodgate is parBenowitz, includes the memories of adults ticularly drawn to the landscape, wildlife, to trigger poignant specific meanings in people, adventure emotional responses. the arrangement of rug travel, and architecture. designs and how difThru 05.25.14 ferent histories of the Thru 05.25.14 Juan Erman rug represent stories Johnny Robles: Gonzalez: Over of the past and ways Recreation My Rainbow of tracing archetypes Art and Art and in physical and mate- Culture Center Culture Center rial forms. of Hollywood of Hollywood Allen Benowitz Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

06.07.14–08.17.14

Robert Adanto Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

In his latest documentary, City of Memory (2013), Robert Adanto offers the stories of several New Orleansbased visual artists whose works explore life post-Hurricane Katrina. 06.07.14–08.17.14

Rod Faulds Art and

Image from Agustina Woodgate: Rugs at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Agustina Woodgate, Milky Ways , 2013, stuffed animal skins, 18 x 11’

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Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Rod Faulds’ photobased artworks present and blend photographic images into repeated patterns of light and color. Faulds interest and work in curating and designing exhibitions has provided a framework that has supported the development of this cohesive body of work. ​(See story on pg. 124.)

objects found in the Salvadoran landscape such as the typical beach sandals known as “yinas” or “chancletas.” The resulting pieces are formal studies of material, texture, form, color, and composition. 06.07.14–08.17.14

The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring “In Pieces” Art and Culture Center

of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Nathan Sawaya builds his awe-inspiring art out of toy building blocks...LEGO® bricks to be exact. In Pieces is a multimedia collaboration between Sawaya and photographer, Dean West. The project features a series of tableau compositions that have been constructed by combining West’s modern photography techniques and Sawa-

ya’s unique sculptures. (See story on pg. 96.) JACKSONVILLE Thru 05.11.14

Observing Objects: Works by Leigh Murphy Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Leigh Murphy creates expressive watercolor works with meticulous detail, rich brilliant color, and varied textures.

Thru 05.25.14

Toni Mena: Accumulations Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

04.09.14–07.06.14

Project Atrium: One Spark Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

www.artandculturecenter.org

In his Accumulations series, Toni Mena transforms the most common day-to-day

www.mocajacksonville.org

A well-known regional artist has worked in secret to complete this

Image from The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring “In Pieces” at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Dress (sculpture) from In Pieces, 2012,

by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photo courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

spring Project Atrium installation, which will be revealed during downtown Jacksonville’s One Spark crowdfunding festival, April 9-13 (www. beonespark.com/calendar) and will compete with other creator entries! 04.26.14–08.24.14

The New York Times Magazine Photographs Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

From pottery to porcelain to paintings and beyond—this exhibit showcases wonderful objects from the collections of individuals in the Jacksonville area. made this magazine the leading venue for photographic storytelling within contemporary news media. (See story on pg. 134.)

www.mocajacksonville.org

Thru 11.02.14

In this exhibition, focusing primarily on the past fifteen years, long-time New York Times Magazine photo editor, Kathy Ryan, provides a behindthe-scenes look at the collaborative, creative processes that have

A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

The Cummer commemorates the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement with an exhibition of photographs from the period, borrowed from the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. 05.17.14–09.14.14

Collector’s Choice: Inside the Hearts and Minds of Regional Collectors

Thru 04.27.14

One Family: Photographs by Vardi Kahana The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This is the story of one family. It is the entire Jewish-Israeli narrative embodied in a single family. To the big question of Jewish-Israeli identity, the photographs of Vardi Kahana’s fam-

Image from The New York Times Magazine Photographs at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Roger Ballen, Resemblance (detail), from “The Selma Blair Witch Project: Fall’s Dark Silhouettes Have a Way of Creeping Up on You,” published October 30, 2005, courtesy the artist and Gagosian Gallery

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

ily provide a kaleidoscope of answers. Thru 05.25.14

Our Shared Past The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Our Shared Past came about when guest curator, Jefree Shalev, rediscovered a box of 8-mm home movies from 1957 through 1968. Selecting 200 single frames from these movies, he then invited 32 local artists to create a new work of art, inspired by these moments.

& Gardens www.cummer.org

Enzo Torcoletti is an innovative young sculptor with traditional ethics of workmanship. Because he is involved in the entire sculpture sequence from conception to exhibition, each finished piece, crafted from stone, wood, or other materials, is truly his own creation.

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition highlights the works of William Walmsley, an impressive printmaker who holds the record for the longest series of prints in the history of art. He is also the inventor of florescent lithography. LAKELAND

Thru 05.04.14

The Prints of William Walmsley

Thru 06.07.14

Site Specifics:

Thru 09.30.14

The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti The Cummer Museum of Art

Installations by Dan Gunderson & Barbara Sorensen Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Working collaboratively, these two artists have transformed the museum with their site-specific installations. Having spent 30 years almost exclusively in ceramics, Gunderson’s current works visually express his observation of pop culture. Sorensen is best known for her monumental sculptural installations that draw on geological formations and classical elements. (See story in the January/March issue on pg. 8.) 06.21.14–09.13.14

Terra Incognita:

Image from Site Specifics: Installations by Dan Gunderson & Barbara Sorensen at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Dan Gunderson, Brush With Death, 2006

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depth as a visual art form.

Photographs of America’s Third Coast Polk Museum of Art

Thru 05.25.14

Film Stories Art & History Museums, Maitland

www.polkmuseumofart.org

On loan from the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans, this exhibition is a photographic project of 15 years’ duration (1991-2006) by nationally recognized photographer and author, Richard Sexton.

www.artandhistory.org

work, their inherent meanings are widely varied. MAITLAND

04.25.14–05.25.14

06.06.14–08.10.14

Battlefield Art & History Museums, Maitland

Thru 04.19.14

What’s In a Gesture? Polk Museum of Art

The paintings in this exhibition emphasize gesture. Although they are characterized by a similar technique of animated brush-

Camera Works Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

www.artandhistory.org

www.polkmuseumofart.org

broad range of powerful artworks by contemporary artists working today.

This thought-provoking exhibition brings together works by J. André Smith and his experience as an artist sent to the front lines, in contrast to a

A selection of photography works from the A&H permanent collection, Camera Works showcases diverse highlights emphasizing the medium’s

Image from Moving Pictures at Art & History Museums, Maitland: Joyce Ely-Walker, Top Speed, oil on wood

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Artist, Nancy Cervenka, takes a lifelong passion working with movie film to new heights with sculptures that honor the disappearing medium. Cervenka manipulates long strands of coiled celluloid into one-of-a-kind twisting objects of beauty, giving new life and meaning to the movie clips. Thru 04.20.14

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www.artandhistory.org

Thru 05.11.14

Moving Pictures is a collection of watercolor studies and digital images captured while artist, Joyce Ely-Walker, traveled across the country by train.

Langdon Kihn: An American Story Foosaner Art Museum

MELBOURNE 05.17.14–08.17.14

Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity Foosaner Art Museum

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

This collection includes never-beforeexhibited portraits, landscapes, and drawings as well as Native American artifacts given to Kihn by the peoples he depicted. 05.24.14–08.23.14

Florida in

Fabric II, Wish You Were Here! The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

Thru 04.26.14

http://textiles.fit.edu

Florida in Fabric II promotes an appreciation of quilt making as an art form. Art accepted for this exhibition exemplifies innovation in quilting and surface design techniques as well as excellence in artistic composition and craftsmanship.

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Tying the Knot: Global Wedding Costume and Ritual The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts http://textiles.fit.edu

Tying the Knot features wedding ensembles and accessories from Asia, Africa, Europe and North America, and showcases the varying customs, textiles, and fashion associated with marriage around the world. MIAMI

American artists of African, Arab European, Asian, Latino, and Native American descent explore their heritage in this vivid and diverse exhibition using a wide variety of media.

Thru 04.19.14

Greetings from Miami ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

DosJotas is ArtCenter’s third visiting art-

Image from Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity at Foosaner Art Museum, Melbourne: Sungho Choi, Drawing for American Pie, 1996, mixed media, paper, courtesy of the artist, photo: D. James Dee

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ist from Spain through its partnership with Accion Cultural Espanola. During his residency in Miami, he has been meeting and interviewing Miamians from all walks of life—immigrants that range from Cubans to Haitians to New Yorkers. His project culminates in a set of “tourist” postcards Ana Ochoa, Ernesthat represent the “real” to Oroza and George Miami. Sanchez-Calderon. 04.30.14–06.15.14

Thru 04.19.14

Radio Miami ArtCenter/ South Florida

winningART ArtCenter/ South Florida

www.artcentersf.org

www.artcentersf.org

Radio Miami is curated by Rosell Meseguer & Glexis Novoa in collaboration with artists Adler Guerrier, Onajide Shabaka, Patricia Margarita Hernandez, Antoni Miralda, Gean Moreno,

winningART is ArtCenter/South Florida’s annual fundraiser featuring artworks generously donated by resident artists. The works will be on view at ArtCenter’s Richard Shack Gal-

www.bassmuseum.org

lery through April 19, 2014. Ticket holders will have a chance to win art from the exhibit in a drawing on Saturday, April 19, 2014. For information or to purchase tickets, call ArtCenter’s office at 305.674.8278. 04.11.14–08.10.14

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui Bass Museum of Art

This show features over 30 works in metal and wood that transform appropriated objects into site-specific sculptures. Anatsui converts found materials into a new type of media that lies between sculpture and painting, combining aesthetic traditions from his birth country, Ghana; his home in Nsukka, Nigeria; and the global history of abstraction. (See story on pg. 56.) Thru 07.20.14

Vanitas: Fashion and Art Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Vanitas: Fashion and Art examines the theme of vanitas as expressed in avant garde

Image from Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: El Anatsui, Ozone Layer, 2010, aluminum and copper wire, 158 x 197”, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum

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ready-to-wear and haute couture, as well as in contemporary paintings, sculptures, industrial design, and new media. Thru 08.24.14

work and environVideo Container: Virginia Overton: ment. Thru 04.16.14

04.18.14–07.06.14

Museum as Method Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Flat Rock Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.mocanomi.org

Marking Virginia Overton’s first solo exhibition at an American museum, Flat Rock features both works from the artist’s studio and commissioned sculpture compiled with objects sourced in the area around the exhibition site to reframe the relationship between

The video works featured in this presentation will rotate each day to address various questions, ranging http://jmof.fiu.edu from the changing This unprecedented relationship between exhibition of iconic artists and institutions Hollywood film postin post-war society to ers from 1939-1949 the role of the artist illustrates how the as interpreted through motion picture industry media. countered America’s isolationism, advocated going to war against the Nazis, influenced post-war perceptions of the Jewish people and the founding of the State of Israel, and shaped the face of contemporary Jewish life. Cinema Judaica: The War Years, 1939–1949 Jewish Museum of Florida

www.mocanomi.org

04.18.14–07.06.14

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

This first major solo museum exhibition for Wangechi Mutu includes her collages, drawings, installations, sculptures, performances, and videos. Combining found materials and magazine cutouts with sculpture and painted imagery, Mutu’s work references African traditions, international politics, the fashion industry, and science fiction. (See story on pg. 68.)

Image from Virginia Overton: Flat Rock at Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Virginia Overton, Untitled (color), 2011, lightbox construction, acrylic and inkjet print on paper, 35-5/8 by 23-5/8 by 6-3/16”, courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash

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Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 05.25.14

A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

PAMM presents an extensive selection of works from the collection of Ruth and Marvin Sackner, including rare manuscripts and published works by international luminaries such as Augusto and Haroldo de Campos, Oyvind Fahlström, and Eugen Gomringer.

www.pamm.org

This exhibition presents a varied selection of photographs drawn from PAMM’s permanent collection, with a particular emphasis on the Cowles www.pamm.org Pérez Art Collection, a gift of Caribbean: Crossroads Museum Miami more than one hunof the World features a www.pamm.org dred iconic works of range of diverse media Edouard Duval-Carrié the 20th century, indepicting images of presents a series of cluding photographs and about the region. large-scale paintings by Edward Steichen, Artists who have lived and sculptures, execut- Andy Warhol, and and worked in the ed entirely in black and Rineke Dijkstra. Caribbean, as well as silver glitter, depicting artists living abroad lush tropical scenes Thru 05.25.14 who responded to the that reference specific Project Gallery: rich visual tradition and 19th century paintings Hew Locke history of the area are executed in the Carib- Pérez Art shown side-by-side. bean and Florida. Museum Miami

04.18.14–08.17.14

www.pamm.org

Caribbean: Crossroads of the World Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 08.31.14

Thru 07.27.14

Edouard Duval-Carrié: Imagined Landscapes

Image Search: Photography from the Collection

For Those in Peril on the Sea (2011) is an installation by Hew Locke that consists of dozens of scaled-

Image from Edouard Duval-Carrié: Imagined Landscapes at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Edouard Duval-Carrié, After Bierstad–The Landing of Columbus, 2013, mixed media on aluminum, 96 x 144”, courtesy of the artist. Photo: Ralph Torres

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down replicas of ships suspended from the ceiling, creating the impression of a massive exodus taking place throughout the architectural space above the viewer—a powerful initial experience for visitors to the new PAMM. 06.19.14–01.18.15

Project Gallery: Leonor Antunes Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Berlin-based artist, Leonor Antunes, will be producing a new, large-scale installation for the Project Gallery. The artist will be visiting Miami several times to research the architecture and design history of the city, which will influence

the production of her installation. Thru 09.28.14

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Monika Sosnowska is best known for large, site-specific sculptures made of steel, concrete, and other industrial materials. Though usually abstract, much of her work draws from the

distinctive built environment of Warsaw, with its defunct or re-purposed Sovietera buildings, its vast industrial zones, and its reconstructions of historic neighborhoods destroyed during World War II. 05.06.14–09.14.14

traditional IndoPersian imagery and techniques with the language of contemporary art. For this exhibition, the artist will present The Last Post (2010), a video animation with sound that addresses the complex relationship between East and West.

Project Gallery: Shahzia Sikander Pérez Art 04.18.14–07.20.14 Museum Miami Project Gallery: www.pamm.org Simon Starling Shahzia Sikander’s Pérez Art work combines Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Simon Starling presents Inverted Retrograde Theme, USA (House for a Songbird), a large-scale installation from 2002 that traces the paradoxes of modernist architecture in the Caribbean.

Image from Project Gallery: Simon Starling at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Simon Starling, Inverted Retrograde Theme, USA (House for a Song Bird), 2002, Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, courtesy of Dennis and Debra Scholl, © Simon Starling / courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York

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European works that date from the 16th to the 19th century, and through the confrontation with artworks by Caribbean artists, this exhibit places in interrelation the expression of two distinct artistic universes that are culturally and historically linked.

Thru 04.20.14

Project Gallery: Yael Bartana Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Among the most celebrated artists of her generation, Yael Bartana’s video work, both documentary and staged, explores social phenomena that illuminate the complexity of contemporary life, particularly within her native country of Israel. Thru 04.20.14

Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

More than 150 pho-

Thru 04.13.14

tographs depict a tumultuous history of the world in the most comprehensive exhibition of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs ever assembled. (See story in the January/ March 2014 issue on pg. 136.)

06.18.14–08.24.14

European & Caribbean Masters: Another History of Caribbean Art The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Through a number of

Karina Chechik: Architectures of Light The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Argentine artist, Karina Chechik, presents an exhibit based on architectural settings with religious and cultural references which combine different artistic currents, beliefs, and temporalities.

Image from Karina Chechik: Architectures of Light at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Karina Chechik, Architectures of light, Venaria Reale Palace Turin, acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 38 x 51”

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04.23.14–08.03.14

Monika Weiss: Sustenazo (Lament II) The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

By enacting ancient gestures of lamentation, Monika Weiss’s video, Sustenazo (Lament II), considers contemporary contexts of apathy, indifference, invisibility, and historical amnesia within the public forum.

Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art, explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. (See story on pg. 112.) 05.07.14–06.29.14

Philippe Dodard: Tradition The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Philippe Dodard’s work is unique and powerful, expressive and bold, and his use of ink, paint and metal is celebrated throughout Haiti’s artistic community. 06.18.14–08.24.14

School of Night: Arturo Rodríguez The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

tures works on paper by Arturo Rodríguez. The drawings are inspired by the personal experience of the artist, who feels that between mid-night and dawn, his surroundings acquire different dimensions. Thru 05.18.14

Echoes and Origins: Italian Interwar Design The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

School of Night fea-

04.02.14–06.22.14

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.wolfsonian.org

Echoes and Origins is part of Rebirth of Rome, a series of exhibitions highlighting Italian art and design from the interwar period.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This exhibition, drawn from the

Image from Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Emilio Sánchez, Untitled, Bronx Storefront “La Rumba Supermarket,” late 1980s, watercolor on paper, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of the Emilio Sánchez Foundation, © Emilio Sánchez Foundation

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honoring the founding members of the Naples Art Association. The exhibition features recent work in all media by NAA members.

06.28.14–09.28.14

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

This presentation is the first major exploration of theater and industrial designer, Norman Bel Geddes, who The New York Times dubbed “the Leonardo da Vinci of the 20th century.”

Thru 04.26.14

cuses on Antonio Giuseppe Santagata’s large-scale studies for mural paintings created in the 1920s and 1930s, commemorating and celebrating Italian soldiers in the first World War.

that cultivated the perception of a storied Italian nation rooted in a mythologized past. NAPLES 06.09.14–07.25.14

www.naplesart.org

The Birth of Rome The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

50th Founders Juried Awards Exhibition Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

www.wolfsonian.org

www.naplesart.org

The Birth of Rome presents modern architectural and urban planning projects

The Naples Art Associations Founders Exhibitions are a long-held tradition

The exquisite beauty and depth of Clyde Butcher’s black-andwhite photographs draw the viewer into a relationship with nature. Niki Butcher’s hand-painted photographs bring another dimension to blackand-white photography and present a

Thru 05.18.14 Thru 05.18.14

Rendering War: The Murals of A. G. Santagata The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Rendering War fo-

Clyde and Niki Butcher: Celebrating 50 Years Together Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

Image from I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America at The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami Beach: A car from Normal Bel Geddes’ “Futurama” exhibit at the 1939-’40 New York World’s Fair

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unique view of the magnificent as well as the jocular side of life. This is a rare opportunity for gallery visitors to see their work displayed together. 05.03.14–05.31.14

Members’ Gallery: My Favorite Things Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

This juried exhibition features allmedia artwork by current members of the Naples Art Association.

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Giovannia Lunardi has been a professional photographer for 50 years and worked for many fashion magazines, including Vogue, Elle and Amica. The Sweet Life features a large selection of his black-and-white photographs highlighting Italian style and culture.

Thru 04.27.14

Thru 07.06.14

Florida Contemporary The Baker Museum

Museum to Scale 1/7 The Baker Museum

www.artisnaples.org

www.artisnaples.org

From realism to abstraction, and everything in between, Florida Contemporary features local photographers, painters, sculptors, and graphic artists who have spent a lifetime at their craft, alongside an exciting array of new artists that visitors can discover for themselves.

This installation, featuring nearly 70 dioramas devoted to current Belgian artists and art movements, recalls the Wunderkammern or “cabinets of curiosities and wonder” dating from the 17th century. (See story on pg. 8.) Thru 05.18.14

Rediscovering Egypt: The Collection of the Dahesh Museum of Art The Baker Museum

05.03.14–05.23.14

The Sweet Life: Photography by Giovanni Lunardi

www.artisnaples.org

Rediscovering Egypt combines original

Image from Museum to Scale 1/7 at The Baker Museum, Naples: Boy En Eric Stappaerts, Conflict paintings on Conflict painting, 2011, 1000 x 650 x 600 mm, metal construction with enamel paint, polished and with 10 small conflict paintings, courtesy Ronny Van de Velde

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engravings from the Description de l’Egypte—considered the seminal work of modern Egyptology—with orientalist works from the collection of the Dahesh Museum of Art of New York City.

are made from license plates, and piano and bicycle parts. Thru 05.11.14

[In]justice: Art and Atrocity in the 20th Century Appleton Museum of Art

and cultural narrative.

04.19.14–07.06.14

The Coast & the Sea: Marine and Maritime Art in America The Baker Museum www.artisnaples.org

This exhibition includes over 50 paintings from 1750 to 1904, a selection of decorative arts with maritime themes, and artifacts and tools. It offers audiences a rich trove of maritime works set in a meaningful historical

tions of the Appleton Museum of Art and Mulvane Art Museum. Also on view: The Living Art of Bonsai includes Bonsai from the collections of members of the Marion Bonsai Society.

OCALA Thru 04.13.14

A Celebration of Japan + The Living Art of Bonsai Appleton Museum of Art

Thru 07.06.14

Industrial Nature: Work www.appletonmuseum.org by Michelle A Celebration of Japan Stitzlein features decorative Appleton sword guards, pen & Museum of Art

ink containers, kimonos, and wood block prints from the collec-

www.appletonmuseum.org

[In]justice: Art and Atrocity in the 20th Century features works chosen for their ability to explore elements of the darker side of humanity by 20th century masters such as Leonard Baskin, Leon Golub, Robert Morris and Alison Saar. 04.26.14–06.29.14

New Art of the Loom www.appletonmuseum.org Appleton Michelle Stitzlein’s Museum of Art

large-scale sculptures

www.appletonmuseum.org

Image from Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein at the Appleton Museum of Art: Michelle Stitzlein, Petaled Lecanora, Lichen Series, 2010; Medium: Piano keys, cooking pans, light bulbs, rubber stoppers, bottle caps, light globe, etc.; dimensions: 60”dia. x 12”d

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This exhibit reveals the woven dreams of artists from 18 countries who combine the ancient craft of weaving with artistic expressions of today, resulting in a display of visually captivating and thought-provoking murals. ORLANDO Thru 04.27.14

Chie Fueki: You and I Orlando Museum of Art

Seam Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

The work seen in Stitching the Seam is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and image as manifest in collage on paper. Thru 05.25.14

Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden

Age of Painting from the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Highlighting work from Italy, France, Spain, Flanders, the Netherlands, Germany, and England, this exhibition illustrates how the tremendous changes in religion and science, coupled with the economic

growth that swept Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries, gave way to a period of incredible artistic creation. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 74.) Thru 04.06.14

Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

The evolution of Sante Fe as an art center is explored through this pictorial history of artists, the work they produced, and the prevailing artistic trends that were applied to this Southwestern city’s landscape, customs, and lifestyle.

www.omart.org

Artist, Chie Fueki, interweaves images, patterns, and spatial constructions that make complex, richly colored works. Thru 04.27.14

Isabel Manalo: Stitching the

Image from Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting from the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky at Orlando Museum of Art: Jean Jacques François Lebarbier, Helen and Paris, 1799, oil on canvas, 34 x 40”, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of the Charter Collectors

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04.10.14–05.31.14

PALM BEACH

Sacred Landscapes: The Photography of Kevin Boldenow Pensacola Museum of Art

Thru 04.20.14

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

www.pensacolamuseum.org

www.flaglermuseum.us

Featured objects shed light on four centuries of silver production and use in the United States. Thru 04.23.14

Light in the Desert, Photographs from the Monastery of Christ in the Desert by Tony O’Brien The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

The photographs featured in this exhibit capture the essence and experience of photojournalist Tony O’Brien’s year-long residency at Christ in the Desert Monastery. O’Brien was granted rare access to photograph daily activities and rituals that have been kept in a tradition dating back to the Middle Ages.

PENSACOLA 06.06.14–07.26.14

60th Annual Members’ Show Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacolamuseum.org

Artist and fellow Floridian, Kevin Boldenow, is bringing part of his photography collection to the Pensacola Museum of Art. The exhibition will focus on his blackand-white landscape photography. 05.03.14–08.08.14

The Art of the Brick: LEGO® Brick Sculpture by Nathan Sawaya Pensacola Museum of Art

The Members’ Show continues to delight visitors every year. The exhibit includes a rich and diverse collection of works, from traditional to contemporary, www.pensacolamuseum.org in a variety of media. Nathan Sawaya’s tour-

Image from The Art of the Brick: LEGO® Brick Sculpture by Nathan Sawaya at Pensacola Museum of Art: Grey by Nathan Sawaya, photo courtesy of brickartist.com

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ing exhibition—The Art of the Brick—has entertained and inspired art lovers and enthusiasts in record numbers with works created using LEGO bricks as the sole art medium. (See story on pg. 110.)

www.ringling.org

An astounding group of lithographs illustrate the importance of secondary attractions to the advertising of American traveling circus shows. 05.23.14–08.02.14

Intent to Deceive

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

the century. (See story on pg. 80.)

www.ringling.org

Thru 07.13.14

Several ingenious forgers of the 20th century are profiled in this ground-breaking exhibition representing some of the most infamous scandals of

In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces explores the many ways in which 20th century photographers responded to the rise of the modern metropolis.

SARASOTA Thru 06.02.14

Conserved The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Featuring posters from the Tibbals Collection, this exhibition examines the life of a circus poster.

Thru 05.04.14

R. Luke Dubois— Now The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

06.03.14–09.09.14

Curiosity The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

Among the works featured in this solo exhibition is the

Image from Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: John Myatt, Odalisque, limited edition print, in the style of Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), 2011, courtesy of Washington Green Fine Art & Castle Galleries, United Kingdom, photo: Washington Green Fine Art

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premiere of a new video work created by the artist while in residence at The Ringling, focused on the historical links between the Ringling legacy and the greatest example of collective performance experience—the circus.

6.07.14–09.28.14

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Stanislav Libensky, among many others.

Thru 06.29.14

The Philip and Nancy Kotler Glass Collection The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

This exhibition presents an overview of a recent gift of Studio Glass to The Ringling, and includes works by Nicolas Africano, Silvia Levenson, Peter Hora, and

ST. AUGUSTINE Thru 04.19.14

Celeste Roberge: Ocean Floors Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College www.flagler.edu/crispellert

The convergence of art and marine biology is evidenced in this exhibition of works created by artist, Celeste Roberge.

This is the first US exhibition to focus solely on the new post-Mao generation ST. PETERSBURG of Chinese artists, Thru 07.20.14 who work in a variety Aaron of media and address Siskind’s issues of alienation, Harlem self-definition, cyniDocument cism, and rebellion. Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The photographs by Aaron Siskind included in this exhibition belong to one of the most important visual records of Harlem during the Great Depression.

Thru 05.11.14

New Mexico and the Arts of Enchantment Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The American Southwest is the focus of this exhibition,

Image from My Generation: Young Chinese Artists at Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Liu Di, Animal Regulation Series No. 4, 2010

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featuring art from the Raymond James Financial Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts, and other area collections. A special feature of the exhibition is the breathtaking jewelry of contemporary masters, inspired by traditional forms.

and a selection of Warhol films, including screen tests—and a special film installation providing visitors their “15 minutes of fame.” (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 134.) TALLAHASSEE 05.16.14–07.11.14

Thru 04.27.14

Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

Artists’ League Summer Annual Salon Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

www.mofa.fsu.edu

Oil paintings, acrylic pieces, bronze sculpture, wood figures, jewelry, black-andwhite photography, digital color imagery, pen and ink drawings, watercolors, and pottery are among the many and various pieces featured in this juried exhibition.

www.mofa.fsu.edu

TaWS is an exhibition promoting the art of watercolor in Tallahassee and its surrounding communities in Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. TAMPA

05.16.14–07.03.14

Thru 05.18.14

Tallahassee Tri-State Watercolor Society

David Hilliard: Intimacies Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. explores how Warhol learned from Dalí’s public visibility, and was equally attuned to the images derived from mass culture. The exhibit includes approximately 35 paintings, 20 drawings, 50 photographs

www.fmopa.org

David Hilliard: Intimacies explores the work of the Boston-based photographer, who makes large-format color images of people, interiors, and landscapes.

Image from David Hilliard: Intimacies at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: David Hilliard, Mary Remembering (detail), 2008

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of marine life and the ancient art it inspired.

Thru 05.18.14

Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF Tampa Museum of Art

TARPON SPRINGS

www.tampamuseum.org

05.04.14–08.31.14

Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF features more than 110 original works by an international array of more than 25 former artistsin-residence at this print atelier in Tampa, Florida. The exhibition pairs important works spanning Graphicstudio’s 45-year history with some of its most recent collaborative endeavors. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 110.)

An Arts Legacy: George Inness, Jr. in Tarpon Springs Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

06.07.14 –09.28.14

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists

place in a globalized art world.

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

www.spcollege.edu/museum

This show is co-presented in two venues simultaneously through a unique collaboration with the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg. At times exuberant and at other times ruminating, the exhibition of 27 emerging artists from mainland China provides a cultural exchange and a dialogue about the Chinese artist’s

06.14.14 –11.30.14

Poseidon and the Sea: Myth, Cult and Daily Life Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

With significant pieces from the Tampa Museum of Art’s collection and museums across the world, this exhibition offers a glimpse into the power and timeless beauty

George Inness, one of America’s greatest landscape artists, created some of his most important works in Tarpon Springs between 1890 and his death in 1894. His son, George Inness, Jr., returned to Tarpon Springs and established a winter residence from 1902 until his death in 1926. This exhibition honors their legacy and

Image from Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF at Tampa Museum of Art: Christian Marclay, Allover (Rush, Barbra Streisand, Tina Turner, and Others) (detail), 2008, cyanotype, 51-1/2 x 100”, published by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection, © 2008 Christian Marclay, Graphicstudio, USF. Photo: Will Lytch, courtesy of the Institute for Research in Art/ Graphicstudio, University of South Florida

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includes late paintings by Inness and eleven large-scale religious paintings created by Inness, Jr. Thru 04.20.14

Dominique Labauvie: Sculpture and Design Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

French-born internationally renowned sculptor, Dominique Labauvie, works primarily in forged steel, and creates large-scale sculptures.

Kennington’s paintings engage viewers both intellectually and emotionally. Her series of wood folding screens combines representational illusion with penetrating emotion. 05.24.14–09.07.14

Glass and Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

The permanent col-

lection of the Vero Beach Museum of Art is central to the Museum’s mission and features art from the early 20th century to the present in a broad range of media. This exhibition focuses on the Museum’s holdings of glass and works on paper.

Museum of American Art Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Picturing America represents two hundred years of American art, from colonial times to the mid-20th century, as America came into its own as the cultural capital of the world.

Thru 05.25.14

Picturing America: Signature Works from the Westmoreland

Thru 05.14.14

Stephen Lawson: Images of Time Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Using film cameras that he has mechanically modified, Lawson has created fascinating sectioned panoramas shot over varying periods of time. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 138.)

VERO BEACH Thru 05.04.14

Dale Kennington: Mythologies Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Image from Dale Kennington: Mythologies at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Dale Kennington, Exposure (recto), 2005–2007, oil on wood panel (six panels), 94 x 144” fully extended, each panel: 94 x 24”

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intimate photos of the famous, the political, and the personal.

06.24.14–09.28.14

Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic Vero Beach Museum of Art

04.16.14–05.18.14

Asaroton— 2000 to 2013 by Vanessa Somers Vreeland Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Walter Wick’s children’s books carry their readers to a land of enchantment. In this delightful exhibition, visitors will be able to see the original models and photographs used to illustrate his many books, including A Book of Science and Wonder, Walter Wick’s Optical Tricks, as well as the Can You See What I See and I Spy series. (See story on pg. 140.)

www.ansg.org

Expressionist Robert Kiley Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

Robert Kiley lived during the exciting and momentous period of Abstract Expressionism. He described his works W. PALM BEACH as “a series of paint05.21.14–06.22.14 ings which make use Abstract of one of the most

Asaroton (The Unancient experiences in swept Floor), was human existence—the inspired by a Roman aperture.” epoch mosaic in the Vatican Museums. Thru 04.13.14 This Roman mosaic “altered EGOS”: was a direct copy of A Retrospective a mosaic from the by Nancy Ellison Second Century BC. Ann Norton Using the same marSculpture ble and shape as the Gardens original masterpiece, www.ansg.org Vreeland’s interpretaPhotographer and tive mosaic holds true author of 14 books, to the Roman piece, Nancy Ellison shares while bringing the

Image from Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Walter Wick at work on his castle model from Can You See What I See? Once Upon a Time, © Walter Wick Studios

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design into the modern age.

Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

04.16.14–05.18.14

The Surrealist Roberto Matta Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

This exhibition features work by Armory Artists-in-Residence produced during their eight-month tenure.

www.ansg.org

Thru 04.13.14

Chilean-born artist, Roberto Matta (19112002), was an international figure whose worldview represented a synthesis of European, American and Latin American cultures. As a member of the Surrealist movement and an early mentor to several Abstract Expressionists, Matta broke with both groups to pursue a highly personal artistic vision.

David Webb: Society’s Jeweler Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This dazzling showcase explores the

mastery of jewelry designer, David Webb, whose creations are inextricably linked to the heady and freewheeling spirit of the 1960s and early ’70s. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 100.) Thru 06.22.14

Industrial Sublime: Modernism and

the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940 Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Featuring paintings by leading artists such as George Bellows, Robert Henri, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Georgia O’Keeffe, and John Sloan, this exhibition examines the shift to urban views of New York’s waterways between 1900 and 1940 as Realists and Modernists conceived a new pictorial language to treat American industrialism. Thru 05.04.14

Qing Chic: Chinese Textiles from the 19th

Thru 05.03.14

Artist-In-Residence Exhibition

Image from Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940 at Norton Museum of Art, W. Palm Beach: Aaron Douglas (American, 1899-1979), Power Plant in Harlem, 1934, oil on canvas, 20-1/4 x 22-1/3”, from the Hampton University Museum Collection, Hampton, Virginia

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to early 20th Century Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This pendant exhibition to David Webb’s jewelry designs features a robe, embroidered silk panels, purses and shoes that share Webb’s love of natural forms, especially flowers and animals. 04.10.14–07.13.14

The Richman Gifts: American Impressionism and Realism Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This collection of works is centered around American painters who worked in representational styles in the first

decades of the 20th century.

their enduring friendship.

Rome highlights the cultural and artistic significance of Roman antiquities in Europe since the Renaissance. The selected works, dating between 1540 and 1750, represent Roman stories, sculpted artifacts, or buildings. Thru 05.11.14

Thru 05.25.14

WINTER PARK

To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar Norton Museum of Art

05.24.14–08.31.14

www.norton.org

To Jane, Love Andy explores the rise of “Baby Jane” as an internationally known model and reveals the evolution of Warhol’s first superstar and

Allure of Ancient Rome: Selected Old Masters Prints and Drawings from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Allure of Ancient

Glimpses into the Golden Age Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This installation provides the opportunity for CFAM to highlight several works in its own possession by artists featured in the Orlando Museum of Art’s corresponding presentation, Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough

Image from The Richman Gifts: American Impressionism and Realism at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Rockwell Kent, image courtesy of Norton Museum of Art

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

and the Golden Age of Painting. (See story in the January/March 2014 issue on pg. 86.) Thru 04.13.14

John Hitchcock: Ghosts of Brutality Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Working within the discipline of printmaking, John Hitchcock uses familiar images of US military weaponry such as tanks and helicopters set against unfamiliar mythological and hybrid creatures to explore notions of assimilation and control.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Ramiro Gomez will be featured.

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru 04.13.14

Recent Acquisitions presents new gifts and museum purchases added to the permanent collection at CFAM during the last two years. Works by Margaret BourkeWhite, Edward Curtis, Imogen Cunningham, Andy Warhol, Matthew Brandt, Kenny Scharf, Felraith Hines, and

The Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia: Icons from the 17th Century— Early 20th Century The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

The sacred images on view in this exhi­ bi­tion were once

read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes in pre-Soviet Russia as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines, and seen as com­ forters and pow­er­ful guardians. 04.20.14–04.26.14

Win­ter Park Paint Out! The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Artists will paint in the Polasek’s sculp­ture gar­dens and at other loca­tions through­out Win­ter Park and their works will be on dis­play and for sale as soon as they are com­pleted and dropped off at the Museum’s wet room. ­

05.24.14–08.31.14

Recent Acquisitions

O n V iew

Image from Recent Acquisitions at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Ramiro Gomez, Portrait of an Affluent Family, 2013, acrylic on magazine, 11 x 8-1/2” framed, courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles

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Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary/ St. Regis Bal Harbour www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Exhibition: SIMON PROCTER: CHANEL COUTURE ON VIEW THRU 04.30.14

Simon Proctor’s photographs capture both the grand scale of fashion shows and the architectural spaces in which they take place. PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: The Art Gallery, Palm Beach State College www.palmbeachstate.edu/artgallerypbg/current-exhibition.aspx

Exhibition: The Nature of Impermanence ON VIEW 05.13.14–09.05.14

Yvonne Parker and Carin Wagner share their complimentary artistic visions of transformation in The Nature of Impermanence. Parker’s sculptures transform vintage materials into contemporary statements of beauty, truth and love. Wagner’s alluring paintings of nature remind us of the cycles of life and that nature and individuals are in a constant state of evolution and renewal. Above left: Simon Procter, Lagerfeld Above Chanel, 2006, C-print, 62.99 x 47.24”, edition of 10 + 2 AP, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary. Above right (left to right): Yvonne Parker, Memories, 20 x 20”, mixed media sculpture; Carin Wagner, When Flowers Turn Their Backs II, oil on canvas, 30 x 30”, courtesy of the artists and The Art Gallery, Palm Beach State College

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MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: Zadok Gallery

Gallery: Dina Mitrani Gallery

www.zadokgallery.com

www.dinamitranigallery.com

Exhibition: Fiction and the Fabricated Image

Exhibition: COLLEEN PLUMB: TOWARDS THE SKY AGAIN, 1997-2011

ON VIEW THRU 04.2014

ON VIEW 04.10.14–05.31.14

Nylon threads and neatly erupted charcoal bits take over Miami’s Zadok Gallery in Fiction and the Fabricated Image, an impressive exhibit of “explosive” works by the South Korean artist, Seon Ghi Bahk.

Dina Mitrani Gallery and The Screening Room present their first collaboration, an exhibition of photography and video by Chicago-based artist, Colleen Plumb, whose works explore how humans interact with the natural world.

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Exhibition: The Face of Beauty ON VIEW 04.05.14-05.10.14

The Face of Beauty: The Photographer’s Quest for the Inspired Portrait examines the diversity of subjects and manners in which artists utilize the photographic medium to create powerful and intimate, yet oftentimes mysterious portraits.

Clockwise from top: Seon Ghi Bahk, from the exhibition Fiction and the Fabricated Image, installation view, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery; Colleen Plumb, Magic Garden, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Dina Mitrani Gallery; Kimiko Yoshida, Painting (Irma Brunner by Manet), Self Portrait, ca. 2007-2010, archival pigment photograph on canvas, 56 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: MARKS OF MEMORY ON VIEW 04.05.14–04.26.14

Arts on Douglas presents Marks of Memory, a solo exhibition featuring a collection of mixed-media paintings and monotypes by Orlando artist, Donne Bitner.

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Ritter Art Gallery www.fau.edu/galleries

Exhibition: PRAXIS ON VIEW 04.18.14–05.02.14

The University Galleries at Florida Atlantic University’s School of the Arts in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters presents PRAXIS: Spring 2014 BFA Exhibition in the Ritter Art Gallery at FAU’s Boca Raton campus, 777 Glades Road. The opening reception is April 17, from 7-9pm. The exhibition and opening reception are free and open to the public. Above left: Donne Bitner, Distant Shores, acrylic, 36 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; Above right (clockwise from top left): Michelle A. M. Miller, Superfun(d) Unleashed, 2014, digital iPhone photograph; Adrian Beuses; Maria Cerezo, Fear; and Erica Socorina Mohan, Throw, all images courtesy of the artists and Ritter Art Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries

Gallery: Baker Sponder Gallery

www.artfusiongalleries.com

www.bakersponder gallery.com

Exhibition: Essence of Triumph & Color

Exhibition: JONATHAN PRINCE SCULPTURE 


ON VIEW 04.01.14–06.16.14

This collection honors a select group of artists who embody the true spirit of artistic achievement through their visionary style and unyielding desire to redefine the essence of creativity.

ON VIEW 04.10.14–05.10.14

Jonathan Prince’s sculptures evoke the work of 20th century masters while referencing ancient artifacts. His work is principally concerned with exposing a material’s latent power, many suggesting the fluid quality of metal in liquid form, but captured in a solid state.

MIAMI BEACH

Gallery: Williams McCall Gallery www.williamsmccallgallery.com

Exhibition: Enrique Flores-Galbis ON VIEW 04.19.14–05.06.14

Enrique Flores-Galbis’ paintings of the Cuban landscape serve as reminders of the mysterious, almost magnetic pull the land has on its sons and daughters.

Clockwise from top: Rochelle Berman, Venice Mirror, photography, 29-1/2 x 19-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries; Jonathan Prince, Alembic Cube, stainless steel, 18-1/2 x 18 x 18”, courtesy of the artist and Baker Sponder Gallery; Enrique Flores-Galbis, Fun and Sun, Dog on the Malecon, oil on linen, 30 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Williams McCall Gallery

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GRAVITY a

MONUMENTA

EL AN

0 4 .1 1 . 1 4 – 0 8 .1 0 . 1 4 a t t h e B A S S M U S E U M o


and GRACE

AL WORKS by

NATSUI

o f A R T, M i a m i B e a c h

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Gravity and Grace

Installation view, Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui, Brooklyn Museum, New York. Courtesy of Jack Shainmman Gallery, New York.

T

he celebrated work

of El Anatsui strikes a rare combination of stunning beauty, fascinating communal process, and deep metaphorical and poetic meaning. Anatsui draws on artistic and aesthetic traditions from his birth country of Ghana, his home in Nsukka, Nigeria, and various Western art forms. His work is about transformation. In the first traveling solo exhibition in the US by the globally renowned contemporary artist, Gravity and Grace responds to a long history of innovations in abstract art, building upon cross-cultural exchange among Africa, Europe, and the Americas. OnV

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Previous pages: El Anatsui, Drifting Continents (detail), 2009, aluminum and copper wire, eight pieces, 151 x 410� overall, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.

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Gravity and Grace

Below: Portrait of El Anatsui. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.

On view at the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, from April 11 through August 10, 2014, Gravity and Grace includes twelve recent, monumental wall and floor sculptures, widely considered to represent the apex of the artist’s career. In addition, a series of drawings illuminates the artist’s process and wooden wall reliefs reference his extensive work in other

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materials and demonstrate relationships to the large metal pieces. The exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum with major support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Reading French philosopher Simone Weil’s 1947 book “Gravity and Grace” inspired Anatsui to explore the concepts of what he calls “the material and the spiri-


tual, of heaven and earth, of the physical and the ethereal” by using a limited, contrasting color palette, as typified in Anatsui’s metal sheet, Gravity and Grace, among his largest works and the inspiration for the exhibition’s title. The seriousness of Anatsui’s project reveals itself in the limits to which he stretches his materials and process, while the title and form evoke a poetic

interest in transcendence and connection. Throughout his career, Anatsui has experimented with a variety of media, including wood, ceramics and paint. In recent years, he has focused on discarded metal materials. Anatsui has said he is inspired by the “huge piles of detritus from consumption” due to West Africa’s limited recycling technology. OnV

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Above: El Anatsui, Gravity and Grace, 2010, aluminum and copper wire, 174 x 396”, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.

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Above: El Anatsui, Ozone Layer, 2010, aluminum and copper wire, 158 x 197”, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.

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His large-scale sculptures are composed of thousands of folded and crumpled pieces of metal sourced from local alcohol recycling stations and bound together with copper wire. These humble metal fragments provide a commentary on globalization, consumerism, waste and the transience of people’s lives in West Africa and beyond.

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Using found materials such as printing plates, condensed milk tins and aluminum liquor bottle caps allows the artist full freedom to improvise and invent. These intricate works, which can grow to be massive in scale, are both luminous and weighty, meticulously fabricated yet malleable. Many of Anatsui’s sculptures are conceived to be so


Gravity and Grace freedom to people to configure my works is to awaken the artist in them.” Works are condensed, expanded or reshaped to fit the space and sensibility of each institution. “At once sculpture and painting, his shimmering wall hangings drape, ripple and cascade to reflect light and create shadowy pockets, creating a fascinating interplay of color, shape and fluidity,” commented Ellen Rudolph, who helped organize the exhibit’s presentation at Akron Art Museum in 2012. “As viewers, we must not only absorb the overwhelming splendor of each piece, but the artworks’ presence confronts us with a contradictory combination free and flexible that they can be shaped in any way and altered in appearance for each installation. He encourages museum staff members to “sculpt” each work as they install it. “A human life is constantly in a state of change,” stated the artist. “I want my artwork to replicate that...I know there is an artist in each of us...And the idea of giving

Below: El Anatsui, Ozone Layer (detail), 2010, aluminum and copper wire, 158 x 197”, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.


“ When the eye scans a certain barrier, the imagination tends to go beyond that barrier. Walls reveal more things than they hide.” —El Anatsui

Above: El Anatsui, Gli (Wall), 2010, aluminum and copper wire, dimensions variable, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Joe Levack, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.

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of weight and lightness, both physical and metaphorical.” Just as the work is greater than the sum of its thousands of parts, its meaning transcends the particular cultural influences that contribute to the artist’s psyche and embody something universal that strikes a chord in every

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one of us. Among the many highlights of the show is Gli (Wall), 2010. Anatsui became interested in the notion of walls as religious, political, and social constructs after visiting three cities whose histories have been shaped by such structures: Berlin, Jerusalem, and


Gravity and Grace Notsie, a city in Togo from which his Ewe ancestors claim descent. “Gli” can mean “wall,” “disrupt,” or “story” in the Ewe language. “Walls are meant to block views,” Anatsui said, “but they block only the view of the eye—the ocular view—not the imaginative view. When the eye scans a certain barrier, the imagination tends to go beyond that barrier. Walls reveal more things than they hide.” Gravity and Grace invites viewers to question where art

comes from as well as explore this internationally celebrated artist’s development. Visitors will be awed by the overwhelming power and beauty of each work. Born in 1944 in Ghana, El Anatsui has lived and worked in Nigeria since 1978. In 1968, he received his BA from the College of Art, University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, where he studied drawing, painting, and sculpture in the Western tradition. He followed his

Below: El Anatsui, Gli (Wall) (detail), 2010, aluminum and copper wire, dimensions variable, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum.


Above: El Anatsui, Drainpipe, 2010, tin and copper wire, 60 x 156 x 336”, installation at the Akron Art Museum, courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY. Photo: Andrew McAllister, courtesy of the Akron Art Museum. Opposite: Drainpipe installation at Jack Shainman Gallery, courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, NY.

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undergraduate degree with a postgraduate diploma in art education. Throughout a distinguished forty-year career as an artist and Professor of Sculpture at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Anatsui has addressed a vast range of social, political and historical concerns, and embraced an equally diverse vocabulary of media and process. Anatsui’s sculpture became one of the most talked-about, photographed, and reproduced works of art at the 2007 Venice

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Biennale, catapulting the artist to worldwide prominence. In 2008, he received the Visionaries Artist Award from the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City. His works are in the public collections of New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN; British Museum, London; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Akron Art Museum, OH; High Museum


Gravity and Grace

Many of Anatsui’s sculptures are conceived to be so free and flexible that they can be shaped in any way and altered in appearance for each installation. of Art, Atlanta, GA; and Denver Art Museum, CO; among many others. Major exhibitions of Anatsui’s work have appeared at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA (2011); Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto (2010); National

Museum of Ethnology, Osaka (2010); Rice University Art Gallery, Houston (2010); Venice Biennale (2007); and the Biennale of African Art, Senegal (2006). El Anatsui is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery in New York. O n V iew OnV

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WANGECHI MUTU:

04.18.14-07.06.14

at

MOCA


A Fantastic Journey

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M WANGECHI MUTU: A Fantastic Journey

MOCA, NORTH MIAMI PRESENTS Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey, a major retrospective featuring Brooklyn-based artist Wangechi Mutu’s most innovative and exhilarating artworks drawn from major international collections, rarely seen early works, and new creations as well as the artist’s sketchbooks of intimate drawings revealing her creative process and inspirations. A new site-specific mixed-media mural created for the MOCA presentation will welcome visitors into exhibition galleries, which will be transformed into a forest-like environment populated by the installation of large-scale felt trees. Within OnV

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Opposite: Suspended Playtime, 2008/2013. Packing blankets, twine, garbage bags, and gold string; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. © Wangechi Mutu. Image courtesy of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, NC. Photo: Peter Paul Geoffrion. In background: People in Glass Towers Should Not Imagine Us, 2003. Mixed-media collage on paper, 70 x 102” overall. Collection of Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn and Nicolas Rohatyn, NY. Image courtesy of Salon 94, NY. © Wangechi Mutu

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WANGECHI MUTU: A Fantastic Journey

Mutu is best known for her spectacular and provocative collages depicting female figures in fantastical landscapes. Above: Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies began to fear her The End, 2013. Mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. © Wangechi Mutu. Image courtesy of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, NC. Photo: Peter Paul Geoffrion Opposite: Riding Death in My Sleep, 2002. Ink and collage on paper, 60 x 44”. Collection of Peter Norton, NY. © Wangechi Mutu

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this setting, Mutu’s works will be prominently featured. Spanning from the mid-1990s to the present, the show unites more than 50 pieces, including the artist’s signature large-scale collages, drawings, installations, sculptures, performance video, and her first animation, The End of eating Everything. “Followers of Mutu’s work will be amazed by her new ideas and creations, and will gain unprecedented insight into

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her artistic process and evolution as an artist over the past 15 years” said Trevor Schoonmaker, Chief Curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Curator of Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art. “Her work is as seductive and beautiful as it is critical and disturbing.” Mutu scrutinizes globalization by combining found materials, magazine cutouts, sculpture, and painted imagery. Sampling such diverse sources as African traditions, international politics, the fashion industry, pornography, and science fiction, her work explores gender, race, war, colonialism, global consumption, and the exoticization of the black female body. She is best known for her spectacular and provocative collages depicting female figures— part human, animal, plant, and machine—in fantastical landscapes that are simultaneously unnerving and alluring, defying easy categorization and identification. “My life’s journey is to continue thinking and mining this notion of femaleness, and feminism, and advocacy for women through the sort of fictional,


sci-fi narratives that I create,” explained the artist. Mutu’s creations have been described as both beautiful and grotesque, but she says that does not bother her at all. In an interview with CNN’s Isha Sesay, Mutu said: “It means that people are looking. It

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means their senses are on when they are in front of the work, which is important. Because for me, it’s important to think about and understand what’s in the work.” For Mutu, her collages are “a meditative, calming obsession...Collages manage to satisfy all of my madness,” she


WANGECHI MUTU: A Fantastic Journey added. “I’m also able to make these very strong statements.” In much of Mutu’s imagery there is a power dynamic at play. Figures are often poised atop one another—a reflection of her interest in hierarchies and evolution. These images invite viewers to question the relationships among them and thereby question other hierarchies in everyday life and history. Such rankings of peoples have historically been constructed around fabricated racial and ethnic categories, which were invoked to justify Europe’s colonization of Africa, the Americas, Australia, and much of Asia. Mutu often uses woundlike splatters to allude to the wars and bloodshed associated with colonialism, particularly in regard to violence against women.

Right: The End of eating Everything (still), 2013. Animated video (color, sound), 8 min. loop, ed. of 6. Courtesy of the artist. Commissioned by the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, NC. © Wangechi Mutu

Opposite: Yo Mama, 2003. Ink, mica flakes, pressure-sensitive synthetic polymer sheeting, cut-and-pasted printed paper, painted paper, and synthetic polymer paint on paper; 59-1/8 x 85”. The Museum of Modern Art, NY. The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection Gift, 2511.2005.a-b. © Wangechi Mutu. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY. Photo: David Allison


WANGECHI MUTU: A Fantastic Journey

Opposite: Family Tree, 2012. Suite of 13, mixed-media collage on paper, 16.25 x 12.25”. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Image courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. © Wangechi Mutu. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer Below: A Shady Promise, 2006. Mixed-media collage on Mylar, 87.5 x 108.75”. The Speyer Family Collection, NY. © Wangechi Mutu

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Expanding on the drawing practice that underlies all her work, Mutu’s first-ever animated video, The End of eating Everything (2013), features a magical, destructive creature played by the like-minded musical performer and recording artist, Santigold. For this collaboration, Santigold takes on the role of an insatiable planetlike being, covered with flailing arms and tentacles, as well as spores that emit polluting smoke, like factory chimneys. Reflecting on gluttonous consumption and overindulgence, the video offers an ending at once apocalyptic and hopeful

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in the sudden transformation of this sickly, sinister entity. In a video installation, titled Eat Cake (2012), Mutu appears well attired in an elaborate gothic dress, ornate jewelry, and high heels, but with wild unkempt hair and long fingernails which she uses to dig into a huge three-tiered cake. Her decadent clothing and voracious appetite can be seen as a commentary on how the trappings of civilization separate us from the natural world and encourage excessive consumption, while her ritualistic movements may be read as an attempt to reconnect with both the earthly and spiritual realms of the forest around her. Bringing her interconnected ecosystems to life for this exhibition through her sculptural installations and videos, Mutu encourages audiences to consider these mythical worlds as places for cultural, psychological, and socio-political exploration and transformation. Born and raised in Nairobi, Kenya, Mutu earned her BFA at Cooper Union in 1996 and her MFA at Yale University in 2000. Her work has been


Gravity and Grace


Above: Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies, 2005. Ink, acrylic, collage, contact paper on Mylar, 81 x 52”. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Purchase through a gift of the Buddy Taub Foundation, Jill and Dennis Roach, directors, 2005.184. Image courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. © Wangechi Mutu. Photo: Joshua White

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shown in solo exhibitions at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University in Durham, NC; Brooklyn Museum, NY; Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, Germany; Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada; San Francisco Museum of Contemporary Art, CA; Miami Art Museum (now Perez Art Museum Miami), FL; and Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. Mutu has participated in group exhibitions at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL; The Geffen Contemporary at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Los Angeles, CA; the Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY; Tate Liverpool, UK; Royal Academy of Art, London, UK; and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. Her work is held in the collections of the Art Gallery of Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt, Germany; The Hague, Netherlands; Judith Rothschild Foundation / The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Perez Art Museum Miami, FL; Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal, Montréal, Canada;


WANGECHI MUTU: A Fantastic Journey Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL; Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Saatchi Gallery, London, UK; San Francisco Museum of Contemporary Art, San Francisco, CA; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. Mutu is also the recipient of Deutsche Bank’s “Artist of the Year” award; a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant; The Cooper Union Urban Vision-

aries Awards, Emerging Talent Award; the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors Award; and the Chrysalis Award, The Museum of Contemporary African Diaspora Art, New York, NY. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, Durham, NC, and distributed by Duke University Press. On View

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Wangechi Mutu, 2012. Photo: Kathryn Parker Almanas Below: Funkalicious fruit field (detail) 2007. Ink, paint, mixed media, plastic pearls, and collage on Mylar, 92 x 106”. Collection of Glenn Scott Wright, London. Image courtesy of Victoria Miro Gallery, London. © Wangechi Mutu

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I DECEI ntent

F A K E S and F O R G E R I E S

05.23.14–08.02.14 at the JOHN and MABLE RING


John Myatt, Girl with a Pearl Earring, in the style of Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632-1675), 2012, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Graham & Margaret Wright, Stratford Upon Avon, Warwickshire. Photo: Washington

to Green Fine Art

IVE:

in the A R T W O R L D

L I N G M U S E U M o f A R T, S a r a s o t a • w w w. r i n g l i n g . o r g OnV

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A

Intent to Deceive

PROVOCATIVE NEW EXHIBIT about art forgery will have its Florida debut at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota. Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World spotlights some of the world’s most notorious con artists, illuminating their dubious legacies, and examining how their talents, charm, and audacity beguiled and assaulted the art world for much of the 20th century through the present day. The exhibition, which is organized by International Arts & Artists of Washington, DC, and curated by Colette Loll, will be on view from May 23 through August 8, 2014. Several ingenious forgers are profiled in this ground-breaking exhibition representing some of the most infamous scandals of the last century. Han van Meegeren, Elmyr de Hory and Eric Hebborn all shook the art world with their exploits, garnering each of them worldwide notoriety but an untimely death. More recently, John Myatt, and Mark Landis have been in the news for their prolific and stylistically diverse art frauds,

landing one in jail. The exhibit is divided into sections that examine each forger’s career. Included in each profile are original works, personal effects and ephemera, photographs, film clips, and representations of the material and techniques used to create the convincing artworks. Works by major artists such as Charles Courtney Curran, Honoré Daumier, Raoul Dufy, Philip de László, Henri OnV

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John Myatt, Odalisque, limited edition print; in the style of Henri Matisse (French, 1869 -1954), 2011. Courtesy of Washington Green Fine Art & Castle Galleries, United Kingdom. Photo: Washington Green Fine Art.

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Right: Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), The Procuress (after Baburen), in the style of Dirck van Baburen (Dutch, ca. 1595 -1624), 1940, oil on canvas. Courtesy of The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London.

Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Paul Signac, and Maurice de Vlaminck, among others, are included alongside the forgeries to better test perceptions of authenticity. Unfortunately, the art world has yet to develop a foolproof system for authenticating works. The current system is based on a three-pillar

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approach: Connoisseurship—a person with expert training in characteristic features of an artist’s style and technique, often referred to as the “eye of the expert.” Provenance—an evaluation of the history of an artwork’s origin, ownership, location, and transactions; documentation for authentication. continued on pg. 86...


Intent to Deceive

Han van Meegeren

covered by art historians in the 1860s. Since Vermeer had a small

Like others who followed him,

body of work (36 known paint-

Han Van Meegeren turned to forg-

ings), Van Meegeren was able to

ery out of frustration with his own

exploit a gap in the artist’s oeuvre

artistic career and the demands

to create an “early religious peri-

of an expensive lifestyle. He

od.” This allowed Van Meegeren’s

began to produce forgeries of

Supper at Emmaus to be heralded

17th century Dutch Masters in

by 17th century Dutch art expert,

the 1920s, but they were not

Abraham Bredius, as a newly

credible enough to earn him

discovered Vermeer masterpiece.

significant wealth. By the mid-

The painting was subsequently

1930s, however, Van Meegeren

purchased by the Museum Boij-

developed a technique to simu-

mans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam,

late the look and feel of centu-

Netherlands.

ries-old dried oil paint by mixing

Information provided by International Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org

Van Meegeren was found

Bakelite (an early form of plastic)

guilty of forgery and fraud by the

into his pigments. After baking

Amsterdam Regional Court and

in an oven, the mixture dried to

sentenced to prison for a mini-

a hardness that passed the alco-

mum of one year. Prior to serving

hol and needle test, the primary

his sentence, Van Meegeren suf-

forensics test of the era.

fered two heart attacks and died

The 17th century Dutch Mas-

on November 30, 1947.

ter, Johannes Vermeer, was redis-

—International Arts & Artists

“Driven to a state of anxiety and depression due to the all-too-meager appreciation of my work, I decided, one fateful day, to revenge myself on the art critics and experts by doing something the likes of which the world has never seen before.” —Han van Meegeren, 1945 OnV

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Above: Elmyr de Hory (1906-1976), Odalisque, in the style of Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), 1974, oil on canvas. Collection of Mark Forgy. Photo: Robert Fogt.

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Technical analysis—scrutiny with scientific equipment of a work’s material components to determine if they are consistent or inconsistent with a purported age or attribution. All of the forgers in this exhibition employed means to thwart this system of authentication. They fooled the experts by mastering techniques of the artists they copied, created false identities and background stories

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to build credibility, constructed elaborate schemes to corrupt provenance documentation, and went to great lengths to ensure their materials would pass forensic examination. All relied heavily on the art of deception. “This exhibition brings to light how each forger was ultimately discovered, and illustrates the role technology plays in detecting forgeries and preventing them from penetrating continued on pg. 88...


Intent to Deceive

Left: Elmyr de Hory (1906-1976), Fauve Landscape, in the style of Maurice de Vlaminck (French, 1876-1958), ca. 1968, oil on canvas. Collection of Mark Forgy. Photo: Robert Fogt. Below: Elmyr de Hory, February, 6 1970. Photo: Pierre Boulet for Life magazine Information provided by International Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org

Elmyr de Hory

partnership with Fernand Legros, who sold a steady supply of de

After World War II, Elmyr de Hory

Hory’s forgeries on five continents

moved to the US and portrayed

over a period of nine years. Their

himself as a dispossessed Hungar-

profitable and prolific collabora-

ian aristocrat selling off artworks

tion came to a tumultuous end in

from his collection. Befriending

1967 when Legros sold over 40 of

the rich and famous, he was both

de Hory’s bogus masterpieces to

enigmatic and charming—yet

Texas oil millionaire, Algur Mead-

behind this façade, de Hory was

ows. After discovering the fraud,

a frustrated artist struggling to

the ensuing scandal unmasked

maintain a standard of living he

de Hory as the artist behind the

Welles’ last film, F for Fake, in

craved but could not afford. After

works. With Legros’ aid, de Hory

1972. Despite his celebrity, he

several failed attempts to ignite

likely inserted more than 1,000

had little success selling his origi-

his own career, de Hory focused

forgeries into the art market during

nal works, though demand for his

on his talent as a forger.

his 30-year career. Many of these

forgeries remained constant. In

works have not been exposed and

1976, deHory learned he would

did not make him immune to

continue to reside in museums

be extradited to France on charg-

treachery, most notably during his

and private collections today.

es of forgery and fraud. Fearing

De Hory’s skill at deception

DeHory was featured in Orson

he would be killed in prison, he

“If my work hangs in a museum long enough, it becomes real.” —Elmyr de Hory OnV

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committed suicide by taking an overdose of sleeping pills. —International Arts & Artists .

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the various channels of the art world,” wrote David Furchgott, Founder & President of International Arts & Artists. “We hope this exhibition inspires a continuing discussion of collection integrity and the challenges faced by museums as they preserve our cultural heritage.” In her statement, Colette Loll, curator of Intent to Deceive and art fraud expert, provides further insight on the subject of art forgery: “Fakes and forgeries were once the dirty little secret of the art world, and no gallery, museum or auction house has ever been entirely free from the embarrassment of a costly error of misattribution or faulty continued on pg. 90...

Right: Eric Hebborn (1934-1996), St. George and the Dragon, in the style of Jacopo Bellini (Italian, 1400-1471), 1994; signed and numbered 37/40, produced for the exhibition The Difficulties of Attribution, at Archeus Fine Art, London; 1994, color photograph. Collection of Colette Loll. Opposite: Eric Hebborn. Photo: Raimondo Luciani, 1991. Information provided by International Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org


Intent to Deceive

Eric Hebborn Eric Hebborn’s training at the Royal Academy of Arts—Britain’s most prestigious art school—as well as his award of the Rome Prize, could have heralded an illustrious artistic and academic career. Instead, as his exquisite drawing skills were belittled by

ized how easily the experts were

the mid-20th century art market,

fooled, his contempt for them

Hebborn became profoundly

increased. Ultimately, he came

critical of the prevailing style of

to justify his forgeries as ethical

modernism and contemptuous

if he sold them to experts and

of art dealers and experts. Like

dealers, who should be able to

other forgers, Hebborn found his

discern the authentic from the

talents better suited to creat-

fake. He never sold his forgeries

ing works from a bygone era; in

to amateur collectors, as a stipu-

his case, the Renaissance and

lation of his own moral code.

Baroque periods.

In 1996, Hebborn published

Hebborn’s training as a paint-

The Art Forger’s Handbook, and

ing restorer taught him to repair

shortly after, he was murdered

damaged works, but also to

on the street, in Rome. The case

enhance them and, at times, to

remains unsolved.

simply forge them. When he real-

—International Arts & Artists

“Only the experts are worth fooling. The greater the expert, the greater the satisfaction in deceiving him.”  —Eric Hebborn, 1991 OnV

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Above: John Myatt (b. 1945), Landscape near Auvers, in the style of Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 2011, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Clive and Shyamali Fenton, UK. Photo: Washington Green Fine Art.

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provenance. In today’s art world, the bungling of authentication makes big news and can no longer be silenced or swept under the rug. Duped museum and art experts, though by no means vindicated, may now find comfort in a growing public interest in deciphering these costly mistakes. A recent flurry of books, conferences and exhibitions dedicated to fakes,

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forgeries, mistakes, and misattributions is evidence that the age-old art of forgery has never intrigued the public more than it does today. Even though profit and greed are often assumed to be the underlying motive for forgery, the psychological underpinning of these grand deceptions is actually far more complex than a simple scheme for financial continued on pg. 92...


Intent to Deceive Left: John Myatt (b. 1945), Charing Cross Railway taken from the Savoy, in the style of Claude Monet (French, 1840-1926), 2011, oil on canvas. Courtesy of Clive and Shyamali Fenton, UK. Photo: Washington Green Fine Art. Opposite: John Myatt; Photo courtesy of Washington Green Fine Art. Information provided by International Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org

John Myatt

did not sell his copies of recognizable masterpieces as original works. It was when he teamed

John Myatt began his artistic

with professional con man, John

career with promise. He was

Drewe, that he crossed the line

awarded a scholarship to open

to illegal art fraud. The Myatt-

his own art studio and supported

Drew partnership created one of

himself by selling and teach-

the most damaging art hoaxes of

ing art for several years. But his

the 20th century. Myatt forged

traditional, pastoral style did not

over 200 modernist paintings,

and curators rely on as proof of an

create enough interest to earn a

approximately 120 of which are

artwork’s authenticity.

proper living. In order to provide

still circulating in the art market,

Myatt served just four months

for his children, he devised a plan

and Drewe most likely corrupted

of a one year prison sentence for

to sell “genuine fakes” through an

the art historical record for gen-

fraud and was released in 2000.

advertisement in a local paper.

erations to come by falsifying

He went on to hold a sold-out

provenance documentation. Prov-

exhibition of his work in 2005.

he originally conceived it because

enance, or ownership history, are

His paintings continue to sell

he had no intent to deceive—he

the crucial documents collectors

for upwards of $40,000. Myatt

Myatt’s idea was not illegal as

teaches and lectures widely and is

“In prison, they called me Picasso.”

represented by Washington Green Fine Art Gallery, London.

—John Myatt

—International Arts & Artists OnV

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Above: Mark Landis (b. 1955), Untitled, in the style of Paul Signac (French, 1863–1935), date unknown, watercolor on paper. Property of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Photo: Shannon Kolvitz. Opposite: Mark Landis (b. 1955), Untitled, in the style of Marie Laurencin (French, 1883-1956), undated, charcoal on paper. Property of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Photo: Shannon Kolvitz.

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gain. The artistic and psychological profiles of the forgers featured in Intent to Deceive, combined with a detailed description of the techniques and tactics used to create massive fraud in the art world, serve as a cautionary tale for any serious collector, investor, or institution accepting patron donations. This exhibition also serves as a wake-up call to those interested in preserving cultural heritage. ...All of the forgers profiled in Intent to Deceive possessed not only artistic talent, but the ability to create and perpetuate

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a con that paved the way for acceptance of their work into the legitimate art market. In profiling their lives and careers, this exhibition points to common and recurring patterns: frustrated artistic ambitions, chaotic personal lives, and a contempt for the art market and its ‘experts.’ Despite their creative powers, each subject in this exhibition suffered a common, fundamental lack: the vision that would allow them to fit into the modernist paradigm, a value system that places primacy above all else. In each case, the forger was most continued on pg. 94...


Intent to Deceive

rial gain, or embittered artist

collection he wished to donate in

seeking to punish a world which

honor of his deceased parents.

failed to appreciate him. Rather,

He has gone to odd lengths to

Mark Landis may be the most

for the past 30 years, Landis

perpetuate this fantasy to give

famous art counterfeiter who

has approached dozens of muse-

away his fakes, not only falsifying

never committed a crime. He

ums and university galleries in

documents and using aliases, but

does not fit the standard profile

multiple states claiming to be

also dressing in costume.

of a charlatan working for mate-

a wealthy philanthropist with a

Mark Landis

Suffering from mental illness, Landis’ actions are apparently

Mark Landis may be the most famous art counterfeiter who never committed a crime.

fueled by the need for attention and validation. Landis was diagnosed a schizophrenic at age 17, although caseworkers have recently suggested bipolar disorder may be a more appropriate diagnosis. Landis cannot understand why museums are upset with his “hobby.” He claims his donations are a tribute to his deceased parents and are acts of goodwill. He has at times promised to stop his museum “donations,” but it is not clear if he can control his compulsions. His age and declining health limit his mobility, so it is likely his spree has come to an end. Art and Craft, a documentary about Landis, will have its film festival premiere in 2014. —International Arts & Artists

Information provided by International Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org


Intent to Deceive

successful at imitating a past genre of art, its motifs and its techniques, and held the older genre in higher esteem than the contemporary. Unable to make a career in an art market that no longer valued their preferred style of artistic expression, these artists found forgery and fakery to be their most accessible avenue to public recognition and commercial success. ...Marketplace complicity may well be the greatest obstacle in remedying the proliferation of art fakes and forgeries. The inability of the art market to self-police or lobby for enforceable civil and criminal laws creates the opportunity for robust criminal enterprise. In

an industry that suffers from a lack of transparency, the problem is one everyone recognizes but few have the incentive to fix in the face of indomitable self-interest. It is the rare dealer or auction house that has not transacted, inadvertently or intentionally, in works of doubtful integrity.” — Colette Loll (@artfraudinsight) is the founder and director of Art Fraud Insights, a consultancy specializing in art fraud related lectures, training and specialized investigation of artworks. The ultimate question proposed within Intent to Deceive one can’t help but ask is whether the uncovering of a painting’s unpalatable history

actually makes it any less of a work of art. Does the discovery of a fake change our relationship with a painting? Admirers and collectors of the work of several contemporary forgers admit that they possess great art, no matter that they are forgeries. “They’re not original artworks, but they’re so prestigious that they require the same security measures as an authentic work,” said Julia Courtney, curator of art at Springfield Museum of Art in Massachusetts. The brilliance is notable, and in fact, the murky history makes the work all the more interesting—the stories and drama behind them are as fascinating as the images themselves. O n V iew

Opposite (clockwise from top left): 1. Mark Landis, Untitled, in the style of Henri Matisse, 2013. Collection of Colette Loll. Photo: Laila Abdul-Hadi Jadallah, International Arts & Artists. 2. Original work of art by Charles Courtney Curran, Noonday Sunlight (detail), 1924, oil on canvas. Richmond Art Museum, Ohio. Photo: Grey Pyle Photography. 3. Mark Landis, Untitled, date unknown, in the style of Honoré Daumier. Property of Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Photo: Shannon Kolvitz. 4. Elmyr de Hory, Caryatid, ca. 1971, pencil on paper, in the style of Amedeo Modigliani. Collection of Mark Forgy. Photo: Robert Fogt. 5. Elmyr de Hory, Woman at Table, in the style of Henri Matisse, ca. 1975, oil on canvas. Collection of Mark Forgy. Photo: Robert Fogt. 6. Elmyr de Hory, Portrait of Elmyr and his brother Stephan, ca. 1950, oil on canvas, in the style of Philip de Laszlo. Collection of Mark Forgy, Photo: Robert Fogt. 7. Elmyr de Hory, Dansueses Nues, 1972, lithograph, in the style of Pablo Picasso. Courtesy of Colette Loll Marvin. Photo: Laila Abdul-Hadi Jadallah, International Arts & Artists. 8. Elmyr de Hory, Portrait of a Woman, in the style of Amedeo Modigliani, ca. 1975, oil on canvas. Collection of Mark Forgy. Photo: Robert Fogt.

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REAL or FAKE? Can you spot the original among the forgeries in this selection of works featured in the show? See answer below...

Answer: The original work is located in the center of the top row. See opposite page for credit details.


The Art of Nathan

IN PIE 06.07.14 -08.17.14 at Art & Culture Cen

Large Cloud from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photo courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com


n Sawaya featuring

E CES

ter of Hollywood • www.artandculturecenter.org OnV

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The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES

N

NATHAN SAWAYA (AKA “THE BRICK ARTIST”)

has gained worldwide recognition for his highly imaginative and masterfully constructed sculptures made exclusively from LEGO® bricks. His touring exhibit, The Art of the Brick, has entertained and inspired millions of art lovers around the globe. It is the first exhibition to focus on LEGO bricks as an art medium. This page, clockwise from top left: Small Cloud and Large Cloud; Hotel; and Bucket; from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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In his latest project, Sawaya has teamed up with Australian photographer, Dean West, to create a series of multimedia compositions that combine his unique sculptures with West’s modern photography techniques. The exhibit, titled In Pieces, opens June 7, 2014 at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood and runs through August 17, 2014. The idea for this new col-

laboration came about in 2009 when West chanced upon Sawaya’s sculpture and became inspired by the notion of combining “pixels and blocks.” West contacted Sawaya to pitch the idea and the two hit it off. Soon after, the pair set out on a roadtrip across the US to scout locations for West to use as background images for the project. Once the backgrounds were shot, Sawaya This page, clockwise from top: Pool; Flip Flops; and Towel; from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES then selected an element or two from each image to build from LEGO bricks. The final set-ups were storyboarded so that he could plan the relevant sculptures on “brick paper.” The sculptures and requisite models were then photographed independently and added onto the backgrounds in post-production. “It’s fun to look at the images and try to pick out what portion of the photograph is actually built from LEGO,” said Sawaya, “but there’s

also some real commentary there on identity and society, and we’ve been getting some strong reactions about it.” “There’s a lot of synergy behind the way Nathan built the sculptures and the way a digital photograph is constructed with the pixels,” said West. “We called [the projBelow and right: Tree; and Tree (sculpture), from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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Above and opposite: Train; and Tracks; from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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ect] In Pieces for two reasons. One, the way it’s constructed, layer by layer, brick by brick, and two, the reflection of the characters in the scenes. The whole concept really stems on c om

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how we build our identity.” Within each of the photographs, individuals stand in recognizable but chillingly empty minimalist scenes derived from common fea-


The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES tures of the American landscape. Their averted eyes gaze into nothingness, and a strange feeling of aloofness and displacement reverberates. The careful positioning of the human figures, the subtle interactions, and special attention to geometrical design echoes the influence of a cinematic ‘Hopper’ painting. Using mostly frontal style imagery of the North American landscape, the simple unvarnished vernacular locations reference the American Picture Postcard. From a distance, the imagery appears

entirely photographic however, upon closer inspection, each work reveals the fabricated brick construction. Throughout the gallery, viewers can marvel at the actual LEGO sculptures featured within the images on display. “The idea is, when we open the show, you’ll see the photo and then the LEGO [sculpture] next to it,” Sawaya said. “It’s almost a ‘Where’s Waldo’ effect.” This newest manifestation of Sawaya’s art is testament to the versatility of the medium. A former New York

Nathan Sawaya poses as the cowboy with crafted LEGO train tracks in Dean West’s photograph, Train, for their In Pieces collaboration.

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Above and right: Bus; and Dog; from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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attorney who quit his day job to “risk it all” to pursue his passion for art, Sawaya is single-handedly credited with elevating LEGO bricks to a legitimate art form. His work has evolved to imbue an emotional content and visual complexity that might be considered antithetical to the hard-edged simplicity of the LEGO brick. Sawaya’s creations have c om

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drawn enormous artistic and popular success. His exhibitions continue to set international museum and gallery attendance records, earning him critical acclaim as well as a wide range of high-profile commissions, and have resulted in appearances on such TV shows as “The Colbert Report,” and “Late Night With David Letterman.” He was even featured on the icon-


The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES

Below: Mannequin from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya

ic quiz show “Jeopardy!” with a category titled “The LEGO Artistry of Nathan Sawaya.” In 2011, he was awarded the “Most Creative Unusual Artist” award by the Society of Unique Artists. The artist’s early representational creations have included a 7-foot-long reproduction of the Brooklyn Bridge, a lifesize Tyrannosaurus Rex, and a replica of photographer Joe

Rosenthal’s famous Battle of Iwo Jima photograph, which is on permanent exhibit at Virginia’s National Museum of the Marine Corps. His unique, one-of-a-kind creations have been commissioned by companies, charities, celebrities, museums and galleries from around the world, and his work has been featured in exhibitions at Columbus Museum of Art, Colum-

Sawaya’s LEGO Dog, featured in Bus, took a week to build and is comprised of some 9,500 bricks.

and Dean West. Photo courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com


bus, OH; Kimball Art Center, Park City, UT; Clinton Library & Museum, Little Rock, AR; Discovery Times Square Museum, New York, NY; ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore; MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA; John F. Ken-

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nedy Center, Washington, DC; Oregon Museum of Science & Industry, Portland, OR; Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, New York; Lancaster Museum of Art in Lancaster, PA; and Art & Culture Center of Hollywood, FL. c om

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Sawaya’s new foundation for the arts, Art Revolution (www.artrevolution.org), is a project that is close to his heart. Following the belief that “art is not optional,” the organization aims to raise awareness and funds to advocate the importance of art, and to


The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES

Above: Nathan Sawaya. Photo courtesy of brickartist.com Left: Dress from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photo courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

Continued on the following pages:“The Art of the Brick” travels to Pensacola, FL...

Above: Dress (sculpture) from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photo courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com

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The Art of NATHAN SAWAYA featuring IN PIECES motivate individuals to stand up for their rights to better art education in schools. All in the name of happiness. Dean West’s body of work includes a highly conceptual and thought-provoking style of contemporary portraiture. His body of work has been featured in top photography magazines and art galleries, and he has received numerous international awards. Born in small-town rural Australia in 1983, West’s love for photography began in his high school’s darkroom and blossomed at the

Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. After graduating in 2007 with a Bachelor of Photography, with majors in visual culture and advertising, West formed a partnership, Berg+West, which won nationwide acclaim as a highend photography and postproduction studio. Through clients like the QLD Government and SONY, he quickly learned to transform stick figure sketches into intricate composited photographs with immense detail and clarity. In 2008, West was includ-

ed in Saatchi & Saatchi’s collection of the world’s top 100 emerging photographers, and went on to win Advertising Photographer of the Year at the International Aperture Awards. With success in advertising

Above and opposite: Umbrella (sculpture); and Umbrella; from In Pieces, 2012, by artists Nathan Sawaya and Dean West. Photos courtesy of InPiecesCollection.com Right: Dean West; Photo courtesy of the artist

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and a growing list of collectors, West decided to dedicate more of his time to the world of art. In the following years, his series, Fabricate, received worldwide recognition from top photography competitions,

including: the International Colour Awards, the Lucie Awards, the Loupe Awards, and in 2009, he was the winner of the IV International Arte Laguna Prize, Venice, Italy. West’s work continues to be OnV

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collected by a growing number of sophisticated art collectors in Australia, the US, Italy, and Canada. To learn more about the artists, visit: www.brickartist.com and www.deanwest.com. •

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The Art of

THE

COINCIDING WITH THE

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood exhibition, The Art of Nathan Sawaya featuring In Pieces, Pensacola Museum of Art presents The Art of the Brick. The exhibit will mark the first time this extraordinary traveling show will be publicly displayed in the Pensacola area. CNN hailed The Art of the Brick as one of the top “mustsee exhibitions in the world.”

“This year alone, we’ve visited Brussels, Singapore and Taiwan,” said Sawaya. “We are thrilled to be bringing this collection to Pensacola, Florida.” Like most young kids, Sawaya started playing with LEGO bricks at a young age. But unlike most kids, he never stopped. His talent has not only solidified his place in pop culture history but has made an indelible mark on the art world as well.

05.03.14-08.08.14 at Pensacola M Above, left to right: Grey and Yellow, by Nathan Sawaya. Photos courtesy of brickartist.com


BRICK

LEGO ® Brick Sculpture

by Nathan Sawaya

The award-winning artist has catapulted the LEGO brick into an art medium all its own, transforming the iconic construction toy into awe-inspiring and thought provoking works of art. Sawaya has created replicas of the human form in various states of emotion, including anger, love, depression and joy. The centerpiece of this collection, and perhaps his most famous piece, is Yellow,

a LEGO torso of a man ripping open his chest while yellow bricks cascade from his open chest cavity. “I strive to create artwork that is interesting and that is unlike anything [people] have seen before” said Sawaya. “And hopefully, at the end of the day, they are at least a little bit inspired—and might even snap together a few LEGO bricks when they get home.” O n V iew

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Our America: The

Latino Presence in American

Art

On view 04.02.14– 06.22.14 at the

Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu


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T

Our America

THE PATRICIA & PHILLIP FROST ART MUSEUM

presents Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art, a major exhibition drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art. In its first showing outside the Smithsonian, this exhibition presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-20th century, when the concept of a collecPrevious pages: Olga Albizu, Radiante, 1967, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of JP Morgan Chase, 2013.17 Left: Carlos Almaraz, Night Magic (Blue Jester), 1988, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of Gloria Werner, 2011.12, © 1988, Carlos Almaraz Estate

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Our America

Right: Juan Sánchez, Para Don Pedro, 1992, lithograph and collage, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Julia D. Strong Endowment, 1998.97, © 1992, Juan Sánchez. Sánchez pays homage to Pedro Albizu Campos (1891–1965), the well-known leader of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party. A Harvard-trained lawyer and devout Catholic, Albizu championed social justice and promoted Puerto Rican independence. For his efforts, he was charged with conspiracy against the US and jailed for most of his life. Sánchez presents Albizu as a martyr and surrounds his likeness with images of Christ and drawings resembling indigenous (or Taino) petroglyphs found in Puerto Rico.

tive Latino identity began to emerge. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. On view from April 2, 2014 through June 22, 2014, Our America includes 85 works in all media by 64 leading modern and contemporary artists who participated in all the various artistic styles and movements, including abstract expressionism; activist, conceptual and performance art; and classic American genres, such as landscape, portraiture and scenes of everyday life. Latino artists across the US were galvanized by the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s. They created new images of their communities and examined bicultural

Our America presents a picture of an evolving national culture that challenges expectations of what is meant by “American” and “Latino.”


experiences. Many critically probed American history and popular culture, revealing the possibilities and tensions of expansionism, migration and settlement. Other Latino artists in the exhibition devoted themselves to experimenta-

tion, pushing the limits of their chosen medium. Our America presents a picture of an evolving national culture that challenges expectations of what is meant by “American” and “Latino.” Artists of Cuban, Mexican, OnV

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Puerto Rican, and Dominican descent as well as other Latin American groups with deep roots in the US are featured. The show reveals recurring themes among artists of different generations and regions working across the country: •

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Our America REFRAMING THE PAST AND PRESENT The artists gathered here tackle themes related to American national identity from Latino perspectives. Many grapple with the repercussions of events that helped establish Latino communities in the US. The MexicanAmerican War (1846–1848), which resulted in the annexation of Mexico’s northern territories, and the Spanish-American War (1898), in which Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the US, are recurring background themes. To reveal these and other lesserknown chapters in our collective past, Latino artists focus on history and the visual strategies by which it can become known. To engage American history, they transform classic genres and icons, or create works that invoke the past and its relationship to the present.

MIGRATING THROUGH HISTORY Many Latinos immigrated to this country in search of a better future or to flee tumultuous events in their homelands. Some communities—specifically

Puerto Ricans after 1898 and Mexicans living in the Southwest prior to 1848—did not emigrate but were incorporated into the US, and were immediately or eventually granted citizenship. The artists united here use layered or dreamlike imagery to reflect on the conditions that spur migration or to contemplate its aftermath. Their works explore themes of displacement, exile, and hope.

THE GRAPHICS BOOM Graphic arts played a pivotal role in the civil rights movement. Chicano and Puerto Rican artists, drawing inspiration from Pop art and graphic traditions from Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Cuba, created prints about the antiwar effort, worker and women’s rights, immigration, Puerto Rican independence, and Latino cultural identity. Their works, which were presented on the street and in the fields, at community venues, and in alternative spaces, facilitated mass mobilization and community education. Many Latino cultural organizations owned OnV

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Opposite: María Brito, El Patio de Mi Casa, 1990, mixed media, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Smithsonian Institution Collections Acquisition Program, 1997.71a-g, © 1991, María Brito. While preparing this installation, Brito remembered the well-known children’s song called El patio de mi casa (The Backyard of My House). In Brito’s backyard, nature struggles to survive the uprooting of migration, here symbolized by the constricting cradle, barren tree shadows, and cracked ground. Rain collects at the top of the wall and channels down into the sink, giving a tree sapling a chance to thrive. Brito’s humble Cuban American kitchen is a site of remembrance, transformation, and growth.

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presses that allowed members to experiment with the medium and quickly respond to community needs. The striking range of styles is balanced by the pervasive use of text, a feature that highlights the importance of public address.

TURNING POINT The civil rights era, in which

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marginalized groups demanded equal rights, dramatically altered American society. Galvanized by the times in which they lived, Latino artists became masters of socially engaged art, challenging prevailing notions of American identity and affirming the mixed indigenous, African, and European heritage of Latino commuc om

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nities. Many reinvigorated mural and graphic traditions in an effort to reach ordinary people where they lived and worked. Whether energizing genres like history painting, or creating activist posters or works that penetrate bicultural experiences, Latino artists shaped and chronicled a turning point in American history.


Our America STREET LIFE Urban Latino communities have blossomed across the United States since the 19th century. Reflecting on this history and its enduring visual evidence, many artists turned to the street as a source of inspiration. The artists in this section approach urban environments as insiders who deeply understand its inner workings. Their works expose the way power structures impact the lives of urban dwellers and how Latino communities transform the cities in which they live. For some, urban themes served as a point of departure for considering personal and political concerns. Above: Frank Romero, Death of Rubén Salazar, 1986, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase made possible in part by the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment, 1993.19, © 1986, Frank Romero Right: Emilio Sánchez, Untitled, Bronx Storefront, “La Rumba Supermarket”, late 1980s, watercolor on paper, Smithsonian American Art Museum, gift of the Emilio Sánchez Foundation, 2011.19.5, © Emilio Sanchez Foundation

SIGNS OF THE POPULAR American artists across time have turned to popular culture as a sign of the changing nature of contemporary life. Latino artists bring a unique perspective to this subject that is attuned to vernacular traditions and the making-do strategies of urban, workingclass communities. The artists gathered here examine objects of daily life or redefine imported traditions and iconographies in a new context, often expanding notions of art making in the process. By actively mining the stuff of everyday life, they comment on the meaning of US popular culture.


Our America EVERYDAY PEOPLE Latino artists, drawn to the richness of daily life, often create intimate or monumental images of everyday people. These artists wrestle with how to depict individual likenesses so that they speak to larger historical forces. More than straightforward portraits, these works reflect on the act of portraying people and cultures that are often stereotyped in the media or unincorporated into accounts of American history. Opposite: Margarita Cabrera, Brown Blender, 2011, vinyl, copper wire, and thread, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment, 2012.35.1a-d, © 2011, Margarita Cabrera. Cabrera’s vinyl sculptures take the form of appliances assembled in Mexican factories and sold to US consumers. She sewed each sculpture in a process that echoes factory labor. The strings used to bind the vinyl are left long and exposed, reminders of the labor involved in producing appliances found in many American homes.

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WE INTERRUPT THIS MESSAGE Many American artists explored the impact of rising mass culture around the mid20th century. A generation of Latino artists came of age during this time and turned their attention to how television, film, advertising, and print media depicted communities with limited access to the means of representation. Latino artists, like some of their African American and Asian American peers, c om

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questioned racial and ethnic stereotypes that permeated American culture. Others, inspired by the rise of Third World liberation movements, critiqued how the news portrayed events in Africa, Asia, and beyond. Together these artists subvert entrenched representations by altering existing images or creatively intervening in established circuits of information.

DEFYING CATEGORIES The relationship between Latino art and the shifting landscape of American art since the mid-20th century is not simple or clear-cut. Some Latino artists actively participated in the prevailing artistic movements of the US, at times becoming leaders in their respective fields. Others eschewed pure formalist tendencies to tackle pressing issues of the day. An even larger group of artists inhabited multiple worlds, infusing avant-garde modes with politically and culturally engaged themes. O n V iew


Te o d o r a D a k o v a , © Te o d o r a D a k o v a , h t t p : / / t e o d o r a d a k o v a . c o m


ON VIEW Interview

ROD FAULDS Art museum administrator, educator, curator, exhibition designer and artist, Rod Faulds talks with On View about designing exhibitions and his upcoming show at Art & Culture Center of Hollywood.

PORTRAIT BY TEODORA DAKOVA

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R

R O D F A U L D S I S T H E D I R E C T O R of the University

Galleries at Florida Atlantic University where he also teaches Museum Studies and Gallery Practices. Since 1980, Faulds has worked as an art museum administrator, a curator and an exhibition and graphic designer. He earned an undergraduate degree in Studio Art from California State University, Humboldt, an MA degree in exhibition design, a Certificate of Museums Studies from California State University, Fullerton, and studied in the

Graduate Program in the History of Art at Williams College, Williamstown, MA. As the Associate and Acting Director of the Williams College Museum of Art, Faulds

designed and provided project management for a number of major exhibitions and programs. In 1993 and 1994 Faulds was the Assistant Director for Operations and Public Programs at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and in 1995 and 1996, he was the Chief Designer at the Brooklyn Museum in New York. In 1997 Faulds relocated to Florida to become the

Left to right: Picturing Florida: Ellen Harvey & Mark Dean Veca curatorial project, University Galleries, FAU, 2005; Rod Faulds, Surf Work 8A, 2014, 34 x 34”; Natural Histories curatorial project, 2002, University Galleries, FAU, 2002

OV: How did you become interested in museums and exhibition design? RF: As an undergraduate studio art major, I decided to take a Gallery class because it offered the one extra credit I needed to graduate—and before I knew it, I was sucked in! I became almost All images courtesy of the artist, ©Rod Faulds

as excited about laying out art in a gallery setting as making my own works. After being accepted into both the photo and exhibition design graduate programs at California State Fullerton, I chose exhibition design, working under the direction of Dextra Frankel,


ON VIEW Interview: Rod Faulds

Director of the University Galleries at Florida Atlantic University. Faulds’ exhibition design, project management, and curatorial experiences have been developed through a wide variety of projects. At the Williams College Museum of Art, Faulds designed exhibition installations and exhibition catalogues while managing the museum’s daily operations. At the Brooklyn Museum, he designed major exhibition installations such as Converging Cultures (1996), while running a design department. At the University Galleries, FAU, he has curated numerous exhibitions, including the solo exhibition of the internationally known artist, Michal Rovner, while creating an engaging learning laboratory for FAU students. Revived interest in image-making has led Faulds to employ digital photography to create semi-abstract works that he likes to think are caught somewhere between photography and painting, blending photographic images into repeated patterns of light and color. Faulds interest and work in curating and designing exhibitions has provided a framework for the development of this cohesive body of work, which will be featured in a solo exhibition at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, FL, from June 7, 2014 through August 17, 2014. We’ve asked Rod to share his thoughts on exhibiting as well as creating art...

Left to right: Terry Adkins: Deeper Heart curatorial project, University Galleries, FAU, 1999; Rod Faulds, Surf Work 9, 2014, 34 x 34”; South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual/Media Artists Fellowship Exhibition curatorial project, University Galleries, FAU, 2009

whose design and interior building standards were meticulous. The program afforded me opportunities to curate several contemporary art exhibitions, one of which was picked up by the State Department for an international tour. By the time I completed the program, an MA in design, OnV

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and a Certificate in Museum Studies, I had gained quite a bit of hands-on administrative, design, production, and curatorial experience. A final chapter of my training was with Thomas Krens, former director of the Guggenheim Museum. At the time, he was the director of the Ma

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ON VIEW Interview: Rod Faulds Williams College Museum of Art, where I also studied art history in the College’s esteemed graduate art history program.

OV: What tools do you use to help plan your designs? RF: There have been changes via computer technology over the years, but we almost always use scaled floorplans and/or models of the spaces. In certain instances, we may also employ miniature versions of the art to help plan out an installation. Knowing how many art objects you need or want can be arrived at pretty easily using floor plans and models, yet sometimes the “arranging furniture in your living room” method is often as effective as trying to figure it all out in advance. The type of venue also greatly affects what may be required in an exhibition design. When I designed exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum and the Guggenheim, few elements were left to the time

of the installation. And if an exhibition requires a lot of case work or platforms, advanced design work is imperative. At the Brooklyn Museum, we often used a “mock-up” method where far in advance of the installation, we would gather the objects together for different parts of an exhibition and work with the curators to determine how best to display groups of objects. The mock-up sessions would provide enough info to allow an exhibition designer to make drawings for the museum’s carpenters.

OV: How do you approach the design of an exhibit? RF: The objects come first. How do they want to be displayed, or how does the curator want to display them? Is the installation supposed to be interpretive or contextual, or are the objects being isolated in a supposedly neutral space? This idea is the norm for modern and contemporary art— the white cube, the neutral container. Architec-

Surfing Florida: A Photographic History project direction and exhibition design, University Galleries, FAU, 2012


Africa: The Art of A Continent exhibition design, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1996

ture, graphic design, and historical exhibitions, among others, tend to require more design. Consider the space you are designing for, and the scale of the objects in relation to the space. Will the exhibition design speak and interact with the objects, or will it be theoretically, invisible? These are important first questions. Color can be really critical even if it is just used as an accent, but it can also have great spatial impact by using it to make large gallery spaces feel smaller.

OV: What are your thoughts regarding the role of exhibition design? RF: Generally speaking, when viewers visit a museum or gallery, they open themselves up to having visual experiences. The physical environment an exhibition designer creates should engage them in a variety of ways. I believe this environment can have some active moments that may enhance the art viewing experience. I also believe there needs to be a balance that leans toward creatOnV

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ing hospitable and quiet environments for art.

OV: What do you enjoy about the process and what do you find most challenging? RF: Combining a group of disparate works in space can be quite challenging, but it is also one of the most enjoyable aspects of designing or installing art exhibitions. How art objects can speak to one another, whether right next to each other or across the gallery, can be very compelling, but it is never automatic or easily predictable. Time and budget always present challenges. You have to believe in magic—and figure out creative ways to bring resources to the table. Although our Surfing Florida: A Photographic History exhibition at FAU received a Florida Humanities Council grant, we still relied on volunteer services and the help of talented students who worked for little or no compensation. We are extremely careful and good at stretching, repurposing and retrofitting. Ma

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ON VIEW Interview: Rod Faulds

OV: Who do you collaborate with during the design process? RF: I have had the pleasure of collaborating with some world-class designers on survey exhibitions of their work, namely the American architect, Charles Moore, early in my career at Williams College, and more recently with Chicago-based graphic designer, Rick Valicenti, at FAU. Charles Moore kind of invented super graphics in the 1960s, and it was such an honor to have the opportunity to work with him. He actually let me pick all the colors—and there was lots of color! Working with artists can provide great challenges as well as pleasures, but in the end, it is almost always the latter. Oftentimes and especially with artists, the relationship is more about facilitating than collaborating. I have also collaborated with many curators, and in our case, we have also welcomed the phenomena of the “artist curator” into the mix.

OV: Do you think in terms of “telling a story’’ as viewers proceeded through an exhibit space? RF: I think less about telling stories with art exhibitions—an awful lot of those we have produced at FAU are about thematics. Getting the art to match the themes happens more in the selection of the artists. In the gallery, it comes back to making the works look their best individually while also speaking to and feeding off their neighbors. If the selections are right then stories will come through for viewers, but like the art itself, there’s usually more than one story, and we hope viewers, triggered by the art, are making the stories up for themselves.

OV: After working with some major museums, what was the transition like when you relocated to Florida to become Director of the University Galleries at FAU?

Charles Moore: Buildings & Projects exhibition design with Charles Moore, Williams College Museum of Art, 1986


Converging Cultures: Art & Identity in Spanish America​exhibition design, The Brooklyn Museum, 1996

RF: While my experiences at both the Guggenheim and the Brooklyn Museum were amazing, I found that I was not well suited for these large organizations, and there was also an educator inside me that wanted to get out. When I first came to FAU, I curated several shows to reestablish my curatorial chops with my knowledge of the then current scene in New York, but I also needed to solidify the program, get resources outside of the university to do high quality exhibitions and in time, invite others to curate. While I have done plenty of curating over the past several years, I have mostly handled the regionally based shows and invited others to do the “out of New York” shows.

OV: Could you share some of the advice you give to your students and let us know if they have also taught you anything? RF: For artists, I highly encourage them to develop their ability to articulate their ideas about their OnV

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art verbally and in writing. Successful artists are really smart and generally, they can sincerely talk about their work intellectually, not just compassionately. For students that want to be curators, I tell them they better plan on getting a Ph.D. just to begin to be able to compete. Finally, diversity of skills is very important and in some ways, I believe computers have helped to make this more natural or easier, but there are also lots of hands-on skills that are not necessarily taught, like framing, installing artwork, etc. At FAU, I have developed the University Galleries program to be a learning laboratory, meaning that I have chosen to employ students rather than a more stable, longer lasting support staff. This creates an environment where we all learn from one another, including me! It is inspiring and fulfilling to see some of the students come into their own through their engagement with our operation. Recently, one of our long-time student employees became the paid full-time intern at the Margulies Ma

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ON VIEW Interview: Rod Faulds Collection in Miami, and a current student will be a summer intern at Lehmann Maupin, a prestigious contemporary art gallery in New York City.

OV: In addition to your work at FAU, you are also an artist. Could you share with us the inspiration behind your artwork? RF: The rigidly gridded repeated imagery apparent in my work is influenced by the geometries of spatial and graphic design. More importantly, I am interested in using reductive strategies identified with abstract painting and minimal art, employing common images of the world I experience, Rod Faulds, Orange Construction Fence I, 2012, 35 x 23”

mostly while driving in surburban south Florida or on highways around the state. Images and subjects from the streets of New York City are also included and most recently, I have been computer-collaging images from surfing magazines along with strips of my repetitive photographs. I try to make images that are as akin to painting as they are to photographs—that is, they clearly reflect their inherent photographic values yet through color and abstraction, they enter another realm that is emphatically neither representational nor illusionistic.

OV: In your upcoming show at Art & Culture Center of Hollywood, what can we expect to see? And will we see some of your design skills at work in the presentation? RF: I expect to be showing selections from two bodies of work. First, there will be selections of my gridded works that I have been making for the last three years. Also included will be my newer works, the Surf Works, which includes imagery from surfing magazines that I have enjoyed “passing through,” as a surfer myself, for the better part of my life. Most of the cropped images are pictures of moving water that are de-personalized like the grid work. I am beginning to think about how I will install my work for the exhibition. To what degree my exhibition design skills will be evident is not clear to me yet, but I have some ideas about “slamming” one of the walls with several of the surf images and using a variety of different funky found materials, like plywood, masonite, etc. to function as a gridded background/context for the images.


Rod Faulds (clockwise from top left): Surf Work 1, 2013, 34 x 34”; Summer Georgia Fence, 2013, 30 x 29”; Surf Work 12, 2014, 34 x 34”; Green Window Orange Fence, 2013, 12 x 12”

*All of Rod Faulds’ photo-based works are archival ink-jet prints.

OV: What lies ahead for you?

and will include an international roster of artists. While the show will not include my work, it is driven to some degree by my artwork, and is equally influenced by the fact that in my 16 years at FAU, we have never presented a photo-based exhibition. I feel like the stars are aligning for a renewed chapter of my career! On View To see more of Rod Fauld’s work, visit: www.rodfaulds.com and www.wrodfaulds.com

RF: As my foray back into making art is gaining full steam, it is concurrent with a change in my family life that is frequently taking me to New York City. Being in New York has allowed me to revive my curatorial practice and I am currently working on a photo-based art exhibition at FAU scheduled for later this year. The exhibition is called Altarations: Built, Blended, Processed OnV

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FOCUS

THE NEW YORK TIMES

{ P H O T O JOU R NA L I S M }

Exhibition

The New York Times Magazine Photographs On view 04.26. 14–08. 24. 14 at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

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Magazine has been part of a Sunday morning, pajama-clad ritual for millions of readers for more than 30 years. The reward for pouring through pages of the Sunday newspaper, it’s the archetype of The New York Times: personality— smart, stylish, surprising. The magazine’s reputation for telling stories in imaginative ways is reinforced by its strong photography. As the magazine’s director of photography, Kathy Ryan has been part of that wildly creative team since 1987. She emphasized the magazine’s collaborative environment that fosters good ideas from anywhere and anyone—editors, reporters, photographers, designers, etc.: “I’ve worked under amazing editors. They have faith in us. They have faith in the power of photography,” Ryan said, “enough to let us try stuff that might seem risky.” Indeed, the magazine takes chances, often resulting in work worthy of framing. Now, that work will appear on the walls of


F O C U S

the Museum of Contemporary some of the finest commisArt Jacksonville. The New York sioned photographs worldTimes Magazine Photographs wide in a variety of genres, inexhibition will attract art lov- cluding reportage, portraiture, ers, photographers, news- style, conceptual photography, hounds and magazine readers. and photo illustration. The exhibition is co-curatAmong the featured arted by Ryan and Lesley A. Mar- ists are: Lynsey Addario, Datin of the Aperture Founda- vid Armstrong, Roger Ballen, tion, which pubLillian Bassman, lished Ryan’s book Chuck Close, Fred on the photographs Conrad, Gregory from The New York Crewdson, PhilTimes Magazine. ip Lorca diCorRyan reviewed cia, Rineke Dijksmore than 1,500 istra, Mitch Epstein, sues of the magaAngel Franco, Lee zine to create the Friedlander, Ashbook and exhibiley Gilbertson, MOCA Jacksontion. The magaNan Goldin, Edville’s new exhibit zine’s history is ward Keating, Jeff presents a stunning edited into an exKoons, Inez van survey of photohibition that docLamsweerde and uments the collab- graphic works from Vinoodh Mata“The New York orative work prodin, Annie Leibocess from initial Times Magazine.” vitz, Steve McCuridea to the pubry, Ryan McGinley, lished page—shot lists, work Abelardo Morell, Simon Norprints, contact sheets, videos, folk, Paolo Pellegrin, Jack Piertear sheets and framed prints. son, Sebastião Salgado, Alfred Eleven modules represent Seiland, Andres Serrano, Mathe magazine’s visual eclec- lick Sidibé, Lars Tunbjörk, and ticism. The selections portray Hellen van Meene. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Lynsey Addario, From “Battle Company Is Out There,” published February 24, 2008, Courtesy the artist/VII NETWORK; 2. Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, From “Dream House,” 2002. Published November 10, 2002, Courtesy the artist/Gagosian Gallery above (top to bottom): 1. Roger Ballen, Resemblance, From “The Selma Blair Witch Project: Fall’s Dark Silhouettes Have a Way of Creeping Up on You,” published October 30, 2005, Courtesy the artist /Gagosian Gallery; 2. HelLen van Meene, Actress Gabourey Sidibe: Precious, Published February 21, 2010, Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York left: Fred R. Conrad (with Paul Myoda and Julian LaVerdiere), Phantom Towers, Photo-collage, From “Remains of the Day,” published September 23, 2001 (cover image), Courtesy the New York Times


SHOWCASE { H E N N I N G

CORAL SPRINGS MUSEUM

H AU P T }

Exhibition

Henning Haupt: Drawing Lines—Making Space On view thru 05. 17. 14 at Coral Springs Museum of Art www.coralspringsmuseum.org

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of Art presents Drawing Lines– Making Space, an exhibition featuring a new body of work by Henning Haupt, a German artist and educator based in Fort Lauderdale. His work explores spatial qualities within drawings, paintings and threedimensional installations. Haupt’s paintings explore visual, spatial compositions by using different modes of line structures in combination with fields of painted colors. The impetus of drawing, the gestural character of the line, results in forms, spaces, and movements that are in tension with serial patterns of the application. His three-dimensional installations are built out of paintings with spatial compositions of lines and color. By placing the paintings in space, Haupt builds a combination of visual and physical spaces. The results may hint to something intangible within the colorspace, yet they are demonstrations of the relationship between a thought and its physical execution in a material. The work


S H O W C A S E

invites viewers to share in the ed by another human being, the pleasure of drawing, painting, painter, is an important qualiand building; to dive into form, ty of the work—and the reason space and atmosphere; to deci- for me to paint.” pher thoughts and processes. Haupt received a Diploma The production process it- of Architecture from the Techself is at the core of Haupt’s nical University in Darmstadt, artistic endeavor. As he ex- Germany. He then undertook plains: “My interest in paint- postgraduate studies in the ing is more about Masters Program ‘how to paint?’ than at the Cranbrook ‘what to paint?’” Academy of Arts in The fast gesturBloomfield Hills, al drawing of lines MI, and completwith pencil is comed his praxis-based bined with a slower PhD on artistic demotion of painting, sign strategies in whereby the lines 2008. are actually drawIn 2013, he was Henning Haupt ing and painting at awarded the South explores spatial the same time. In- compositions of line Florida Cultural corporating semiConsortium Feland color. transparent oils, lowship in the viHaupt’s paintings may com- sual arts, as exhibited in Who prise anywhere from 6 to 20 lay- am I to you?, the South Floriers of media on canvas or paper. da Cultural Consortium Exhib“In general, my paintings re- it 2013 at the Museum of Art | veal my presence in the work, Fort Lauderdale. and the viewer may read and reHaupt currently teaches Collate to this, says Haupt. “This or, Material and Space, and Arintimacy between the viewer chitectural Design Studios at observing the painting and the the Florida Atlantic University process of emergence execut- School of Architecture. O n V iew

opposite: 1. #18386 - Circular Black Forms in Stripes, 2013, 72 x 52”, Oil on Canvas Above (top to bottom): 1.#18350 - Black Lines in White and Blue, 2013, 58 x 38”, Oil on Canvas 2. #18349 - White between Quinacridone Red, 2013, 58 x 38”, Oil on Canvas left: Henning Haupt, photo: Kara Starzyk. to view more of Henning haupt’s work, visit: http://henninghaupt.com


PROFILE { E L A I N E

KNITTED AND EMBROI-

dered works with a conceptual twist have made Elaine Reichek’s art the subject of solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Jewish Museum of New York, Palais des Beaux-Arts in Belgium, and other distinguished venues in the US and abroad. Employing techniques traditionally associated with women’s work, including sewing and knitting, she explores questions of language, culture, and authenticity, while also elevating media typically associated with craft into the realm of high art. Opening May 3, 2014, Boca Museum of Art will present an elegant survey of Reichek’s art, dating from 1972 to 1995. The show spans Reichek’s minimal, abstract fabric works of the 1970s through the knit, photographic, and sampler works of the 1980s and ’90s. In these later works, Reichek deliberately misinterprets the objects and symbols in photographs—translating structures and figures into knitted objects hung directly on the wall, or add-

R E I C H E K }

Exhibition

Elaine Reichek: The Eye of the Needle On view 05.03. 14–07. 27. 14 at Boca Museum of Art, Boca Raton www.bocamuseum.org

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P R O F I L E

ing subjectively chosen color to formal methods to encourage black-and-white images. A shel- viewers to read and understand ter seen in an appropriated ethno- objects and images in dimengraphic photograph becomes an sions beyond their original funcabstract knitted sculpture, now tions. The use of knitting and collapsed, colored, and hung up- embroidery is central to her side down. The method empha- narratives—although she ofsizes a colonizing ten combines this culture’s tendency with installation to misinterpret and and other media. aestheticize the artiReichek received facts it comes across her BFA from Yale in its travels, and the University and her translation from BA from Brooklyn photographed form College. Her work to knitted form repis held in the colleclicates the way intions of New York’s Elaine Reichek’s formation is passed Museum of Modabstract knitted and from language to ern Art, the Whitembroidered works language and in the ney Museum of take media process, reshaped American Art, and and altered—its typically associated the Brooklyn Muwith craft into content never quite seum; the Musethe same. Working the realm of high art. um of Fine Arts and in related ways with the Isabella Stewart ethnographic images of indi- Gardner Museum, both in Bosviduals, Reichek undermines ton; the Pennsylvania Academy the camera’s pretense at con- of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia; veying their “truth,” which is and the Norton Museum of Art as absent from the photograph in Palm Beach, FL; among othas their bodies are from her flat ers. Her work was also includknitted forms. ed in the 2012 Whitney BienniThe artist uses a number of al in New York. O n V iew

opposite: 1. Painted Blackfoot, 1990, knitted wool yarn and oil on gelatin silver print, 79 x 73” above (top to bottom): 1. The Artist’s Bedroom (detail), 1979, Cloth, thread, bed, and paint, Installation dimensions variable 2. Sampler (Their Manners Are Decorous), 1992, hand embroidery on linen, 13-1/4 x 14-1/2” 3. Yellow Men, 1986, knitted wool yarn and oil on gelatin silver print, 71 x 115” left: Elaine Reichek images Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery, NY


SPOTLIGHT { WA LT E R

DELIGHTFUL, ENTERTAINING

W I C K }

Exhibition

Walter Wick: Games, Gizmos and Toys in the Attic On view 06.24. 14–09. 28. 14 at Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

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and unexpected, Walter Wick’s children’s books carry their readers to a land of enchantment. In this retrospective spotlighting the playful and interactive world of the best-selling author and artist,visitors will be able to see the original photographs that Wick used to illustrate his many books, including A Book of Science and Wonder, Walter Wick’s Optical Tricks, as well as the Can You See What I See and I Spy series. In addition, Vero Beach Museum of Art will display the artist’s Crazy Columns model from his book Optical Tricks, his castle from Can You See What I See: Once Upon a Time, and three more models photographed for other books in the Can You See What I See? series. The models, photographs, and behind-the-scenes video clips will help visitors understand Wick’s creative process. The photographs, enlarged to five to six-feet wide, reveal details and colors not possible in the book reproductions. To illustrate his many books,


S P O T L I G H T

Walter Wick searches for ob- subjects which had long fasjects to assemble, sort and ar- cinated him—science and virange in playful settings that sual perception—interested he carefully photographs. The kids, too. This led to his first books provide a magical expe- two solo projects: A Drop of rience in which viewers engage Water: A Book of Science and in a visual quest from one page Wonder and Walter Wick’s Opto the next. tical Tricks. When his third solo Wick began his artistic ca- project, Can You See What I reer in the 1970s as See?: Picture Puza commercial prodzles to Search and uct photographer. Solve, debuted An interest in opon The New York tical illusions, esTimes bestseller pecially ones inlist in 2002, a new volving photograseries of searchphy and its effects and-find puzzle on 3-D objects and books was born. scenes, led him to More than 38 Walter Wick’s experimentation million copies of children’s books and exploration. his books have carry their By the 1980s, he been sold worldreaders to a land of began work with wide. Whether creenchantment. Games magazine, ating photographic creating photocompositions out graphic puzzles. In 1991, he of odds and ends or out of elabcollaborated with Jean Mar- orate sets that he constructs zollo on I Spy: A Book of Pic- with a team of model makers, ture Riddles. With the success Walter Wick opens the eyes of I Spy, Wick had opportu- and tickles the fancy of young nities to visit schools and see and old alike. firsthand how kids respondWant to know more? Visit ed to his work. He found that www.walterwick.com. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Yikes! from I Spy, Fantasy, 1994, pigmented inkjet photograph, 60 x 36”, © Walter Wick Studios 2. sky high from Can You See What I See? Dream Machine, pigmented inkjet photograph, © 2003 Walter Wick studios Above (top to bottom): 1. walter wick at work on his castle model from Can You See What I See? Once Upon a Time, © Walter Wick Studios 2. Puss and Boots from Can You See What I See? Once Upon a Time, 2006, Pigmented Inkjet photograph, 60 x 36”, © Walter Wick Studios left: walter wick, image courtesy of the artist


“My own breast cancer journey has only ignited my research.”

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN.

Dr. Kristi Egland knows breast cancer. She had been researching it for years when she was diagnosed with breast cancer herself. Suddenly, she went from researcher to patient. Her personal experience inspired her to focus on innovative new treatments. Today, through a grant from Susan G. Komen®, Kristi studies ways to detect signs of breast cancer through a blood test, which could one day make early detection accessible for more women.

Help save lives. Donate at IamSusanGKomen.org or text SGK to 90999. $10.00 donation to Susan G. Komen. Charges will appear on your wireless bill, or be deducted from your prepaid balance. All purchases must be authorized by account holder. Must be 18 years of age or have parental permission to participate. Message and Data Rates May Apply. Text STOP to 90999 to STOP. Text HELP to 90999 for HELP. Full Terms: www.mGive.org/T. Privacy Policy: www.mGive.org/P. © 2014 Susan G. Komen. For financial information, please visit ww5.komen.org/donate/disclosurestatement.html

On View 04-06.2014  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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