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on iew FLORIDA

REVISITING EDEN: Glass by

Kathleen Elliot AT T H E P E N S A C O L A MUSEUM OF ART

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 2

Carrie Ann Baade : SOLAR MIDNIGHT AT M O C A JACKSONVILLE

The Photography

Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor of

AT T H E V O N L I E B I G ART CENTER, NAPLES

Ursula von Rydingsvard : SCULPTURE AT T H E PAT R I C I A & P H I L L I P FROST ART MUSEUM, MIAMI


CONTENTS April/May

2012

Vo l . 3 , N o . 1

ON THE COVER : KATHLEEN ELLIOT, BOUQUET, NOVEMBER 2008, GLASS, MIXED MEDIA, 44”H X 24”W X 6”D RIGHT: KATHLEEN ELLIOT, UNTITLED MINIATURE, 2010, GLASS, 4”H X 9.5”W X 3”D

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on iew FLORIDA

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 1 2

Carrie Ann Baade :

REVISITING EDEN: Glass by

Kathleen Elliot

SOLAR MIDNIGHT

AT T H E P E N S A C O L A MUSEUM OF ART

AT M O C A JACKSONVILLE

The Photography

Ursula von Rydingsvard :

of Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

SCULPTURE AT T H E PAT R I C I A & P H I L L I P FROST ART

AT T H E V O N L I E B I G

MUSEUM, MIAMI

ART CENTER, NAPLES

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44 Pensacola

REVISITING EDEN: GLASS BY KATHLEEN ELLIOT

Kathleen Elliot’s exquisite sculptures of flameworked glass take traditional botanical forms to new imaginary heights. For her new show at the Pensacola Museum of Art, Elliot is exhibiting a selection of pieces that represent major developments of her recent work. Leaves, flowers, fruit and vines take on surprising and unique characteristics that convey an alternate sense of reality.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

56 Miami

70 Naples

80 Jacksonville

90 Fort Myers

RYDINGSVARD:

JERRY UELSMANN

BAADE: SOLAR

JOURNAL OF

URSULA VON SCULPTURE

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum is hosting a showcase of abstract, large-scale– often monumental­– sculptures by Ursula von Rydingsvard, whose work is recognized for its great psychological force and powerful physical presence.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY & MAGGIE TAYLOR

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center presents a hauntingly beautiful display of surreal and enigmatic dreamscapes.

CARRIE ANN

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC

MIDNIGHT

CLYDE BUTCHER

This unique exhibition at the Southwest Florida Museum of History, was designed and developed by Clyde Butcher and provides a neverbefore-seen glimpse into the making of his stunning blackand-white landscape masterpieces.

Baade’s new show at MOCA Jacksonville is a survey of autobiographical works inspired by literature and art history.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): URSULA RYDINGSVARD,

On View Destination:

KRASAWICA II, ©URSULA VON

BOSTON, MA

RYDINGSVARD, COURTESY GALERIE LELONG, NY; MAGGIE TAYLOR,

112 The Museums: An overview of Boston’s

OH HAPPY DAY, ©MAGGIE TAYLOR, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST;

outstanding art venues

CARRIE ANN BAADE, LADY OR TIGER, ©CARRIE ANN BAADE, COURTESY

120 A Gallery Tour: A fine art gallery listing OnV

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OF THE ARTIST; CLYDE BUTCHER, DUNES, ©CLYDE BUTCHER

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CONTENTS April/May

2012

Vo l u m e

3,

No. 1

5

COMMENTARY

6

Profile

106

APRIL W. DAVIS

Finding inspiration in the splendor of nature, April Davis has become known for her brilliant tropical landscapes.

MUSE

Insight

Summer Art Camps: Expanding the Imagination

108

MISAKO INAOKA

A menagerie of bizarre combinations of animals and machines, Misako Inaoka’s hybrid and kinetic creations compel observers to get as close as possible.

8

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

40

GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

Spotlight Fo c u s

104

CHARLES LEDRAY

PICTURED: charles ledray, mENS SUITS (installation view), 2009, mixed media, Photo: John Kennard

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In a world of high tech mass production, Charles LeDray revives manual traditions of exquisite craftsmanship. Considered feats of miniaturism, his meticulously handcrafted works are breathtaking to behold. .

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PAUL JACOULET

Rare prints from noted woodblock artist, Paul Jacoulet, provide a unique glimpse into the life and work of the first foreigner to become a master of ukiyo-e.


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C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew M A G A Z I N E

Turning Two This issue marks the 2nd anniversary of On View. And once again, we’d like to extend our thanks to all of our readers, subscribers and supporters—you help make this all happen! It’s been another stunning year. We’ve featured hundreds of new exhibitions and works from a truly remarkable array of artists. Our covers have included: Pablo Cano’s masterfully crafted marionettes (April/May 2011); an eye-popping display of works by contemporary Chinese artists in East/West: Visually Speaking (June/July 2011); the powerful visual documentation by photojournalists of the ravages of world conflict in The Power of the Image (August/ September 2011); the monumental nature-inspired sculptures of Steve Tobin (October/November 2011); a tribute to the 50th anniversary of American studio glass (December 2011/January 2012); and the extraordinary narrative works of textile artists, presented in Thread of Life (February/March 2012). With your support, we will continue to bring you illuminating and visually compelling coverage of Florida’s amazing shows—so please keep reading!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director

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MUSE

Summer Art Camps

T

E X PA N D I N G T H E I M A G I N AT I O N

HE IMAGINATION IS

a terrible thing to waste. A child’s imagination is an essential part of growing up. Exercises in exploring the imagination help children develop flexible perspectives, which allow them to think beyond boundaries, explore possibilities, ask questions and better understand the world. Summer arts camps encourage children to expand and communicate their imagination and are specifically geared towards creating a safe, supportive environment, where they can artistically grow.


MUSE

Summer art camps are growing in popularity because of the positive experience the children are having. It is no secret that art museums and art centers have become quite masterful at developing fun and clever ways to inspire kids to be creative. And it is, therefore, not surprising that summer art camp programs are becoming more successful each year. Ken Hannon, Director of Communications for Dunedin Fine Art Center (www.dfac.org), feels the camps are growing in popularity because of the positive experience the children are having. “Studies show that children who study art, end up doing better in ALL of their studies,” says Hannon, “so that makes our programs pretty popular with parents too!” These programs are designed to expose students to a broad range of ideas and art-making experiences through a virtually endless array of media and theme-based classes. From drawing, painting and collage to sculpture, photography and printmaking, summer art camps offer something for every budding artist. As summer swiftly approaches, we encourage you to take a few moments to check out local museums and art centers for exciting art camp experiences for your “mini master(s),” and realize the possibilities. O n V iew OnV

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{S P E C I A L

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

04-05.2012 BOCA RATON Thru 10.14.12

Glass Act: The Contemporary Art Glass Movement Turns 50 Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

glass representative of the full breadth of this defining period in contemporary glassmaking and focuses on unique objects that explore ideas by leading glass artists such as Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Michael Glancy, Harvey Littleton, Concetta Mason, William Morris, Jay Musler, Toots Zynsky and others. Thru 05.20.12

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement in America, this display showcases art

Muted Imprints: An Installation by Misako Inaoka Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Delight in the invented creatures and landscapes of Misako Inaoka’s imagination. The relationship between the viewer and Inaoka’s artwork is one of discovery—the viewer’s presence brings this exhibition to life, literally. (See story on pg. 108.)

From the pensive gaze of Georgia O’Keeffe, to Mohammed Ali’s powerful punch, this exhibition presents more than 50 works in all media, exploring the intimate and public faces of artists, celebrities, politicians and everyday people.

Thru 05.13.12

Portraits from the Permanent Collection

1. Harvey K. Littleton, Ruby Orange Mobile Arc, 1982, internally decorated, hot-drawn glass, cut and polished, 14-3/4 x 18-1/2 x 2-1/4”, Museum Permanent Collection, gift of the Estate of George Epstein 2. Misako Inaoka, Pine Hands, 2012, mixed media, 30 x 21 x 11”, photography by Misako Inaoka, courtesy of the artist 3. Andy Warhol, Muhammad Ali, 1979, silkscreen on Strathmore Bristol paper, edition no. 3/150, 4 panels, 40 x 30” each, Permanent Collection, gift of Dr. Richard Golden

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Boca Raton continued...

Thru 05.20.12

Will Barnet at 100: Eight Decades of Painting and Printmaking Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

during one of the most distinguished careers in American art. (See story in the February/ March 2012 issue on pg. 108.) CORAL GABLES Thru 05.31.12

Will Ryman Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Sculptor, Will Ryman, has designed a series of larger-thanlife fiberglass and stainless steel flowers To mark the 100th and insects for the birthday of pioneering Fairchild’s 2011-2012 painter, printmaker and art season. Viewers, educator, Will Barnet (b. May 25, 1911), this exhibition of nearly 50 works explores the momentous evolution of Barnet’s art, from realism to abstraction,

young and young at heart, will enjoy Ryman’s organic and playful sculptures set amidst the Fairchild’s lush tropical gardens. (See On View Destination in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 108.)

seek favors, are on exhibit for the first time.

Thru 09.23.12

Saintly Blessings from Mexico: The Joseph D. and Janet M. Shein Collection of Retablos Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Painted devotional images of saints, called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects of veneration and to

Thru 04.22.12

Women, Windows and the Word: Diverging Perspectives on Islamic Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

The complex theme of Islamic art is examined in 3 intertwining themes: Muslim women as creators and

1. Will Barnet, Midnight, 1983-1984, oil on canvas, 49 x 29”, Private Collection, Naples, FL 2. Rendering of Icon (with Petals) by Will Ryman, 2011, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, ©WR Studio Inc./photo by Kirkland Hyman, courtesy Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden 3. El Alma de Maria, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum

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Coral Gables continued...

www.csmart.org

Guest Curator, Dr. John Childrey, who has a passion for trains, history and writing, brings to light the historic photographs of O. Winston Link. Also featured are paintsubjects of art, Western ing collections, train views of the Islamic memorabilia and world, and decoration and the written word. (See story in the December 2011/January 2012 issue on pg. 88.) CORAL SPRINGS

a fully operational small gauge train set.

Thru 05.26.12

All Aboard: An Artistic History of the Railroad— Photography of O. Winston Link Coral Springs Museum of Art

Thru 05.26.12

Candy Childrey, Cesar Barroso, and Nester Guzman Coral Springs Museum of Art

www.csmart.org

This exhibition showcases images by Cesar Barroso, a native Brazilian with an extraordinary ability to capture light and shadows, as demonstrated in his series of botanicals and skylines; photographs by Candy Childrey, whose favorite subjects are nature, birds and old broken down vehicles; and abstract marble sculptures by Columbian born artist, Nester Guzman. DAYTONA BEACH 04.27-09.02.12

Director’s Choice:

Favorite Artworks from the Collections as Selected by MOAS Director Emeritus Gary R. Libby Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The extraordinary quality and range of artwork at MOAS lends itself well to an exhibit that highlights the ‘best of the best.’ Included are stunning contemporary jewels together with historic French, American and decorative pieces from across the globe—a show not to be missed! Thru 07.08.12

Havana Revisited: An Architectural Heritage

1. Aphrodite Désirée Navab, I Am Not a Persian Painting, 2000-2001, gelatin silver print, 18-5/8 x 14-7/8”, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbaum, ©2001 Aphrodite Désirée Navab 2. O. Winston Link, image courtesy of Coral Springs Museum of Art 3. Nester Guzman, image courtesy of Coral Springs Museum of Art

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Daytona Beach continued...

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Historical colored postcard images of Havana are juxtaposed with recent digital color photographs of the same views in this visual documentary, The focus of this based on years of exexhibition is a remarkable set of woodblock prints that are beautifully composed, visually exciting and masterfully produced using the centuries-old process of Ukiyo-e carving and printing. haustive research and Though Paul Jacoulet investigation. used traditional processes his images are 04.14-06.10.12 modern and beautifulJacoulet: Woodly synthesize Japanese block Prints and French aesthetics. from the MOAS (See story on pg. 110.) Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

04.13-06.10.12

Treasures of the Chrysanthemum

Throne: Bronzes, Porcelain and Ivory from the Meiji Empire Museum of Arts & Sciences

with the aid of Samurai advisors until his death in 1912. Thru 05.02.12

www.moas.org

The exquisite Japanese bronzes, intricate yet delicate ivories and glorious porcelains presented

A Tale of Two Cities: Eugene Atget’s Paris and Berenice Abbott’s New York Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

More than an exhibition of architectural photography, this show examines the work of two artists who were inextricably linked to each other and to the development of modern photography.

in this important exhibition were created during the progressive reign of Mutsuhito, the Meiji Emperor, who ascended the Japanese throne in 1867 at the age of 15 and ruled

1. Image courtesy of Museum of Arts & Sciences 2. Paul Jacoulet, Nuit de Neige, collection of the Museum of Arts & Sciences 3. Iron Censer, Hagiya Katsuhira, Meiji, Japan 4. Eugene Atget, Untitled (Along the Seine), c. 1921-1926, © Eugene Atget, courtesy of the Syracuse University Art Collection

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Daytona Beach continued...

an overt theatricality and an implied narrative structure in the events, scenes and characters that are depicted. (See Vintage Blends in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 78.) Thru 04.22.12

Fluidrive: Modern Daguerreotypes by Curtis Wehrfritz Southeast Museum of Photography

www.smponline.org

Featured in this survey are portraits of contemporary Americans, each one made as a unique and unreproducible tintype image using a technology and a technique from the middle of the 19th century, and Thru 05.02.12 each alludes to the [hyphen]hyphenated character Americans: of American identiContemporary ties—Irish-American, Tintype Portraits­ African-American, etc. by Keliy (See Vintage Blends Anderson-Staley in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 78.)

www.smponline.org

Work in the Fluidrive series spans over six years and is concerned with forms of lyrical and allegorical storytelling. Wehrfritz’s daguerreoSoutheast type images are very Museum of much concerned with Photography

Thru 04.22.12

SurfLand: Joni Sternbach Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Far from typical surfer action shots, the combination of historic

process and contemporary subject yields direct and timeless images of individuals standing on the verge of sea and land. (See Vintage Blends in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 78.) D e LAND 04.13-06.10.12

Expanding Visions Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

FMWA presents the expanded bodies of work of eight exceptional Florida art-

1. Curtis Wehrfritz, Poe Raven Heart (detail), daguerreotype, ©Curtis Wehrfritz 2. Keliy Anderson-Staley, Helen, 2009, ©Keliy Anderson-Staley 3. Joni Sternbach, Wayne & Brandon, Santa Barbara, CA, 2008, ferrotype on aluminum, ©Joni Sternbach

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DeLand continued...

ists: Amy W. Miller of Venice, Carolina Cleere of Tampa, Julia Owens of Sanford, Vivian Spencer of Pensacola, Candance Knapp of Brandon, Barbara Balzer of Tallahassee, Jo Sinclair of St. Augustine and Louise Lieber. Their sculptural creations evoke basic elements of architectural design. DELRAY BEACH

Jean Banas of New Smyrna Beach.

www.morikami.org

This exhibition comprises an array of paintings, colorful woodblock prints, sculptures, masks and other objects depicting a host of legendary ghosts, gods and otherworldly beings.

05.22-09.16.12

Thru 05.06.12

Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art

Mariko Kusumoto: Unfolding Stories Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Thru 07.15.12

Architectural Counterpoints Museum of Florida Art

a mélange of objects, present a wide range of whimsical, often surrealist, scenes reminiscent of various places and times, from Victorian-era Boston to 1950s Tokyo. (See story in the February/

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

March 2012 issue on pg. 96.) Thru 05.06.12

www.morikami.org

Mariko Kusumoto’s meticulous handcrafted sculptural vignettes, comprising

www.museumoffloridaart.org

On display are works by Roxanne Horvath, Peter Rumpel and

Old Techniques, New Interpretations: Japanese Prints from the 1950s to the 21st Century, from the Collection of Paul and Christine Meehan

1. Barbara Balzer, image courtesy of the artist and Florida Museum for Women Artists 2. Peter Rumpel, Orchard #1, 2011, painted metal, 29 x 24 x 12” 3. Tengu Mask (detail), artist unknown, ink and colors on papier-mâché, straw and fibers, Showa Period, early 1980s, gift of Japan Pavilion, 1984 Louisiana World Exposition 4. Mariko Kusumoto, Self-Entertainment Kit (interior detail), 2009, nickel silver, brass, copper, sterling silver, resin, decal, found objects, photo: Dean Powell

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Delray Beach continued...

Aydelette Kelsey is a Florida-based artist with a wide range of talent. Spirit and emotion are common threads throughout her work. This exhibition

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Featured in this exhibition are more than 60 prints that celebrate over 40 years of sosaku hanga masters from Kiyoshi Saitō (1907–1997) to Toko Shinoda (b. 1913), among many others.

is a photographic exploration of the artist as traveler.

Maine artist, Bill McCarthy, exhibits a photographic series created at three environmentally and geographically distinct island locations: the active volcanic island country of Iceland, Bailey Island off the coast of Maine and local barrier island, Caladesi.

Featuring tapestries and paintings by some of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, this highly-acclaimed exhibition includes paintings by Sandro Botticelli, Parmigianino, Alessandro Allori, Luca Giordano and Lorenzo Monaco,

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 04.08.12

Other Islands: Aydelette Kelsey 


 Dunedin Fine Dunedin Fine Art Center Art Center

Offering of the Angels: Old Master Paintings and Tapestries from the Uffizi Gallery Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

www.dfac.org

www.moafl.org

05.04-08.11.12

Three Islands: Bill McCarthy 

 


DUNEDIN 05.04-08.11.12

www.dfac.org

selected by Antonio Natali, director of Florence’s famous Uffizi Gallery. Thru 05.27.12

Primordial: Paintings and Sculpture by

1. Image courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens 2. Aydelette Kelsey, The Fish Seller 3. Bill McCarthy, Jokullon, Glacial Lagoon 4. Alessandro Di Mariano Filipepi (called Sandro Botticelli), Madonna with Child (Madonna della loggia), c. 1466-1467, oil on panel, collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Nova Southeastern University

Gifts from the Freundlich Collection Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

In addition to drawings of all the known varieties of sharks in the world, this exhibition contains photographs, sculptures Isabel De Obaldía, and video as well as 1985–2011 a section devoted to Museum of Art / the sensational impact Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Demons, gods, ghosts and beasts are the subjects of this mid-career retrospective of the work of Panamanianbased artist, Isabel De Obaldía, who explores the art of ancient cultures. 05.13.12-01.06.13

Shark Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale,

of the 1975 Steven Spielberg film Jaws. FORT MYERS Thru 05.26.12

Photographic Journal of Clyde Butcher Southwest Florida Museum of History

www.harn.ufl.edu www.swflmuseumof history.com

The spectacular blackand-white landscapes for which Clyde is so famous, tell their own story as Clyde takes guests on a step-bystep journey through the stages of conception and creation of his work, with photos and informational exhibit panels culminating in his dramatic large-format prints. (See story on pg. 90.)

A Singular Vision celebrates the recent gift of nearly 100 works on paper from the collection of Dr. August and L. Tommie Freundlich. The selected prints and drawings span the years 1908 to 1986 and represent more than 40 American and European artists, as well as a variety of themes such as portraiture, figural

GAINESVILLE

study, caricature, social commentary and landscape.

Thru 06.03.12

A Singular Vision: Recent

1. Isabel De Obaldía, Blue Idol (Idolo azul), 2008, sand cast glass, 17 x 8 x 5”, Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art, NY 2. Richard Ellis, Great White Shark Portrait, 1974, acrylic on board, 30 x 40”, Peter and Wendy Benchley Collection, Princeton, NJ, ©Richard Ellis 3. Photograph ©Clyde Butcher 4. Kenneth Hayes Miller, Leaving the Shop, n.d., lithograph from the collection of Dr. August and L. Tommie Freundlich

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Gainesville continued...

Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Considered one of the most highly recognized photojournalists in the world, Salgado focuses on people who are politically, ecoNewly opened nomically and culturDavid A. Cofrin ally excluded from Asian Art Wing the promise of global Harn Museum development. In this of Art exhibition, Salgado www.harn.ufl.edu documents famine in The inaugural exhibi- Africa and manual lations of the new David bor around the world. A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing showcase the Thru 04.29.12 Museum’s Asian art collection and honor 20 years of collecting, made possible by generous donors and academic interests. Thru 05.27.12

Sebastião Salgado: World Witness

Vanishing Points: Paint and Paintings from the Debra

and Dennis Scholl Collection Harn Museum of Art

Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highwww.harn.ufl.edu lights the Museum’s Vanishing Points collection of ceramic reflects and imagines a figures and vessels, world transformed by stone sculptures and contemporary science, jade ornaments from technology and media. In the exhibition, 24 artists mirror and assimilate the strategies of technology and the media. In doing so, they embrace multiple perspectives and challenge the limits of paint and painting, Ancient America— as applied to canvas, primarily Meso-Amersculpture and found ica, Central America objects. and the Andes. Thru 11.04.12

Verdant Earth and Teeming Seas: The Natural World in Ancient American Art

HOLLYWOOD Thru 05.27.12

Moira Holohan: Elements Art and Culture Center

1. Ooka Umpo, With Crane on Blossoming-plum Stream, 1844, hanging scroll, ink and color on silk, 6’ x 18-5/8”, Museum Purchase, funds provided by donors in memory of Dr. David A. Cofrin 2. Carla Klein, Untitled (detail), 2005, oil on canvas, courtesy of the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection, Miami, FL 3. Moche people
, Stirrup-Sprout Bottle of Crab God with Fanged Feline Mouth
, early intermediate period, Moche III phase, 200–300, 
burnished red-slipped ceramic, 
Museum Collection, University Gallery purchase

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Holly wood continued...

Subprime-Subtropics is Phillip Estlund’s first solo exhibition in Broward County. The contemporary visual artist is presenting of Hollywood sculptures and twoartandculturecenter.org dimensional collages Moira Holohan’s prac- that inhabit the psytice focuses on exchological and physiperimentation through cal terrain left behind layering of several media—assemblage, video animation and collage. Presented in this exhibition are animated video works inspired by the four classic elements by man-made and of nature—earth, air, natural disasters. water and fire. (See story in the February/March 2012 Thru 05.27.12 issue on pg. 106.) Phillip Estlund: Subprime/ Subtropics Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

For his show at MOCA Jacksonville, Mark Licari has tansformed Museum of the gallery space with Contemporary his dramatic wall drawArt Jacksonville ings, created on-site www.mocajacksonville.org in the 7 days leading Carrie Ann Baade is an up to the exhibition’s internationally exhibit- opening. (See story in ing artist whose surreal the February/March oil paintings are rich 2012 issue on pg. 110.) with allegorical metanarratives inspired by Thru 04.08.12 literature, art history, ReFocus: religion and mythology. Art of the ’60s (See story on pg. 80.) Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Thru 07.08.12

Project Atrium: Mark Licari

www.mocajacksonville.org

This is the first of a 3-part series examining contemporary art in the 1960s,’70s, and ’80s. Featured artists for the ’60s installation include

JACKSONVILLE 04.12-05.27.12

Carrie Ann Baade: Solar Midnight

1. Moira Holohan, Untitled (Water) [still], 2011, video, 2 minutes 2. Phillip Estlund, Orange Crush (detail), 2007, collage on wood, courtesy of Gavlak Gallery 3. Carrie Ann Baade, Joy and Sorrow, 2011, oil on copper, 12” tondo 4. Mark Licari , Motorcycle with Roses, 2008, ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper, 42 x 64”

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens presents a collection of 19th century Japanese woodblock prints that showcases this uniquely expressive art form

Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso and Roy Lichtenstein. 04.28-08.26.12

ReFocus: Art of the ’70s Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

& Gardens www.cummer.org

Impressionism and Post Impressionism from the High Museum of Art showcases Thru 07.31.12 almost 50 paintings, 50 Forward: drawings and prints New Additions by such renowned to the Permanent artists as Claude Collection Monet, Camille PisThe Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

www.mocajacksonville.org

This is the second of a 3-part series examining contemporary art in the 1960s,’70s, and ’80s.

and provides an extenBeyond Ukiyo-e: sive view of the styles Japanese and themes encomWoodblock passed by this genre as Prints and Their well as an understandInfluence on ing of 19th century Western Art Japanese culture. Thru 08.09.12

The Cummer unveils new acquisitions made through gifts and purchases in sarro, Pierre-Auguste honor of the Museum’s Renoir, Mary Cas50th Anniversary. satt and John Singer Sargent. The works in Thru 05.06.12 this exhibition illusImpressionism trate the emergence and Post of Impressionism Impressionism in 1870s France, its from the High evolution to PostMuseum of Art Impressionism and The Cummer its later influence on Museum of Art American artists.

1. Roy Lichtenstein, Crak!–Now, Mes Petits…Pour La France!, 1963, collage 2. Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th century, woodblock print, 8-7/8 x 10-7/8”, purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund 3. Hughie Lee-Smith, End of the Festival, 1954, oil on Masonite, 24 x 36”, purchased with funds from the 2011 Grand Benefactors of the Cummer Ball and the Robert Helms Memorial Fund 4. Claude Monet, Houses of Parliament in the Fog, 1903, oil on canvas, 32 x 36-3/8”, purchase with Great Painting Fund in honor of Sarah Belle Broadnax Hansell, courtesy of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Thru 07.08.12 Richard Chamberlain: The Year of the Sheep The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

Albert Paley’s use of steel can be described as industrial poetry. His large sculptures combine an apparent heaviness with an almost lost sense of gravity as unfurled and

www.cummer.org

Chamberlain’s images explore the conflicts between good and evil, light and dark, and the seen and the unseen, in vivid yet abstracted compositions. The Year of the Sheep illustrates the power art has to transform and heal. LAKELAND Thru 06.23.12

sculptures from the Museum’s Permanent Collection.

emerging painter, Chism has exhibited her dreamlike, atmospheric paintings across Florida. Based in landscape, the work is a formal tour-de-force, evoking new realities. MELBOURNE

MAITLAND Thru 04.15.12

animate forms construct massive works of art. (See story in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 68.)

EMERGE! Molly Chism Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

An accomplished

04.28-08.18.12

Thru 05.27.12

3-D Polk Museum of Art

Hungarian Masterworks, from Impressionism to Modernism Foosaner Art Museum

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Albert Paley: In all shapes and Sketches & Steel 
 sizes, 3-D showcases

1. Richard Chamberlain, Year of the Sheep #19, 1989, enamel and oil on canvas, ©Richard Chamberlain 2. Albert Paley, Splayed Bench, 1992, forged and fabricated steel with mahogany, PMoA Permanent Collection 3. Howard Finster, Untitled (Clock), Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection 4. Molly Chism, The Dead Meat of Convention, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48” 5. József Rippl-Rónai (1885-1974), Anella Holding Flowers, 1912, oil on cardboard, 40”h x 28”w, image courtesy of Jill A. Wiltse and H. Kirk Brown III

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Melbourne continued...

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

This thought-provoking exhibition presents a rare and intimate look at an exceptional collection of modern Hungarian art, from the collection of Jill A. Wiltse and H. Kirk Brown III. MIAMI

ented artists-in-residence will be unveiled and eventually raffled off to 38 lucky winners during this interactive exhibition supporting ArtCenter/ South Florida’s goal of offering affordable arts education and making contemporary art accessible to all. Call 305.674.8278 for details. 04.27-08.12.12

Charles Ledray: Bass Museum of Art Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

04.06-05.06.12

Winning Art! ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

The works of 38 tal-

Charles Ledray’s work is a poetry of material, scale and cultural resonance, rich with history and emotion. Well known for his exquisitely crafted objects, work-

ing in a range of materials from fabric to human bone, Ledray’s work touches on loss, pathos and absence. This exhibition is focused on creating a unique dialogue between four individual, powerful works—a dialogue of profound intellectual and visual beauty. (See story on pg. 104.) Thru 05.13.12

Max Miller: Final Mourner’s Kaddish—333 Days in Painting Jewish Museum of Florida www.jewishmuseum.com

This exhibit of 50

vibrant watercolors is a moving, thoughtful depiction of the artist’s experience visiting different shuls over an 11month period honoring his father through the daily recitation of

Kaddish, the Jewish prayer of mourning. Thru 05.06.12

Dara Friedman: Dancer Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

For Dancer, Miami-

1. Hugo Moro, Strap Ons, 2011, faux etching, limited edition of 50, 17 x 20”, framed & matted to 25” x 28” 2. Charles Ledray, Cricket Cage, 2002, human bone, 3-3/8 x 3-3/8 x 1-7/16”, Private Collection, London, photograph by Tom Powel, courtesy of Sperone Westwater 3. Max Miller, Kehilath Jeshurun, Upper East Side, New York City, 2005, watercolor

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Miami Art Museum

www.miamiartmuseum.org

MAM presents a selection of important works of art for the public to enjoy in this new exhibition, which includes works by modern and contemporary masters such as Morris

based artist, Dara Friedman, filmed her subjects as they performed their dance moves at various public locations throughout Miami. She transforms each participant from someone being passively watched to someone being danced with—a partner. In this way, she brings the spectator into the action, minimizing the divide between reality Louis and Fred Wilson, and the moving image. and emerging artists such as Nicolas Lobo Thru 05.06.12 and George SanchezRestless: Recent Calderón. Acquisitions from the MAM Collection Miami Art Museum

www.miamiartmuseum.org

This major career retrospective of the Miami Art work of José Bedia Museum includes works on www.miamiartmuseum.org paper and canvas Bringing together and two large-scale artists from around installations. Bedia’s the world who have personal border crossworked with records ings (social, racial as their subject or and religious) reflect medium, this ground- his exploration of breaking exhibition historical and conexamines the record’s temporary encounters transformative power, between cultures and from the 1960s to countries, which he the present, through sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography, video and performance. personalizes in his 05.25-09.02.12 artistic production. Transcultural Pilgrim: Three Decades of Work by José Bedia

Thru 06.10.12

The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl

05.24-09.02.12

Ed Ruscha: On the Road

1. Dara Friedman,
Dancer (still), 2011,
super 16mm film transferred to high definition digital video,
running time: 25 minutes,
Collection Miami Art Museum, partial gift of Robert and Diane Moss,
courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, NY 2. Lyle Ashton Harris,
Miss America, 1987-1988,
gelatin print,
 48 x 38”, edition 3 of 10,
Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Robert Crane and Shirley Muñoz, courtesy of CRG Gallery, NY 3. Jeroen Diepenmaat,
Pour des dents d’un blanc éclatant et saines, 2005,
record players, vinyl records, stuffed birds, sound, courtesy of the artist 4. José Bedia,
Abre Nkuto muchacho nuevo (Listen Up, Kid), 1989/2007,
 mixed media installation,
156 x 240”,
Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of José Bedia, Peter Menéndez and Fredric Snitzer,
photo: Peter Harholdt

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Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Ed Ruscha is known for his use of language to document and comment on the shifting character of American

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

This survey exhibition examines the artist’s paintings throughout her career and the changes in her work that occurred through her immer-

www.mocanomi.org

Part of MOCA’s Knight Exhibition Series, Song presents the video works of Icelandic artist, culture. Drawing Ragnar Kjartansson. inspiration from the The videos reflect classic American novel the artist’s interest On the Road by Jack in music and theater Kerouac, in his own and the personae of limited art book verits performers, often sion of the novel, he coupled with extreme has created a new body environments. of paintings, drawings and photographs. Thru 05.06.12 05.17-09.02.12

Ragnar Kjartansson: Song

sion into Western culture. 05.16-09.02.12

Scapes: Lynne Golob Gelfman The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Rita Ackermann Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The works in this exhibition reference water, clouds and sand as well as aerial views of Greco-Roman ruins. The focus of the show is the dune paintings, a series of images whose surfaces change with the slightest shift in viewing position or the angle of light. These paintings are experiences in perception, about what happens when the viewer traverses the image. 04.25-08.26.12

Miami’s Vices
 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Miami’s Vices, curated by Annie Wharton, is a thoughtprovoking exhibition of videos by female

1. Ed Ruscha, Mañana, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 38-5/8 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery, © Ed Ruscha 2. Ragnar Kjartansson,
The End, 2008,
five-channel video, color, sound,
30 minutes,
courtesy the artist, Luhring Augustine, NY, and i8, Reykjavik 3. Rita Ackermann, Picnic , 2009, acrylic, oil, oil stick, spray paint, acrylic medium, tempera, printed paper on canvas, 72 x 96” 4. Lynne Golob Gelfman, Dune 17 (detail), 2011, acrylic on panel, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist, photo: Richard Fendleman

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artists working internationally in the medium. The videos encompass a wide range of subject matter ranging from corporeal, action-based performances, to computer-generated iconography, to humorous and poignant slices of life.

who spent two years painting their personal experiences, illustrating the rural tragedy. 04.21-08.05.12

assembles, glues, clamps and laminates, rubbing powered graphite into the work’s textured, faced surfaces. Her signature shapes are abstract, drawing on a range of sources, from the humble to the majestic. (See story on pg.56.)

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Thru 07.01.12

05.11-08.19.12

The War We Have Not Seen by Juan Manuel Echavarría The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Graphic Intervention: 25 Years of International AIDS Awareness Posters 1985–2010

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The 24 paintings included in this exhibition were created by men and women who participated in Colombia’s war. All 35 participants were rank and file soldiers

Ursula von Rydingsvard: Sculpture The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Ursula Von Rydingsvard is renowned for creating large-scale sculpture from cedar beams, which she painstakingly cuts,

This exhibition features a selection of 152 posters, which presents an insightful overview of diverse visual strategies employed by many different countries in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a public health emergency. Thru 08.31.12

Manifest and Mundane: Scenes of Modern America from the Wolfsonian Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

1. Ursula von Rydingsvard, Halo with a Straight Line, 2010, cedar, graphite, ink, 133 x 114 x 79”, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York 2. Image courtesy of Wolfsonian–Florida International University

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Vizcaya’s ongoing Contemporary Arts Project presents New York-based artist, Francesco Simeti, who has transformed Witness how artists one of Vizcaya’s outmanifested in their work door fountains into a the most profound and surreal theatrical set mundane aspects of inspired by the meAmerican life through chanical apparatuses this display of American paintings, sculptures and prints from the 1920s to the ’40s. Thru 05.21.12

Francesco Simeti:
A seahorse, a caravel and large quantities of concrete, stone, fill, topsoil, tiles, piping, trees and other plants Vizcaya Museum & Gardens www.vizcayamuseum.org

from storage and on display for the first time in decades. NAPLES 05.12-05.19.12

Leonid Semeiko: Bricks of Kremlin Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

Thru 05.05.12

Photography by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor from the Harn Museum of Art Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

www.naplesart.org

ArtNaples World Festival’s featured artist, Leonid that simulated natural Semeiko presents phenomena in Balarge-scale paintings roque gardens. Sime- inspired by the ti’s animated assemKremlin and Red blage is composed Square. of floating sculptures representing elements of the estate. The project continues in the Main House with an installation of historic artifacts pulled

www.naplesart.org

The beautiful and surreal photographic imagery featured in this exhibition by husband and wife artists, Maggie Taylor and Jerry Uelsmann, has been generated using two completely different techniques. Jerry’s photographic

1. Torvalt Arnt Hoyer, Barn, 1938, produced for Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration, Illinois, oil on board, The Wolfsonian–FIU, Miami Beach, Florida, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection, photo: Silvia Ros 2. Francesco Simeti, A seahorse, a caravel, and large quantities of concrete, stone, fill, topsoil, tiles, piping, trees and other plants, courtesy Vizcaya Museum & Gardens 3. Leonid Semeiko, Kremlin Bricks, 2011-12, oil on canvas, courtesy of Nadia Gyetvay 4. Maggie Taylor, Girl with a bee dress, 2004, pigmented inkjet print, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville; gift of Jerry N. Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

manipulations take place in a traditional darkroom setting, while Maggie utilizes 21st century digital processes and Photoshop montage techniques. Thru 06.30.12 (See story on pg. 70.) Leaders 04.10-06.30.12

Juan Genovés: A Retrospective Naples Museum of Art

hibition features a remarkable variety of works from throughout Nevelson’s prolific career, ranging from massive wall pieces to more

in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

An exciting new selecwww.thephil.org tion of works from the One of Spain’s bestMuseum’s American known contemporary Modernism Collecartists, Juan Genovés is tion are on display, celebrated for his pro- representing all of the vocative expressionimportant movements ist paintings, which in American art during explore issues of social the first half of the and political realism. 20th century.

intimate wood sculptures. Thru 04.07.12

Memories of World War II:
 Photos From the Archives of the Associated Press

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This compelling presentation includes a spectrum of AP photographs from all theaters of World War II and the home front, ranging from familiar scenes of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor to Joe Rosenthal’s classic Iwo Jima flag-raising in 1945 to scores of pictures not seen in decades. Thru 06.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art

Thru 05.20.12

www.thephil.org

The colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico are reflected in this new installation, which

Louise Nevelson Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This insightful ex-

1. Juan Genovés, Anudado, 2011, acrylic on canvas on board, ©Juan Genovés,
courtesy Marlborough Gallery, NY 2. Arthur B. Davies, Façades, oil on canvas, 23 x 28”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, Museum Purchase 3. Louise Nevelson, Mirror-Shadow VII, 1985, wood painted black, 9’ 9” x 11’ 7” x 1’ 9”,
photo: G.R. Christmas/courtesy The Pace Gallery 4. Victor Jorgensen, US Navy/AP Archives, Sailor and Nurse Kiss, Times Square (New York City), August 14, 1945,
black and white photograph, 20 x 16”, courtesy of the Associated Press

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of the first half of the 20th century, including Maurice Prendergast, Mark Rothko, Arthur Dove, Ashile Gorky, Jackson Pollock and more. includes works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Miguel Covarrubias and José Clement Orozco.

Thru 06.30.12

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

Prendergast to Pollock Naples Museum of Art

Featured in this survey are key works from some of the most important artists

century art. This delightful exhibition recreates the environment of Hirshhorn’s art-packed home in Washington, known as “The Mouse House.”

Thru 06.30.12

Thru 04.15.12

www.thephil.org

feature rotating exhibitions of selections from the Permanent Collection, including new and recent acquisitions and art never before displayed in the Museum.

NEW SMYRNA BEACH Thru 06.16.12

www.thephil.org

Selections from The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art Permanent Collection Naples Museum of Art

The Mouse House is a treasure trove of intimate-sized works from some of the giants of 20th

www.thephil.org

Throughout the season, the Museum will

The Art of Doris Leeper Atlantic Center for the Arts www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

This retrospective survey includes paintings and three-

1. Pedro Friedeberg, Cualquier Lado Por Arriba (Any Side Up), 1975, acrylic on board mounted on wood, 29 x 29”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of Harry Pollak, ©Pedro Friedeberg 2. Jackson Pollock, No. 34, 1949, enamel on paper mounted on masonite, 22 x 30”,
Edward W. Root Bequest, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art, Utica, NY, 
photo: Williamstown Art Conservation Laboratory,
©2011 Pollock-Krasner Foundation /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Alfred Eisenstaedt, Premiere at La Scala, Milan (detail), gelatin silver print, 25-1/2 x 21”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, bequest of Herbert & Ruth Abramson 4. Installation view of The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection exhibition 5. Doris Leeper, Multiple Images: 32, 1975, enamel on canvas, 72” x 72”, on loan from The Honorable Suzanne M. Kosmas

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Ne w S m y r n a B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

dimensional works by artist, environmentalist, visionary and founder of the Atlantic Center for the Arts, Doris Leeper (1936-2001). OCALA 04.14-06.17.12

Art and the Animal

Appleton Museum of Art

specializing in animal subject matter. Thru 05.06.12

Modern Impressions: 20th Century Prints from the Appleton Collection Appleton Museum of Art

Rosenquist. Colorful and bold, sometimes minimalist and surreal, these works represent the major trends in art internationally throughout the last century.

exhibition of detailed drawings, architectural plans, set designs, props and costumes.

ORLANDO Thru 04.29.12

www.appletonmuseum.org

Showcased are more than 40 abstract and figurative works by some of the most important names in 20th century art, including Dalí, Miro, Calder, Rauschenberg and

www.appletonmuseum.org

View 45 works from the flagship exhibition of The Society of Animal Artists, featuring works created by some of today’s best classically trained international artists

Thru 04.29.12

The Serious Art of Make-Believe Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

Enjoy a rare opportunity to peek inside the creative genius behind the theme-park entertainment experience. Discover how imaginary worlds of unique characters, objects, and environments start with the art and design revealed in this

Traversing\ Suburban: Michael Dax Iacovone & Billy Friebele Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

1. Guy Harvey, Fair Game 2. Alexander Calder, Kinetic Sculpture 3. Terra Queen’s bike from the 2005 Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Orlando Resort 4. Michael Dax Iacovone and Billy Friebele, Virtual\Actual: Disney, 2012, digital print, dimensions variable

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Orlando continued...

Michael Dax Iacovone and Billy Friebele, founders of Washington, D.C.’s Freespace Collective, investigate our experience with both physical and virtual spaces. For this exhibition, Iacovone and Friebele create site-responsive work that examines the everyday spaces of Orlando in new ways. The exhibition combines videos, maps and photographs comparing the artists’ experiences of real and virtual sites.

This interactive exhibition is a celebration of fine art book

www.mennellomuseum.com

Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls

www.ormondartmuseum.org

printing. It highlights the limited-edition art objects and fine art books printed by Flying Horse Editions, located at the University of Central Florida’s Center for Emerging Media in downtown Orlando.

Thru 08.12.12

IMPRINTS: 20 Years of Flying Horse Editions The Mennello Museum of American Art

Landscape Painting of April Davis Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

ORMOND

April Davis finds her artistic inspiration in the splendor of nature. Since moving to Florida 15 years ago, she The Henry has become known for Morrison Flagler her brilliant tropical Museum www.flaglermuseum.us

landscapes. (See story on pg. 106.)

BEACH PALM BEACH

Thru 04.15.12

Window Into the Garden: The Panoramic

A New Light on Tiffany features more than 50 Tiffany lamps, windows, mosaics, enamels and ceramics designed by Clara Driscoll as well as numerous objects made under her direction by the “Tiffany Girls.”

Thru 04.22.12

A New Light on Tiffany:

Thru 04.29.12

Recapturing

1. Carmon Coangelo, Green Jetty, from the portfolio O-Land-O, 2011, letterpress, relief, digital and color pencil on paper 2. April Davis, Tropical Foliage II 3. Wisteria lamp, designed by Clara Driscoll, c. 1901, 18-1/2” diam., New-York Historical Society, gift of Dr. Egon Neustadt

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Pa l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

This exciting exhibit features the only existing photograph of Billy the Kid, as well as stagecoaches, paintings and sculptures. Clothing, guns and photographs illustrate

social concepts that shaped the era, such as the power of the brothel and the attitudes that led to Native American displacement.

PENSACOLA

Pensacola Museum of Art

Opening 04.02.12

www.pensacola museumofart.org

In his still life photographs, presented in Garden of Eden, that which looks perfect belies corruption, From Private according to Andrjez Walls: Pensacola Maciejewski. The exCollects III hibit features seemPensacola ingly pristine photoMuseum of Art graphs of fruits and www.pensacola vegetables, inspired museumofart.org by the paintings of This exhibition of Old Masters, that, notable works by upon closer inspecnationally and internationally acclaimed artists is drawn from the area’s private art collections. tion, reveal unexpectThru 05.19.12 ed details. Garden of Eden: Photography by Andrjez Maciejewski

Thru 06.02.12

Revisiting Eden: Glass

by Kathleen Elliot Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

Kathleen Elliot creates sculptures out of flame-

worked glass, using a vocabulary of botanical forms, including leaves, flowers, fruit and vines. (See story on pg. 44.) 05.24-09.02.12

Surfing Florida: A Photographic History Pensacola Museum of Art

1. Photograph of Billy the Kid, from the collection of William I. Koch, photo: Kyle Bajakian 2. Image courtesy of Pensacola Museum of Art 3. Andrjez Maciejewski, Still Life with 4024(USA), 4025(USA), 4049(Honduras), 4410(USA) and 4026(USA), 2011 4. Kathleen Elliot, From the Valley of Heart’s Delight, 2008, glass, mixed media

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.pensacola museumofart.org

More than 25 professional surf photographers have contributed their images for this exhibition, which presents the history of Florida, surfing and surf culture, including its international dimensions. PONTE VEDRA BEACH

The Cultural Center

SARASOTA

www.ccpvb.org

Thru 06.03.12

In the tradition of Ansel Adams’ iconic large-format black-and-white photographs of Yosemite and Yellowstone, Clyde Butcher composes his works at pristine and untarnished locations across the Big Cypress Swamp, creating arresting compositions that distinctly mark him as the foremost landscape photographer of natural Florida.

Thru 04.05.12

Clyde Butcher: Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades

Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master showcases the work of one of the greatest and most influential artists of all time— the Flemish Baroque master, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640).

Thru 10.14.12

Sanford Biggers: Codex The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

As part of his Constellation Series, the works featured in this exhibit consist of quilts that depict “constellations” inspired by Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad conductors, whose use of the stars to navigate from slavery to freedom in the 19th century, is a vibrant part of North American history. ST. PETERSBURG Thru 04.29.12

Ancient Egypt—Art and Magic:

1. Photo courtesy of Surfing Florida, University Galleries at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton 2. Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5 (detail), 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108”, collection of the artist 3. Peter Paul Rubens, image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Treasures from the Fondation Gandur pour l’Art Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Mummy cases and sacred works, tomb and temple reliefs, papyrus fragments, alabaster vessels and rare objects comprised of precious stones make this one of the most dramatic shows ever presented at the MFA.

Photographs from the Soviet Union 1920s– 1980s Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg 05.19-10.14.12

University Museum of Fine Arts www.mofa.fsu.edu

Selections from the Permanent Collection unites new acquisitions and visitor favorites in an annual review of the strengths of the MoFA holdings in contemporary and traditional art. Foremost among 20th century paintings in the collection are works by British artist, Trevor Bell, whose heroic-scaled shaped canvases allude to mountainous

www.fine-arts.org

Global + Local: Studio and Contemporary Glass on Florida’s West Coast Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Marking the 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, Global + Local reveals the range and richness of the area’s best glass from internationally renowned artists. 04.14-08.19.12

Picturing a New Society:

This exhibition explores contradictions between idealistic

images and life in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). TALLAHASSEE 05.07-06.01.12

Selections from the Permanent Collection Florida State

1. Lid from an Anthropoid Sarcophagus (detail),
wood, gessoed and painted,
Dynasty XXI-XXII, 1080-720 BC,
image ©Sandra Pointet 2. William Morris, Artifact: Tooth, 1995, blown glass, collection of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Hough 3. Georgi Zelma, 
Fitness Parade on Red Square, 1935, 
gift of Janice Tuckwood in memory of Donald A. Tuckwood 4. Trevor Bell, Light Pillar and Rising Heat, both 1982, acrylic on canvas, 186 x 86” each, Collection: Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts, gift of the American Express Corporation, photo: Larry Coltharp, Tallahassee, Florida

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 5 o f 3 2 }

Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

East Indian terrain, religious shrines and fiery Florida space launches at Cape Canaveral. TAMPA Thru 05.27.12

Andy Warhol & Friends Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

For the inaugural exhibition in its new home at the Cube at Rivergate Plaza,

the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts welcomes Andy Warhol & Friends. This landmark exhibition includes vividly hued screen prints as well as photographs and photo booth strips from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. They feature portraits of such celebrities as John Wayne, Liza Minnelli, Sting, Mick Jagger, Jack Nicholson, Sylvester Stallone, Grace Jones and Dennis Hopper. Also included are Warhol’s famous self-portraits. 05.19-09.16.12

A Hundred Years— A Hundred Chairs: Masterworks

from the Vitra Design Museum Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

This show offers a view of the different periods of furniture design of the past century and is certain

to appeal to all lovers of great design.

lished categories and challenges rote notions of the role of the artist in society. The thrust of his Cyborg series is to awaken viewers to the possible dangers that might lurk in our futures if we allow computers to become too close. Thru 09.23.12

Thru 05.06.12

Don Zanfagna: Cyborgs Tampa Museum of Art

Object Image/ Erik Levine/ Sculpture & Video Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

Artist, architect and designer, Don Zanfagna’s lifework both defies estab-

1. Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, 1977, © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2. Charles and Ray Eames, No 670 and No. 671, Lounge Chair and Ottoman, 1956, Eames Office, Santa Monica, File:MEA-1161, photography: Thomas Dix 3. Don ZanFagna, Cyborg Notes 56 4. Erik Levine, Hand Held, 1997, plywood, Tampa Museum of Art, gift of the artist, photograph courtesy of Gary Hulton

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C A L E N D A R

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.tampamuseum.org

New York-based sculptor, Erik Levine, is known for his use of humble plywood in massive installations. In 2011, the Museum acquired one of his large-scale sculptures, ironically titled HandHeld (1997), for its Permanent Collection. This exhibition marks the debut of this new acquisition and also includes two recent video works.

original audience participation work entitled “score.” Museum visitors are invited to act as DJs and create a musical mix by playing records and “performing” the work.

Thru 05.06.12

Thru 09.09.12

John Cage 33 1/3— Performed by Audience Tampa Museum of Art

Masterworks of 20th Century Sculpture from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

In celebration of Cage’s centennial, this exhibition honors and reinterprets the artist’s

www.tampamuseum.org

The latest exhibition in the Museum’s

three-year partnership with the Marguiles Collection, Masterworks chronicles important developments in sculpture in the second half of the 20th century. In addition to sculptures by such 20th century luminaries as Joan Miro, Willem de

Kooning and Louise Nevelson, the exhibition will also include works by Isamu Noguchi, Manuel Neri, George Segal and Deborah Butterfield. An abiding fascination with the figure unites all the works in the exhibition.

Thru 05.06.12

Romare Bearden: Southern Recollections Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

This exhibition spans the career of Romare Bearden (19111988), regarded as one of the most important AfricanAmerican artists who worked in the US during the 20th century. Bearden’s mastery of collage as well as his development of narrative and

1. Image courtesy of Tampa Museum of Art 2. George Segal, Three People on 4 Benches, 1980, bronze and steel, Martin Z. Margulies Collection, ©The George and Helen Segal Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 3. Romare Bearden, Carolina Morning, 1974, mixed media collage on board, 30 x 22”, in memory of Elaine Lebenbom and Dr. Miriam Mansour

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

thematic explorations of his native South are highlighted. (See story in the February/ March 2012 issue on pg. 112.) Thru 07.14.12

vidual style, to form, utility, and technical details. In each case, the visitor is invited to ask whether aesthetics or utility takes precedence, or whether a given object should be labeled art or craft, its maker artist or artisan. Thru 05.06.12

Utility and Aesthetics in Ancient Art Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

In this exhibition, drawn primarily from the Permanent Collection, objects have been grouped together according to certain common features—from images, aesthetics and indi-

William Pachner: Works from the 1960s Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Ninety-seven year old artist William Pachner (b. 1914)

has been one of the major forces in the development of the Tampa Bay region’s art scene. This exhibition of Pachner’s work focuses on the important decade of the 1960s. During this period, Pachner split his time between the Tampa Bay region and Woodstock, New York and explored abstraction as a vocabulary to come to terms with his complicated personal history and his newfound freedom of expression. TARPON SPRINGS Thru 04.29.12

Telling Stories/ Building a Legacy: Prints

from the Collection Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

As part of its 10th anniversary celebration, the LeepaRattner Museum of Art presents a survey of print holdings

from the Museum’s collection. VERO BEACH Thru 05.13.12

Beyond Reality: Hyperrealism and American Culture Vero Beach Museum of Art

1. Red-Figure Calyx Krater (Mixing Vessel), attributed to the Menelaos Painter, Greek, Attic, c. 440 BC, ceramic, Tampa Museum of Art, Joseph Veach Noble Collection, purchased in part with funds donated by Trenam, Simmons, Kemker, Scharf, Barkin, Frye, and O’Neill 2. William Pachner, Night Train, 1964 3. Abraham Rattner, Among Those Who Stood (detail), 1944, color etching, 6-3/4 x 9-7/8”, Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Beyond Reality presents American art that is closely associated with the concept of photo-realism as well as ultra-illusionistic paintings and

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Stephen Knapp’s Lightpaintings seem to emerge out of deep space, with varied hues Tom Nakashima is a of light passing nationally recognized through a series of artist whose paintings irregular panels and prints often con- of colored glass, tain complex metacreating a stunning phors drawn from display of light Western art history and shadow. as well as traditional Japanese art.

to reveal the essence of spirit.

WEST PALM BEACH

Thru 06.03.12

sculpture. (See story in the February/March 2012 issue on pg. 56.)

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings Vero Beach Museum of Art

Thru 06.03.12

Cycle of Change: Tom Nakashima’s Treepile Paintings Vero Beach Museum of Art

04.04-04.29.12

Thru 04.06.12

The Curious World of Austin Manchester Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

Curved: Herbert Mehler Sculptures Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

The inspiration for Mehler’s artwork comes from organic, natural matter. His sculptures serve as

www.ansg.org

Austin Manchester’s paintings radiate with their own inner energy and touch

www.verobeachmuseum.org

on the surreal and figurative. They are emotional yet serene, possessing the power

1. Davis Cone, Thompson, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 55 x 39”, courtesy of Monica and Richard Segal 2. Tom Nakashima, Westwood Road Nocturne, 2006, magazine collage and chalkline on canvas, 9 x 14’, collection of the artist 3. Stephen Knapp, Inner Vision, 2011, light, glass and stainless steel, 13’ x 12’ x 10”, collection of the artist 4. Austin Manchester, Sequoia 1, 2011, oil on canvas panel, 122 x 107 cm

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C A L E N D A R

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Stanley Katz, Roni Doppelt and Stephanie Doppelt. Thru 05.04.12

a play between light fluid shapes and the seemingly insurmountable weight of metal.

WITVA: Women in the Visual Arts Armory Art Center

arts through its programs and activities. The organization serves as a forum whose members network, share ideas and support one another to achieve their artistic goals, while giving back to the community. Thru 05.27.12

Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation Norton Museum of Art

Thru 05.04.12

Three Generations of Love and Art Armory Art Center

www.norton.org

www.armoryart.org

This exhibition presents artwork by family members

www.armoryart.org

The Armory and WITVA have partnered to exhibit works by WITVA members. WITVA was founded in 1989 to promote public interest in the visual

For this exhibit, the Museum commissioned Lipman to create a large-scale glass construction which has been installed in the center of the Museum’s European galleries, displayed in the context of Old Master

works—the inspiration for the installation. (See story in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 55.) Thru 04.15.12

Cocktail Culture Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Decorative arts, photography, fash-

1. Herbert Mehler, WV718 & 765 (2006, 2010) 2. Roni Lynn Doppelt, The Wave II, bronze 3. Francene Levinson, Sea Flower, 2011, 27 x 10 x 12” 4. Beth Lipman, One and Others 5. Larry Salk, Summer Cocktail Party with English Butler, 1961,
watercolor, gouache, ink on paper,
gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

ionable cocktail attire and accessories by major designers are included in this first-of-its-kind exhibition, which explores the social ritual of drinking and entertainment through the lens of fashion and design. (See story in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 78.)

From very early cosmology to later developments of Taoist and Confucian philosophies and ethics, Chinese animals gained new meanings related to their historical contexts.

whose work explores issues of identity, culture, environment, surveillance and the documentary, confront their image-making heritage through visual dialogues with works drawn from the Museum’s

Tampa, and the team of Eduardo del Valle and Mirta Gómez from Miami. Thru 05.27.12

Studio Glass: Works from the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Thru 06.24.12

Decoding Messages in Chinese Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

The subjects of all of the Chinese works featured in this exhibition are animals, which evoke symbolic associations and homonymic puns.

Thru 06.10.12

Outside/In: Florida Photographers Face-toFace with the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Six contemporary Florida-based artists,

Permanent Collection of photographs. The exhibiting photographers are: Maria MartinezCañas from Miami, Alexander Diaz from St. Augustine, Valerie George from Pensacola, Christopher Morris from

Dramatic works by Dale Chihuly, William Morris and Toots Zynsky are featured alongside other outstanding examples of contemporary studio glass. (See story in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 44.)

1. Five Quail (wu anchun), anonymous, 13th century hanging scroll, ink and color on paper, purchase, acquired through the generosity of the John and Heidi Niblack Fund 2. Alexander Diaz, Untitled, 2006-2011, from the series, Florida’s Mountains, archival pigment print, 16 x 20”, courtesy of the artist, ©Alexander Diaz 2006 3. Dale Chihuly, Green Macchia with Lemon Yellow Lip Wrap, 1994,
blown glass, 23 x 38”,
purchase acquired through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Adler, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sterling

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 1 o f 3 2 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Group and Their Contemporaries Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Thru 05.06.12

Tacita Dean Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Spare, sublime, and separated from conventional photographic practice, Tacita Dean’s photo-based works are nonetheless dependent upon

the found and often authorless image. WINTER PARK

cfam.rollins.edu

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This exhibition features paintings by Grandma Moses and Jennie Augusta Brownscombe; prints by Georgia O’Keeffe, Faith Ringgold and Nancy Graves; and threedimensional work by Anna H. Huntington and Jennifer Bartlett.

Thru 05.13.12

A Room of One’s Own: Women Artists from the Permanent Collection

Thru 05.13.12

British & Modern: Art by the Bloomsbury

Paintings and drawings by Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, and others working in the UK in the early 20th

cfam.rollins.edu

DC-based artist, Charles Ritchie, explores the limits of vision in his intimate images of dusk, twilight and night. Thru 04.08.12

century, are on display. Thru 05.13.12

Dust and Shade: Drawings by Charles Ritchie Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Likewise, as technical experts, but not (at all) by way of culture/ an installation by Leigh-Ann Pahapill Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This site-specific exhibit by Canadian artist, Leigh-Ann Pahapill, explores how language and

1.Tacita Dean, Fernweh (detail), 2008, gravure in 8 parts on Somerset White Satin 400g, 39-1/2 x 46-1/2” each, 90-1/2 x 98-1/2” framed, ©Tacita Dean, courtesy of the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, NY/Paris and Frith Street Gallery, London 2. Faith Ringgold,
Tar Beach 2, 1993,
#10/10, woodcut,
12 x 11”, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum,
Faith Ringgold ©1993 3. Vanessa Bell, Portrait of Mary St. John Hutchinson, 1915, oil on canvas, 31 x 21-3/4”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum 4. Charles Ritchie, House: 5 February 2011, 10:30 am, 2011, watercolor and graphite on Fabriano paper sheet/image: 4 x 6”, frame: 12 x 14”

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C A L E N D A R

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

thought influence our experiences of objects and space.

The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

Thru 05.13.12

www.morsemuseum.org

Sam Gilliam: Contingencies Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This culminating research project by Ana Engels, CFAM’s 2011-12 Fred Hicks Fellow, features works by the popular contemporary artist. 04.22-05.13.12

2012 Winter Park Paint Out + Florida Plein Air Masters

Roseville Pottery The Albin Company (1890– Polasek Museum 1954) of Ohio was & Sculpture one of the country’s Gardens most prolific and longwww.polasek.org lived art potteries. In From April 22nd-28th, this exhibit, the Morse 25 professional artists will paint outdoors (en plein air) throughout the Winter Park for the annual spring “Winter Park Paint Out.” The works created during this event will be on view at The Polasek in presents new acquisithe special two-week tions of Roseville ceexhibition Florida ramic objects, which Plein Air Masters be- represent the rich ginning April 29th. colors and beloved patterns that made the Thru 10.07.12 pottery so popular in Roseville Pottery its era and contribute from the Morse to its collectability Collection today.

Thru 02.03.2013

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. On View

1. Sam Gilliam, Chakaia, 2009,
serigraph on fabric, 25 x 30”,
Cornell Fine Arts Museum 2. Image courtesy of The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens 3. Vase, 1938, Bleeding Heart, Roseville Pottery Company, 1890–1954, Ohio, gift of Noel and Toby Siegel 4. Otto Heinigke, Dawn, 1886, watercolor on paper, gift of Eric Green and Jock Truman

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebaker gallery.com

Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Exhibition: STEVE TOBIN ON VIEW THRU 04.07.12

From his monumental sculptures in bronze and “Exploded Earth” vessels, to his soaring, massive yet elegant “Steelroots” structures, Steve Tobin has pushed the limits of every material he has touched.

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Studio E Gallery www.studioegallery.com

Artist: DL Watson

“PAINTING FOR ME IS A VERY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE—

A connection to my life and emotions, both conscious and subconscious. There is seldom a plan as the process begins. The subject, medium and technique just emerge. An image from a dream, a detail found that is usually missed or under appreciated often find their way onto the canvas.” From left: Steve Tobin, Steel Roots, steel, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; DL Watson, Mariposa XIV, mixed media on canvas, 30 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

CORAL GABLES

SARASOTA

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries

Gallery: Dabbert Gallery

www.virginiamiller.com

www.dabbert gallery.com

Exhibition: Impact: Emotions of Color ON VIEW THRU 06.30.12

This exhibition offers art enthusiasts an opportunity to experience the contemporary works of outstanding Southern California artists deeply rooted in that region’s “Light and Space” movement.

Exhibition: CRAIG RUBADOUX: ONE MAN SHOW ON VIEW 04.06-04.30.12

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries www.artfusiongallery.com

Exhibition: A Spring Affair ON VIEW 04.02-06.18.12

“In my work I express exuberance, the joy of life, a spontaneous celebration. With line 
and color, I express the inner energy, the spirit, the essence of life.”

The Gallery’s 2012 spring exhibition features a fresh, colorful and vibrant array of works by 40 emerging to mid-career contemporary international artists.

Clockwise from top left: Andy Moses, Morphology 301, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 20”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Craig Rubadoux, Twenty-Six March, oil on canvas, 50 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Dabbert Gallery; Santina Semadar Panetta, Essence, 2012, oil on canvas, 48 x 36”, image courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries

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G A L L E R Y

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MIAMI

Gallery: Dot Fiftyone Gallery www.dotfiftyone.com

Exhibition: INK ON ROSES 
 ON VIEW THRU 05.30.12

With a mission to manifest her interpretation of women, love, passion and the adversities of human relationships, Leslie Gabaldon chal-

NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Exhibition: Hand Works: Glass, Ceramics, Metal and Paper ON VIEW THRU 04.30.12

lenges you to seek yourself in these oversized prints of language interleaved within the finest of mediums— rose petals.

Hand Works features sculptural pieces that explore a range of media from Adam Waimon’s sleek and dramatic glass vessels and Elizabeth Rhoads Read’s fiber works to Susan Singleton’s handmade paper installations and Elizabeth Kendall’s minimalist black and white porcelain sculptures.

From left: Leslie Gabaldon, Slow and sweet, July 2011, photography ©Leslie Gabaldon, courtesy of the artist and Dot Fiftyone Gallery; Elizabeth Kendall, Shadow Play, metal porcelain & stoneware, 8’ x 4’ x 2’, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art

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G A L L E R Y

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MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: Dorsch Gallery

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Gallery

www.dorschgallery.com

www.dianalowenstein gallery.com

Exhibition: Ralph Provisero: For Old Times’ Sake ON VIEW 04.05-05.05.12

Ralph Provisero is known for his investigation of dynamic forms, as demonstrated in Delicat (pictured). For his new show at Dorsch Gallery, Provisero repurposes a found fiberglass child’s car to communicate, through its form, an ambivalence regarding typically joyful childhood objects.

Exhibition: MICHAEL LOVELAND ON VIEW 04.14-05.31.12

Inspired by mundane places, Loveland finds interest in their unassuming imperfec-

MIAMI

Gallery: Zadok Gallery www.zadokgallery.com

Exhibition: The Plastic Menagerie ON VIEW

THRU 05.01.12

tions and levels of decaying condition. This raw and natural state finds its place within the artist’s finished works.

The Plastic Menagerie features artist, Sasha Meret, whose creations encompass a wide range of techniques and styles. He alternates figuration with abstraction in search for a balance between ideas and emotions.

Clockwise from top: Ralph Provisero, Delicat, from the series Trinacria, courtesy of the artist and Dorsch Gallery; Michael Loveland, Table Talk, 2012, found glass and wood, printed images, paint, 56 x 58 x 27”, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts; Sasha Meret, Plastic Menagerie #1, 2011, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery

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Revi G L A S S

B Y

It Grows in Deep Water, 2008, glass, 12”h x 16”w x 4”d All photography by Keay Edwards, images courtesy of the artist

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s i t i n g E d e n: L

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On view through

06.02.2012

at PENSACOLA MUSEUM of ART w w w. p e n s a c o l a m u s e u m o f a r t . o r g


k

Revisiting Eden

KATHLEEN ELLIOT’S EXQUISITE SCULPTURES of flameworked glass take traditional botanical forms to new imaginary heights. Leaves, flowers, fruit and vines take on surprising and unique characteristics that convey an alternate sense of reality. “The undercurrent of my work is the shifting nature of ‘reality’,” Elliot explains. “I’m curious. I like to be curious. I like to venture into new understandings, interpretations, and experiences. Encountering new worlds, new realities, brings a sense of scared excitement—and I like that.” For her show at the Pensacola Museum of Art, Elliot is exhibiting a selection of pieces that represent major developments of her recent work—some of which remain close to their natural origins, while others venture deep into the realm of imagina-

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Angst, 2011, glass, 15”h x 10”w x 14”d

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00


Revisiting Eden tion. “The work in this exhibition reaches back to childhood memories, delves into my emotional experiences, travels out to realities I imagine, and has a pinch of political statement sprinkled in.” Natural forms appear in unexpected colors and fantastic combinations. Through this process, the vocabulary of observed botany becomes a vehicle for personal expression. Recently, Elliot has begun to incorporate human characteristics, reflecting the artist’s inner life through an organic vocabulary. One can’t help but be struck by the visual richness and detail of her work, the sense of invention and the high degree

This page (left to right): Peppers, May 2008, glass, 9”h x 5”w x 4”d Garnet Blossoms, September 2009, 11”h x 8”w x 3”d Opposite: Bouquet, November 2008, glass, mixed media, 44”h x 24”w x 6”d

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of craft. Each of Elliot’s pieces may begin either with a general concept or with a fully-formed idea, triggered by something in the world: a conversation, a pattern of shadows, or a color combination. At times, an initial idea yields to a completely new direction. The sculptures are made by flameworking, treating glass directly with the flame of a torch. This technique allows the artist to create threedimensional forms, add color and texture, and then assemble complex structures. “Creating a sculpture is a painstaking, meditative process, often requiring many technical adjustments,” says Elliot.


Revisiting Eden “A piece may take weeks or months to finish.” Each imaginary botanical has its own story and its own meaning. Works in this series explore a wide range of subjects from female sexuality, to dancers and infants, to the idea of botanical life in alternate realities. Personal growth and development are continuing themes, and a number of pieces have arisen from imagining the emotional phenomena in our lives, in botanical imagery. Elliot was born in Akron, OH, in 1958, but has lived

in the Bay Area in California since childhood. As a girl, she enjoyed all manner of arts and crafts—and even taught herself to knit and crochet. She went on to study cosmetology and earned her degree from San Jose City College. After taking adult education programs, Elliot designed management tools for a semi-conductor company in Silicon Valley. Her life changed in 1991 when a friend invited her to try glasswork in his garage. Elliot took to working with glass immediately.

From the Valley of Heart’s Delight, 2008, glass, mixed media, 32”h x 63”w x 6”d

“Creating a sculpture is a painstak adjustments. A piece 00

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king, meditative process, often requiring many technical may take weeks or months to finish.” —K athleen E lliot OnV

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Revisiting Eden She bought herself the basic equipment—a torch, a kiln and a sampler of glass—and began teaching herself how to make glass beads. This introduction to flamework would become the basis for her future sculptural projects. Elliot took her first glassblowing workshop in 1996, studied art at De Anza College and attended the Pilchuck Glass School for three summers. There she studied with leading glass artists, Laura Donefer, Robert Mickelsen and Shane Fero. In 2003, Elliot began making botanical sculptures, drawing upon plant forms she observed in nature. “These arose from a great love of plants, their lifecycles, the beauty of all of their parts— leaves, seed pods, flowers, bark, etc.—and the spiritual connection I feel when in nature,” Elliot explains. Four years later, she began an ongoing series of imaginary botanicals that use natural forms, but invent new species, including human/plant hybrids. Elliot has found inspiration in the study of applied phi-

Right (top to bottom): En Pointe, 2009, glass, enamel, 21”h x 8”w x 8”d When Plants and Animals Merge, 2011, glass, 26”h x 13”w x 9”d Winter Cyclone, 2009, glass, 34”h x 10”w x 10”d Opposite: Trunk, March 2009, glass, 19”h x 6”w x 7”d

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Revisiting Eden

Untitled Miniature, 2010, glass, 4”h x 9.5”w x 3”d

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losophy and alternative spiritual disciplines. She studied with Carlos Castaneda, who wrote about his encounters with a Yaqui shaman. This experience as well as her exploration into the theories of alternate dimensions of reality, lead her to create works that reflect a wide range of fresh and expressive possibilities. Elliot’s sculptural work

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has gained wide recognition through many awards and articles, and two solo exhibitions at the William Traver Gallery, Tacoma, as well as through many group exhibitions, including those at the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville, KY; Triton Museum of Art, San Jose, CA; Sanchez Art Center, Pacifica, CA; and Micaëla Gallery in San Francisco. O n V iew


“The undercurrent of my work is the shifting nature of ‘reality.’...I like to venture into new understandings, interpretations, and experiences.” —K athleen E lliot

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ON VIEW 04.21-08.05.12 AT THE PATRICIA thefrost Droga (detail), 2009, cedar, graphite, 4’6” x 9’7” x 18’3”, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York


R Y D I N G S V A R D:

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Halo with a Straight Line, 2010, cedar, graphite, ink, 133 x 114 x 79�, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ŠUrsula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York


U Ursula von Rydingsvard: SCULPTURE

URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD HAS BEEN CREATING

large-scale­—often monumental­—sculptures from cedar beams, which she painstakingly cuts, assembles, glues,

clamps, laminates, and finally rubs with powdered

graphite to enhance the work’s textured, faceted surfaces. Her signature shapes are abstract, with references to

objects in the real world. Drawing on a range of sources, from the humble to the majestic, von Rydingsvard’s work is recognized for its great psychological force and powerful physical presence. OnV

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Ursula von Rydingsvard: SCULPTURE

Top left: Ursula von Rydingsvard, photography by Zonder Titel Below: Weeping Plates, 2005, cedar, 12’2” x 9’6” x 6.5” (left), 10’8” x 8’5” x 8” (right), photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York

Ursula von Rydingsvard: Sculpture, at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum in Miami, includes a selection of the artist’s most significant sculptures, including wall reliefs and massive cedar works created from 1991 to 2009. Built slowly and incrementally from thousands of cedar beams, each work reveals the mark of the artist’s hand, her respect for physical labor and her deep trust of intuitive process. Though she sometimes adds bronze, resins or other materials to the equation, wood is her primary material. Von Rydingsvard regards her connection to wood as part of her history. She comes from a long line of Polish peasant farmers for whom wood provided basic shelter and tools to work the land. Her forms

typically suggest domestic objects such as spoons, plates and bowls; shovels, axes and other farm tools; women’s bonnets and lace collars; and vernacular architecture, including barns, barracks and fences. Her work also evokes great natural forms, from a craggy cliff side to a deep canyon, and phenomena such as the forces of wind and water or the formation of the earth’s strata.


Von Rydingsvard’s sculptures are simultaneously primitive and elegant, lyrical and ominous. Her most characteristic form is the bowl, which may appear as a shallow or towering form, and may alternately evoke nourishment, domesticity, the body, a simple enclosure or a mountain, among other references. The exhibition includes the five undulating bowls that make

up Krasawica II (1998-2001), Ukrainian for “beautiful young woman,” whose overall shape conveys a fluid sense of movement and vitality, despite its substantial, weighty volume; Ocean Floor (1996), a large, low basin, ringed with bulbous, stuffed intestinal forms; a pair of huge, wall-mounted Weeping Plates (2005); and the enormous, horizontal torqued shape of Droga, or OnV

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Above: Krasawica II, 1998-2001, cedar, graphite, 6’ x 22’ x 4’, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York

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Ursula von Rydingsvard: SCULPTURE

“bride’s veil” (2009), which undulates across the floor, flowing like soft fabric. In sculptures filled with contradiction, the artist succeeds in expressing something raw and elemental with remark-

Ocean Floor, 1996, cedar, graphite, cow intestines, 3’ x 13’ x 11’, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy of Galerie Lelong, New York, photography by Jason Mandella

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able sophistication and grace. Von Rydingsvard builds her sculpture from the ground up— block by block, cut by cut. She begins with an image she envisions in her mind, then scratches chalk markings on the floor,


indicating where pieces will be assembled. She then lays down cedar beams and decides how big each piece should be. Curved lines are sketched onto the wood in pencil and the beams are cut with a circular

saw to the desired geometric and/or organic curves. Hacking irregularly gives the edges visual interest. At this stage, the artist’s studio is filled with the sounds of saws and the impact of wood landing on the


Ursula von Rydingsvard: SCULPTURE

Above: Johnny Angel, 1991, cedar, graphite, 112” x 14” x 18.5” Right: Wall Pocket, 2003-2004, cedar, graphite, 13’5.5” x 6’ x 5’5”, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb Images courtesy of SculptureCenter, New York

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floor, after being lobbed. To maintain proper order, each piece of wood is given a code number and von Rydingsvard stacks the pieces of wood in layers. The positioning is crucial from the outset. “The bottom is important,” she points out. “Some of the pieces will dramatically move away from each other. That initiates the mood of the piece.”

The cutting, stacking, marking, lifting, kneeling, bending and carrying goes on for days, weeks or months, depending on the size and complexity of the piece. “This part, the cutting and the building,” von Rydingsvard says, “is the glory of my life, because this is where all the decisions get made.” After a sculpture is entirely cut, shaped and coded, the pieces are clamped and glued together, one layer at a time. When the work is reassembled, von Rydingsvard rubs the red surface of the cedar with a grayish-black graphite. She then sprays the work with an alcohol-based adhesive before brushing on powdered graphite. The piece is finally scrubbed with a steel scouring pad to remove excess powder and to push some of the

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pigment under the skin of the wood. This “wearing down” of the finish creates a patina that imbues the wood with a greater sense of depth and resonance. Born in 1942 in Deensen, Germany, von Rydingsvard’s childhood was deeply affected by the upheaval of World War II. The artist spent years in postwar refugee camps for displaced Polish people, until her

took place,” von Rydingsvard has said, and when her examination results in a tangible construction, the result is profound. Von Rydingsvard received a BA and MA from the University of Miami, Coral Gables, in 1965, an MFA from Columbia University in 1975, and an honorary doctorate from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, in 1991. She subse-

Von Rydingsvard’s childhood years were spent in postwar refugee camps until her family emigrated to the US, in 1950. family eventually emigrated to the US, in 1950. The artist’s respect for organic materials, the dignity of labor, the sense of loss and pain, and the persistent memories that inform her work, may be traced back to those early formative experiences. Her nearly 14-foot-tall piece titled Wall Pocket, 2004, suggests the fragility of humanity in the face of violent devastation. “The easiest way for me to recall my past is to examine the spaces in which the events OnV

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quently taught at several metropolitan institutions and then as a professor at Yale School of Art before she could afford to work full-time in her studio. She did not have a chance to turn her attention seriously to art until she was in her 30s and like many other women artists, her career trajectory has been steady, persistent and hard-won. It was during her years at Columbia that von Rydingsvard was first introduced to the idea of using cedar as her c om

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“I hope more than ever to consciously controlled, to predictable.” — U r s u l a v o n

Above: Five Lace Medallions, 2001-2007, cedar, graphite, chalk, 9’9” x 41’9” x 9’ Photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York

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primary material. There she learned to fuse sheets of welded steel with small steel bead by heating a rod and dripping it onto the sheets as it melted. For von Rydingsvard, the significance of this period was the discovery of a craft-oriented process for manipulating an industrial material and giving it a hand-worked texture—but the rigidity of steel frustrated her. When artist, Michael Mulhern, gave her some cedar beams to experiment with, she was cap-

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tivated. She has remained faithful to milled lumber ever since, embracing the lush organicism of the wood and its heavily detailed, expressively textured surface. In the 1990s von Rydingsvard began to draw on archaic Greek sculpture and on nonWestern sources of art such as Asian, Oceanic and African art for inspiration, and her repertoire of materials has expanded to include plastic, aluminum, polyurethane resin and even


be able to dip into that which is not so be able to trust myself where things are less Rydingsvard cow intestines (included in her 1996 work, Ocean Floor). “I hope more than ever to be able to dip into that which is not so consciously controlled, to be able to trust myself where things are less predictable,” said the artist. “That’s where the fun is for me, and that’s where I want to go.” Von Rydingsvard’s work has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally. Her sculpture is included in numerous permanent collections,

Below: Droga, 2009, cedar, graphite, 4’6” x 9’7” x 18’3”

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Ursula von Rydingsvard: SCULPTURE

including New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and Brooklyn Museum; Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City; High

Museum of Art in Atlanta; and the Detroit Institute of Arts. Major permanent commissions of her work are on view at the Microsoft Corporation in Redmond, WA, and New York’s Storm King Art Center, the Bloomberg Build-

Ursula von Rydingsv are simultan and elegant, lyric

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ing and the Queens Family Courthouse. She has received two individual grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Guggenheim Fellowship and three awards from the American International Critics Association. In 2007, she

vard’s sculptures neously primitive cal and ominous.

Splayed, 2009, cedar, pigment, 4’9” x 7’10” x 7”, photography by Rosalyn and Michael Bodycomb, ©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York

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was the recipient of the Mary Miss Resident in Visual Arts Award from the American Academy in Rome. In 2008, she was awarded the Rappaport Prize and an induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, along with being featured in Art21: Art in the Twenty-First Century on PBS. In 2011 she received the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture from the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture in New York. A monograph on her work titled Ursula von Rydingsvard: Working, by Patricia C. Phillips, was published by Prestel Publishing in 2011. Von Rydingsvard currently resides in New York and is represented by Galerie Lelong, New York. On View c om

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Jerry U E LS M A N N Maggie TAYL O R AND

FROM THE HARN MUSEUM OF ART,

University of Florida On view through

05.05.2012

NAPLES ART ASSOCIATION at

The von Liebig Art Center w w w. n a p l e s a r t . o r g

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I N S P I R E D B Y O N E A N O T H E R , husband and wife artists, Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor, share a passion for composing hauntingly beautiful and surreal dreamscapes portraying strange and enigmatic situations. But despite any similarity regarding subject matter and theme, their work is entirely distinct from each other—each masterfully employs a completely different process to realize their vision. Using traditional photographic techniques, Uelsmann’s images are built up over time in the darkroom where he uses enlargers and the systematic layering of negatives to produce seamless, black and white prints—without the aid of digital technology. On the other hand, Taylor is a pioneer in the world of digitally created art. With the aid of Photoshop and a scanner, she takes digital snapshots of found images which she then composes into digital collages. The resulting compositions are rich in color and possess a painterly quality. The couple first met in 1985 when Taylor was a graduate student at the University of Florida. They have been together over 25 years, and while they do not work collaboratively, they are the first audience for each other’s work. This exhibition explores the two photographers’ work with large and small format images by Taylor and photographs by Uelsmann from the 1960s to the present.

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Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor share a passion for creating hauntingly beautiful and surreal dreamscapes. All images are courtesy of the artists

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Photography by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

In addition to inspiring awe and arous Jerry and Maggie also share some common moti a completely different process to creat Left to right: Jerry Uelsmann, Untitled, 1969, gelatin silver print; Maggie Taylor, Oh happy day, 2009, pigmented inkjet print, 15 x 15�


sing a questioning response in viewers, ifs in their work—yet each masterfully employs te their unique and dreamlike visions. OnV

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Photography by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor Maggie Taylor

Above: Jerry Uelsmann, The Committee, 2002, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16” Opposite: Jerry Uelsmann, Dream Theater, 2004, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16”

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Jerry Uelsmann was born in Detroit in 1934. He studied photography at Rochester Institute and Indiana University and was deeply influenced by his instructors, Ralph Hattersley, Minor White and especially, Henry Holmes Smith, who introduced Uelsmann to the concept that photography can be used as a vehicle for self-expression. In 1960, Uelsmann began teaching at the University of Florida and in 1974, was awarded a graduate research professorship. While he is now retired from teaching, he is still actively producing art. A master of photo montage and a trailblazer in the art of

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Photography by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

“I fell in love with the alchemy of the photographic process and to this day, watching that print come up in the developer is magic for me.”

—J erry U elsmann

Above: Jerry Uelsmann, Apocalypse II, 1967, gelatin silver print, 10-3/4 x 13-1/2” Opposite: Jerry Uelsmann, Untitled, 2003, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16”

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photo manipulation, Uelsmann finds his source material in many locations and through his travels. He uses a series of up to eight enlargers in his darkroom to “build” his photographs and adds the individual component images from each negative to his photographs by making a timed exposure at each enlarger. After images from all the negatives have been exposed onto the photographic paper, it is stopped, fixed and rinsed in wash basins. Over the last 50 years Uelsmann’s work has been exhibited in nearly 150 solo exhibitions in the US and internationally. His photographs are also held in the permanent collections of virtually every major museum worldwide.

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Photography by Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

Below: Maggie Taylor, Girl in a bee dress, 2004, pigmented inkjet print, 58 x 58”

Maggie Taylor was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1961. In 1983, she graduated Cum Laude from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy and shortly thereafter began graduate studies at the University of Florida in Gainesville. In 1987 she received her MFA degree and in 1989 married Jerry Uelsmann. In 1995, when a representative from Adobe approached Uelsmann to create a poster for the company using Photoshop, Taylor offered her assistance. She read the Photoshop manual and became intrigued with the entire process. Uelsmann created the photograph for the poster and returned to his work in the darkroom while Taylor continued to experiment with the computer and Photoshop software. By 1998, she was using the computer exclusively to create her images. Above: Maggie Taylor, Sketchy characters, 2009, pigmented inkjet print, 15 x 15”

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Taylor collects 19th Century tintype portraits, which she finds in antique stores, at flea markets and on the internet. She captures the figures in the original portraits using a flatbed scanner. Additional acquired and photographed images are scanned and combined with the portraits using her computer and the Adobe Photoshop program. Typically, Taylor works with 40 to 60 image layers. She imports images, configures, filters and otherwise manipulates them before integrating them into a single image, which she prints on a state-of-the-art Epson inkjet printer. Taylor’s work has been exhibited throughout the US and internationally. Her whimsical creations are held in numerous public and private collections and featured in several books, including Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Modernbook Editions, 2008. O n V iew

Below: Maggie Taylor, The pretender, 2009, pigmented inkjet print, 15 x 15”

Above: Maggie Taylor, Weather makers, 2011, pigmented inkjet print, 15 x 15”

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“Solar Midnight is the instant when the sun is at the nadir, equidistant from dusk and dawn. Even in darkest night is the seed of full light. Amidst the darkest imagery shows through a suggestion of redemption and hope.” — C. A. Baade

C A R R I E

A N N B A A D E

SOLAR £

£

MIDNIGHT 04.12-05.27.12 at the

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

Jacksonville (A Cultural Resource of UNF) w w w. m o c a j a c k s o n v i l l e . o r g

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C Carrie Ann Baade:

SOLAR MIDNIGHT

CARRIE ANN BAADE’S NEW EXHIBITION,

Solar Midnight, at MOCA Jacksonville, is a survey of her past three years of work. Through myths

and monsters, Baade has explored the complexity of the human condition within her autobiographical

oil paintings, rich with allegorical meta-narratives inspired by literature and art history. Combining

fragments of Renaissance and Baroque religious

paintings, these parables have culminated in a myr-

Previous page:

The Devil is in the Details, Part III: Lilith the Protector, 2009,

gouache and ink mixed media on paper, 11 x 15”

Above:

Carrie Ann Baade Opposite:

Lady or Tiger, 2009,

oil on panel, 18 x 24” Images courtesy of the artist, ©Carrie Ann Baade; photography by Jon Nalon

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iad of surreal landscapes inhabited by exotic flora,

fauna and figures. Dubbed “Imaginative Realism,” her works present an entirely original vision, where cultures and time periods converge.

“ My subjects are adopted from religion and mythology—these are often cautionary tales that mirror my

personal experience,” says Baade. “In desiring to

speak to the complexity of the human condition, I use this language of allegory and narrative to relate my own story.”

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Carrie Ann Baade:

SOLAR MIDNIGHT

Opposite: The Afterlife of the Honeybees, 2010, ink, gouache and gold leaf on paper, 11 x 15”, ©Carrie Ann Baade

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Born in Natchitoches, Louisiana, Baade’s earliest and fondest recollections are of living in New Orleans. But when her family later relocated to a rural and arid region of Colorado, with no children within walking distance of her house, Baade found new ways to entertain herself by playing with branches and the bones from dead horses. She also practiced drawing and painting, using art books as inspiration. As Baade grew older, she saved up her money and traveled the world, exploring art museums and learning about ancient civilizations. After returning from her travels, Baade spent years searching for new direction in her painting. Through sheer frustration, she began tearing apart her library of art books, cutting out characters from paintings to collage onto different paintings, transforming them into her own new creations. Collage has consistently remained a critical element in her process ever since. “The ideas for my work may start in the fanciful and idealized world of the mind,

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yet something must be generated to observe from. To begin a composition, I start with scissors, clipping fragments, composing from snippets of several hundred pictures scattered about me on the floor. A prototype collage of layered scraps with cut edges is created that includes an array of photographs and images from art history. Looking at this collage, a painting is execut-

work is an ongoing investigation of the struggles between inside versus outside, virtue versus vice, and man versus monster. Where she finds inspiration is through life experiences—childhood memories, the passage of time, personal sacrifice, triumph over adversity and ultimately, achieving one’s life goals. “It is making the painful sacrifices and liv-

Baade’s work is an ongoing investigation of the struggles between inside versus outside, virtue versus vice, and man versus monster. ed in a trompe l’oeil manner, showing the multiple layers with cut edges, which suggest the complexity of individuals’ psychologies—their masks and their hidden secrets. To create these paintings, I cut up and serve the reinvigorated past to be contemplated in context of the contemporary.” Fascinated by secret languages, paradoxes, mysteriousness and lies, Baade’s OnV

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ing the beautiful small, intimate sensual life at the same time that is the balancing act, while dodging debt, danger, and death.
I love this ride!” Highlights from the exhibition include Explaining Death to a Rabbit, a painting created for a group exhibit titled INLE, curated by Greg Simkins. “Inle is what the rabbits in the book, Watership Down, call the black c om

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Carrie Ann Baade:

rabbit, or a figure of death,” explains Baade. “When I was a child, I imagined myself as a rabbit. I collected rabbits and had an eerie obsession with Easter. When I was four, my parents took me to see the movie version of Watership Down. In the film, there is a war between warrens, where the rabbits fight each other to the death. As you can imagine, this was a traumatic experience for a young child. When I was asked to do this

SOLAR MIDNIGHT

ure of my painting represents the image of Beuys holding the hare from this performance. For me, Explaining Death to a Rabbit is homage to innocence that is lost in the process of understanding the larger world.” Another notable painting from the exhibition, The Perilous Compassion of the Honey Queen, portrays a visual component often found in Baade’s portraits— a mask of crying eyes. “In my

“ For me, Explaining Death to a Rabbit is homage to innocence that is lost in the process of understanding the larger world.”

Opposite: Explaining Death to a Rabbit, 2011, oil on panel, 24 x 30”, ©Carrie Ann Baade

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piece for INLE, it was very significant for me. In my painting, a woman personifies Inle by wearing a mask with an outline of a rabbit. The rabbit face is a headdress of sorts, subtly rendered in the 22K gold leaf accents. Another allusion for this painting is Joseph Beuys’s How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare, a performance art piece about the complexity of understanding art. The rabbit in the arms of the fig-

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older work, I used Our Lady of Sorrow and Our Man of Sorrow—a type of painting, created in the early Northern Renaissance, of the Madonna and Christ crying—as a foundation,” she explains. “I would cut the eyes out of historic paintings. These would serve as masks, often for myself. Through this period of my life, I was dealing with my own sadness. I wanted to connect with the universal and the Christian arche-


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types of compassion, so that I might be removed from my own personal story. In a way, this is hiding, but it is also protection. While sorrow is a constant, unending river that flows beneath us, I have now experienced the universal river of joy that flows above us, and I am attempting a new and exciting challenge—how to paint out of pure joy.” Baade received her Masters in Painting from the University of Delaware where

SOLAR MIDNIGHT

querque Journal. She has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, the Rosenfeld Gallery in Philadelphia, Billy Shire Fine Arts in Los Angeles, and the Ningbo Art Museum in China. Baade has been awarded the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs Individual Artist Fellowship, the Delaware Division of the Arts Fellowship for Established Artists, and a nomination for the prestigious

“ While sorrow is a constant, unending river that flows beneath us, I have now experienced the universal river of joy that flows above us.”

Opposite: Explaining Death to a Rabbit, 2011, oil on panel, 24 x 30”, ©Carrie Ann Baade

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she expanded her knowledge of materials and techniques under the guidance of professors of art conservation. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which included one year of study at the Florence Academy of Art in Italy. Her work has been reviewed and the subject of features in NY ARTS Magazine, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Austin Chronicle, Colorado Springs Independent, and the Albu-

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United States Artist Fellowship. Exhibiting widely with the Pop Surrealists, her paintings have been featured in Metamorphosis, a survey of the top, contemporary Visionary Surrealists, and Suggestivism, curated by Nathan Spoor, at the Grand Central Art Center in California. Baade currently lives and works in Tallahassee, where she is an Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at Florida State University. On View


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THE PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNAL

ON

VIEW THROUGH

0

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA MUSEU w w w. s w f l m u s e u Dunes, St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, Panhandle of Florida, 5 x 7 Deardorf view camera, 90mm lens, color negative film, no filter, f/32, 1/30


OF

Clyde Butcher

05.26.12

AT THE

U M O F H I S TO RY, F O RT M Y E R S m o f h i s t o r y. c o m second exposure, ©Clyde Butcher

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T The Photographic Journal of Clyde Butcher

THE SPECTACULAR BLACK-AND-WHITE

landscapes for which Clyde Butcher is so famous, tell their own story in The Photographic Journal of Clyde Butcher, an exhibition marking three decades in photography for the Fort Myers native as well as the 30th anniversary of the Southwest Florida Museum of History. With photos and informative exhibit panels, Clyde takes guests on a step-by-step journey through the developmental stages of his work, culminating in dramatic large-format prints. This unique exhibition, designed and developed by the artist, provides a never-beforeseen glimpse into the making of Clyde’s stunning masterpieces. More than 15 works and their stories are displayed, including Ochopee, the elusive Ghost Orchid, and Cayo Costa. Viewers will find themselves entranced by this behind-the-scenes documentary—from the hours spent waiting for the right light, to the process of developing the perfect print, Clyde shares his thoughts and techniques. An advocate for nature and preserving it, Above: To print or not to print... the artist examines his negative Left: Clyde with his “super-sized” enlarger All images courtesy of the artist, ©Clyde Butcher


Clyde strives to do just that through his work. “The objective is to present a perception of Florida as it is supposed to be, hopefully providing inspiration and a catalyst for action to those people striving to reclaim a natural balance and purity,” he says. Clyde also believes the essence of good photography is two-fold: seeing the image with the heart and knowing enough about the mechanics OnV

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of photography to get a good shot. For Clyde and his wife, Niki, photography has been the great adventure of their lives. Clyde hopes that by sharing his photographic journal, he may inspire others to open their eyes and discover their own personal adventures in photography—and an appreciation for nature. The following pages include a sampling of works featured in this engaging exhibition. Ma

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Ochopee BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE

The Tamiami Trail is one of the most scenic drives thunderstorm was brewing. After pre-focusing the in Florida, particularly a stretch of grassy plain camera, he extended the tripod and camera as high near Ochopee. The Trail reveals the most repre- as it would go, so the camera was aimed over the sentative elements of the Florida landscape: water, grass and beyond to the horizon. His eyes couldn’t grass, cabbage palms and low hanging thunder actually see the image, but he was confident it clouds. For Clyde Butcher, there is a feeling of would be good. being able to see clear into eternity. Choosing which negative to print was the most This picture was taken along the edge of difficult part. Clyde finally selected this one because Tamiami Trail. Clyde set up his tripod and camera of its balance between the storm and the sunlight. next to the railing that lines the north side of High- The image has become one of Clyde’s signature, way 41, leaving only a few feet of space between or classic, images and it graced the front of Clyde’s him and the speeding traffic. The light was per- first book, Portfolio I ~ Landscapes of Florida. Clyde Butcher, Tamiami Trail 2, 1990, silver gelatin fect, coming from behind him—and wasn’t Years later, Clyde discovered the image had an fiber print, 36 x 46”,there collection of the artist a cloud in sight. In front of Clyde, a wonderful underlying purpose. That purpose was revealed as Above: Image negative and darkroom manipulations for Ochopee,
Big Cypress National Preserve, 8 x 10 view camera, 121mm lens, orange


he became more educated about Florida’s environment. When Clyde first began photographing Florida, he loved the beauty he saw, but was ignorant of its environmental stresses. The “grass” in the foreground of Ochopee actually consists of blades of cattails, which only grow in dirty water. The ecosystem of the Everglades is based on a nutrient poor environment. Historically, cattails are found in small amounts throughout the Everglades. The environmental purpose of cattails is to clean the waste located in those areas. Massive

it is beautiful, like the “grass” in Ochopee—but that doesn’t make it right. This photograph has provided an opportunity to educate people about Florida. As Clyde said to Carol Browner, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, when she received the Ochopee photograph as a gift, “Remember when you look at this picture that your job is to make sure dirty water no longer contaminates Florida, creating miles and miles of cattails.” The Ochopee negative is one of Clyde’s most difficult negatives to print. Without extensive dark-

growth of cattails indicates that the water quality has been diminished. A healthy balance of swamp water and grassy vegetation should be dominated by sawgrass, not cattails! If the water remains polluted, cattails continue to multiply, rapidly creating a dense mass of vegetation; fish become unable to survive; birds lose a critical food source; and the Everglades eventually die. When Clyde realized that one of his favorite pictures depicted environmental damage, he considered taking it off the market, but after careful consideration, he opted to keep the image. Clyde decided it was important to understand that environmental damage doesn’t always look bad—often

room work, the picture would lack the drama that is visible in the finished piece of art. Clyde made nine separate exposures to create the image. The basic exposure includes a 40 magenta filter that adds contrast to the print. Then he made two burns from the white part of the grass up through the sky. Next he removed the 40 magenta filter and, using a mask on the cabbage palms and foreground, he burned the sky three more times. He then changed to a 40 yellow filter and burned in the hot spot in the cloud three times. Next he burned in the foreground water one more time. To complete the exposure of one 40 x 60” print, it takes approximately 11 minutes. That is all there is to it!

filter, 1/30th second exposure

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Ochopee,
Big Cypress National Preserve, 8 x 10 view camera, 121mm lens, orange filter, 1/30th second exposure


The Photographic Journal of Clyde Butcher

Ghost Orchid (POLYRRHIZA LINDENNI) When Mike Owen, the biologist of the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve, offered to take Clyde Butcher out to see the elusive and rare Ghost Orchid, he jumped at the chance! Clyde describes the experience... GHOST ORCHID #2


“The air was thick with the humidity of early morning mist when Mike Owen and I made our way through the swamp in the dim tree-filtered light of an August morning. Mike had called a few days before to invite me out to photograph a Ghost Orchid that he thought would soon be blooming. It was my first opportunity to see a Ghost Orchid and so, waist deep in swamp water, with mosquitoes eagerly consuming Clyde Butcher, Tamiami Trail 2, 1990, silver gelatin my flesh for their fiber morning breakfast, I anxprint, 36 x 46”, collection of the artist iously hoped the orchid would be in bloom.

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Very few people have ever seen the Ghost Orchid, and so, mosquitoes not withstanding, I felt very honored to be following Mike through the swamps in search of one of the most rare native orchids in Florida. The majority of the Ghost Orchids are found in the Fakahatchee Strand Preserve and in Big Cypress Preserve. They are so rare that most of them have been located by GPS so that the Preserve can keep track of their health. There are approximately 150 or so plants left, with only 10% or less blooming. The orchid is pollinated by the large Sphinx Moth. Unfortunately, the moth is disappearing, leaving the Ghost Orchid with an uncertain future. Because of its rarity, the Ghost Orchid has often been the prey to theft. However, no matter the level of ‘orchid knowledge’ that is possessed by the thief, no one has ever managed to keep the Ghost Orchid alive outside of it’s own personal habitat. As we trekked deeper into the swamp, we came upon a tree with vine-like roots running around the trunk of the tree. Extending out from those roots, and defying the complexity of the surrounding ecosystem, was a beautiful, simple, white orchid. The Ghost Orchid has no leaves. All of the photosynthesis takes place in the roots, so when there is no bloom, the plant is close to impossible to find. It took quite a while before I felt like the breeze and the orchid had calmed down enough for me to take a picture. Even then, I wondered if I had actually gotten the photograph. I didn’t know until I developed the film. Fortunately, the negative was good, and I had my picture of the Ghost Orchid!” Left to right: Mike Owen, Clyde, Oscar Thompson & Jeff Ripple


Ghost Orchid #2, 1999, ŠClyde Butcher


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Cayo Costa BARRIER ISLAND ON THE GULF COAST Cayo Costa, north of Sanibel Island, is one of Clyde Butcher’s favorite places in Florida. He has been there many times and chose late June to photograph the island, when the angle of the sun is from its most northern direction, providing great light. “This photograph was taken on the southern end of the island. The southern point, with all its sunbleached driftwood along the beach, has wonderful possibilities for black and white photography. I had taken my 5 x 7 view camera with me because I wasn’t feeling safe about taking the 8 x 10 view camera out into the ocean in our small sailboat. Later, as I became more accustomed to using the 8 x 10, I took it out in the boat as often as I could. Now, I even take my 12 x 20 view camera out in the boat­—it’s so big we could use it as a flotation device if anything happened to the boat! For a safer harbor, Niki and I spent our nights anchored on the north end of Cayo Costa. To time our arrival at the southern end of the island, in order to get the proper lighting for the photograph,

we had to pull anchor and set sail at dawn. We had quite a time anchoring our boat in this area since the current between North Captiva Island and Cayo Costa Island is very strong. We had put the stern anchor out in the Gulf and the bow anchor up on shore, but no matter what we did, the boat sat side-on to the shore, flopping back and forth with the wave action. Getting my camera gear out of the boat and walking ashore was pretty tricky. For this picture, I needed a sky with absolutely no clouds. I used a red filter to enhance the white driftwood against the dark sky. If clouds had been in the picture they would have detracted from the driftwood. To achieve the picture I had in mind, we needed strong morning light, with the sun still low in the sky and no cloud build up over land to block out the sunlight. It took a few mornings, but I finally got the shot I wanted. Everything was perfect. This is one of the few negatives I have that is a straight printer—no darkroom work needed!” —C. Butcher O n V iew

Clyde Butcher, Tamiami Trail 2, 1990, silver gelatin fiber print, 36 x 46”, collection of the artist

Cayo Costa Island #2 (detail), 5 x 7 view camera, 75mm lens, T-Max 100 film, dark red filter, f/45, 5 sec. exposure, ©Clyde Butcher

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FOCUS { C H A R L E S

IN A WORLD OF HIGH

L E D R AY }

Exhibition

Charles LeDray: Bass Museum of Art On view April 27th-August 12th at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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tech mass production, Charles LeDray revives manual traditions of exquisite craftsmanship. Considered feats of miniaturism, his tiny suits, miniature ceramic vessels and embroidered baseball caps are all meticulously made by his hand, bringing awe to our experience of them. His work is a poetry of material, scale and cultural resonance, rich with history and emotion. Charles LeDray: Bass Museum of Art is the artist’s first museum exhibition to follow his just-completed comprehensive survey exhibition, workworkworkworkwork, which was organized by The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, and toured to The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. While workworkworkworkwork included more than 50 artworks spanning the artist’s career, Charles LeDray: Bass Museum of Art consists of just four works. The result is an exhibition which gives enormous physical and imaginative space


F O C U S

to these very carefully selected private gallery where his first projects. In contrast to a survey piece of work was selected for that seeks to explore the full inclusion in a group show, just range of an artist’s concerns or hours before the opening. approaches, this exhibition is The artist’s previous solo focused on creating a unique shows include a major traveldialogue between these indi- ing survey exhibition organized vidual, powerful creations—a by the ICA, Philadelphia (2002); dialogue of profound intellec- Past Presence: Childhood and tual and visual beauty. Memory, Whitney Museum of Included in the American Art, New exhibition is LeYork (2005); and Dray’s major work, Venice Biennale Mens Suits, an in(1997). In 1993, he stallation that literewas the recipient of ally brings viewers the Louis Comfort to the floor to examTiffany Foundation ine three very disAward and in 1997, tinct vignettes of a Charles LeDray’s he received the Prix second-hand clothde Rome from the WORK IS ing shop in which American Acada POETRY of every item is renemy in Rome. material, scale and dered in extremely LeDray’s work cultural resonance. precise, intimately can be found in wrought detail and scale. major public collections, inCharles LeDray was born in cluding the Museum of ModSeattle, WA, in 1960 and now ern Art, New York; the Whitlives and works in New York. ney Museum of American Art, He did not receive conventional New York; the Museum of Fine artistic training. He began his Arts, Boston; Institute of Concareer as a security guard at temporary Art, Boston; and the Seattle Art Museum, then the San Francisco Museum of worked as an art handler for a Modern Art. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. MENS SUITS (installation view), 2009, mixed media, Photo: John Kennard 2. Wheat, 2000, human bone, 6-1/2 x 24 x 1/2”, Private Collection Above (top to bottom): 1. Jewelry Window (detail), 2002, mixed media, 54 x 75 x 42” 2. Cricket Cage, 2002, human bone, 3-3/8 x 3-3/8 x 1 7/16”, Private Collection, UK IMAGES Courtesy of the artist and Sperone Westwater, NY left: image detail from “CHARLES LEDRAY: MENS SUITS” BY ARTANGEL (HARDBACK, 2009)


PROFILE { A P R I L

W.

D AV I S }

Exhibition

Window Into the Garden: The Panoramic Landscape Painting of April W. Davis On view through April 15th at the Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

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A P R I L D AV I S F I N D S H E R

artistic inspiration in the splendor of nature. Since moving to Florida 15 years ago, she has become known for her brilliant tropical landscapes. “The inspiration for my art has always come from the world around me, landscape being the primary focus of my work now,” says Davis. “I have recently become aware of trying to create a window into nature, bringing the outside in… By working on a large scale, I believe it becomes easier for the viewer to visually move inside my paintings, being transported to that space, perceiving the image not through thought but through feeling.” Throughout her 30-year career, Davis has continued to present a unique perspective through her work. By using her inherent talent as an artist, she focuses on bringing out the beauty and tranquility of a specific scene. “My philosophy on art and life is the same,” she explains. “Do something you are passionate about, and create joy and peace for yourself and those around you. This is what I strive for in my life and


P R O F I L E

in every work of art I create.” ami as their poster image. Born and raised in New York Davis has also received nuCity, Davis holds a BA from merous awards from prestigious Queens College and MFA from art shows throughout Florida, Indiana University in Blooming- including Coconut Grove Art ton. Upon completing her Mas- Festival, Under the Oaks Art ters, Davis relocated to Pitts- Fair in Vero Beach, Pigeon Key burgh, PA, where she truly began Arts Festival in Marathon, to explore the intricacies of pan- Sunfest in West Palm Beach, oramic landscape— Old Island Days and the communiin Key West and ty took notice. The South Miami Art Rooney CorporaFestival, to name a tion, owners of the few. Additionally, Pittsburgh SteelApril was invited ers, acquired a large to exhibit at Epcot diptych that was inCenter in Disney stalled in the ownWorld, for the 2011 er’s box at Three Art in the Garden April Davis River Stadium. Festival. finds artistic Davis’ work has INSPIRATION IN Teaching credits been exhibited in include positions at the splendor galleries, museums the University of of NATURE. and private collecPittsburgh, where tions throughout the country. Cit- she received a teaching excelies such as South Miami, Jupi- lence award, Indiana Universiter and Tarpon Springs, FL, have ty and Montgomery Community commissioned Davis to create College in Rockville, MD. She original poster images repre- has taught classes in oil painting, senting their area. Her painting watercolor, drawing and design. Fairchild Gardens Series I was April Davis currently works chosen by the Fairchild Tropical from her studio/gallery in JupiBotanical Gardens in South Mi- ter, FL. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Tropical Foliage III 2. Everglades IV above (top to bottom): 1. Lincoln Rd., South Beach 2. White Bird of Paradise III left: April W. Davis images courtesy of the artist. to view more of Davis’ work, please visit her website: www.aprilwdavis.com


INSIGHT { M I S A KO

I NAO K A }

Exhibition

Muted Imprints: An Installation by Misako Inaoka On view through May 20th at the Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

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T H E R E L AT I O N S H I P B E -

tween the viewer and Misako Inaoka’s artwork is one of discovery. One can expect to find a menagerie of bizarre combinations of animals and machines. Her hybrid creations, which often move and make sounds, compel the observer to get as close as possible, to delight in these invented creatures and landscapes of Inaoka’s imagination. Here the viewer’s presence brings art to life, literally. Misako Inaoka is known for her kinetic sculpture and sitespecific installations. For her exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Inaoka has created a series of life-sized and miniature works as well as a new kinetic installation inside of artificial wood knot holes. The artist’s desire to carefully construct environments that evoke wilderness, yet are grounded in technology, comes from a longstanding interest in the boundary between what we call “natural” and “artificial.” As Inaoka has stated, “To arouse notions of existence and coexistence, I construct envi-


I N S I G H T

ronments that are rooted in the culiarity,” says Inaoka. “I emreality of vanishing species and phasize these subtle details and mutating nature. My minuscule exaggerate their illogicality to sculptures and site-specific in- cultivate my own version of installations force viewers to fo- vented creatures.” cus on small details and to take Born in Kyoto, Japan in 1977, a harder look at their surround- Inaoka received a BFA from ings. My world is not a creation Rhode Island School of Deof total imagination, but is a hy- sign and a MFA from Mills Colbrid of the artificial lege, CA. Her work and the actual.” has been exhibited Inaoka creates in numerous muher miniature hyseums and gallerbrid sculptures by ies, including San seamlessly fusing Francisco’s Yerba together plastic and Buena Center for rubber toys, resultthe Arts, and de ing in simultaneousYoung Museum; Viewers will ly mutated and huand San Jose ICA. DELIGHT IN moristic inventions. She is a recipient of the invented She sometimes ap- CREATURES OF the Irvine Fellowplies a metallic finship for Montalvo Inaoka’s ish that gives the residency, NationIMAGINATION. figurines the initial al Endowment of appearance of cast metal or she Arts for MacDowell Colony resmay use battery operated mo- idency, and has been an artist-intion sensors that detect chang- residence at the Headlands Cenes in light or sound, allowing ter for the Arts in Sausalito, De her creatures to move and make Young Museum, and Vermont sounds as viewers approach. Studio Center. Inaoka lives and “I observe the physical and works in San Francisco and is social environment in detail, represented by Johansson Projto find hidden beauty and pe- ects, Oakland, CA. O n V iew

opposite (clockwise from top left): 1. spiders, 2012, mixed media, 25 x 33 x 18” & 18 x 22 x 11” 2. muted imprints (detail), 2012, mixed media 3. furniturized, 2012, mixed media, 18 x 23 x 6” 4. Wood knot installation, 2012, mixed media, 11 x 11” & 12 x 12” above (top to bottom): 1. bear, 2012, mixed media, 36 x 45 x 18” 2. pine hands (detail), 2012, mixed media, 30 x 21 x 11” left: Misako Inaoka photography by Misako Inaoka, images courtesy of the artist


SPOTLIGHT { E D M E

M A R I E

PAU L

JAC OU L E T }

Exhibition

Jacoulet: Woodblock Prints from the MOAS Collections On view April 15th-June 10th at the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach www.moas.org

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A R A R E O P P O RT U N I T Y TO

view works by noted woodblock artist, Paul Jacoulet, this selection of prints from the MOAS Collections, provides viewers a unique glimpse into the life and work of the first foreigner to become a master of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world of pleasure) and worthy to rank within those Japanese masters. Paul Jacoulet spent most of his life in Japan after his parents moved the family there from France in 1906, when he was just four years old. His father taught French at the Imperial University of Tokyo. Jacoulet displayed artistic talent early on and began painting at the age of eleven. He subsequently studied under Seiki Kuroda. Jacoulet also spoke fluent Japanese, French and English in addition to having mastered the violin and the Japanese samisen, a traditional three-stringed lute. In the early 1920s, Jacoulet was forced to resign from a position with the French embassy in Tokyo, due to frail health,


S P O T L I G H T

and he then decided to pursue inum, mica, mother of pearl art full-time. In 1929, he made and powdered semi-precious the first of many trips to the stones, coupled with his use of South Seas. Much of his body as many as 300 different blocks of work is based on the people for a single print, made his body and customs he observed dur- of work so unique. Over the ing his travels. He made many course of his life, he produced sketches and photographs of some thirty-thousand woodlocal natives, elegantly dressed block prints. and posed. In 1941, Jacoulet In 1931, Jacoulet moved from Tokyo turned his attention to Kauizawa, where to creating woodhe maintained a stublock prints. With dio until his death the aid of a succesin 1960. sion of top carvers A flamboyant and printers, Jacoucharacter, Jacoulet soon became let often dressed in Paul Jacoulet his own publisher, a silk kimono, his was the FIRST personally superface lightly coated FOREIGNER vising the printing with oshiroi riceTO become process. His subpowder and toucha MASTER of jects ranged from es of color on his “UKIYO-E.� the most aristocratlips. He enjoyed ic exoticism to the spare stud- taking guests to his studio to ies of ordinary people. view his print production and His prints were not on sale he took great pride in the fact in shops, however. Only those that his prints hung in the officprints for which he had sub- es and homes of the rich and fascription orders were produced. mous, including General DougSpecial hand-made and water- las MacArthur, Pope Pius XII, marked paper made in Kyoto, President Truman, Greta Garbo lavish use of gold, silver, plat- and Queen Elizabeth II. O n V iew

opposite: Nuit de Neige above (top to bottom): 1. Retour de la Jungle Tondano Celebes 2. Vieil Aino collection of the Museum of arts & sciences left: Paul Jacoulet, self portrait


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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Boston

The museums. . .

WELCOME TO BOSTO N ! The City of Boston hosts over

12 million annual visitors from across the country and around the globe. This vibrant, thriving metropolis is renowned for its cultural facilities, educational institutions, champion sports franchises as well as its place at the very forefront of American history. But Boston is also a trendy urban enclave, home to world-class art museums including the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Harvard Art Museum, the MIT Museum and the Peabody Essex Museum—all within city limits or a short ride away via the subway (T) line or commuter rail. Tourism is one of New England’s largest industries. As the region’s social and commercial hub, Boston will accommodate and entertain as few other cities can. On View is pleased to present some of the best art venues the city has to offer—so pack your bags! O n V iew

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Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston

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A W A R D - W I N N I N G archi-

tects Diller Scofidio + Renfro designed the ICA, conceiving the building both “from the sky down,” as a contemplative space for experiencing contemporary art, and “from the ground up,” providing dynamic areas for public enjoyment. The design weaves together interior and exterior space, producing shifting perspectives of the waterfront throughout the museum’s galleries and public spaces.

Since its 2006 move to the architecturally stunning new harborfront digs, the museum has continued its path on the cutting edge of contemporary art in Boston. The facility houses an amazing permanent collection, as well as traveling exhibitions showcasing the hottest talents from around the world. ICA is also home to a year-round program of dance, theater and film. The cafe overlooks the water and offers outdoor seating in fine weather, and the gift shop is spectacular! O n V iew

INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART www.icaboston.org

Info

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

100 Northern Avenue Boston, MA 02210 617.478.3100

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. JOSIAH MCELHENY, CZECH MODERNISM MIRRORED AND REFLECTED INFINITELY, 2005, MIRRORED GLASS CASE WITH HAND BLOWN MIRRORED GLASS OBJECTS, PURCHASED THROUGH FUNDS PROVIDED BY BRIDGITT & BRUCE EVANS, KIMBERLY & JAMES PALLOTTA, BETH & ANTHONY TERRANA, AND NANCY B. TIEKEN IN HONOR OF JILL MEDVEDOW 2. the ICA, photo: Iwan Baan 3. Damian Ortega, Olympus, 2009, Two metal structures, twenty-six plastic sheets holding a sectioned photographic camera, Gift of Mark and Marie Schwartz IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

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I S A B E L L A Stewart Gardner

Info

first welcomed visitors to her museum on New Year’s Day, 1903. Since then, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum has remained essentially unchanged, but certainly not stagnant­, since its founder’s death in 1924. The Museum is modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palazzo surrounding an interior courtyard garden that blooms with life in all seasons. The Collection is housed on ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM www.gardnermuseum.org 280 Fenway Boston, MA 02115 (617) 566-1401

three floors of galleries filled with paintings, sculpture, tapestries, furniture, and decorative arts from cultures spanning thirty centuries, including works by Rembrandt, Titian, Raphael, Botticelli, Degas, and Sargent. In January of 2012, the Museum opened a new wing, designed by Renzo Piano, which includes a 6,000-squarefoot performance hall, a Special Exhibition Gallery featuring a retractable ceiling and a full curtain wall overlooking the Monks Garden. O n V iew OnV

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BostonBostonBoston

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM COURTYARD 2. Titian, Europa, circa 1485, Oil on canvas, Purchased in 1896 from Colnaghi, London, through Berenson 3. grand staircase in the museum’s new wing, photo ©Nic Lehoux/Renzo Piano Building Workshop 4. JOHN S. SARGENT, PORTRAIT OF ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER (DETAIL), 1888, OIL ON CANVAS, COMMISSIONED IN 1888 FROM THE ARTIST IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

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Museum of Fine Art, Boston

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THE MFA IS ONE OF THE

most comprehensive art museums in the world. The museum welcomes more than one million visitors each year to experience art from ancient Egyptian to contemporary, special exhibitions and innovative educational programs. With a collection of 450,000 objects, the MFA owns some of the most rare and important artistic treasures in existence. At every turn, you’ll view breathtaking works of art, from mas-

ters of American painting to the icons of Impressionism, from exquisite Asian scrolls to Egyptian mummies—you never know what you might find! November 2010 marked the opening of The New MFA, which comprises a new wing for Art of the Americas; renovated art of Europe galleries; improved conservation and education facilities; The Linde Family Wing devoted entirely to contemporary art; and a new, larger public space—the Ruth and Carl J. Shapiro Family Courtyard. O n V iew

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS www.mfa.org

Info

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

Avenue of the Arts 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617.267.9300

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. the mfa 2. Antonio López García, The Night, 2008, Bronze Sculpture, Museum purchase with funds donated by Gail and Ernst von Metzsch, © Antonio López García (One of two sculptures) 3. artist rendering: Glass-enclosed Ruth and carl J. Shapiro Family Courtyard, designed by Foster + Partners (London) IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge

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ONE OF THE WORLD’S lead-

Info

ing arts institutions, the Harvard Art Museums are comprised of three constituent museums: the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. The Art Museums are distinguished by the range and depth of their collections, their groundbreaking exhibitions, and the original research of their staff. The collections include more than 250,000 objects, ranging in date from ancient times HARVARD ART MUSEUMS www.harvardartmuseums.org 485 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02138 617.495.9400

to the present, from Europe, North America, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. While the Art Museums are currently undergoing a major renovation, the Sackler Museum remains open and has been reinstalled with a unique exhibition called Re-View, which features some of the finest works representing the collections of all three museums. When the renovation is complete, the three museums will be housed in a single state-of-theart facility designed by architect Renzo Piano. O n V iew OnV

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 1. STANDING BODHISATTVA AVALOKITESHVARA (GUANYIN PUSA) WITH CIRCULAR HALO, CHINESE, SUI DYNASTY (581–618), LIMESTONE WITH TRACES OF GILDING AND POLYCHROME PIGMENT, ARTHUR M. SACKLER MUSEUM, BEQUEST OF GRENVILLE L. WINTHROP 2. MAX BECKMANN, SELF-PORTRAIT IN TUXEDO, 1927, OIL ON CANVAS, BUSCH-REISINGER MUSEUM, ASSOCIATION FUND 3. MASTER OF THE ARGONAUT PANELS, ITALIAN, THE JUDGMENT OF PARIS, C. 1480, TEMPERA ON PANEL, TRANSFERRED TO CANVAS, FOGG MUSEUM, GIFT OF META AND PAUL J. SACHS ALL PHOTOS: DIGITAL IMAGING AND VISUAL RESOURCES, HARVARD ART MUSEUMS, ©PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF HARVARD COLLEGE •

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MIT Museum, Cambridge

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T H E M I T M U S E U M invites

you to explore invention, ideas and innovation. Through interactive exhibitions and its renown collections, the MIT Museum showcases the fascinating world of science, technology and art. Ongoing exhibitions such as Holography: The Light Fantastic, and Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson, demonstrate how technology can translate into wonderful artistic creations.

The holography exhibit presents an awe-inspiring sampling of twenty-three historic holograms from the MIT Museum holography collection, the world’s largest, including scientific and artistic applications of holography in diverse fields such as medicine, engineering, and retailing as well as architecture, portraiture and abstract art. Ganson’s sculptures feature ingenious, philosophical, and witty kinetic works composed of a range of materials from delicate wire to welded steel and concrete. O n V iew

MIT MUSEUM www.mit.edu/museum

Info

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265 Massachusetts Ave. Building N51 Cambridge, MA 02139 617.253.5927

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ARTHUR GANSON, ANOTHER DREAM (DETAIL), PHOTO: ERIC ROTH 2. MIT MUSEUM 3. SALLY WEBER, LACOLITH ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF MIT MUSEUM


Peabody Essex Museum, Salem

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE MUSEUM’S GRAND ATRIUM CEILING 2. PEM’S EXTERIOR 3. YIN YU TANG, A 200-YEAR-OLD CHINESE HOUSE THAT WAS BROUGHT TO AMERICA AND REASSEMBLED AT THE MUSEUM

TO ENGAGE THE MIND and

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spirit, the PEM collection offers outstanding works, primarily from the 1700s to today: paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, textiles, architecture and decorative objects. African, American, Asian, maritime, Native American and Oceanic art emphasizes the lively conversation that occurs through creativity across time, place and culture. Approximately 1 million works—many of them the PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM www.pem.org 161 Essex Street Salem, MA 0197o 978.745.9500

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE PEM

first to be collected in this country—offer experiences unique among American art museums. Deep and far ranging, the collection opens windows onto how people live, work and celebrate. Explore art and the world in which it is made—revealing and comparing concepts of creativity, individuality, community, tradition, spirituality and even emotion. See special exhibitions and tour historic houses, including Yin Yu Tang, the 200-year-old ancestral home of the Huang family. O n V iew OnV

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Boston

A gallery tour. . .

HERE’S TO THE GA L L E R I E S ! Boston offers a world of

choice when it comes to seeking out fine art. From antiquarian to historical, representational to abstract, modern to contemporary—Boston’s galleries have it all. These artistic venues boast an eclectic and compelling mélange of work including paintings, sculpture, prints, photography, decorative arts, furnishings, mixed media, video and performing arts. If you take a stroll down Newbury Street or wander through the South End, you are bound to be drawn in by at least several of these amazing gems. Galleries provide a more intimate setting for the display of art and afford viewers the opportunity to experience established as well as emerging talents—often showcasing the works of local artists and celebrities. Whether you are interested in purchasing art or simply viewing a current exhibit, galleries are a wonderful resource for art lovers. On the following pages, On View presents a listing of Boston’s most distinctive galleries. O n V iew

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Newbury Street galleries

INTERNATIONAL

MILLER BLOCK GALLERY

POSTER GALLERY

www.millerblockgallery.com

www.internationalposter.com

38 Newbury St

ALPHA GALLERY

205 Newbury St

617.536.4650

www.alphagallery.com

617.375.0076

Original vintage posters

37 Newbury St 617.536.4465

Contemporary art NEWBURY FINE ARTS

Contemporary art

JUDI ROTENBERG GALLERY

www.newburyfinearts.com

www.judirotenberg.com

29 Newbury St

BARBARA KRAKOW

130 Newbury St

617.536.0210

GALLERY

617.437.1518

www.barbarakrakowgallery.com

Contemporary art

10 Newbury St

Contemporary art PUCKER GALLERY

617.262.4490

Contemporary art

LANOUE FINE ART

www.puckergallery.com

www.lanouefineart.com

171 Newbury St

125 Newbury St 617.262.4400 Contemporary art

ELLEN MILLER GALLERY

617.267-9473

Contemporary art QUIDLEY & COMPANY

www.ellenmillergallery.com

38 Newbury St

MARTHA RICHARDSON

www.quidleyandco.com

617.536.4650

FINE ART

38 Newbury St

www.martharichardsonfineart.com

617.450-4300

Contemporary art

38 Newbury St 617.266.3321

GALERIE D’ORSAY

American and European 19th & 20th century art

www.galerie-dorsay.com

33 Newbury St 617.266.8001

Master works and contemporary artists

ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY www.robertkleingallery.com

38 Newbury St 617.267.7997

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES

GALLERY NAGA

www.martinlawrence.com

www.gallerynaga.com

77 Newbury St

67 Newbury St

617.369.4800

Modern & contemporary art

617.267.9060

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19th & 20th century and contemporary photography THE IRIS GALLERY OF FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY


www.irisgallery.net

GALERÍA CUBANA

www.kingstongallery.com

129 Newbury St

www.lagaleriacubana.com

450 Harrison Ave, #43

617.895-8951

460 Harrison Ave

617.423.4113

Contemporary photography

Contemporary art

617.292.2822

Contemporary Cuban art

LACONIA GALLERY VOSE

GALLERY KAYAFAS

www.laconiagallery.org

GALLERIES

www.gallerykayafas.com

433 Harrison Ave

www.vosegalleries.com

450 Harrison Ave, #37

617.670.1568

238 Newbury St

617.482.0411

617.536.6176

18th, 19th and early 20th century art

South End galleries

Contemporary art

Contemporary photography

SOPRAFINA GALLERY www.soprafina.com

GURARI COLLECTIONS

55 Thayer St

www.gurari.com

617.728.0770

Contemporary art

460 Harrison Ave, B16 617.367.9800

Antiquarian and contemporary artwork

Cambridge galleries

450 Harrison Ave

HOWARD

MOBILIA GALLERY

617.451.3605

YEZERSKI GALLERY

http://mobilia-gallery.com

www.howardyezerskigallery.com

358 Huron Avenue

460 Harrison Ave, A16

617.876.2109

BROMFIELD GALLERY www.bromfieldgallery.com

Contemporary art CARROLL AND SONS www.carrollandsons.net

Contemporary art

617.262.0550

Contemporary art

450 Harrison Ave 617.482.2477

Contemporary art CHASE YOUNG GALLERY www.chasegallery.com

PIERRE MENARD KHAKI GALLERY

GALLERY

www.khakigallery.net

http://pierremenardgallery.com

460 Harrison Ave

10 Arrow Street

617.423.0105

Harvard Square

Contemporary art

617.868.2033

Contemporary art

450 Harrison Ave, #57 617.859.7222

Contemporary art

KINGSTON GALLERY OnV

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On View 04-05.2012