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PABLO CANO: SEVEN WONDERS OF THE MODERN WORLD

ON THE COVER : PABLO CANO, GINGER BOBBY PIN (2011), AND INTERNET TAPPER FACE BOOKA (2011), MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST RIGHT: PABLO CANO,

Miami artist and master puppeteer, Pablo Cano, returns to MOCA, North Miami with a new multi-media musical production featuring his beloved and masterfully crafted marionettes, which take the form of his personal selection of the modern world’s wonders.

CELL PHONE FROG (2011), MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

52 West Palm Beach 64 Orlando ALTERED STATES: JOSE ALVAREZ, YAYOI KUSAMA, FRED TOMASELLI & LEO VILLAREAL

The Norton Museum of Art showcases a selection of engaging and seductive works which challenge viewers’ perceptions of reality and the ability of art to create an altered and transformative experience.

XX-XY/GENDER REPRESENTATION IN ART

The Orlando Museum of Art presents a provocative exhibition which examines gender and how artists are exploring the topic.

72 Tampa

82 Art Camps

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts is featuring a portfolio of images that Ansel Adams considered to be the best of his career.

every budding artist. Check out a few of the wonderful programs being offered by art institutions throughout Florida.

CLASSIC IMAGES: MINI MASTERS PHOTOGRAPHY Summer art camps BY ANSEL ADAMS offer something for

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): JOSE ALVAREZ, THE PROGRESS OF INSPIRATION (DETAIL), 2008, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GAVLAK GALLERY, PALM BEACH; © 2010 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY,

On View Destination:

TUSCANY: WANDERING THE BACK ROADS

1932, PHOTOGRAPH BY ANSEL

ful, charming and elegant images of renowned photographers Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee, on view at the Naples Museum of Art. i e w

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1967; ROSE AND DRIFTWOOD, SAN FRANCISCO, CA. (DETAIL), CIRCA

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ANDY WARHOL, MARILYN MONROE,

ADAMS, ©2011 THE ANSEL ADAMS PUBLISHING RIGHTS TRUST LEFT: MICHAEL A. SMITH, MELETO CASTELLO, TUSCANY (DETAIL), 2000

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CONTENTS April/May

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No.

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Retrospective

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ROBERT VICKREY

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COMMENTARY

Robert’s paintings demonstrate mastery in the centuries-old method of egg tempera.

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Fo c u s

MUSE

90

In honor of Earth Day, on April 22nd, On View highlights several exhibits which offer distinct interpretations of natural treasures.

FREDERICK W. GLASIER

Museum exhibitions

Frederick’s intimate portraits capture circus life at the turn of the 20th century, revealing the public and private personalities of some of the greatest entertainers of the era.

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Exhibition

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CALENDAR

GALLERY

Spotlight

A selection of gallery artists

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KAREN GLASER

PICTURED (TOP TO BOTTOM):

Karen’s photographs offer unique views of rare landscapes “inside” Florida’s springs, swamps and waterways.

karen glaser, Gator Flag (2008) and Air Plant (2009), Pigment Prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag

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TOSHUSAI SHARAKU

After 216 years, the artistic genius of Sharaku, as reinterpreted by Japan’s top artists, still resonates within Japanese art and design.


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Turning One This issue marks the 1st anniversary of On View! A big thank you to all of our readers, subscribers and supporters—we simply would not be here without you. Looking back, it’s been a stunning year. We’ve featured hundreds of exhibitions and works from a remarkable array of artists. Our covers have included: Yayoi Kusama’s exuberant sculptures set amidst the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (April/May 2010); Nathan Sawaya’s awe-inspiring LEGO® brick sculpture (June/July 2010); the masterful drawing and witty, offbeat humor of Edward Gorey (August/ September 2010); dazzling, wearable sculpture by Nick Cave (October/November 2010); the artistry of cinematic couture’s most celebrated designers (December 2010/January 2011); and the extraordinary body painting of the Surma and Mursi tribes of Southern Ethiopia, as depicted in the imagery of Hans Silvester (February/March 2011). And it just keeps getting better as we kick off another year of exhibition coverage with a new lineup of shows for all to discover and enjoy—so, let’s get this party started!...

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s

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Adver tising

FLORIDA

Marketing & Sales Director

PR EM

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E

ISSU

ART IN THE GARDEN

Paul McEnaney

THE ART OF YAYOI KUSAMA AT FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN

Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director

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APRIL / MAY 2010


MUSE

Earth Day

T APRIL 22, 2011

HE AWESOME POWER

and influence of nature has been a primary source of inspiration for artists for centuries, shaping many creative legacies. Through their artistic genius and unique perspectives, these creative masterminds have shared the grandeur, beauty, elegance, serenity and wilds of our planet with generations, while promoting an awareness and appreciation for what many of us take for granted each day. In honor of Earth Day, on April 22nd, we celebrate those artists who have embraced both the physical and spiritual aspects of this driving force, and whose efforts have brought to light the critical significance of nature preservation. Through painting, photography and sculpture, several exhibitions present distinct interpretations of our planet’s natural treasures...


MUSE BOCA RATON: California Impressionism: Paintings from

The Irvine Museum, on view through 04.17 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art (www.bocamuseum.org), captures California’s

majestic landscape through the California plein air style, a composite of traditional American landscape painting and French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism.

DAYTONA BEACH: Signs and Wonders, on view through

05.13 and The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps, on view through 05.29 at the Southeast Museum of Photography (www.smponline.org), present hidden details and rare views of natural landscapes.

MELBOURNE: Elements of Nature: Selections

from the Frederick R.Weisman Art Foundation, on view from 04.01-06.19 at the Brevard Art Museum (www.brevardartmuseum.org), examines, through a diverse range of works and perspectives, the varying

ways in which the earth and its elements continue to inspire artists to create works of art that have meaning in our lives.

MIAMI: The Wilderness, on view through 06.26 at

the Miami Art Museum (www.miamiartmuseum.org), offers

a focused selection of film and sculptural installations which explore the boundaries between tamed and untamed nature.

TAMPA: Classic Images: Photography by Ansel Adams, on

view 04.28-07.06 at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts (www.fmopa.org), showcases the stunning portfolio selections of an environmental folk hero and a symbol of the American West.

TARPON SPRINGS: Barbara Sorensen: Topographies, on

view through 05.22 at the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art (www. spcollege.edu/museum), includes large-scale clay installations

PICTURED: Barbara Sorensen, Chalice W1-08, stoneware, stones and gold leaf; barbara sorensen: topographies exhibition, leepa-rattner museum of art, tarpon springs

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CALENDAR Current

04-05.2011 BOCA RATON 04.26-09.11

ART FOR THE PEOPLE: 20th Century Social Realism Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

A selection of more than 100 paintings, drawings and prints, representative of American art between

Exhibitions

the 1920s and 1960s, includes examples of American urban and rural scene painting, and political and social realism. Thru 04.17

California Impressionism: Paintings from The Irvine Museum Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

This exhibition presents masterpieces of California Impressionism from The Irvine Museum, arguably the most important collection of West coast

C O M P I L E D

B Y

American Impressionism. The colorful collection of more than 60 paintings presents the work of more than 44 artists, including: William Wendt, Guy Rose, Dona Schuster, Granville Redmond and Alson Clark.

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CUT! Costume and the Cinema explores the intersection of fashion and film with 43 extraordinary period costumes worn by luminous film stars: Sandra Bullock, Johnnie Depp, Robert Downey Jr., Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, Heath Ledger, Vanessa Redgrave, Maggie

Thru 04.17

CUT! Costume and the Cinema Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

1. Richard Florsheim, Poles in a Landscape, 1936, egg tempera on paper board, 14-1/2 x 21-1/4”, Museum Permanent Collection, gift of the Richard A. Florsheim Art Fund 2. Granville Redmond, Flowers Under the Oaks, n.d., oil on canvas, 20 x 25”, Private Collection, courtesy of The Irvine Museum 3. Keira Knightley wore this costume as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, in The Duchess (2008), Costume Design by Michael O’Connor, Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design

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Smith, Kate Winslet, Renée Zellweger and others. This exhibition allows us to appreciate the quality of these costumes up close—some of which only fleetingly glanced on the screen. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 48.)

has become America’s leading modern master of tempera painting. This exhibition presents approximately 40 works from Vickrey’s Francisco de Goya and 60-year career. (See Pablo Picasso, each of story on pg. 88.) whom is celebrated for his pioneering experiThru 06.19 ments in graphic art.

Castro-Cid, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Julio Larraz, Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Zúñiga.

Robert Vickrey: The Magic of Realism Boca Raton Museum of Art

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso Boca Raton Museum of Art

www.bocamuseum.org

www.bocamuseum.org

04.26-06.19 Thru 05.01

Latin American Art from the Museum’s Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

This sampling of Latin American art, from the Museum’s Collections, features 20 works by many of the most important 20th century Latin American artists, including: Enrique

Using the same laborintensive techniques practiced by Renaissance artists Giotto and Botticelli, Vickrey

CORAL GABLES Thru 05.31

Les Lalanne at Fairchild Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Fine prints have been admired for their great artistic diversity and technical virtuosity since their origin in the 15th century. Examples by masters of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries include works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi,

The Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden hosts a series of pre-

1. Roberto Matta, Etoile Des Jardins [Star of the Gardens], 1995, carborundum etching on handmade paper, edition #100/125, 40 x 40”, Permanent Collection, gift of Nordstamp Publishers 2. Robert Vickrey, Sea Breeze, 1985, egg tempera on board, 20 x 30”, Permanent Collection, gift of the artist 3. Pablo Picasso, Faune dévoilant une dormeuse (Jupiter et Antiope, d’après Rembrandt), [Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt)], 1936, etching with aquatint on paper, 12-3/8 x 16-3/8”, Permanent Collection, bequest of Isadore and Kelly Friedman 4. Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Mouton Transhumant (Brebis), 1988, epoxy stone and bronze, 35.425 x 41 x 15.375”, edition of 250, courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and artist, rendering by Spine3D

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miere works by French sculptors Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne as part of its renowned, annual visual art program. The Lalannes’ sculptures create an extraordinary element of surprise and wonder set within Fairchild’s botanic paradise. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 72.)

and Judi Matus Focus Gallery. Paulin is recognized for uniquely documenting fleeting human moments of both humor and poetry, particularly against the backdrop of gritty urban scenes.

Thru 05.2011

Thru 04.24

Frank Paulin: An American Documentarian Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

ArtLab@The Lowe: The Changing Face of Art and Politics Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.lowemuseum.org

A gift of 30 photographs by American photographer, Frank Paulin, has been made to the Lowe and is on view in the Michael

www.lowemuseum.org

Featuring 32 works of art from the Permanent Collection, The Changing Face of Art and Politics examines political imagery through style and technique, and the consideration of motifs and narratives that share an affinity over time. CORAL SPRINGS

Thru 04.23

bronze by German sculptor Lothar Nickel. Thru 04.23

Miles Batt Retrospective: 1976-2010

Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Nearly 60 contemporary watercolor paintings by award-winning artist and teacher, Miles Batt, are presented in this retrospective.

Lothar Nickel: Sculpture Coral Springs Museum of Art

DAYTONA

www.csmart.org

Thru 04.10

Included in this exhibition are works in marble, ceramic, and

BEACH

C’est la Vie: Robert Gring’s France

1. Frank Paulin, Flower Messenger, Times Square, 1955 (printed later), gelatin silver print, 13 x 19-3/8”, gift of Bruce Silverstein, ©Frank Paulin, courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery 2. Reginald Murray Pollack, Peace March, 1967, acrylic on canvas, 41-1/2 x 50”, gift of Lawrence B. Felton 3. Lothar Nickel, Olive Sheep 4. Miles Batt, Dubl Jeopardy

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the circus coming to town, performances of spectacular feats, and the behind-the-scenes life of circus members. (See story on pg. 90.)

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

C’est la Vie is a light-hearted exhibition of 34 gouache paintings by French illustrator Robert Gring, whose “Cartoon modern” style is now recognized as an important offshoot of modernism

Thru 05.22 Thru 06.05

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

that strongly influenced animation art, such as the animated titles in the original Pink Panther films of the 1960s.

A dual exhibition of Turkoman jewelry, carpets and rugs, gives a rare glimpse into the beauty and artistry of the nomadic and semi-nomadic peoples of Central Asia, who dwell in rugged isolation, yet whose instinctive craftsmanship and love of natural materials created some of the most seductive artworks of 19th century Oriental Europe.

HEYDAY offers a glimpse into the most dynamic period of the American circus through the rarely seen photographs of Frederick W. Glasier (1866-1950). The exhibition features more than 60 photographs and approximately a dozen lithographic posters that depict

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes from Central Asia and Turkoman Carpets from the Falasiri Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences

Thru 05.29

Images: Found and Lost Southeast Museum of Photography

www.moas.org

www.smponline.org

Images: Found and Lost presents the mural-sized photographs of Lorna Bieber. Lorna’s process incorporates a

1. Robert Gring, Untitled, ca. 1950, 12 x 8” 2. Frederick W. Glasier, Pete Mardo, 1923, Collection of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 3. Yomud Tribe, Asyk (Hair Ornament) [detail], dated 1880-1920, gift of Mr. Stephen Van C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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range of traditional and non-traditional photographic techniques, resulting in hauntingly beautiful and moving images and narratives. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 90.) Thru 05.13

Signs and Wonders Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

people and their environment. Stuart Rome’s eloquent black and white prints resonate with a precision and draftsmanship that belies the teeming energy and vitality present in the hidden details of a location. (See story

in the Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 82.)

Karen Glaser’s largescale photographs of Florida’s wilds provide a unique view, shot from a vantage point unfamiliar to most— landscapes shot underwater and combined with elements of street shooting, documentary, the pictorial and the ethereal. (See story on pg. 92.) Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 84.) D e LAND

Thru 05.29

Signs and Wonders is concerned with the relationship between

www.smponline.org

The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps Southeast Museum of Photography

Dorothy Gillespie’s illustrious career in art spans over 50 years. This installation vividly transforms the Museum with an array of colorful paintings, collages, murals and sculpture. (See story in the

05.07-07.10

Dorothy Gillespie Florida Museum for Women Artists

Through the Collector’s Eye Florida Museum for Women Artists

www.floridamuseumfor

www.floridamuseumfor

womenartists.org

womenartists.org

Thru 05.01

1. Lorna Bieber, Tree/Tree Trunks (detail), 2005-6, gelatin silver print, 68 x 42”, courtesy of Lorna Bieber, Box Gallery, Santa Fe, NM and C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, MD 2. Stuart Rome, FL09-8-1, Turtle Tracks, Florida Everglades, 2009, aluminum/silver leaf pigment print, stonehenge paper, 24 x 30” and 10 x 10”, courtesy of the artist and gallery 339 3. Karen Glaser, Pollen Skin (detail), 2009, pigment print on Hahnemühle photo rag, 37 x 25” 4. Dorothy Gillespie, Untitled, 1989, courtesy of the artist

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DeLand continued...

Artwork from 5 important Florida collectors will be on display. Multiple artists working in a variety of media and styles will be represented through the Collections of Ed Harris, Judy Thompson, Linda Pinto, Margery Pabst and Charlotte Everbach. The show will also include insight from the collectors on how they got started and how they select art.

Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

exhibition are an array of kimono and fashionable accoutrements. The garments are displayed alongside various woodblock prints and paintings reflecting a broad range of kimono fashions and time periods, DELRAY BEACH including those Thru 06.05 worn by geisha and Kimono: courtesans in the Art, Fashion late Edo Period and Society (1600-1868). Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Presented in this

Master Pastelist Brooke Allison shows her life’s work as never seen before— drawings, paintings and pastels spanning

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 09.04

over 40 years of creative study.

An Intimate Look at William Glackens and The Eight Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Thru 05.01

Frozen in Fire: Crystalline Waves Dunedin Fine Art Center

DUNEDIN 05.13-06.26

Brooke Allison: A Retrospective

DFAC is hosting this outstanding ceramics exhibit featuring the latest crystalline glazed pottery from around the world.

www.moafl.org

Included in this exhi-

www.dfac.org

1. Adolescent Girl’s Ceremonial Kimono with Floral Motifs and Crest-like Emblems of Wisteria and Mandarin Orange Motifs, stencil-printed (kata-yuzen) design on figured silk (rinzu), Japan, Showa Period, 1960s, 56.5” h, 43.25”w, .5”d, gift of Eisha Nakano 2. Brooke Allison, Hammock Palm 3. Rod and Denyse Simair, Ondas Cristalinas Floridas aka Flowery Crystalline Waves, photo: Rod and Denyse Simair

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bition are works by Glackens and his contemporaries as well as a special installation of landscapes created by

Glackens from 1908 through the 1930s. 04.03-09.04

Sight Specific: Explorations in Space, Vision and Sound Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

by some of the region’s leading contemporary artists, including: Roberto Behar & Rosario Marquardt, Clifton Childree, Juan Maristany, and Gustavo Matamoros..

lections of art, documents and historically significant objects from the Vatican ever to tour North America, Vatican Splendors presents spectacular paintings, mosaics, sculpture, Papal jewThru 04.24 els, intricately embroiVatican Splendered silk vestments, dors: A Journey uniforms of the Papal Through Faith Swiss Guard and an and Art elaborately decorated Museum of Art / gold and silver reliFt. Lauderdale, quary containing bone Nova Southeastern fragments of Saint University Peter and Saint Paul. www.moafl.org

One of the largest col-

GAINESVILLE Thru 05.08

Africa Interweave: Textile Diasporas Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

The Museum of Art celebrates the creative energy of South Florida in this exhibition containing installations

www.harn.ufl.edu

Whether worn for work, masquerades,

sacred ceremonies, or adorning the home or shrine, textiles are one of the most vibrant art forms on the African continent. This exhibition illustrates the continuity of textile designs and techniques from past to present, highlighting innovations, contemporary fashion and works inspired by traditional practices. HOLLYWOOD Thru 04.10

Cristina Lei Rodriguez: Forever

1. William Glackens, Sledding, Central Park (detail), 1912, oil on canvas 2. Bust of an Angel, Giotto di Bondone, after 1304, polychrome mosaic, The Reverenda Fabbrica of Saint Peter, Vatican City State, photo © Città del Vaticano 3. Kuba people, Woman’s Dance Skirt, 20th century, raffia fibers, natural dye, gift of an anonymous donor

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

artandculturecenter.org

artandculturecenter.org

Forever presents a survey of sculptures and installations from 2003 through 2010. Delving into the aesthetics of desire that are part of the consumer products that surround us, Christina’s works are primarily sculptural landscapes, sometimes very realistic and other times very abstract. (See story in the Feb./

Louise Erhard’s creation of space and place is executed through collage. Her use and manipulation of common imagery of architectural elements is intended to create visual representations of

04.30-06.05

Lisa Rockford: The She-Monster Sideshow Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

The She-Monster Sideshow presents a series of large-scale banner paintings representing mythical females. These “she-monsters” are drawn from preexisting pop culture the everyday struggle imagery, humorously with one’s ego and the referencing historical desire to rise above it. myth and narrative.

Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 66.)

Louise Erhard: Yes, No, and Everything in Between

www.mocajacksonville.org

MOCA, Jacksonville is hosting an exhibition of recent ceramic works by The Firm, an art collective founded by Shane Christensen, Stephen Heywood, Brian Jensen and Michael T Schmidt. 04.22-08.28

The Works of Reverend Howard Finster Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

JACKSONVILLE

Thru 04.10

Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

Thru 05.01

FUSION: Ceramic Works by The FIRM

www.mocajacksonville.org

1. Christina Lei Rodriguez, Gnarled, 2010, mixed-media, courtesy of the artist 2. Lisa Rockford, She-Monster #24 (Judith) (detail), oil on Taracloth banner, 52 x 70”, courtesy of the artist 3. Louise Erhard, Satin and Lace (detail), 2010, paper and resin on board, 38 x 38”, courtesy of the artist 4. Shane Christensen, Accordian Jars

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Thru 04.24

Howard Finster was responsible for introducing millions to “outsider art,” a term often applied to include self-taught or Naïve art makers. From pop culture icons, like Elvis Presley, to historical figures, such as George Washington, to religious images, like The Devils Vice and John the Baptist, to his own visions, Finster’s “sacred art” paintings incorporate colorful, detailed, flat picture planes, often covered with Bible verses.

A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

igan; Val Verde in California; and Naumkeag in Massachusetts. (See story in the Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 86.)

featured in this exhibition, were treasured at home and abroad, and considered rarities until the mid-18th century. Specific styles and 05.13-08.14 innovations that arose On the Silk Road as a result of crossand the High cultural exchanges are Seas: Chinese highlighted. Ceramics, Culture, and Commerce The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

A Genius for Place The superb examples features large-format of Chinese ceramics, photographs, by photographer Carol Betsch, of well-known American estates, including: Gwinn and Stan Hywet Hall in Ohio; Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, DC; Delaware’s Winterthur; the Edsel Ford Grosse Pointe Shores estate in Mich-

Thru 12.31

Re-opening of the Tudor Room The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer has unveiled a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnishings, a fireplace and a selection of art, from the Cummers’ home, to recreate the domestic sphere in which their collection

1. Howard Finster, Emages of Visions of Other Worlds Beyond (3077), n.d., tractor enamel on plexiglas, courtesy of the Arient Family Collection 2. Boy with Dolphin from East Staircase, Gwinn (detail), 1995, photograph by Carol Betsch from A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era, organized by the Library of American Landscape History 3. Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount, Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796–1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century, porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamel-on-biscuit decoration, 17 x 10-1/4 x 6-3/4”, gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

was originally displayed. Thru 05.22

The Cummer Legacy The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

and Arthur Cummer. A selection of these paintings and sculptures is highlighted to honor the legacy of the Cummer family.

celain, recognized as the most important collection of Meissen in the US.

05.13-12.31

04.02-06.26

The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain

Annie Leibovitz: Women Polk Museum of Art

LAKELAND

05.27-09.04

Figuration

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.cummer.org

When The Cummer opened in 1961, the nucleus of its Permanent Collection consisted of 60 works of art collected by Ninah

portraits from a broad spectrum of society. Among the recognizable faces are: Betty Ford, Gloria Steinem, Toni Morrison, and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

More than 3 years of planning and research culminate with a new reinstallation of The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Por-

Annie Leibovitz is one of the most famous photographers working today. Her photographs have been featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine and in the often imitated “Got Milk?” advertising campaign. In this exhibition of more than 60 photographs, Leibovitz focuses on the American woman, at the turn of the millenium, with

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

This exhibition focuses on artworks from the Permanent Collection that feature the human figure.

1. Interior of Cummer Home (detail), ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives 2. Peter Paul Rubens, The Lamentation of Christ, ca.1605, oil on copper, 11 x 9-1/2”, bequest of Ninah M. H. Cummer 3. Tea Caddy from the Queen Marie of Hanover Coffee and Tea Service, ca. 1730, porcelain with painted decoration Johann Gregorius Höroldt, 4-1/3” 4. Harrison Covington, Face to Face, 1990, acrylic and collage on canvas, PMoA Permanent Collection, purchased through the Kent Harrison Memorial Acquisition Fund

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Polk Museum of Art

Bass Museum of Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

www.bassmuseum.org

Featured in this exhibition are works from the Museum’s Permanent Collection that were created by female artists. Thru 04.17

Heavy Metal Polk Museum of Art

MELBOURNE 04.01-06.19

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Presented is a fine assortment of artworks assembled, poured and shaped with metal. Thru 05.22

Women’s Views

Elements of Nature: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation Brevard Art Museum

varying ways in which the earth and its elements continue to inspire artists to create works of art that have meaning in our lives. MIAMI

Thru 06.19

Come Together: Frances Trombly and Leyden RodriguezCasanova Bass Museum of Art

www.brevardartmuseum.org

This exhibition, curated by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation director, Billie Milam Weisman, examines, through a diverse range of works and perspectives, the

An Invitation to LOOK brings more than 40 works from the Bass Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection together in a presentation that takes a brief pause from the conventional museum approach of arranging works according to art historical or theoretical systems.

www.bassmuseum.org 04.01-07.03

An Invitation to LOOK

Frances Trombly uses trompe l’oeil effects in her work to recreate mundane objects,

1. Jorgen Aguerrevere, Novus Mundus, PMoA Permanent Collection 2. Artwork by Miriam Schapiro 3. Roger Brown, Saguaro’s Revenge, 1983, oil on canvas, 72 x 48”, courtesy of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation 4. George Romney, Mrs. John Charnock, oil on canvas, gift of John and Johanna Bass

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making labor-intensive pieces through weaving, embroidery, cross

stitch, and crochet. Leyden RodriguezCasanova challenges the absoluteness of psychological and utilitarian narratives associated with our utilization and memory of everyday objects. Thru 08.28

Anchor Gallery: Mark Dion Miami Art Museum

www.miamiartmuseum.org

Interweaving the diverse disciplines of art, science, ecology, history, and archeology, Dion’s large-scale installation, South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit, explores human attempts to rationalize and control Florida’s Everglades.

Thru 06.26

Thru 06.05

The Wilderness Miami Art Museum

At Capacity: Large-Scale Works from the Permanent Collection Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.miamiartmuseum.org

This thematic group exhibition explores the topic of tamed versus untamed nature through a focused selection of film and sculptural installa-

www.mocanomi.org

Thanks to the outstanding generosity of local and international Thru 04.10 collectors and patrons Focus Gallery: to MOCA’s acquisition Robert fund, the current muRauschenberg seum facility is “at caMiami Art pacity.” In addition to Museum tions. The exhibition its growth in size, the www.miamiartmuseum.org grapples with comCollection’s impressive MAM presents a new peting definitions of monumental works exhibition of its Per“wildness,” pitting and installations have manent Collection traditional conceptions become one of the installation dedicated of a chaotic, primormuseum’s hallmarks. to works by the late dial realm that awaits Robert Rauschenberg, human subjugation one of the first artists against the idea of a to incorporate mass self-regulating order media imagery into his that courses through artwork. the natural world.

1. Frances Trombly, Mop, 2008, hand-spun silver wool and cotton, wooden mop handle, 52 x 14 x 13”, courtesy of the artist and David Castillo Gallery, Miami 2. Mark Dion, The South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit: Mobile Laboratory, 2006, mixed media installation, 18’ 11” x 7’ 7” x 8’ 11”, Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Lin Lougheed, reproduced with permission of the artist, photo: Tim McAfee 3. Christy Gast, Batty Cave, 2010, threechannel HD video installation, dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist and Gallery Diet, Miami Dade County 4. Ed and Nancy Kienholz, Soup Course at the She-She Café, 1982, mixed media, variable dimensions, Collection of Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, gift of Irma Braman

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MOCA is featuring a selection of these works by John Baldessari, Dara Friedman, Thomas Hirschhorn, Jene Highstein, Edward and Nancy Kienholz, Louise Nevelson, Dennis Oppenheim and others.

The featured artists are given access to resources provided by MOCA, including the museum’s archives and Collection, and receive professional guidance as they research and create new projects within the context of the museum. Miami-based choreThru 06.05 ographer, Katherine Open Process: 05.07-05.28 Kramer. Cano’s marioNew Work by Pablo Cano: nettes take the form of Miami Artists Seven Wonders his personal selection Museum of of the Modern of the modern world’s Contemporary World wonders. When not in Art, North Miami Museum of performance, the mariwww.mocanomi.org Contemporary onettes and set will be Open Process is an Art, North Miami on view as an exhibiexhibition featuring www.mocanomi.org tion during museum This new multi-media hours. (See story on musical production pg. 40.) features marionettes created by Miami artThru 04.17 ist, Pablo Cano, and Aesthetics was produced in col& Values 2011 new work, by young laboration with New The Patricia Miami artists, comYork-based writer, & Phillip Frost missioned by MOCA. Carmen Pelaez, and Art Museum

thefrost.fiu.edu

Aesthetics and Values 2011, a student produced art show, features the works of local Miami artists: Daniel Arsham, Jose Bedia, Ivan Toth Depena, Jacin Giordano, Fabian Pena, Karen Rifas, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, John

Sanchez, Jen Stark, and Antonia Wright. Thru 04.24

As of 24-03-07 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

“The true is the name of whatever proves

1. Autumn Casey, Somewhere Between Here and Las Vegas, 2011, video still 2. Pablo Cano, Cell Phone Frog, 2011, mixed media, courtesy of the artist, photography by José Rodriguez 3. Daniel Arsham, Pixel Cloud (Miami), 2010, plastique, peinture/plastic, paint, 21-1/4 x 27-1/2 x 31”, courtesy of Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin

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lived, to a surprising degree, in a context of boxes of our own making. Opening 05.25

itself to be good in the way of belief, and good too, for definite, assignable reasons.”

East/West: Visually Speaking The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

David and Hi-Jin Hodge: Who’s Counting and Temporal State of Being The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

duce significant trends and movements of new Ital-

Thru 04.17

—W illiam J ames  thefrost.fiu.edu

05.25-09.18

styles of art. In some works, the reference to Western culture seems adoring, while in others, it appears to parody the West, its cultural symbols and values.

East/West: Visually Speaking, highlights 11 contemporary Chinese artists who have adapted Western ideas and art forms to create new

thefrost.fiu.edu

This multi-media exhibit consists of 2 works that look at modern life and explore the idea that 21st century life is

ian art to the North American public.

Gran Torino: Italian Contemporary Art The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

04.15-08.14

thefrost.fiu.edu

Gran Torino presents the work of a selected group of artists from Torino, Italy, one of Europe’s most vibrant cities and also one of the most dynamic centers of contemporary art. The exhibition is an engaging cultural initiative by the Museum to intro-

Art for All: British Posters for Transport Organized by the Yale Center for British Art The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

In 1908, the London Underground began an aggressive campaign that became one of the most successful,

1. María Brito, As of 24-03-07, 2007, mixed media installation, 88 x 103 x 141”, courtesy of the artist 2. Zhong Biao, Grand Entry, 2007, charcoal and acrylic on canvas, 78-3/4 x 59-1/4”, courtesy of the artist 3. Enrico Iuliano, Composition for glass objects on Vespa, 2005, Vespa, glass, zinc, steel sheet, hydraulic, 122 x 70.9 x 41.3”, courtesy of the artist

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Archetype Vizcaya marks the return of the Contemporary Arts Project (CAP) to Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. CAP is a commission program that invites artists to develop site-specific projects inspired by adventurous and best Vizcaya. Through sustained branding op- Archetype Vizcaya, erations ever attemptartist Ernesto Oroza ed. The more than has created a visitor 5,000 works produced map that focuses on include some of the things that are not usugreatest achievements ally visible at Vizcaya. of poster art. Art for All In so doing, the artist features outstanding virtually reorganizes posters executed for the objects and spaces both the Underground of the Museum and and the British railprovides visitors with a ways. new tool for exploring the Main House and its Thru 05.29 Collections. Archetype Vizcaya Vizcaya Museum & Gardens

NAPLES

www.vizcayamuseum.org

Cuba on My Mind

Thru 04.30

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

the most widely respected sculptors of his era. In addition to his

www.naplesart.org

Visual artists in Cuba are creating compelling contemporary works exploring ideas and their feelings about the human condition and life in Revolutionary Cuba. This exhibition features work

by Cuban and CubanAmerican artists.

smaller works, Paley is also known for his often colossal entry gates that masterfully blend both sculptural and architectural elements. This exhibition consists of approximately 24 recent sculptures and a selection of drawings. 04.23-06.30

Thru 04.17

Albert Paley Sculpture Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Albert Paley is one of

Florida Contemporary 2011 Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

From realism to abstraction, and every-

1. Poster: To Summer Sales by Underground, 1926,
designed by Horace Christopher Taylor,
lithograph,
Yale Center for British Art, gift of Henry S. Hacker,
Yale College, class of 1965,
©TfL from the London Transport Museum Collection 2. JAMA (José Andres Matos),
The Conflict, 2004,
mixed media on canvas: acrylic, crayon,
63 x 89” 3. Albert Paley, Interlace, 2006, formed and fabricated bronze, 3.6 x 4.5 x 1.3’,
© Albert Paley

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

thing in between, the 3rd annual edition of this popular invitational exhibition features familiar photographers, painters, sculptors and graphic artists, who have spent a lifetime at their craft, together with an exciting array of new artists that visi-

www.thephil.org

This jewel of an exhibition recreates the atmosphere of Olga Hirshhorn’s Nevelson (1899-1988), art-packed house in one of the most imWashington, DC, portant and influential known as “The figures in postwar Mouse House,” and American art, and the features intimatemost internationally sized works by Picascelebrated woman so, Matisse, Calder, artist of her time. Giacometti, de Kooning and many others.

back roads of Tuscany in search of the source of that inspiration. The resulting black-andwhite photographs are captivating works that communicate the beauty, warmth and lifestyle that make

Thru 06.30

tors can “discover” for themselves. Thru 06.30

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

Louise Nevelson: Dawn’s Forest Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Dawn’s Forest consists of a series of sculptures by Louise

04.09-06.30

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads Naples Museum of Art

Tuscany so appealing. (See story on pg. 96.)

www.thephil.org

04.09-06.12

OCALA

The land of Tuscany has inspired artists for centuries. During several extended visits, made from 1999-2001, photographers Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee traveled the

Out West: The Art of Theodore Waddell Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Included in this exhibition are more

1. Christina Pettersson, Desdemona Sleeping Beside Death, 2009, graphite on paper, 66 x 70”,
© Christina Pettersson, courtesy of the artist and Spinello Gallery (as seen in Florida Contemporary 2010) 2. Louise Nevelson, Dawn’s Forest (detail), 1986, painted balsa-plywood,
Collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of GA-Met, a joint venture Georgia-Pacific, LLC,
© 2010 Estate of Louise Nevelson /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Image courtesy of Naples Museum of Art 4. Paula Chamlee, Cortona, Tuscany, 1999,
© Paula Chamlee

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www.appletonmuseum.org

than 40 paintings and original illustrations by noted Montana artist, Theodore Waddell. Thru 04.10

Pan Magazine: A Graphic Arts Time Capsule of Avant Garde Europe, 1895-1900 Appleton Museum of Art

On exhibit are 80 remarkable, original art nouveau prints from this important publication from the late 19th century.

ORLANDO Thru 06.12

Florida in the Civil War

04.09-06.12

Silent Frontier: Icons of Montana’s Early Settlements

Thru 05.29

The Working White House: 200 Years of Tradition and Memories Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

In a special 10th anniversary exhibit, Florida in the Civil War acknowledges Appleton Florida’s important Museum of Art role in the “War www.appletonmuseum.org between the States.” The nostalgia of Highlights include earlier times in the rare artifacts, a Colt Old West is captured revolver and letters in this exhibition exchanged between of 55 black-anda soldier and his wife. white images by Children can also photographer try on uniforms and Richard Buswell. other clothing.

The Working White House gives exhibition visitors a rare view of the inner workings of America’s most renowned residence through the experiences, firsthand accounts and one-ofa-kind artifacts of the

largely unrecognized people crucial to the everyday lives of our first families.

1. Theodore Waddell, Beaverhead Paints 2. Mademoiselle Marcelle Lender en Buste by Comte Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864-1901) 3. Richard S. Buswell, silver gelatin print, © Richard S. Buswell 4. Occupation of Jacksonville, from the Collection of Richard J. Ferry 5. White House floral designer Rusty Young creates a striking arrangement in the Green Room, photo courtesy The White House Historical Association

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Thru 06.30

American Visions: Changing Viewpoints Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Orlando Museum of Art

Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

www.omart.org

Aztec to Zapotec II features more than 180 works drawn from the OMA’s comprehensive Art of the Ancient Americas Collection and gives a rare glimpse into the life and culture of numerous civilizations from the North, Cen-

American Visions explores how artists have represented American life and culture over the past century. Works by Ansel Adams, Richard Estes, Malcolm Morley, Earl Cunningham and many others are included. tral and South American regions. Thru 06.30

Aztec to Zapoctec II: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection

Thru 06.30

Common Ground: Art of the American Landscape

Thru 06.12

Currents in Contemporary Art: Process and Materials Orlando Museum of Art

Common Ground: Art of the American Landscape brings together paintings and

www.omart.org

sculptures by artists from the mid-19th century to the present and explores themes that have continued to interest artists over time. The exhibition includes paintings by George Inness, Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, April Gornik, Joseph Raffael and Frank Moore; and sculpture by Thomas Ridgeway Gould, Hermon Atkins MacNeil and Bryan Hunt.

A hallmark of contemporary art is its diversity and acceptance of varied approaches to creating art. Additionally, artists have borrowed styles and imagery from the past, other cultures and popular media. Among the artists represented are: Ursula von Rydingsvard, John Chamberlain, Frank Moore and Chuck Close.

1. Jane Hammond, Untitled, 1993, oil on canvas with metal leaf, 70 x 80”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1993 2. Seated Figure Urn, AD 300-600, Zapotec; Oaxaca, Monte Alban, Mexico, ceramic, 12”, gift of Howard Phillips 3. Georgia O’Keeffe, Datura and Pedernal, 1940, oil on board, 11 x 16-1/8”, gift of the Dorothy Meigs Eidlitz Foundation, © 2010 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artist Rights Society (ARS), NY 4. John Chamberlain, Lazzarini’s Pie, 1990, painted metal, 46 x 70 x 46”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1991, © 2010 John Chamberlain /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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years—are on display, including works by Benjamin West, Rembrandt Peale, John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam, Robert Henri and Cindy Sherman.

and women and how they are portrayed visually. Featured works are divided into four themes: Domesticity, Power, Magnetism, and Enhancements. (See story on pg. 64)

Thru 06.05 Thru 06.30

Life Stories: American Portraits Past and Present Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Life Stories explores how styles and purposes of portraiture have changed over time, reflecting changing social values and the shift of emphasis from formal to casual representations of the individual. Paintings, photographs and sculpture—spanning a period of over 200

XX-XY/Gender Representation in Art Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Drawing from the

Thru 05.01

1934: A New Deal for Artists The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

This exhibition recognizes the 75th anniversary of the federal Public Works of Art Project. From midDecember 1933 to June 1934, the New Deal program emOMA’s Permanent ployed artists during Collection and from the Great Depression important local, private and encouraged them and public collections, to depict the “Amerithis exhibition examcan Scene.” Included ines the roles of men are 56 works, ranging

from portraits and city scenes to landscapes and images of rural life, created by artists from across the US. PENSACOLA 04.01-05.01

Private Walls: Pensacola Collects II Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

The PMA presents its 2nd annual exhibition of notable works from private art collections in the Pensacola area. The works, by artists of national and international acclaim,

1. Robert Henri, Rosaleen, 1928, oil on canvas, 28 x 20”, on long-term loan from Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc. 2. Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1967, screenprint on paper; edition of 250, 36 x 36”, gift of Council of 101, © 2010 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Lily Furedi, Subway, 1934, oil on canvas, 39 x 48-1/4”, Smithsonian American Art Museum Transfer from the US Department of the Interior, National Park Service

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

showcase the significant and engaging artwork that lies in private homes and offices, presenting a unique opportunity to view the holdings of local collectors. Thru 05.15

rounding our relationship to the natural world and the role that science has in shaping the living environment. PONTE VEDRA BEACH

Rob Vander Zee: Visions of Paradise Pensacola Museum of Art

Immerse yourself in Rob Vander Zee’s imaginary world of vibrant colors, fantastic plants and mutant creatures that explore the questions sur-

shapes of architectural structures. SARASOTA

Thru 04.09

The Works of Ryan Ketterman & Stephen Heywood The Cultural Center

www.pensacola museumofart.org

of these experiences. Iron, which connotes strength and permanence and the texture of satin, which emanates luxury and elegance, signify traditional thoughts on masculinity and femininity.

04.15-05.27

Jenny HagerVickery The Cultural Center

05.21-08.14

Beyond Bling: Voices of HipHop in Art The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ccpvb.org

Using bold colors, deliberate compositions, www.ccpvb.org clean lines and a touch Rust and Satin, a series of dramatic flair, Ryan of sculptural works by Ketterman strives Jenny Hager-Vickery, to find the spirit of life is an expression of the in every subject he artist’s experiences photographs. Stephen as a woman. Process, Heywood’s ceramic material, and form are work is influenced by the visual vocabulary the simple geometric

www.ringling.org

Hip-hop has become a dominant part of popular culture and its influence can be

1. Rob Vander Zee, New World 2, 2010, 48 x 60”, oil on board 2. Jenny K. Hager, Rust and Satin No. 2, mixed media (iron, satin, rope, brass), courtesy of the artist 3. Ryan Ketterman, Beer Can Island at Long Boat Key on Florida’s Gulf Coast, ©Ryan Ketterman 4. Sofia Maldonado, Concrete Jungle Divas, 2010, courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery, NY

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seen in contemporary art. Beyond Bling takes a look at the work of a diverse mix of artists who all operate within and are informed by hiphop culture. Thru 10.30

Crosscurrents of Design: Asian Export Ceramics The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Asian export ceramics were created in areas that are now known

Combining indigenous traditions and borrowed designs, these decorative and practical objects document the crosscultural exchange of material goods and artistic motifs that began centuries ago and still continue today. Thru 04.24

Gardens in Perpetual Bloom: Botanical Illustration in Europe and America 1600-1850 The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

as Thailand, Vietnam, China and Japan.

Comprised of more than 100 flower prints, Gardens in Perpetual Bloom features the products of a fruitful collaboration of

ing challenges far beyond those faced by sculptors of more compliant materials. This exhibition features objects that were fashioned chiefly during the late botanists, horticulturists, Qing dynasty (1644painters, and printmak- 1912), and reflect ers from the 17th-19th ancient traditions, centuries. (See story though occasionally in the Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 58.) Thru 10.30

The Art of Jade The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Jade has been shaped for human purposes for thousands of years. Its hardness makes it almost impossible to carve— instead, it must be worn away, abraded, and drilled—present-

reveal a glimpse of a more modern spirit. Thru 04.11

Tumbling & Twisting Talents Under the Big Top The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

1. Japanese, early Meiji (1868-1912) period, painting 1868-1870, Montgolfier Balloon with Enameled Decorations, porcelain 2. Hybrid Amaryllis Regina Vittata, 1824 (English, active 1810-1850), engraving and coloring by William Say (English, 1768-1834) 3. Image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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www.ringling.org

This display of posters and ephemera illustrates some of the amazing ground acts featured with American circuses.

100 years and features over 100 images from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection. Highlights include historic images which document the building of the Paris Opera, construction of the Panama Canal, the American West,

ics by Jennifer Forsberg, Sarah Lindley, and Jeanne Quinn

Thru 05.01

Romantics to Moderns: British Watercolors and Drawings from the Collection of BNY Mellon Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.fine-arts.org

Drawn from the prestigious BNY Mellon Collection, Romantics to Moderns represents a veritable survey of British art, featuring 70 watercolors and drawings by 48 British artists, dating

www.fine-arts.org ST. PETERSBURG Thru 06.12

Familiar and Fantastic: Photographs from the Dandrew-Drapkin Donation Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Familiar and Fantastic spans more than

and Egypt and its antiquities. Thru 04.24

PLACE: Contemporary Ceram-

This dramatic exhibition brings together 3 largescale ceramic installations by Jennifer Forsberg, Sarah Lindley, and Jeanne Quinn, for the first time. The striking objects created for Place express and interpret notions of space with 3 complementary approaches: form, structure, and air.

from the mid-18th century to 1935.

1. Barnum & Bailey: Miss Duray Leonara Contortionist, Strobridge Lithographing Co., Tibbals Digital Collections 2. Fémina (French, active early 1900s),
 Child in Eastern Costume (1910),
autochrome,
gift of Ludmila and Bruce Dandrew from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection 3. Jeanne Quinn, Everything is Not as it Seems, 2009, porcelain, wire, and electrical hardware, ©Jeanne Quinn 4. Alfred William Hunt, Ullswater at Midday, 1863, Collection of BNY Mellon

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S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

05.14-09.04

The Human Touch: Contemporary Art from the RBC Wealth Management Collection

TAMPA 04.28-07.06

Classic Images: Photography by Ansel Adams Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

eral national parks, especially images of his beloved Yosemite. (See story on pg. 72.)

as images of extreme beauty. (See story in the Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 38.)

Thru 04.10

Thru 06.19

Degas: Form, Movement and the Antique Tampa Museum of Art

www.fmopa.org

Classic Images includes 72 photographs that Ansel Adams personally printed for his daughter. The fifteen sections of the exhibition encompass Museum of Adams’ work throughFine Arts, out the country from St. Petersburg 1921 through 1968. www.fine-arts.org His devotion to the The Human Touch: American wilderness features 46 largeis evident in his scale paintings, prints, photographs of sevworks on paper, and photographs that give insight into the human psyche, while helping us to understand the human condition.

www.tampamuseum.org

Natural Fashion: Art and the Body, Photographs by Hans Silvester Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

In the first ever exhibition of works by Degas in the Tampa Bay region, Degas: Form, Movement and the Antique brings together a selection of this French genius’s bronze sculptures with a selection

www.fmopa.org

The stunning works of German photographer Hans Silvester function as sociological and anthropological documents as well

1. Hung Liu,
Baby King II, 1996,
oil on canvas and painted wood,
RBC Wealth Management Collection 2. Rose And Driftwood, San Francisco, CA, ca. 1932, photograph by Ansel Adams, ©2011 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust 3. Hans Silvester, Natural Fashion, No. 86, 2006/2007, C-print 4. Edgar Degas, The Little Dancer (Petite danseuse de quatorze ans), ca. 1880-1881 (cast ca. 1919-32), Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; State Operating Fund and The Art Lovers’ Society, photo: Katherine Wetzel, © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

of paintings and drawings to demonstrate the close relationship between his sculptures and two-dimensional work, as he explored form and movement.

around us. Upon the publication of a new collection of his images, Glorious Days and Nights, the TMA presents a selection of Snitzer’s worldfamous jazz images.

Thru 05.15

Herb Snitzer: A Jazz Memoir Tampa Museum of Art

Thru 07.17

Realism: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

St. Petersburg resident and former photojournalist for Life, Look and Fortune magazines, Herb Snitzer has spent nearly 5 decades capturing the world

SPRINGS Thru 04.24

Art Posters of France Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

lations by leading contemporary artists.

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Art Posters of France includes 23 color lithographs, created

Thru 11.20

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

TARPON

Realism provides a compelling view of the realist tendencies in the visual arts of the last 30 years. The exhibition juxtaposes stellar examples of the Photo-Realist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural instal-

Worlds Apart: Myth & History, Gods & Mortals, Heroes & Hybrids Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Worlds Apart explores the many intersecting spheres of the world of classical antiquity.

by European, British and American artists as advertising posters in the late 19th century, published in Les Maîtres de l’Affiche (Masters of the Poster).

1. Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir by Herb Snitzer, published by University Press of Mississippi 2. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies 3. Image courtesy of Tampa Museum of Art 4. Jules Chéret, Taverne Olympia (Olympia Tavern), 1898

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 5 o f 2 8 }

Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

Vero Beach Museum of Art

Thru 04.24

The Commercial Medium: Winslow Homer’s America Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

American Masterworks presents a selection of American art from the 19th century www.spcollege.edu/museum to the late 20th century, Winslow Homer’s www.spcollege.edu/museum including stellar works America showcases This exhibition inby Albert Bierstadt, 58 wood engravings cludes large-scale clay John Sloan, Childe that appeared in lead- installations by sculp- Hassam, Charles ing American magator and ceramic artist, Burchfield, Reginald Barbara Sorensen, that reference geological forms in nature and serves as an enhancement to the celebration of Earth Day, on April 22nd. Marsh, Edward Hopzines from the 1850s per, Andy Warhol and VERO BEACH through the 1870s. Chuck Close. Thru 05.22 Thru 05.22

Barbara Sorensen: Topographies Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

American Masterworks: 150 Years of Painting from the Butler Institute of American Art

Thru 06.30

Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection

Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Celebrating 25 Years presents an engaging look at the Museum’s outdoor sculpture collection. The works include: welded sculpture by John Henry and David Hayes, kinetic sculpture by Jerome Kirk, bronze work by Thomas Ostenberg and the Museum’s most recent sculpture acquisition, Hanneke Beaumont’s Bronze #56. Thru 05.22

Impressions: Selections

1. Winslow Homer, The Robin’s Note, 1870 2. Barbara Sorensen, Chalice W1-08,
28 x 25 x 14” + 2” base,
stoneware, stones & gold leaf 3. Frank Weston Benson, Red and Gold, 1915, oil on canvas, 51 x 59”, Collection of the Butler Institute of American Art, courtesy of International Arts 4. Jane Manus, End of the Day, 1988, painted and welded aluminum, 86 x 58 x 42”, gift of Janet and Clark Daugherty

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

from the Manoogian Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

This exhibition brings together a group of paintings, some on view for the first time in Vero Beach, which capture an “impression” of their subject matter rather than a

Jose Alvarez, Yayoi Kusama, Fred Tomaselli and Leo Villareal, this exhibition challenges the viewer’s perceptions of reality and the ability of art to create an al-

Here in 75 Years Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

showcases a selection of promised gifts to the Museum celebrating this momentous occasion.

A retrospective exhibition of paintings by Edward C. Michener, Creative Journey celebrates the life of the artist in his final exhibition. 04.02-07.17

W. PALM BEACH

detailed realistic portrayal of it.

04.06-05.15

Thru 04.24

Vero Promises Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.norton.org

www.verobeachmuseum.org

In honor of the Museum’s 25th Anniversary, Vero Promises

Altered States: Jose Alvarez, Yayoi Kusama, Fred Tomaselli and Leo Villareal Norton Museum of Art

Creative Journey: From There to

Through the unapologetically beautiful collages, paintings and light installations by a select group of artists, including:

tered and transformative experience. (See story on pg. 52.) Thru 07.17

Eternal China: Tales from the Crypt Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

1. Edward W. Redfield, Road to the River, oil on canvas, 32 x 40”, courtesy of the Manoogian Collection 2. Richard Diebenkorn, High Green, Version II, 1992, color spit bite and soap ground aquatint with soft ground and hard ground etching and drypoint, 52-5/16 x 33-1/2”, Collection of Georgia Welles 3. Edward C. Michener, Prague, watercolor, courtesy of Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens 4. Jose Alvarez, The Arrival, 2008, feathers, porcupine quills, crystals, paint, ink, paper collage, and acetate on paper, 72 x 44”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

To Live Forever reCatch a rare glimpse veals what the Egypof the work of Kentians believed they neth Jay Lane, a would find in the next stalwart of the fashion world and contrasts world, whose “fabuhow the rich and the lous fakes” have been poor prepared for the worn by First Ladies hereafter. Featured are and Hollywood roysome of the most objects that illustrate alty. (See story in the notable photographers a range of strategies of the 20th and 21st the ancient Egyptians centuries, ranging from developed to defeat such seminal figures death, including mumas Ansel Adams and Edward Weston to a younger generation of photo-based artFeb./Mar. 2011 issue ists, including Thomas on pg. 74.) Demand and Valérie Belin. www.norton.org

Designed to complement the special exhibition of Egyptian treasures from the Brooklyn Museum, the Norton highlights works of art from another great ancient culture—China. This installation explores important discoveries of mummies and renowned tombs. Thru 05.01

Fabulous Fakes: The Jewelry of Kenneth Jay Lane Norton Museum of Art

Thru 07.17

From A to Z: 26 Great Photographs from the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

From A to Z acknowledges the work of

Thru 05.08

To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

mification and various rituals. WINTER PARK 04.16-06.12

Sharaku Interpreted by

1. Covered tripod ritual wine vessel (jia), China, Shang dynasty, Anyang period, ca. 13th-12th century BCE, bronze, 13 x 7-3/4 x 8-1/8”, gift of R.H. Norton 2. Kenneth J. Lane, Starfish brooch, 1980s, photography by Erik Gould, courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design and Kenneth Jay Lane 3. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas, Juchitan, 1979, gelatin silver photograph, 24 x 20”, purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art, courtesy of the artist and Rose Gallery 4. Mummy Cartonnage of a Woman, Roman Period, 1st century C.E., linen, gilded gesso, glass and faience 22-11/16 x 14-5/8 x 7 1/2”, possible place collected: Hawara, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund

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C A L E N D A R

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Japan’s Contemporary Artists Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

of Japan and the diversity of current artistic expression. (See story on pg. 94.)

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru-04.17

Sharaku Interpreted is an engaging report of the personal reinterpretation of Sharaku, an 18th cen-

Silver Springs: The Underwater Photography of Bruce Mozert The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

tury Japanese master printmaker, by today’s contemporary Japanese graphic designers and artists. The project illustrates the connections between ukiyo-e and the graphic design

Depicting beautiful models in real-life domestic situations under the crystal clear waters of the Silver River, Bruce Mozert’s photographs are a retro look at simpler times. (See story in the Feb./Mar. 2011 issue on pg. 88.) 05.01-05.08

Paint Out Exhibit The Albin Polasek Museum

Arthur Jones & Sam Jones The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Artists Arthur and Sam Jones (father and son respectively)

& Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Beginning Sunday, April 24th, 26 professional artists will paint outdoors (en plein air) throughout the city of Winter Park, for the annual spring “Winter Park Paint Out.” The artists have 6 days to publicly create their works, which will be presented in the Paint Out Exhibit and offered for sale as a fundraiser for the Museum.

share the same bloodline, the same history and the same artistic spirit. Their distinctly different approaches to art are 05.17-07.10 highlighted in their Two Generations— first-ever dual exhibit. Two Visions:

On View

1. Miran Fukada, Otani Oniji III As The Servant Edohei, 1996, acrylic on cotton on panel 2. Bruce Mozert, photo from Silver Springs: The Underwater Photography of Bruce Mozert, Bruce Mozert/University Press of Florida 3. Arthur Jones, Stuttering Parrot, courtesy of the artist

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MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: ANTONI AMAT

gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

ANTONI AMAT’S

large-format works portray dense worlds that undress to show an inner hidden breath, revealing powerful gestures of color and emotion displayed with provocative vivacity. His works can be found in museums, private foundations and private collections all over the world.

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

Artist: Bill Beckley

BILL BECKLEY’S ARTWORKS INCLUDE A HIGHLY ACUTE

sensitivity that allows viewers to enter into the artist’s dreamy maze of fact and fantasy. From left: Antoni Amat, Destapa Narariga, 60 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art; Bill Beckley, Ulyssees,
2010, cibachrome photograph, 48 x 77”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: David Castillo Gallery www.davidcastillogallery.com

Artist: Pepe Mar

PEPE MAR’S CREATIONS

emerge from the artist’s intuitive obsessions with MIAMI thrift store shopping, sci- Gallery: ence fiction, high design and fashion. His process includes the playful Art Fusion Galleries investigation of the history of assemblage, painting and popular culture. www.artfusiongallery.com Artist: RUBEN UBIERA

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Onessimo Fine Art

RUBEN UBIERA REFERS

to his style as “urbanpop”— his inspiration is derived from the interactivity between man and his urban environment. In his work, he strives to capture an essential part of his past, his present and his subjects through the use of line and form.

www.onessimofineart.com

Artist: Peter Mars

PETER MARS COM-

bines innovation with Pop Art. His sensibilities fall somewhere, as he says, “in that area where nonsense and popular culture so frequently meet.”

Clockwise from top left: Pepe Mar, Club Universe (Saturday), 2010, fabric, wood, wire, 44 x 48 x 40”, courtesy of the artist and David Castillo Gallery; Ruben Ubiera, Ay Warhol two, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries; Peter Mars, silkscreen on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Onessimo Fine Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak Gallery www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: ROB WYNNE GLAMOROUS,

glittering and iridescent, Rob Wynne’s creations are enchanting and seductive. His shimmering poured mirrored-glass letters describe thoughts and

MIAMI

Gallery: Bernice Steinbaum Gallery www.bernicesteinbaumgallery.com

Artist: Carol Prusa

BUILDING ON THE METAPHOR OF THE “DOME OF HEAVEN”

emotions through words and phrases, drawing wit and poetry out of seemingly decorative forms.

as a visual container for what we know, this body of work consists of painted 3-dimensional acrylic hemispheres ranging from bowl-sized to 5’ in diameter. The dome paintings are a visual embodiment of what it feels like to be alive while in conversation with contested cosmologies. “As artists and scientists seek to explain our place, I join these dreamers of the ‘whole’ to imaginatively visualize the creative matrix existing within all domes or paradigms and offer possibilities while embracing indeterminacy—where the boundary between myself and what I observe is blurred.”

From left: Rob Wynne, Face, 2009, poured and mirrored glass, 21 x 27”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery; Carol Prusa, Portal (detail), 2010, silverpoint, graphite, titanium white pigment with acrylic binder on acrylic hemisphere with aluminum leaf and fiber optics, 48 x 48 x 10”, courtesy of the artist and Bernice Steinbaum Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

NAPLES

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art

GARDENS

www.trudylabellfineart.com

www.studioegallery.com

Artist: David Willis

Artist: DEBORAH BIGELEISEN

Gallery: Studio E Gallery

“MY WORK IS CREAT-

ed mostly in lampworked borosilicate glass, allowing me to range from delicate to massive. The contradictions of glass (enduring and ephemeral, micro and macro, ubiquitous and precious, weak and strong...) mirror much of what intrigues me about nature.”

DEBORAH BIGELEISEN’S

evocative paintings of natural forms are endlessly engaging. With her unique vision,

MIAMI

Gallery: Giovanni Rossi Fine Arts www.giovannirossifineart.com

Artist: Adam Best

FASCINATED BY THE

reflection of water, Adam Best has set forth a body of work that contains the zenlike beauty of the moment, captured frame by frame within his unique vision.

profound sense of color and glazing technique, Deborah’s work elicits a fresh perspective and a deep insight into the familiar.

Clockwise from top: David Willis, Here Today (detail), hot sculpted glass, lampworked glass, 11’ w x 9’ h x 3’ d, 2006,
courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Deborah Bigeleisen, Multiple Perspectives, Untitled No. 21, 40 x 30”, oil on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery; Adam Best, Link (detail), courtesy of the artist and Giovanni Rossi Fine Arts

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7 PA B L O

C A N O :

WONDERS of the

Modern World at

MOCA,

N O R T H

M I A M I

05.07-05.28

w w w. m o c a n o m i . o rg 40

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GINGER BOBBY PIN, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ


INTERNET TAPPER FACE BOOKA, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ


PABLO CANO: Seven Wonders

of the Modern World

Since childhood, marionettes have fascinated Pablo Cano. At the age

of ten, he was mounting elaborate plays for his family, featuring puppets constructed of household bric-

a-brac. His primary work today continues to center around the marionettes that he fashions from found

objects, and the performance pieces he composes to showcase these protagonists.

“I create a dream world where inanimate objects come

to life—springing from my imagination in the Surrealist

tradition,” says Cano, “but my work is founded on Dada

ideals. The Dadaists used chance, spontaneity, and child-

like innocence in order to create their statement. Their intention, as is my own, was to break with tradition and painting technique and to return to the elemental basics of

art—to start from scratch—to allow the process of imagination to unfold and begin anew each time I create.”

Seven Wonders of the Modern World is Pablo Cano’s

12th annual MOCA-commissioned production— OnV

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PABLO CANO: Seven Wonders of the Modern World

a brand new multi-media musical presentation featuring Cano’s beloved marionettes, which take the form of his personal selection of the modern world’s wonders. Cano worked in collaboration with New York-based writer, Carmen Pelaez, and Miami-based choreographer, Katherine Kramer, to produce Seven Wonders. The production is dedicated to Pablo’s grandparents, Ana Bergada and Rafael Fernandez Ruenes. “America witnessed an historic breakthrough with the election of President Obama in 2008,” explains Cano. “This memorable Presidential election inspired me to create the concept for Seven Wonders. The idea evolved over the next three years, with the help of renowned stage comedian and playwright, Carmen Pelaez, who wrote the script and adapted lyrics to music from popular American songs from the 1930s and ’50s.”

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Cano considers this marionette play an American folk art piece—a work in progress, forever changing as future “wonders of the modern world” are invented. “I tried to choose seven modern wonders, inspired by the Theater of the Absurd and current discoveries and ideas that would be suitable for interesting marionette forms,” he says. “The brilliant choreography of Katherine Kramer, along with four dancers/puppeteers, brings the marionettes to life with movement, lighting and music.” The delightful and whimsical Seven Wonders marionette characters include: 1. The Bobby Pins: Fred and Ginger 2. The Internet Tappers: GOOGLEINA, FACE BOOKA and AMAZONA

3. Minty the Tooth Paste and Bing the Tooth Brush


MINTY THE TOOTH PASTE, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST OPPOSITE: BING THE TOOTH BRUSH, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ


PRESIDENT OBAMA, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ


PABLO CANO: Seven Wonders

of the Modern World

4. The Cell Phone Frog, AKA: Mr. Maurice Cellvaille 5. The Madonna of the DNA 6. The Clone Clowns 7. The Satellite Ballerina (SADI), aka: Strategic American Defense Initiative All of the marionettes have been created with discarded materials collaged with silver

around, is the grand finale! “Each marionette is a complete sculpture in its own right and, when not in performance, the marionettes and set will be on view as an exhibition in their inanimate state; but when their creator and grand puppeteer, Cano, performs them, the figures will take on a life force, causing audience members to

“Seven Wonders of the Modern World is a work in progress that promises hope to Americans.” —Pablo Cano cigarette paper foil. The Seven Wonders’ characters reside inside an old grocery cart that transforms, onstage, into a beautiful marionette theater. Cano’s marionette of Louis Armstrong singing “It’s a Wonderful World,” with President Obama and the Seven Wonders’ characters gathered

suspend their disbelief,” says Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Chief Curator, MOCA, North Miami. “It was clear, right from Cano’s first productions at MOCA, that a truly original artist, who marched to his own drummer, was in our midst. In the 1990s, at a time when conceptual art dominatOnV

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PABLO CANO: Seven Wonders of the Modern World

ed the international art world, Cano followed his heart and passion, seeing treasures in garbage and bringing unforgettable characters into existence.” “For me, the most anticipated element of the process of creation is the final step— when the contributors (choreographers, dancers, actors, musi-

Influences from the color palette of Russian Constructivist, Alexandra Exter, who assembled marionettes in the 1920s, the mechanics of the pieces in Alexander Calder’s Circus and Cubist bricolage can be seen in Cano’s work. By incorporating carefully selected, discarded debris from

“ The human condition is always one of the most important elements in my work as a puppeteer.” —Pablo Cano cians and producers) sprinkle magic stardust over the tenderly assembled detritus and bring the cast of remarkably unique marionettes to life,” says Cano. “I am sure the stardust has worked when I see in the faces of the audience, young and old, the unfolding of their connection with the characters in the production.”

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the urban streets he frequents, as well as miscellany brought to his studio by friends from all over the world, he has developed his own charming and inventive palette. Cano employs numerous art forms in his work, including: oil and watercolor painting, fine drawing, charcoal and ceramic sculpture—he is accomplished


CELL PHONE FROG, 2011, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ


“MOCA, North Miami has made it possi incarnations of my own reality through marion in each of these areas. Born in Havana, Cuba, in 1961, Cano was on the last flight out of the country before the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. He received his MFA from Queens College of the City University of New York in 1985 and has studied and worked in New York, Paris, Baltimore and Miami. He is a resident of

PAST MOCA PERFORMANCES HAVE INCLUDED (LEFT TO RIGHT): BUSTY GALORE, 2007; ATHENA (CAVALETTI’S DREAM), 2009; THE CYCLOPS (CAVALETTI’S DREAM), 2009; MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ

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Miami’s Little Havana and is considered one of Florida’s premier contemporary fine artists. MOCA, North Miami has commissioned his work annually since 1997. Pablo Cano’s work is found in numerous public and private collections internationally, including: MOCA, North Miami; Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale; Lowe


PABLO CANO: Seven Wonders

of the Modern World

ble for people of all ages to escape inside ette theater...for this, I am thankful.”—Pablo Cano Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables; Cintas Foundation, New York, NY; Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, SUNY at New Paltz, New Paltz, NY; The Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, GA; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN; Art in Public Places, Olympia, GA; Bacardi, Miami; R.J.

Reynolds Company, WinstonSalem, NC; Sagamore Hotel, Collection of Martin & Cricket Taplin, Miami Beach; and the Rubell Family Collection, Miami. You can also catch Pablo’s solo show, Ladies In White, on view through April 2nd at the Kelley Roy Gallery in Wynwood (www. kelleyroygallery.com). O n V iew OnV

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PAST MOCA PERFORMANCES HAVE INCLUDED (LEFT TO RIGHT): LADY IN WHITE VASE, STANDING SCULPTURE, 2009; PRINCESS TULA (CITY BENEATH THE SEA), 2005; RED DIABLO (VIVA VAUDEVILLE), 2007; MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSÉ RODRIGUEZ

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Altered Jose ALVAREZ

Yayoi KUSAMA

04.02-

at the NORTON MUSEUM 00

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States: Fred TOMASELLI

Leo VILLAREAL

-07.17

M of ART • www.norton.org OnV

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By CHERYL BRUTVAN, Curator of Contemporary Art, Norton Museum of Art

C CAN ART HAVE A TRANSFORM-

ative power or is that a romantic and naive expectation? The

ironic statement, by Bruce Nauman, in his early neon sculpture:

The true artist helps the world by

revealing mystic truths (1967),

expresses the burden of both the artist and the viewer, while acknowledging the desire of each for a meaningful experience.

Through the unapologetically

beautiful works by Jose Alvarez,


ALTERED STATES

Yayoi Kusama, Fred Tomaselli

and Leo Villareal, this exhibition challenges the viewer’s perceptions of reality and the abil-

ity of art to create an altered and transformative experience. From

the glistening and colorful col-

lages of Alvarez, the obsessively painted Infinity Nets of Kusama, and the incredibly detailed paintings of Tomaselli, to Villareal’s

room-sized installation of vibrating color, these works are especially tempting to the eye—their

seductive energy encourages,

even demands, the viewers’ participation and reflection.

Whether ultimately transcend-

ent and altering or simply engag-

ing, they each consider and explore the power of art and the

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JOSE ALVAREZ, THE ARRIVAL, 2008, FEATHERS, PORCUPINE QUILLS, CRYSTALS, PAINT, INK, PAPER COLLAGE, AND ACETATE ON PAPER, 72 X 44”, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GAVLAK GALLERY, PALM BEACH /May 2011

55


ALTERED STATES

Jose ALVAREZ JOSE ALVAREZ INCORPORATES crystal (mica), feathers and quills (porcupine)—essential elements used in various ancient and new age rituals—in his collages. These creations are an extension of his early work as a performance artist, when he “channeled” a 2,000 year old shaman, named “Carlos”. For two decades, “Carlos” appeared to international audiences, numbering in the thousands, as Alvarez explored, examined and tested the nature of belief, charisma, and power, and how they intersect. When Alvarez returned to making artworks, he transferred this knowledge into spectacular collages of natural elements, which may be imbued with meanings associated with science and mysticism or, simply, aesthetic appeal. Some are layered over brightly hued watercolors that verge on the hallucinogenic, others are composed entirely of single elements, such as a square of glimmering sheets of mica or a circle of peacock feathers, demonstrating the seductive power of modernism. THE PROGRESS OF INSPIRATION, 2008, ENAMEL,

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GOUACHE, FEATHERS, PORCUPINE QUILLS ON MICA, 72 X 90”, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GAVLAK GALLERY, PALM BEACH


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ALTERED STATES

Yayoi KUSAMA “BY OBLITERATING ONE’S individual self, one returns to the infinite universe,” said Yayoi Kusama, when reflecting on her obsessive paintings, Infinity Nets. From an early age, the artist endured extreme hallucinations in which she saw everyone and everything, in her world, covered in a net-like pattern. This perception and her obsessive compulsive behavior was manifest in her artwork, resulting in provocative, figurative sculptures and minimalist paintings, covered in highly detailed patterns, meticulously painted over the course of days. The intensity of her efforts and physical demands of their creation transcended the act of painting and carried Kusama into another state of reality.

INFINITY NETS (ZATTOO), 2008, © YAYOI KUSAMA, 2011, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 57-1/4 x 57-1/4, COURTESY GAGOSIAN GALLERY, NEW YORK, PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT MCKEEVER


ALTERED STATES

Fred TOMASELLI FRED TOMASELLI CREATES provocative and personal pictures that reflect both the interior and exterior worlds of the artist’s experiences. Tomaselli grew up in the Los Angeles area, during 1970s and 1980s, in proximity to theme parks focused on artificial worlds and illusions. It was a time and place characterized by cultural and physical experimentation achieved by natural and man-made substances. Together, these influences affected his artistic evolution, resulting in highly finished works that are both painting and collage. He uses materials such as leaves, pills, aspirin, photos and paper cutouts to create fantastic abstractions and images that embody altered states of reality—seductive and curious. THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): DEAD EYED BIRD BLAST, 1997, COLLAGE, ACRYLIC AND RESIN ON WOOD PANEL, 60 x 60”; BRAIN WITH FLOWERS, 1990-1997, LEAVES, PILLS, PHOTO COLLAGE, ACRYLIC, AND RESIN ON WOOD PANEL, 24 x 24”; 13,000, 1996, MIXED MEDIA, RESIN ON WOOD, 48 x 48” OPPOSITE: RADIATING COLUMN, 2002, BOTANICAL MATERIAL, PILLS, ACRYLIC, PHOTO-COLLAGE, RESIN ON WOOD PANEL, 30 X 24” IMAGES © FRED TOMASELLI, COURTESY JAMES COHAN GALLERY, NY/SHANGHAI

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ALTERED STATES

Leo VILLAREAL LEO VILLAREAL WORKS WITH light and color in its purest forms, creating discrete objects and magnificent installations which respond to architectural elements through his sensitive manipulation of shapes and passages of color, emanating from programmed LEDs (light emitting diodes). He has reinvented the use of color and light and integral elements of art, succeeding the efforts of Modern Masters, Dan Flavin and James Turrell, recognized for their transformative, even spiritual effects. The light works of Villareal have an extraordinary power both visually and, potentially, internally on the viewer. O n V iew FIRMAMENT, 2001, STROBE LIGHTS, STEEL, CUSTOM SOFTWARE, ELECTRICAL HARDWARE, 192 x 192 x 4�, UNIQUE, COURTESY GERING & LOPEZ GALLERY, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES EWING NOTE: IMAGE IS REPRESENTATIONAL OF ACTUAL WORK TO BE INCLUDED IN EXHIBITION.


XX XY

GENDER REPRESENTATION IN

ART On view through 06.05 at the

Orlando Museum of Art w w w. o m a r t . o r g 64

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O

XX-XY / Gender

Representation in Art

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS

XX-XY/Gender Representation in Art, an overview of visual gender expression

and identification. Drawing upon the

OMA’s permanent collections of American Art, Art of the Ancient Americas,

and African Art, as well as loans from

important collectors and other fine art institutions, the exhibition examines how

the roles of men and women are portrayed in different cultures and in different

time periods. It addresses issues that are being discussed in the media and debated in politics, and reflects the hot topics in contemporary literature.

PREVIOUS PAGE: © 2010 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY. ANDY WARHOL, MARILYN MONROE, 1967, SCREENPRINT ON PAPER, 36 x 36”, PURCHASED WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY THE COUNCIL OF 101 OPPOSITE: LESLEY DILL, DADA POEM WEDDING DRESS, 1994, ACRYLIC AND THREAD ON PAPER ON MANNEQUIN, 64 x 60 x 70”, PURCHASED WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY THE ACQUISITION TRUST

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The choice to include a variety of old and new paintings and sculpture, photos and objets d’art is deliberate and emphasizes how gender issues have existed for centuries. “I imagine that there may be some people who will be a bit uncomfortable in the show, but for the most part there is a playfulness about it,” says Kristin Congdon, a professor of philosophy and humanities at the University of Central Florida, who helped curate the exhibit. “We wanted to make it edgy enough to where

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people enjoy it in a way that gets them thinking.” As the line between male and female continues to blur, artists expand their understanding of what defines gender. XX or XY has been the scientific way to identify a man (XY) or a woman (XX). Whether it determines your identity, or even your gender, is now debatable in the 21st century. Issues of gender and identity seem increasingly complex and problematic, but also of fundamental and growing importance.


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XX-XY / Gender

Representation in Art

“Gender is a convoluted topic in the 21st century and a powerful theme in contemporary art,” says OMA curator, Jan Clanton, who selected the works in the exhibition. “XXXY/Gender Representation in Art is a showcase for provocative pairings in art to encourage visitors to see how artists are exploring the topic today.” The show examines gender by focusing on four main themes: power, domesticity, magnetism and enhancements. By presenting both traditional and contemporary examples of art, visitors have a clearer picture of the changing nuances in gender representation.

ELIZABETH PEYTON , PIERRE, 2000, WATERCOLOR ON PAPER, 26-3/4 x 40-3/4”, PURCHASED WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY THE ACQUISITION TRUST

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POWER, or the ability to have strength, influence and/or control: This segment of the exhibition prompts us to question how we identify power figures in our society and how this power is achieved. Among the selection of works included are designer suits by Armani and Chanel and pre-Columbian fertility artifacts, as well as America’s ultimate female sex sym-

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bol, Marilyn Monroe, iconically rendered in Andy Warhol’s 1967 screenprint, on pg. 65. DOMESTICITY, or the influences of home life—and also the possibility to tame: Is domesticity a term that is even relevant for the 21st century? The depiction of domesticity, especially in tra-


ditional American artworks, often seems stereotypical to us today, however, Leslie Dill’s Dada Poem Wedding Dress, on pg. 67, is an example of a traditional symbol of domesticity—a wedding dress— seen in a vastly different context. Originally created for an AIDS benefit, the brown paper dress, which is painted white

and stamped with the words of Emily Dickinson’s poem, The Soul Has Bandaged Moments, has been ripped and shred into pieces and reassembled, subtly symbolizing a woman’s loss of innocence and single selfness. MAGNETISM, or the power of attraction: Here we are compelled to question our desires, OnV

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XX-XY / Gender

Representation in Art

what we find appealing and how we define beauty. Take, for example, a watercolor painting by Elizabeth Peyton, on pg. 69, which portrays a sleeping figure surrounded by soft, pastel shades. The subject, while feminine in its representation, is actually a male. Is the viewer’s perception of the image changed? Is this appealing or repulsive?

ments. She believes that comparing the female form to Barbie dolls is inappropriate and, to illustrate her point, uses rubber forms and video to urge viewers to question the status given to fashion. Through XX-XY/Gender Representation in Art, the OMA has ambitiously strived to address perceptions surround-

If viewers leave the exhibition as confused as they are enlightened, the museum has done its job successfully.

ALLIE POHL, IDEAL WOMAN: 36-24-36, POLYURETHANE RUBBER, POLYURETHANE MEMORY FOAM AND MIRROR PEDESTAL, COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST

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E N H A N C E M E N T S , or adornments that enhance an individual’s status: Enhancements have played a role in shaping identities for centuries. Is the impulse to adorn biological? Does a 20+ year old woman really need $200,000 worth of plastic surgery to be popular? Allie Pohl’s Ideal Woman: 36-2436, pictured on the opposite page, is a direct challenge to society’s attention to enhance-

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ing gender. According to Congdon, if viewers leave the exhibition as confused as they are enlightened, the museum has done its job successfully. Augmenting the show are lectures on the exhibit’s themes, led by UCF professors. The talks take place on April 10th and May 8th, at 1:30 p.m., followed by an indepth tour of the exhibition. O n V iew


CLASSIC

Photography b

04.28-

at the FLORIDA MUSEUM of PHOT

Classic Images includes personally printed for his he conceived, in the 1970 Reproduction of this image is prohibited


IMAGES:

by

Ansel Adams

-07.06

OGRAPHIC ARTS • www.fmopa.org 72 photographs that Ansel Adams daughter, Anne Adams Helms — a portfolio s, as the best images of his career... OnV

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CLASSIC IMAGES:

Photographs by Ansel Adams

“A true ph

A

ANSEL ADAMS CREATED IMAGES

that capture the American spirit: the

wild, unconquered spaces of the West, the endless skies that recall the limitless possibilities of the American dream

and the rugged terrain that evokes this nation’s “can-do” energy.


Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

in Tampa presents Classic Images: Photography by Ansel Adams, a series of 72

black and white photographs, which Adams personally printed for his daughter, Anne. The portfolio consists of what he felt were the best images of his career.

The fifteen sections of the exhibition encompass his work throughout the coun-

try from 1921 through 1968. Landscapes dominate the group, complemented by OPPOSITE: MOUNT WILLIAMSON, THE SIERRA NEVADA, FROM MANZANAR, CA.; 1945; PHOTOGRAPH BY ANSEL ADAMS; © 2011 THE ANSEL ADAMS PUBLISHING RIGHTS TRUST

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otograph need not be explained, nor can it be contained in words.”—Ansel Adams

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Reproduction of this image is prohibited

“ There are no rules for good photographs, good photographs.”—Ansel Adams

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CLASSIC IMAGES:

Photographs by Ansel Adams

there are only a selection of close-up nature shots, portraits and architectural subjects. Through these images, Adams reveals his emotional responses to the subjects, making them far more than mere visual records. The artist’s devotion to the American wilderness is evident in his photographs of several national parks—especially images of his beloved Yosemite. These images have become the symbols, the veritable icons, of wild America. Born on February 20, 1902 in San Francisco, California, Ansel Adams was the grandson of a wealthy timber baron and the only child of Charles Hitchcock Adams and Olive Bray. At the tender age of four, Adams fell and badly broke his nose during an aftershock from the great earthquake and fire of 1906—the experience distinctly marked him for life. A year later, the family fortune collapsed in the financial panic of 1907. These events, coupled with hyperactivity, shyness, a certain intensity of genius and a possible case of dyslexia, resulted in a rather unfortunate childhood. The most important outcome from his youth was the joy that he found in nature. As a young boy, Adams took long walks along the Golden Gate and often hiked the dunes near the beach OnV

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OPPOSITE: GEORGIA O’KEEFFE & ORVILLE COX, CANYON DE CHELLY NATIONAL MONUMENT, AZ; 1937; PHOTOGRAPH BY ANSEL ADAMS; ©2011 THE ANSEL ADAMS PUBLISHING RIGHTS TRUST

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CLASSIC IMAGES:

Photographs by Ansel Adams

“Dodging and burning ar in es

OPPOSITE : ROSE AND DRIFTWOOD, SAN FRANCISCO, CA.; CA. 1932; PHOTOGRAPH BY ANSEL ADAMS; ©2011 THE ANSEL ADAMS PUBLISHING RIGHTS TRUST

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or meandered along Lobos Creek. When Adams was twelve, he taught himself to play the piano and read music. He soon began taking lessons and, eventually, the piano became his primary occupation. Although he would ultimately give up music for photography, the piano brought substance, discipline and structure to his life. Adams fell in love with Yosemite National Park during his first visit in 1916. He wrote of his first view of the valley: “...the splendor of Yosemite burst upon us and it was glorious... One wonder after another descended upon us... There was light everywhere... A new era began for me.” He started taking photographs using the Kodak No. 1 Box Brownie his parents had given him. He would spend substantial time there every year until his death. Adams also met his wife, Virginia Best, in Yosemite. The couple married in 1928 and had two children, Michael and Anne. In 1919 Adams joined the Sierra Club, which became vital to his early success as a photographer. His first published photographs and writings appeared in the club’s 1922 Bulletin, and he had his first one man exhibition in 1928 at the club’s San Francisco headquarters. Adams’s star rose rapidly in the early 1930s, when he met photographer Alfred Stieglitz, the artist whose work and philosophy Adams most admired and emulated. In 1936 Stieglitz gave Adams a one-man show at An American Place,

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e steps to take care of mistakes God made tablishing tonal relationships.”—Ansel Adams

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Reproduction of this image is prohibited

“Sometimes I do get to places just when Go somebody click the shutter.”—Ansel Adams

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CLASSIC IMAGES:

Photographs by Ansel Adams

d’s ready to have Stieglitz’s New York gallery. Adams’ technical mastery was legendary. He reveled in the theory and practice of the medium and produced ten volumes of technical manuals on photography. He also possessed an endless capacity for work, often laboring for eighteen or more hours per day. His hyperactive existence was also fueled by alcohol and a constant whirl of social activity. Adams was a relentless activist for the cause of wilderness and the environment. The artist traveled the country in pursuit of both the natural beauty he revered and the audiences he required. He also felt an intense commitment to promoting photography as a fine art and played a key role in the establishment of the first museum department of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Throughout his lifetime, Adams celebrated the profound magnificence of nature. He died on April 22, 1984 in Monterey, California, at the age of 82. As John Swarkowski stated in the introduction to Adams’ Classic Images (1985), “The love that Americans poured out for the work and person of Ansel Adams during his old age, and that they have continued to express with undiminished enthusiasm since his death, is an extraordinary phenomenon, perhaps even unparalleled in our country’s response to a visual artist.” O n V iew OnV

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OPPOSITE: CLEARING WINTER STORM, YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, CA.; 1944; PHOTOGRAPH BY ANSEL ADAMS; © 2011 THE ANSEL ADAMS PUBLISHING RIGHTS TRUST

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Dunedin Fine Art Center, Dunedin The Summer Camp Programs at DFAC, which run from 06.13-08.19, provide exciting art experiences for children 4.5-14 years of age.

IT IS NO SECRET THAT THE

arts are vital to providing a wellrounded education. Researchers tell us that getting an early start in the arts can make a real difference in the lives of children. The benefits of an early arts education extend way beyond providing a creative outlet for kids. An arts education can help a child develop imagination, cognitive skills, creative abilities, problem solving, fine motor skills, language, social skills and more... As summer approaches, we wanted to share a few of the wonderful programs being offered by art institutions throughout the state—please make sure to call ahead for dates, times and fees.

p AGES 4.5-5: Children explore adventures in

art with mixed-media, focused on fun and educational themes, in Mini Masters. Working within the theme of the week, students rotate through drawing/ painting, 3-D art, hands on museum and clay in Sizzlin’ Summer Visual Arts Camp.

p

AGES 6-10:

p AGES 8-12: Young artists learn the steps in

creating magnificent, monumental-sized drawings and paintings that will be on display at DFAC in Mural Madness.

p AGES 11-14: Using weekly themes as a creative departure point, students rotate through classes in photography/black & white darkroom, computers, throwing on the wheel, and drawing/ painting in Art Squad Art Camp. For information, call: 727.298.3322.

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, Hollywood

MOCA Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

Bring out the artist in your child at the Art and Culture Center’s Summer Arts Camp.

MOCA, Jacksonville, a cultural resource of the University of North Florida, presents artcamp@MOCA, a program of 9 week-long sessions of classes, available from 06.13-08.19, in creative art-making for children 4-17 years of age. Experienced art educators provide a variety of fun and creative activities through which children learn about art and grow their visual vocabulary.

Students 6-12 years of age explore drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, clay, and a lot more—all inspired by different themes. Each session culminates with an exhibition for family and friends.

p YOUNG

ARTISTS (06.13-08.19):

p YOUNG ARTISTS ADVANCED (07.18-

This program is for students, 10-15 years of age, who have enrolled in the Young Artists program in the past or would like to focus on developing a vast range of techniques by studying contemporary art. The program provides students with a practical approach to art-making by applying their imagination, creativity and learned skills. The 2-D Session focuses on drawing, mixed-media, painting and structural design. The 3-D Session focuses on assemblage, sculpture and textile. 08.12):

p It’s never too early to start enjoying con-

temporary art! ARTCAMP@MOCA provides an unforgettable, full-immersion art experience for age groups, 4-6, 7-11, and 12-17. Museum educators and certified local art educators provide quality instruction in a wide range of subjects and media. The program includes a variety of activities, exploration of art history, tours of the Museum’s collection, and more. For information, call: 904. 366.6911 ext. 212.

For information, call: 954. 921. 3274. www.artandculturecenter.org OnV

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Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center, Naples ARTScool, the 13th annual summer arts program at the Naples Art Association, for children ages 5 to 14, is being offered from 06.13-08.12.

p ARTScool features 96 classes—all taught

by professional artists and certified art instructors—and provides a seemingly endless array of possibilities for aspiring artists. From the Masters to mythical creatures and beyond, ARTScool challenges students in virtually every area of visual arts, including: painting, drawing, sculpture, collage, clay modeling, craft-making, printing, mixed-media and so much more. Students learn about art history, art styles and techniques, while creating exciting artworks in a range of 2-D and 3-D mediums. A late summer exhibition features work by all students and a closing reception brings together students, their families and instructors to celebrate the creativity of the young artists. For information, call: 239.262.6517

Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando The OMA summer camps, available from 06.1308.19, offer unique art-making experiences for students in grades 1-9.

p 1ST-2ND GRADE: Programs are designed to expose students to a broad range of ideas and art-making experiences through theme-based classes. Students create headdresses fit for a Pharaoh in Walk Like an Egyptian or learn how to mold clay in Artes Mexicano. Classes emphasize developing observation skills and an ability to think independently. Camp-goers make unique masks out of clay in Faces & Masks in Clay or spend a week exploring the world through art in Art from Many Lands.

p 3RD-5TH

GRADE:

p 6TH-9TH GRADE: Emphasis is on strength-

ening technical skills and on opportunities for personal exploration. Participants can design cool patterns in Linoleum Block Printing or plaster sculptures through casting, wrapping and carving techniques in Plaster Sculpture. For information, call: 407.896.4231 ext. 262.

www.naplesart.org

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Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida, Panama City

Vero Beach Museum of Art, Vero Beach

VAC’s Summer Youth Art provides playful exploration and enhancement of art skills for kids 6-14 years of age. Classes run from 05.31-07.29.

p MIXED-MEDIA (05.31-06.10): Weaving, pottery, printmaking and more…kids create fun projects using 2-D and 3-D materials.

p DRAWING (06.13-06.24): Through experimentation with drawing tools and a variety of media and subjects, students gain a basic understanding and confidence in drawing techniques.

p SCULPTURE (06.27-07.08): Young artists create great 3-D art projects in a variety of mediums, including papier-mâché and clay.

p PAINTING (07.11-07.22): Children study

drawing, composition, color theory and the proper use of painting materials while creating art.

p CLAY (07.25-07.29): Students explore the

creative, sculptural and functional uses of clay and produce fired and glazed works. For information, call 850.769.4451.

The Vero Beach Museum of Art’s Summer Art Camp is designed to offer a creative, child-centered environment for young artists to explore new ideas, develop skills, and build self-esteem through making and learning about art. Expert instructors are experienced in getting the best work from their students in a fun, welcoming setting.

p VBMA’s SUMMER ART CAMP (06.13-

provides imaginative project-based and engaging skills-based offerings for young artists, ages 4-15, to create and express themselves with a full range of age-appropriate materials. The program features 8 weekly sessions of more than 60 morning and afternoon classes that can be combined to create a personalized full-day program of creative experiences. Whether the interest is in photography, sculpture, drawing, painting, collage, mixed-media or more, VBMA’s Summer Art Camp is your summer art fun destination! 08.05)

For information, call 772.231.0707 ext. 116.

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RETROSPECTIVE { R O B E R T

V I C K R E Y }

Exhibition

Robert Vickrey: The Magic of Realism On view April 26th-June 19th at the Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

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ROBERT VICKREY HAS BEEN

a crucial figure in the mid20th century renaissance of egg tempera, one of the oldest, most versatile and most durable painting mediums. The Magic of Realism, presents approximately 40 works from the artist’s 60-year career. Using the same labor-intensive method practiced by Renaissance artists Giotto and Botticelli, Vickrey has become America’s leading modern master of this centuries-old technique. As a painting medium, egg tempera has a short drying time, enabling overpainting and revision, and its distinctive matte surface allows for meticulous detail and textural illusion. Vickrey makes changes by scraping paint with a razor, scumbling, stippling, sponging and sandpapering. Few artists have attained Vickrey’s level of expertise in egg tempera. For nearly 6 decades, he has re-written the various aspects of this demanding technique. Having authored two books on the subject, New Techniques in Egg Tempera (1973) and Robert Vickrey: Artist at Work (1979),


R E T R O S P E C T I V E

he is easily the most respected on Time magazine covers. artist in contemporary AmeriVickrey continues today to can art in this medium. mix egg yolks with ground pigVickrey was born in New ments to create realist images York City, in 1926. He attend- that incorporate symbols and ed the Art Students League of subjects from his personal obNew York, and received his servations. His subjects are disB.F.A. from the Yale School of tinctly contemporary figures, Fine Arts, where he learned egg placed in almost surreal landtempera from Lewis E. York— scapes, defined by exaggerated a protege of Danshadows and light. iel Thompson, Jr., Visions of balloons who wrote the textand bicycles, chilbook for the temdren playing, nuns pera class at Yale. and mural-painted Vickrey startbrick walls make ed off fast in the frequent appearart world, winning ances in his visucritical praise for al narratives—all Robert Vickrey is both his innovaembodiments of AMERICA’S tive technique and the mysteriousleading modern complex content. ness, fantasy and MASTER OF His first solo exwonder that perEGG TEMPERA. hibition, in 1951, meates his works. drew laudatory reviews. In Vickrey’s paintings are in1952, Vickrey’s Labyrinth was cluded in more than 80 Ameriselected for the permanent col- can art museums, including: the lection of the Whitney Mu- Metropolitan Museum of Art, seum of American Art—his Whitney Museum of American work was included in a to- Art, the Smithsonian’s National tal of 9 Whitney exhibitions. Portrait Gallery, Corcoran GalAnd, between 1957 and 1968, lery and the National Academy 78 of his works were published of Design. O n V iew

opposite: 1. Lacy’s Sparkler, 2008, egg tempera on gesso panel, 28-3/4 x 22-1/4”* above (top to bottom): 1. Tiger, Tiger, 2009, egg tempera on gesso panel, 15-1/2 x 23-1/2”* 2. Sea Breeze, 1985, egg tempera on board, 20 x 30”, Museum Permanent Collection, Gift of the artist 3. Yellow Chalk Flowers, 2010, egg tempera on gesso panel, 12 x 17”* left: robert vickrey, photo by william meek* *courtesy of the Harmon-Meek Gallery


FOCUS { F R E D E R I C K

W.

VIEW THE SPECTACULAR

G L A S I E R }

Exhibition

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier On view through June 5th at the Museum of Arts & Sciences, Daytona Beach www.moas.org

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arrival of the circus into town, at the turn of the 20th century, through the vantage point of Frederick W. Glasier, who served as the official photographer for the Barnum & Bailey Circus. Glasier’s unrestricted access to both grand performances and backstage life allowed him to explore the public and private personalities of some of the greatest entertainers of the era. HEYDAY features more than 60 photographs juxtaposed with lithographic promotional posters that vividly announce the spectacular events that were about to unfold. From the excitement of parades that took over small towns, to the setup of the massive big top tent, which could hold more than 12,000 people, the circus was an unmatched social spectacle. Glasier’s great strength was as a portraitist, and his photographs reveal an intimate connection with the circus and sideshow performers. Highlights from the exhibit include a photograph of Mademoiselle


F O C U S

Octavia (ca. 1901), known as King view cameras, to which the “Yankee Snake Charm- he added a Thornton-Pickard er,” and Pete Mardo (1923), focal plane shutter with a speed a portrait of Peter Guckeyson, up to 1/3,000th of a second (just who ran away from home and a little longer than today’s camjoined the circus to become a era flash speed and quicker than traditional white-faced clown it takes to blink your eyes!). He under the name Pete Mardo. also used a Goerz Celor lens on Frederick W. Glasier was a 5x7” Graflex with an accorborn on March 5, dion-line pleated 1866, in Adams, focusing hood and MA.

Prior to starta postcard Kodak ing his career in camera. With all photography, he this equipment, worked as a town Glasier was conclerk and texsidered a master at tile designer. By capturing an image 1890, he moved Frederick Glasier’s of an object or perto Brockton, MA, PHOTOGRAPHS son in motion. and eventually After over 50 REVEAL opened the Glasiyears as a profesan intimate er Art Studio and sional photogconnection with Museum, where rapher, Glasier THE CIRCUS. he worked, exhibretired and spent ited his photographs and sold his time wood carving, or “whitcopies of his prints. By 1900, tling” as he called it. He died on he was taking scenic shots of July 28, 1950, in Brockton, and the circus and portraits of cir- was buried in his hometown of cus performers for commercial Adams, MA. Glasier is regarded sale. He also documented the not only as a gifted circus phodaily life of the traveling circus tographer, but also among the and Wild West show. greats of American photograGlasier used three 8 x10” phy. O n V iew

opposite: MADEMOISELLE SCHEEL WITH LIONS, CA. 1905 above (top to bottom): 1. PETE MARDO, 1923 2. MADEMOISELLE OCTAVIA, SNAKE CHARMER (DETAIL), CA. 1901 left: FREDERICK W. GLASIER, (1866-1950), CA. 1927 all IMAGES ARE FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART


SPOTLIGHT { K A R E N

G L A S E R }

Exhibition

The Mark of Water: Florida’s Springs and Swamps On view through May 29th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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FOR MORE THAN TWO DE-

cades, Karen Glaser has documented amazing worlds beneath the surface of water. The photographs in this exhibition offer unique views of rare landscapes “inside” Florida’s springs, swamps and waterways. The exquisite natural light that graces these landscapes is used solely to illuminate the images. No attempt is made by the artist to slick up the locations or the pictures—the photographs are as layered and rich as the environments. The pictures are from two related bodies of work, Springs and Swamps. The first series was shot in the pristine freshwater rivers and springs of north and central Florida. This exploration, and the resulting photographs, inspired Glaser to trek to the southern part of the state, where the most magnificent and ancient swamps are located—Big Cypress National Preserve and its neighbor, Everglades National Park. “The wetland environments of Big Cypress National Preserve and Everglades National Park contain many unique eco-


S P O T L I G H T

systems, including: freshwater tographs. My work evolves like and saltwater marshes, dry and a river with many tributaries.” wet prairies, hardwood hamKaren Glaser was born and mocks, mangrove forests, vast raised in Pittsburgh. She holds acres of primeval swamp and, a BFA from the Kansas City Art of course, the river of grass,” Institute, and an MFA from Innotes Glaser. “The tie that binds diana University, Bloomington. these extraordinary regions and She is recognized for her susthese photographs tained and expert together is water. practice of innoMuch of this undervative underwater water world is priphotography and mordial, alien and for covering varseductive, and only ious aquatic subpartially touched by jects. Most recently the hand of culture she was appointed and society.” as the 2010 PhotogKaren Glaser For most of us, rapher Laureate for DOCUMENTS water is far from amazing WORLDS the City of Tampa. our day-to-day conGlaser’s work is BENEATH the sciousness and conwidely exhibitsurface of WATER. cern. These pictures ed and her photoremind us of the intricate and in- graphs are held in many public finite nature of water. collections, including: the Art “Photographing the Florida Institute of Chicago; Museum freshwaters has become an emo- of Fine Arts, Houston; Musetional and spiritual process for um of Contemporary Photograme, as well as an artistic one,” phy, Chicago; Museum of Phosays Glaser. “I am acutely aware tographic Arts, San Diego; New of all the elements: earth, water, York Public Library; Museum fire and air, and how they inter- of Science, Miami; Port of Mimix. I am driven to translate this ami; and the Florida Art in State visceral experience into my pho- Buildings Collection. O n V iew

opposite: (top to bottom): 1. Edge of Orange Grove Sink, 2006* 2. Pollen Skin, 2009* above (top to bottom): 1. Dust Storm in Catfish Sink, 2006* 2. Gator Flag, 2008* 3. Air Plant, 2009* *Pigment Print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, 37 x 25” left: Karen Glaser (with “Frankie”), courtesy of the artist


EXHIBITION { H O M A G E

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Exhibition

Sharaku Interpreted by Japan’s Contemporary Artists On view April 16th-June 12th at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park cfam.rollins.edu

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AFTER 216 YEARS, THE

artistic genius of Toshusai Sharaku still resonates within contemporary Japanese art and design. Despite his shortlived career, Sharaku produced an innovative and influential body of work. He was a master of ukiyo-e, a genre of Japanese carved woodblock prints. Ukiyo-e was popular during Japan’s Edo period, an era spanning from 1603 to 1868. Ukiyo-e artists of this time depicted courtesans, warriors, sumo wrestlers, and Noh and Kabuki theater actors. Sharaku focused his work on portraits of actors in the Kabuki theater tradition, a highly stylized form of musical theater in which heavily made-up actors portray historical events, moral dilemmas, and melodramatic love affairs. Not much is known about the true identity of Sharaku. The only documented record of the artist lies in the more than 140 woodblock prints he produced between 1794 and 1795. As mysteriously as Sharaku burst onto the scene, he disap-


E X H I B I T I O N

peared. Like most creative in- posters along with original dividuals who go against the artworks, created especially grain, he was largely misun- for the show, by some of Jaderstood. The public did not pan’s most prominent artists, embrace the remarkable spec- including Takashi Murakami ificity and expressive likeness and Yasumasa Morimura. of the characters portrayed in Sharaku Interpreted by his work and, as a Japan’s Contemresult, Sharaku was porary Artists inlargely forgotten— cludes 28 posters until he was redisand 23 artworks covered in 1910 (in varying meby German scholdia) in addition to ar Julius Kurth, a number of Sharwhose book, Shaaku’s Kabuki porraku, created intertraits—all faithfulest in the West and ly reproduced from brought the artist to the original woodThe ARTISTIC the forefront, evenblocks. The juxtaGENIUS of tually leading to a position of these Sharaku STILL re-evaluation of his prints to the imagRESONATES work in Japan and inative and playWITHIN recognition of Shaful interpretations contemporary raku as an outstandof some of Japan’s JAPANESE ART. ing ukiyo-e artist. leading contempoAs a testament to his impor- rary artists demonstrates not tance, on his bicentennial, in only the influence of Shara1994, Japan’s top graphic de- ku’s artistic genius, but also the signers were asked to create differences between approachposters celebrating the artist es used in graphic design and and his cultural significance. contemporary art as well as the The Japan Foundation or- great diversity of today’s artisganized an exhibition of these tic expression. O n V iew

opposite (clockwise from top left): 1. Toshusai Sharaku, Nakajima Wadaemon as Bodara Chozaemon, and Nakamura Konozo as Gon of the Kanagawa-ya 2. Yasumasa Morimura, Self-portrait, “Sharaku” 3- after Bodara and Gon 3. Toshusai sharaku, Ichikawa Ebizo as Takemura Sadanoshin 4. Yasumasa Morimura, self portrait, “Sharaku” 4- After Sadanoshin above (top to bottom): 1. Toshusai sharaku, Otani Oniji III as the Servant Edohei 2. Miran Fukada, Otani Oniji III as the Servant Edohei, 1996, Acrylic on cotton on panel left: Kiyoshi Awazu, “SHARAKU elements” Festival


“The spectacular photography of Paula C and Michael A. Smith, with its powerfu composed and delicately lit black and whit captures the eternal soul of Tuscany. —F e r e n c M at é , A u t h o r

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Experience the beauty, warmth and lifestyle of Tuscany, as portrayed in a captivating series of images by renowned photographers, Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee, in the exhibition...

Tuscany Wandering the Back Roads

hamlee ully e images, .”

4.09-06.30 AT T H E

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

LEFT: PAULA CHAMLEE; LA FOCE, TUSCANY; 2000

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CANY TUSCANY TUSCA

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ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads

T

THE LAND OF TUSCANY has nurtured and inspired artists for centuries. Its charm and beauty is elegantly portrayed through the photographs of husband and wife, Michael A. Smith and Paula Chamlee, in the exhibition, Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads, at the Naples Museum of Art. Masterfully crafted and visually stunning, these images capture the essence of one of the most alluring and romantic places in the world. Noted Curator of Photography at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the late Robert Sobieszek, wrote in his essay, Matters of Choice and OnV

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PAULA CHAMLEE; CORTONA, TUSCANY; 1999


CANY TUSCANY TUSCA

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Discovery: “Look carefully at Chamlee’s and Smith’s photographs. Surprising things occur, amazing relationships reveal hidden associations, modest epiphanies announce themselves gracefully....Chamlee sets up poetic resonances... visual sonnets of felt sensations comprised of shapes and their repetitions, textures and their echoes, and all artfully considered and balanced.... Smith’s scenes are like musical scores...a symphony made up

ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads

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TOP: MICHAEL A. SMITH; SAN GIMIGNANO, TUSCANY; 1999. BOTTOM: MICHAEL A. SMITH; NEAR SAN QUIRICO D’ ORCIA, TUSCANY; 2000


CANY TUSCANY TUSCA

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ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads of subtle, nuanced tones, textures, flows, and rhythms carefully framed within the scenic panoramas.” In the spring of 1999 and 2000, and in the fall of 2001, Smith and Chamlee shipped their old Land Rover to Europe, configuring it to accommodate their large-format camera equipment and camping gear. They then drove to Italy where they traveled together, yet worked separately, while exploring the landscape and the small towns and villages of Tuscany—each recording their own deeply personal visual responses to a land they had come to love. “Wandering the back roads of Tuscany was always a pleasurable and rewarding adventure. We had no specific plans—except to take the next least traveled road and to discover what might lie ahead.”

—M. A. S mith & P. C hamlee

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PAULA CHAMLEE; MONTERIGGIONI, TUSCANY; 2000


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During their travels and adventures, Smith and Chamlee photographed from the quarries in the Carrara region in the north to the old Etruscan towns in the south, and from the Val di Chiana and Cortona in the east to the Island of Elba off the coast to the west. Their photographs, full of warmth and life, yet powerfully composed, are the culmination of those three extensive trips.

ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads

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TOP: MICHAEL A. SMITH; MELETO CASTELLO, TUSCANY; 2000. BOTTOM: MICHAEL A SMITH; MONTEPULCIANO, TUSCANY; 2000


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ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads “For months, we traveled throughout the countryside in Tuscany, meeting local people and experiencing local customs—and we could call it work!”

—M. A. S mith & P. C hamlee

Accompanying the series of works on display are two books: Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads, Volume I and Volume II. Chamlee’s 8x10, 5x7, and 4x5-inch contact prints are presented in Volume I. Volume II is a long-format book and contains Smith’s 8x20-inch photographs. Signed copies will be available at the Museum and a lecture and book signing will take place on April 12th. Michael A. Smith is an internationally acclaimed photographer. His photographs have been exhibited widely and are in the permanent collections of over 100 museums worldwide, including: the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, OnV

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PAULA CHAMLEE; EREMO DI SANTA CATARINA, ISOLA D’ELBA; 2000


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New York; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; and the Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto. Smith has received numerous grants and awards as well as commissions to photograph American cities. His first book, Landscapes 19751979, was awarded Le Grand Prix du Livre at the International Festival of Photography in Arles, France. His second book, Michael A. Smith: A

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TOP: MICHAEL A. SMITH; LORO CIUFFENNA, TUSCANY; 2001. BOTTOM: MICHAEL A. SMITH; CASTELFALFI, TUSCANY; 2001


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ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads Visual Journey was published in 1992, on the occasion of his twenty-five year retrospective exhibition at the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House. His third book, The Students of Deep Springs College, was published in 2000 and a book of his Chicago photographs, Chicago: Loop, was published in 2009. Paula Chamlee, an internationally celebrated photographer, has traveled extensively throughout the US, Canada, and Europe making her photographs. She has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards, and her photographs have been widely exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions. Her photographs are in over thirty museum collections, including those of the Library of Congress, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Harry Ransom Humanities Research OnV

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PAULA CHAMLEE; NEAR COLONNATA, TUSCANY; 1999


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ON VIEW D E S T I N AT I O N :

Tuscany: Wandering the Back Roads TUSCANY: WANDERING THE BACK ROADS, VOLUMES 1 AND 2

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“ In three different years we shipped our old Land Rover to Europe. When in Tuscany, it was the vehicle from which we worked and lived— there is a tent that unfolds on the roof.” —M. A. Smith & P. Chamlee

Center at the University of Texas (Austin), and in numerous private collections in the US and abroad. Her monographs include: Natural Connections: Photographs by Paula Chamlee (1994), High Plains Farm (1996), San Francisco: Twenty Corner Markets and One in the Middle of the Block (1997), and Chicago: Lake (2009). Published in 2004 is another book of her photographs from Tuscany, Madonnina. In addition to her still

photography, Chamlee made her first film, Flow, while in Iceland in 2006. She is currently working on several new series of films from Iceland. Michael and Paula live in the country, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. O n V iew

TOP: MICHAEL A. SMITH; PIOMBINO, TUSCANY; 2000. BOTTOM: PAULA CHAMLEE AND MICHAEL A. SMITH, PORTRAIT BY ACHIM CASPER

On View 04-05.2011  

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