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F E B R U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 2

Thread of Life:

NARRATIVE TEXTILES AT T H E M U S E U M O F F I N E A R T S , F S U , TA L L A H A S S E E

PLUS

Beyond

REALITY: Hyperrealism & American Culture AT T H E V E R O B E A C H M U S E U M O F A R T

AND

Mariko Kusumoto: UNFOLDING STORIES AT T H E

MORIKAMI MUSEUM A N D J A PA N E S E G A R D E N S , D E L R AY B E A C H


CONTENTS Fe b r u a r y/ M a rc h

2012

V o l . 2 , N o .6

ON THE COVER : LANNY BERGNER, FOREST HOLLOW (DETAIL), 2011, STAINLESS STEEL MESH, GLASS FRIT, WIRE, 33 x 15 x 10” RIGHT: LINDA PIGMAN FIFIELD, HILLS OF HOME SERIES, GLASS BEADS ON ARMATURE, 10 x 12” AND 3 x 4”

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F E B R U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 2

Thread of Life:

NARRATIVE TEXTILES AT T H E M U S E U M O F F I N E A R T S , F S U , TA L L A H A S S E E

PLUS

Beyond REALITY: Hyperrealism & American Culture AT T H E V E R O B E A C H M U S E U M O F A R T

AND

Mariko Kusumoto: UNFOLDING STORIES AT T H E

MORIKAMI MUSEUM A N D J A PA N E S E G A R D E N S , D E L R AY B E A C H

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THREAD OF LIFE: NARRATIVE TEXTILES

Weavers, painters, sculptors and needleworkers have created exciting narratives and statements, ecological landscapes and installations addressing such subjects as civil rights and imprisonment, the sweatshop, natural and man-made disasters, and the human narrative from birth to poetic elegy. Their efforts are the inspiration behind Thread of Life, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

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68 Lakeland

HYPERREALISM

SKETCHES & STEEL

BEYOND REALITY: AND AMERICAN CULTURE

Vero Beach Museum of Art is hosting an eye-popping display of American art closely associated with the concept of photo-realism as well as ultraillusionistic paintings and sculptures that add an expressive dimension to the understanding of realism.

78 Daytona Beach

ALBERT PALEY:

VINTAGE BLENDS

The blending of Polk Museum of Art’s contemporary voices exhibition of sketches with historical underand sculptures by pinnings is a distinAlbert Paley, provides a guishing feature of unique glimpse into the three new shows at thought processes of the Southeast Museum the renowned sculptor. of Photography.

96 Delray Beach

MARIKO KUSUMOTO: UNFOLDING STORIES

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens invites you to enter the enchanting world of Japanese metal sculptor, Mariko Kusumoto, to view her extraordinary and intricate metal sculptures and fantastical constructions.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): LINDA BACON, GRAB YOUR PARDNER, 2007, OIL ON LINEN, COURTESY OF BERNARDUCCI.MEISEL. GALLERY; ALBERT PALEY, EPOCH STEEL MODEL, COURTESY OF PALEY

On View Destination:

STUDIOS LTD. ; CURTIS WEHRFRITZ,

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2011 RIGHT: INSTALLATION VIEW; EDWARD TYLER NAHEM FINE ART, NEW YORK; COURTESY OF MCH SWISS EXHIBITION (BASEL) LTD.

SECRET HEART, COLLABORATION

114 On View presents highlights from the

10th edition of Art Basel Miami Beach—a four day art extravaganza which took place in December. In case you missed it, check this out... OnV

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WITH LISA MANN, DAGUERREOTYPE IMAGE, ©CURTIS WEHRFRITZ; MARIKO KUSUMOTO, BLOOMINGDALES (BOX EXTERIOR), NICKEL SILVER, STERLING SILVER, BRASS, COPPER, DECAL, DIAMOND, 2007, PHOTO: DEAN POWELL

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CONTENTS Fe b r u a r y/ M a rc h

2012

Vo l u m e

2,

No.6

5

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

Through the Brush: Artist, Patton Hunter, shares her inspirational journey.

In addition to striking works on paper, elaborate lithographs and amusing sculptures, Mark Licari also creates dramatic wall drawings that transform entire rooms.

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

Retrospective Profile

ROMARE BEARDEN

PHILLIP ESTLUND

PICTURED:

Phillip Estlund’s witty and disquieting images combine nature-made with man-made and are infused with beauty and playfulness.

Adventures in Interior Design 5, 2009, Collage on wood, 13.5 x 8.25”, Courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach

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Phillip Estlund

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At the age of 100, renowned artist and printmaker, Will Barnet, still possesses the continuous capacity for reinvention and new perspectives.

MARK LICARI

Museum exhibitions

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A master of collage, Romare Bearden’s thematic narratives reflect his native South, a source of inspiration throughout his career.


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Hearts & Flowers

M A G A Z I N E

I nspired by S t . V alentine ’ s D ay , we ’ d like to share a few events that are sure to delight the senses: The Florida Museum for Women Artists in DeLand is hosting a culinary arts workshop on February 11th, where participants will create enchanting edible valentines (http://bit.ly/apHylu). The Henry B. Plant Museum in Tampa is featuring a collection of antique valentines from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, on display February 1st-29th (http://bit.ly/b86S7J). On Valentine’s Day, savor the sultry sounds of jazz under the stars at the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables (http://bit.ly/ sIVjvu), or enjoy an evening of dining, music and a romantic moonlit stroll through the Butterfly Rainforest exhibit at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville (http://bit.ly/A7ehaj). Floral art springs to life with Ringling in Bloom at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, February 23rd-26th. View inspired floral creations by area designers, enjoy a presentation by celebrity floral designer, Remco van Vliet, and preview the Lilly Pulitzer Spring 2012 Collection (http://bit.ly/yDyhXj). Excitement is in bloom at Disney’s Epcot International Flower & Garden Festival, March 7th-May 20th, with fantasy topiaries, designer presentations and live music from the ’60s and ’70s during the Flower Power Concert Series (http://bit.ly/9uP1q). Enjoy!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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MUSE

Through the Brush

I

B Y PAT T O N H U N T E R

N 2011,

I was fortunate

to not only be named among the top 10 artists in America (over age 60) by Artist’s Magazine (March 2011), but was also included as one of 10 emerging artists to watch by Watercolor Magazine (December 2011). When I think of these and other awards I have achieved over 18 years of painting, I realize that they are the result of a concentrated effort to survive a very difficult period of time in my life. Several years after my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, I began to create a new life for us, one that would enable me to keep him at home with me as long as possible—I started to paint. And what I thought would


MUSE

Painting is my language, and I’m striving to become fluent. The journey is joyful!

become a hobby and an emotional release for the inevitable fears and frustrations of care-taking, became an obsession. Within a year of taking lessons, I began to teach at local art centers and later, taught at the University of Florida’s Lifelong Learning program. I continue to commit to ongoing classes as a student for the benefit of critique and the stimulation of working alongside other artists, which drives me to continuously explore. After my husband passed away, I moved into a loft in downtown St. Petersburg, FL. The diversity and energy of the city has been a great influence on my art

LEFT: the sweeper,
 acrylic on canvas, 30 x 40” BELOW : patton hunter images courtesy of the artist

career, casting a little of its bright light on my work. I am inspired by other artists and also by circumstances. In 2003, I crossed the Atlantic as first mate on a 43-ft. sailboat and cruised the coast of Europe, the British Isles and Ireland, for two years. I dreamed of the boat being my floating studio, but my painting efforts were stymied by wind and constant movement. Upon my return to Florida, I created my most successful figurative work, inspired by the photographs I had taken on my voyage. Each of my paintings, abstract or representational, is an emotional response that comes from the total of my life expe-

to view more works by patton hunter, visit her website at: www.pattonhunter.com

riences. Painting is my language and I am striving to become fluent. The journey is joyful! O n V iew OnV

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{S P E C I A L

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02-03.2012 BOCA RATON

ples of American art from the 19th to the late 20th centuries, featuring a virtual who’s who of American masters. 03.27-10.14.12

Thru 03.18.12

American Treasures: Masterworks from the Butler Institute of American Art Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

American Treasures includes a selection of significant exam-

Contemporary Glass: The 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement in America, this display showcases art glass representative of the full breadth of

this defining period in contemporary glassmaking and focuses on unique objects that explore ideas by leading glass artists such as Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Michael Glancy, Harvey Littleton, Concetta Mason, William Morris, Jay Musler, Toots Zynsky and others.

ents 48 arresting, large-format images that challenge the viewer to question topics such as selfrepresentation, celebrity and photographic honesty as well as the impressive explanatory power of

Thru 03.18.12

Martin Schoeller: Close Up Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

This exhibition pres-

portrait photography. (See story in the December 2011/January 2012 issue on pg. 56.)

1. Frank Weston Benson, Red and Gold, 1915, oil on canvas, 31 x 39”, courtesy of The Butler Institute of American Art 2. Martin Schoeller, Jackson, 2005, C-Print, ©Martin Schoeller, courtesy of the artist, Ace Gallery and August Agency

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Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

From the pensive gaze of Georgia O’Keeffe in profile, to the powerful punch of Mohammed Ali’s fist, this exhibi-

Painting and Printmaking Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Natura Morta (Still Life) features 18 color photographs by one of Italy’s most interesting and controversial photographers. Included are works from three portfolios: Attesa silente (Quiet Wait), Cenci (Rags) and In Carne ed Ossa (In Flesh and Blood).

To mark the 100th birthday of pioneering painter, printmaker and educator, Will Barnet (b. May 25, 1911), this exhibition of nearly 50 works explores the momentous evolution of Barnet’s art, from realism to abstraction, during one of the most distinguished careers in American art. (See tion presents more than story on pg. 108.) 50 images in all media, exploring the intimate, as well as very public, faces of artists, celebrities, politicians and everyday people.

Thru 05.13.12

03.27-05.20.12

Portraits from the Permanent Collection

Will Barnet at 100: Eight Decades of

Thru 03.18.12

Natura Morta: Photographs by Patrizia Zelano Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

CORAL GABLES 12.01.11-05.31.12

Will Ryman Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Sculptor, Will Ryman, has designed a series of larger-thanlife fiberglass and stainless steel flowers and insects for the Fairchild’s 2011-2012 art season. Viewers, young and young at heart, will enjoy Ryman’s organic and playful sculptures set amidst the Fairchild’s lush tropical gardens. (See On View

1. Patrizia Zelano, In Carne ed Ossa [In Flesh and Blood]#6 Caravaggio, 2008, archival digital print on dibond and plexiglass, 23.6 x 35.4”, courtesy of the artist 2. Andy Warhol, Muhammad Ali, 1979, silkscreen on Strathmore Bristol paper, edition no. 3/150, 4 panels, 40 x 30” each, Permanent Collection, gift of Dr. Richard Golden 3. Will Barnet, Midnight, 1983-1984, oil on canvas, 49 x 29”, Private Collection, Naples, FL 4. Rendering of Icon (with Petals) by Will Ryman, 2011, at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, ©WR Studio Inc./photo by Kirkland Hyman, courtesy Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

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Coral Gables continued...

Destination in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 108.)

veys the development of the Lowe’s Permanent Collection from its earliest history to the present day.

Thru 03.25.12

From the Vault: Building a Legacy, Sixty Years of Collecting at the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

This exhibition sur-

Thru 09.23.12

called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects of veneration and to seek favors, are on exhibit for the first time. Thru 04.22.12

Saintly Blessings from Mexico: The Joseph D. and Janet M. Shein Collection of Retablos Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Women, Windows and the Word: Diverging Perspectives on Islamic Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

The complex theme of Islamic art is examined in 3 intertwining themes: Muslim women as creators and subjects of art, Western views of the Islamic world, and decoration and the written word. (See story in the December 2011/January 2012 issue on pg. 88.) CORAL SPRINGS 02.11-04.21.12

All Aboard: An Artistic History of the Railroad— Photography of O. Winston Link Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Guest Curator, Dr. John Childrey, who has a passion for trains, history and

www.lowemuseum.org

Painted devotional images of saints,

1. Mary Van Cline, The Healing Passages of Time, 1988,
photosensitive glass, sandblasted glass, wood and paint, 51-3/4 x 38 x 18-1/4”,
gift of Myrna and Sheldon Palley, 2009,
©1988 Mary Van Cline 2. El Alma de Maria, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum 3. Aphrodite Désirée Navab, I Am Not a Persian Painting, 2000-2001, gelatin silver print, 18-5/8 x 14-7/8”, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Harold Steinbaum, ©2001 Aphrodite Désirée Navab

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writing, brings to light the historic photographs of O. Winston Link. Also featured are painting collections, train memorabilia and a fully operational small gauge train set. 02.24-04.21.12

Candy Childrey, Cesar Barroso, and Nester Guzman Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

This exhibition showcases images by Cesar Barroso, a native Brazilian with an extraordinary ability

to capture light and shadows, as demonstrated in his series of botanicals and skylines; photographs by Candy Childrey, whose favorite subjects are nature, birds and old broken down vehicles; and abstract of-a-kind exhibition of marble sculptures by 19th Century Impressionist art created by internationally known artists, Henri ToulouseLautrec, Mary Cassatt, Alphonse Mucha, Edgar Degas, Edouard Columbian born artManet, James Whistler, ist, Nester Guzman. Pierre-Auguste Renoir and other notable Thru 02.11.12 Impressionists. ToulouseLautrec and His 19th Century Mentors Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Coral Springs Museum of Art presents a one-

Collections Together with Illuminated Manuscripts: From the Collection of Ronald R. McCarty Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

The iconic visions of Russian and Greek saints, and the historic stories of the saints themselves, are beautifully and strikingly represented in Sacred Icons, depicting both miraculous

DAYTONA BEACH Thru 03.18.12

Sacred Icons: From the MOAS and Private

1. O. Winston Link, image courtesy of Coral Springs Museum of Art 2. Nester Guzman, image courtesy of Coral Springs Museum of Art 3. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Divan Japonais, 1893, lithograph, printed in color, 31-5/8 x 23-7/8� 4. Image courtesy of Museum of Arts & Sciences

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stories of the past and the rich heritage of both nations. In Illuminated Manuscripts, the art of embellishing hand-scribed books and manuscripts with colored, gold and silver margins and pictorial ornamental letters is exquisitely presented in a rare collection of text leaves, Biblical miniatures and Books of Hours.

English artist, George Morland, are featured in addition to bronze and marble portrait busts, delicate porcelains, daguerreotypes and the perfection of French and American framed miniature portraits. Thru 03.25.12

03.02-05.02.12

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Historic Portraits from the Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Oil paintings from the historic international scene by Eastman Johnson, Thomas Sully and the famed

Reflections I, which debuted at MOAS in 2009, Reflections II presents a broad, fullcolor survey of watercolors of Florida in a range of styles, including examples within Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Ashcan, Regionalism, Modernism and varieties of Abstraction.

Reflections II: Watercolors of Florida 18352000, From the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Arts & Sciences

A Tale of Two Cities: Eugene Atget’s Paris and Berenice Abbott’s New York Southeast Museum of Photography

www.moas.org

A stunningly beautiful follow-up to

www.smponline.org

More than an exhibition of architectural photography, this show examines the work of two artists who were inextricably linked to each other and to the development of modern photography. Thru 02.19.12

Douglas Kirkland Retrospective: Fifty Years of Photography Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Renowned for his work in photojournalism, celebrity portraiture and film photography, Douglas Kirkland’s retrospective is a compelling look into a career spanning

1. Laura Woodward, Royal Poinciana at Lake Worth, Florida, 1889 2. Eugene Atget, Untitled (Along the Seine), ca. 1921-1926, © Eugene Atget, courtesy of the Syracuse University Art Collection

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www.smponline.org

over 5 decades. With just under 200 images, this exhibition features portraits of celebrities alongside iconic stills taken on the sets of acclaimed films. (See story in the October/November 2011 issue on pg. 74.)

Work in the Fluidrive series spans over six years and is concerned with forms of lyrical and allegorical story-telling. Wehrfritz’s daguerreotype images are very much concerned 03.02-05.02.12 with an overt theatri- [hyphen]cality and an implied Americans:

Thru 04.22.12

SurfLand: Joni Sternbach Southeast Contemporary Museum of Tintype Portraits­ Photography by Keliy www.smponline.org Anderson-Staley Far from typical surfer Southeast action shots, the comMuseum of bination of historic Photography process and contemwww.smponline.org

Thru 04.22.12

Fluidrive: Modern Daguerreotypes by Curtis Wehrfritz Southeast Museum of Photography

each alludes to the hyphenated character of American identities—Irish-American, African-American, etc. (See Vintage Blends on pg. 78.)

narrative structure in the events, scenes and characters that are depicted. (See Vintage Blends on pg. 78.)

Featured in this survey are portraits of contemporary Americans, each one made as a unique and unreproducible tintype image using a technology and a technique from the middle of the 19th century, and

porary subject yields direct and timeless images of individuals standing on the verge of sea and land. The

1. Douglas Kirkland, Elizabeth Taylor, 1961, ©Douglas Kirkland 2. Curtis Wehrfritz, Poe Raven Heart (detail), daguerreotype, ©Curtis Wehrfritz 3. Keliy Anderson-Staley, Helen, 2009, ©Keliy Anderson-Staley 4. Joni Sternbach, Wayne & Brandon, Santa Barbara, CA, 2008, ferrotype on aluminum, ©Joni Sternbach

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resulting images catalogue a highly diverse and eclectic tribe of mariners that has long fascinated the photographer. (See Vintage Blends on pg. 78.) D e LAND 02.11-04.01.12

White Mountain Women (1840-1940)

This exhibit features an assortment of works by women artists associated with the Hudson River School, who stepped out into the vast, rustic landscape to conquer and appreciate the wonders of nature while steadfastly securing their place in history among the prodigious artists of the White Mountains.

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

crafted sculptural vignettes, comprising a mélange of objects, present a wide range of whimsical, often surrealist, scenes reminiscent of various places and times, from Victorian-era Boston to 1950s Tokyo. (See story DELRAY BEACH on pg. 96.) 02.07-05.06.12

Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor womenartists.org

Mariko Kusumoto: Unfolding Stories Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Mariko Kusumoto’s meticulous, hand-

02.07-05.06.12

Old Techniques, New Interpretations: Japanese Prints from the 1950s to the 21st Century, from the Collection of Paul and Christine Meehan

Featured in this exhibition are more than 60 prints that celebrate over 40 years of sosaku hanga masters from Kiyoshi Saitō (1907–1997) to Toko

Shinoda (b. 1913), among many others. DUNEDIN Thru 02.05.12

The Miniature Art Society of Florida 

 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

1. Josephine Bradstreet, image courtesy of Florida Museum for Women Artists 2. Mariko Kusumoto, Self-Entertainment Kit (interior detail), 2009, nickel silver, brass, copper, sterling silver, resin, decal, found objects, photo: Dean Powell 3. Image courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

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Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

GAINESVILLE Thru 06.03.12

A Singular Vision: Recent Gifts from the Freundlich Collection Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

The 37th Annual International Miniature Art Society Exhibition returns featuring another stunning array of works by the finest calligraphers, painters and sculptors working worldwide in miniature today.

Featuring tapestries and paintings by some of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, this highly-acclaimed exhibition includes paintings by Sandro Botticelli, Parmigianino, Alessandro Allori, Luca Giordano and Lorenzo Monaco,

www.harn.ufl.edu

Primordial: Paintings and Sculpture by Isabel De Obaldía, 1985–2011 Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 04.08.12

Offering of the Angels: Old Master Paintings and Tapestries from the Uffizi Gallery

Thru 05.27.12

selected by Antonio Natali, director of Florence’s famous Uffizi Gallery.

Demons, gods, ghosts and beasts are the subjects of this midcareer retrospective of the work of Panamanian-based artist, Isabel De Obaldía, who explores the art of ancient cultures.

Among the highlights of this exhibit are nu-

merous drawings from artists’ sketchbooks that relate to larger finished works such as paintings, sculpture, prints or mural projects. Artists represented include Milton Avery, George Bellows, Childe Hassam,

1. Lynn Ponto-Peterson, The Nutmeg Lantern, watercolor, 3 x 3” 2. Alessandro Di Mariano Filipepi (called Sandro Botticelli), Madonna with Child (Madonna della loggia), ca. 1466-1467, oil on panel, collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy 3. Isabel De Obaldía, Blue Idol (Idolo azul), 2008, sand cast glass, 17 x 8 x 5”, Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art, NY 4. Kenneth Hayes Miller, Leaving the Shop, n.d., lithograph from the collection of Dr. August and L. Tommie Freundlich

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Leon Kroll, Gaston Lachaise and Marguerite Zorach.

generous donors and academic interests.

02.11-11.04.12

Thru 05.27.12

David A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing Harn Museum of Art

Sebastião Salgado: World Witness Harn Museum of Art

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.harn.ufl.edu

Opening 03.31.12

The inaugural exhibi- Considered one of tion of the new David the most highly recognized photojournalists in the world, Salgado focuses on people who are politically, economically and culturally excluded from the promise of global development. In this exhibition, Salgado documents famine in A. Cofrin Asian Art Africa and manual laWing will showcase bor around the world. the Harn Museum’s Asian art collection 02.07-04.29.12 and honor 20 years Vanishing of collecting history Points: Paint made possible by and Paintings

from the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Vanishing Points reflects and imagines a world transformed by contemporary science, technology and media. In the exhibition, 24 artists mirror and assimilate the strategies of technology and the media. In doing so, they embrace multiple perspectives and challenge the limits of paint and painting, as applied to canvas, sculpture and found objects.

Verdant Earth and Teeming Seas: The Natural World in Ancient American Art Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highlights the Museum’s

collection of ceramic figures and vessels, stone sculptures and jade ornaments from Ancient America— primarily Mesoamerica, Central America and the Andes.

1.Ooka Umpo, Japanese, 1765–1849, With Crane on Blossoming-plum Stream, 1844, hanging scroll, ink and color on silk, 6’ x 18-5/8”, Museum Purchase, funds provided by donors in memory of Dr. David A. Cofrin 2. Carla Klein, Untitled (detail), 2005, oil on canvas, courtesy of the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection, Miami, FL 3. Moche people
, Stirrup-Sprout Bottle of Crab God with Fanged Feline Mouth
, early intermediate period, Moche III phase, 200–300, 
burnished red-slipped ceramic, 
Museum Collection, University Gallery purchase

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Moira Holohan’s practice focuses on experimentation through layering of several media—assemblage, video animation and collage. Presented in this exhibition are animated video works inspired by the four classic elements of

HOLLYWOOD 02.11-03.11.12

Christina Pettersson: The Sentinel Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Christina Pettersson’s drawings examine the self not as one lives it, but as one’s imagination creates it. The Sentinel focuses on Florida as a tropical locale that is almost always remaking itself through what she calls “the alluring mystery of faraway places.”

02.11-03.11.12

John DeFaro: Trawler Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

“Trawler” is the name given to a boat or vessel used for trawling. John DeFaro’s site specific installation combines activism and environmental concerns with visual art as a communicator. 03.24-05.27.12

Moira Holohan Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

nature—earth, air, water and fire.

is Phillip Estlund’s first solo exhibition in Broward County. The contemporary visual artist is presenting sculptures and twodimensional collages that inhabit the psychological and physical terrain left behind by man-made and natural disasters. (See story on pg. 106.) JACKSONVILLE

03.24-05.27.12

Phillip Estlund: Subprime/ Subtropics Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Subprime-Subtropics

02.03-04.01.12

Joe Forkan: Paintings from the Lebowski Cycle Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

1. Christina Pettersson, The Sentinel, 2011, graphite on paper 2. John DeFaro, image courtesy of Art and Culture Center of Hollywood 3. Moira Holohan, Untitled (Water) [still], 2011, video, 2 minutes 4. Phillip Estlund, Orange Crush (detail), 2007, collage on wood, courtesy of Gavlak Gallery

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

Known for his unconventional and large sculptures, this Los Angeles-based artist creates interactive constructions made of www.mocajacksonville.org plexiglass, plywood Drawn to the symbol- and wall polish, simulism and attention the taneously playful and Coen brothers brought to the film The Big Lebowski, Forkan has attempted to translate that very energy into The Lebowski Cycle, a series of paintings replete with art historiand drawings explorcal references. ing layered narratives, using masterpieces 03.24-07.08.12 of western art and the Project Atrium: Coen Brothers’ film as Mark Licari a point of departure. Museum of

installation include Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso and Roy Lichtenstein. ings, created on-site in the 7 days leading up to the exhibition opening. (See story on pg. 110.) Thru 04.08.12

ReFocus: Art of the ’60s Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

Thru 08.09.12

Beyond Ukiyo-e: Japanese Woodblock Prints and their influence on Western Art The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.mocajacksonville.org presents a collecThis is the first of a tion of 19th century 3-part series examin- Japanese woodblock ing contemporary art prints that showcases in the 1960s,’70s, many aspects of this Contemporary uniquely expressive art Thru 03.11.12 Art, Jacksonville form and provides a Project Atrium: www.mocajacksonville.org wide-ranging view of Gustavo Godoy For his show at MOCA, the styles and themes Museum of Jacksonville, Mark encompassed by this Contemporary Licari will tansform vibrant genre, each in Art, Jacksonville the gallery space with and ’80s. Featured its own way illumiwww.mocajacksonville.org his dramatic wall draw- artists for the ’60s nates an understanding 1. Joe Forkan, Supper at Emmaus (After Caravaggio) [detail], 2006-2010, oil on linen, 96 x 38” 2. Gustavo Godoy, Fast-formal Object: Big Blue, 2010, mixed media construction, 18 x 32 x 19’ 3. Mark Licari , Motorcycle with Roses, 2008, ink, watercolor and colored pencil on paper, 42 x 64” 4. Roy Lichtenstein, Crak!–Now, Mes Petits…Pour La France!, 1963, collage

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

exhibition illustrate the emergence of Impressionism in 1870s France, its evolution to Post-Impressionism and its later influence on American artists.

02.16-05.06.12

Impressionism and Post Impressionism from the High Museum of Art The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Thru 02.26.12

www.polkmuseumofart.org

& Gardens

Richard Chamberlain: The Year of the Sheep The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

www.cummer.org

The Cummer unveils new acquisitions made through gifts and purchases in honor of the Museum’s 50th Anniversary.

LAKELAND

Günter Wirth Polk Museum of Art

Thru 07.08.12

Impressionism and of 19th century JapaPost Impressionism nese culture. from the High Museum of Art showcases Thru 08.15.12 almost 50 paintings, 50 Forward: drawings and prints New Additions by such renowned to the Permanent artists as Claude Collection Monet, Camille PisThe Cummer sarro, Pierre-Auguste Museum of Art Renoir, Mary Cassatt

of the Sheep illustrates the power art has to transform and heal.

Chamberlain’s images explore the conflicts between good and evil, light and dark, and the seen and the unseen, and John Singer Sarin vivid yet abstracted gent. The works in this compositions. The Year

Günter Wirth is a German artist who has dedicated his artistic career to the exploration of geo-

metric forms, primarily rectangles and circles. Thru 03.24.12

Hunt Slonem: An Expressive Nature

1. Artist Unknown (Japanese), Untitled, 19th century, woodblock print, 8-7/8 x 10-7/8”, purchased with funds from the Cornelia Morse Carithers Endowment Fund 2. Claude Monet, Houses of Parliament in the Fog, 1903, oil on canvas, 32 x 36-3/8”, purchase with Great Painting Fund in honor of Sarah Belle Broadnax Hansell, courtesy of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta 3. Richard Chamberlain, Year of the Sheep #19, 1989, enamel and oil on canvas, ©Richard Chamberlin 4. Günter Wirth, Berlin Wall I, Collage No. 523 (9/10), 1995, screenprint with collage, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Günter Wirth

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Lakeland continued...

acquisitions, including photographs by Ansel Adams, André Kertesz and Alfred Eisenstaedt, a sculpture by William Kidd, a seascape by Richard Currier and a small Rembrandt etching

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

As a youth in Hawaii, Slonem developed an early affinity for nature, especially the various species of tropical birds living on the island. These natural forms ultimately became the subjects for his art. Thru 03.24.12

Recent Acquisitions
 Polk Museum of Art

Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

almost lost sense of gravity as unfurled and animate forms construct massive works of art. (See story on pg. 68.) MAITLAND

donated by William and Norma Roth. 03.31-06.23.12

Albert Paley: Sketches & Steel 
 Polk Museum of Art

Thru 02.26.12

Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Imagined and exaggerated portrayals of the Americas are presented through maps, etchings, engravings and lithographs from the 17th through 19th centuries, depicting tales of mysterious, lost paradises and fantastic creatures from evolving primitive worlds. 02.03-04.15.12

EMERGE! Molly Chism Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Albert Paley’s use of steel can be described www.polkmuseumofart.org as industrial poetry. This exhibition show- His large sculptures cases some of the combine an apparMuseum’s newer ent heaviness with an

An accomplished emerging painter, Chism has exhibited her dreamlike, atmospheric paintings across Florida.

1. Hunt Slonem, Lories, 2011, oil on canvas, 60 x 70” 2. William Kidd, Still Life with Red Poppies, 2011, clay with low-fire glaze 3. Albert Paley, Splayed Bench, 1992, forged and fabricated steel with mahogany, PMoA Permanent Collection 4. J. Trentsensky (After Jacques le Moyne de Morgues), Floridaners of 1500, ca.1825 (le Moyne original ca.1564), lithograph on paper, on loan from the Museum of Arts and Sciences, gift of Kenneth Worcester Dow and Mary Mohan Dow

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all three artists work within made and found forms, conceiving possibilities that allow for reworking, acknowledged errors, purpose and process.

Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Based in landscape, the work is a formal tour-de-force, evoking new realities. MELBOURNE Thru 03.18.12

Many artists have been drawn to things dark and fantastic, but few have probed the human condition with the insight and truthfulness found in these images, which include Castellon’s lithographs for Edgar Allen Poe’s The Masque of the Red Death and Goya’s etchings from Los Disparates (or The Proverbs). MIAMI 02.24-04.01.12

Fear and Folly: The Visionary Prints of Francisco Goya and Federico Castellon

Mapping Time and Space ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Curated by Lauren Wagner, Mapping Time and Space fea-

Thru 03.04.12

tures works by Nick Vaughan and Jake Margolin, Carrie Sieh, Amanda Serrano, Lucinda Linderman, Regina Jestrow, and Rosa Naday Garmendia

Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Erwin Wurm: Beauty Business made its debut during Art Basel Miami Beach 2011. Thru 02.19.12 Wurm combines varPotential Amend- ious art forms into a ments: Jenny unique personal view Brillhart, Vincent of the everyday world. Hemphill and Drawing on history, Moira Holohan humor and philosophy, ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

This show is based in structure, form and mark-making—

1. Molly Chism, The Dead Meat of Convention, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48” 2. Federico Castellon, Stop Him and Strip Him I Say, 1968, lithograph/collection of the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Director’s Fund Purchase. Fear and Folly was organized by Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, MI 3. Nick Vaughan and Jake Margolin, Double Self Portrait: Pennsylvania (detail), 2010 4. Erwin Wurm, Little Big Earth House, 2003/2005,
silverplated bronze, 7-7/8 x 13-3/8 x 9-7/8”, courtesy of the artist; Xavier Hufkens, Brussels; Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg and Paris; and Lehmann Maupin, NY

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he creates light-hearted artworks with, at times, serious messages. (See story in the December 2011/January 2012 issue on pg. 102.) Thru 02.12.12

Portrait of a Young Man: Laurent Grasso Bass Museum of Art

tions that become reflections on the past, from a contemporary viewpoint. Thru 02.26.12

Dana Schutz: If the Face Had Wheels Miami Art Museum

Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Bringing together artists from around the world who have Thru 03.18.12 worked with records Focus Gallery: as their subject or Marcel Duchamp medium, this groundMiami Art breaking exhibition Museum examines the record’s www.miamiartmuseum.org

This is a rare opportuwww.bassmuseum.org nity for audiences to Grasso juxtaposexperience the seminal es historical works French artist’s work from the Permanent firsthand. Among the Collection with his works presented is own series of paintwww.miamiartmuseum.org MAM’s edition of De ings, sculptures, vid- Schutz combines fan- ou par Marcel Ducheos and neons to form tasy and reality, and amp ou Rrose Sélavy unexpected connechumor and horror, (Boîte-en-valise) [From to create figurative or by Marcel Duchamp paintings that abound or Rrose Sélavy with expressionist en- (Box in a Suitcase)]. ergy and a distinctive visual style character- 03.18-06.10.12 ized by vibrant color The Record: and raw and tactile Contemporary brushwork. Art and Vinyl

transformative power, from the 1960s to the present, through sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography, video and performance. Thru 02.29.12

Mangrove Coast: Photographs of a Native Son by Barry Fellman

1. Laurent Grasso, 1610 (detail), 2011, neon tubes, transformer, ed. of 5 & 2 A.P., courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery, NY 2. Dana Schutz, Swimming, Smoking, Crying, 2009, oil on canvas, collection Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS, gift of Marti & Tony Oppenheimer & the Oppenheimer Brothers Foundation, courtesy of the artist & Zach Feuer, NY 3. De ou par Marcel Duchamp our Rrose Sélavy (Boîte-en-valise), Series D, 1941/1961, ed. 1/30, collection Miami Art Museum, Museum Purchase with funds from Lang Baumgarten & Mimi Floback & Sally Ashton Story in memory of Jon Ashton, photo: Sid Hoeltzell, ©2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris / Succession Marcel Duchamp 4. Jeroen Diepenmaat,
Pour des dents d’un blanc éclatant et saines, 2005,
record players, vinyl records, stuffed birds, sound, courtesy of the artist

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Miami Science Museum www.miamisci.org

Fellman’s photographs reflect the South Florida coastline’s mangrove ecosystem and its beauty, rhythms and patterns. Images of hundreds of species, nurturing a wide range of marine life, amphibians, birds and mammals are highlighted.

to receive a solo show at MOCA, North Miami in March 1996. He has since achieved major international recognition and has become an important role model for Miami artists. (See story in the October/

Mark Handforth: Rolling Stop Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Mark Handforth was the first Miami artist

conceptual work, in which the spectator is a participant as well as part of the work itself. Thru 02.19.12

Thru 04.01.12

Annette Turrillo: A Thought for the Planet The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Color on Color The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

November 2011 issue on pg. 104.) 03.15-05.06.12

Thru 02.19.12

and the changes in her work that occurred through her immersion into Western culture.

A Thought for the Planet seeks to unite us through one of the simplest and most personal means: thought. Turrillo’s goal is to create an interactive,

Rita Ackermann Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Color on Color presents works by different artists in which the use of color is not used as a representation, but as the essence of the artwork.

www.mocanomi.org

This survey exhibition examines the artist’s paintings throughout her career

Thru 04.01.12

Maria Thereza Negreiros: Offerings

1.Image courtesy of Barry Fellman and Miami Science Museum 2. Mark Handforth,
Rolling Stop, 2008,
aluminum, vinyl and acrylic,
96 x 96”, courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise 3. Annette Turrillo, Verano (Summer) [detail], 2011, 77 x 38”, oil on canvas, courtesy of Ninoska Huerta Gallery 4. Karina Peisjovich, Color Making Machine (Eight-Movement Suite), 2010, light projection, installation view at Theories at Recoleta Cultural Center, courtesy of MACBA

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The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Inspired by Brazil’s tropical rainforest, Negreiros works with rich colors, deep foliage and mysterious habitats filled with birds, animals and strange vegetation. Her personal experiences bring nature to life on monumental canvases handled with extraordinary virtuosity. Thru 03.18.12

Qin Feng: West Wind East Water

Qin Feng continually researches and experiments with new approaches to contemporary ink painting, resulting in works that speak the language of

diverse cultures within a personal symbolic lexicon. Even with oil painting, acrylic painting and Western mixed media techniques, he uses Eastern elements to show off the expression of ink painting.

03.07-0701.12

The War We Have Not Seen by Juan Manuel Echavarría The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The 24 paintings included in this exhibition were created by men and women who participated in Colombia’s war. All 35 participants were rank and file soldiers who spent two years painting their personal experiences, illustrating the rural tragedy. Thru 03.18.12

Tour de France/ Florida: Contemporary Artists from France in Florida’s Private Collections

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

This exhibition features paintings by French artists Christian Boltanski, Sophie Calle, Annette Messager and Bernar Venet—many of which have never

before been presented to the public. Thru 03.26.12

Liberty, Equality and Fraternity: French Design for Living

1. Maria Thereza Negreiros, Jungle Fires, Offering, Module VII, 1995, oil on canvas, 71 x 71” 2. Qin Feng, Desire.Landscape, 2011, 24-3/4 x 9-3/4”, acrylic on silk and cotton paper, courtesy of the artist 3. Christian Boltanski, Untitled (Reserve), 1989, clothes, black and white photographs and lights, 111 x 64 x 7”, ©Christian Boltanski / ADAGP, Paris, courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection

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The evolution of Studio Glass is traced in this delightful exhibition, which includes a wide assortment of exquisite work from www.wolfsonian.org Naples Art the leading AmeriWitness how artists Association at can glass artists of manifested in their work The von Liebig the past half century, the most profound and Art Center including Marvin Liwww.wolfsonian.org mundane aspects of www.naplesart.org pofsky, Dale Chihuly This exhibition exAmerican life through Simpson is an “imag- and many others. (See amines the changing this display of Ameri- inist” who has worked story in the December political, economic can paintings, sculpin nearly every mediand cultural contexts in um, including woodwhich French design working, painting, is created and dissemiprintmaking, clay, nated. Objects on diswoodcarving, bookplay include furniture, making, jewelry— industrial design and and even prose. (See craft created by some story in the December of the most celebrated tures and prints from 2011/January 2012 2011/January 2012 French designers of the the 1920s to the ’40s. issue on pg. 106.) issue on pg. 44.) past and present. The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

Thru 08.2012

Manifest and Mundane: Scenes of Modern America from

the Wolfsonian Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

NAPLES Thru 02.27.12

Tommy Simpson: Hand, Heart, Home

Thru 04.01.12

03.01-05.20.12

Evolution/ Revolution Naples Museum of Art

Juan Genovés: A Retrospective Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

www.thephil.org

1. Martin Szekely, chaise lounge, Pi, 1984, Galerie Néotù, Paris (producer), steel, aluminum paint, leather, foam, Centre national des arts plastiques, France, ©Martin Szekely/CNAP/photo: Jean Tholance/Les Arts décoratifs, Paris 2. Torvalt Arnt Hoyer, Barn, 1938, produced for Federal Art Project, Works Progress Administration, Illinois, oil on board, The Wolfsonian–FIU, Miami Beach, Florida, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection, photo: Silvia Ros 3. Tommy Simpson, Bonhomie, 2010, mixed woods bench, 26 x 39 x 15”, photo: Brad Stanton 4. Leah Wingfield, Chance Meeting = Love, 2010, cast glass, 17 x 17.5 x 4”,
courtesy of Habatat Galleries, MI

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

One of Spain’s bestknown contemporary artists, Juan Genovés is celebrated for his provocative expressionist paintings, which explore issues of social and political realism.

An exciting new selection of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection are on display, representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century.

more intimate wood sculptures.

scores of pictures not seen in decades.

02.12-04.07.12

Thru 03.25.12

Memories of World War II:
 Photos From the Archives of the Associated Press Naples Museum of Art

Manolo Valdés Naples Museum of Art

Thru 05.20.12

www.thephil.org

Thru 06.30.12

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Louise Nevelson Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This insightful exhibition features a remarkable variety of works from throughout Nevelson’s prolific career, ranging from massive wall pieces to

This compelling presentation includes a spectrum of AP photographs from all theaters of World War II and the home front, ranging from familiar scenes of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor to Joe Rosenthal’s classic Iwo Jima flag-raising in 1945 to

www.thephil.org

Featured in this stunning retrospective is a variety of paintings and sculpture that demonstrate the range and singular talent of internationally renowned Spanish master, Manolo Valdés. Thru 06.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters

1. Juan Genovés, Anudado, 2011, acrylic on canvas on board, ©Juan Genovés,
courtesy Marlborough Gallery, NY 2. Arthur B. Davies, Facades, oil on canvas, 23 x 28”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, Museum Purchase 3. Louise Nevelson, Mirror-Shadow VII, 1985, wood painted black, 9’ 9” x 11’ 7” x 1’ 9”,
photo: G.R. Christmas/courtesy The Pace Gallery 4. Victor Jorgensen, US Navy/AP Archives, Sailor and Nurse Kiss, Times Square (New York City), August 14, 1945,
black and white photograph, 20 x 16”, courtesy of the Associated Press 5. Manolo Valdés, Retrato de una Dama con Collar, 2009, mixed media on canvas, 76.8 x 70.9”, ©Manolo Valdés, courtesy Marlborough Gallery, NY

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico are reflected in this new installation, which includes works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Miguel Covarrubias and José Clement Orozco. Thru 04.15.12

Prendergast to Pollock

Featured in this survey are key works from some of the most important artists of the first half of the 20th century, including Maurice Prendergast, Mark Rothko, Arthur Dove, Ashile Gorky, Jackson Pollock and more.

Collection, including new and recent acquisitions and art never before displayed in the Museum. Thru 06.30.12

www.thephil.org

Throughout the season, the Museum will feature rotating exhibitions of selections from the Permanent

NEW SMYRNA BEACH 02.11-06.16.12

The Art of Doris Leeper Atlantic Center for the Arts

Thru 06.30.12

Selections from The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art Permanent Collection Naples Museum of Art

is a treasure trove of intimate-sized works from some of the giants of 20th century art. This delightful exhibition recreates the environment of Hirshhorn’s art-packed home in Washington, known as “The Mouse House.”

www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

This retrospective surThe Mouse House: vey includes paintings Works from the and three-dimensional Olga Hirshhorn works by artist, enviCollection ronmentalist, visionNaples Museum ary and founder of the of Art Atlantic Center for www.thephil.org the Arts, Doris Leeper The Mouse House (1936-2001).

1. Pedro Friedeberg, Cualquier Lado Por Arriba (Any Side Up), 1975, acrylic on board mounted on wood, 29 x 29”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of Harry Pollak, ©Pedro Friedeberg 2. Jackson Pollock, No. 34, 1949, enamel on paper mounted on masonite, 22 x 30”,
Edward W. Root Bequest, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art, Utica, NY, 
photo: Williamstown Art Conservation Laboratory,
©2011 Pollock-Krasner Foundation /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Alfred Eisenstaedt, Premiere at La Scala, Milan (detail), gelatin silver print, 25-1/2 x 21”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, bequest of Herbert & Ruth Abramson 4. Installation view of The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection exhibition

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and Sandro— The Fantastic to the Sublime Appleton Museum of Art

OCALA

Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Topographies is the largest retrospective of work by artist, Barbara Sorensen, who is known for her large-scale installations. Her sculptures serve as references to geological forms and the conceptual notion of the vessel. (See

Enjoy a rare opportuwww.appletonmuseum.org nity to peek inside the Included in this exhibit are more than 30 recent works, including landscapes, still lifes and portraits by Cuban Thru 03.11.12 artists, Vicente Hercreative genius behind For the Love nandez, Sandro de the theme-park enterof the Sea: tainment experience. Watercolors of Discover how imagiPhilip Steel nary worlds of unique Appleton characters, objects, Museum of Art and environments www.appletonmuseum.org start with the art and Steel’s paintings redesign revealed in this flect a lifelong love la Rosa and Miguel exhibition of detailed of the sea and the Florido. drawings, architectural story in the December people whose lives plans, set designs, 2011/January 2012 are affected by it. props and costumes. issue on pg. 68.) ORLANDO

02.11-04.01.12

Thru 04.29.12

Thru 04.01.12

Thru 02.12.12

Three from Cuba: The Art of Vicente, Miguel

The Serious Art of Make-Believe

Barbara Sorensen: Topographies

Wendy Babcox: Landscape Interrupted

1. Philip Steel, Light In A Storm 2. Painting by Sandro de la Rosa, image courtesy of the Appleton Museum of Art 3. Terra Queen’s bike from the 2005 Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Orlando Resort 4. Barbara Sorensen, Shield de Pyrenees W4-07, 33 x 30 x 4”, stoneware & stones, 2007

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Museum of American Art

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens

www.mennellomuseum.com

Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

The photographs in this exhibition come from an investigation of form and color in the landscape. These works identify the strange and exquisite forms that emerge from the human desire to shape and control one’s surroundings.

This exhibit features paintings portraying women in many varied settings—in the garden, at repose, lighting Chinese lanterns and attending an outdoor musical concert. Works by George Bellows, John White Alexander

Thru 03.18.12

Style & Grace: Masterworks of American Art from the Collection of Michael A. and Marilyn L. Mennello The Mennello

and Milton Avery are on display.

www.ormondartmuseum.org

The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

One of the most important African American artists of the 20th century, William H. Johnson produced a body of work that focused on biblical themes, Harlem’s energy and his Southern roots. ORMOND BEACH

Thru 03.18.12

William H. Johnson: An American Modern

Thru 03.11.12

Speed 2012

The Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens presents an exhibition of motorsports and racing fine art, featuring images and rarely seen items from

International Speedway Corporation and NASCAR. Over 25 private collectors, painters, sculptors and photographers are represented, including works by Colin Carter, Alain Lévesque, Dan McCrary and Doc Pike.

1. Wendy Babcox, Untitled Tent, Long, 2011, archival ink jet print, 19-3/4 x 15-3/4”, collection of the artist 2. Lila Cabot Perry, The Japanese Children, ca. 1900, oil on canvas, from the collection of Michael Mennello 3. William H. Johnson, Aunt Alice, 1944, oil on compressed cardboard, courtesy Morgan State University 4. Victory Last Time Out (detail), oil on canvas, 4 x 3’

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PALM BEACH

PENSACOLA

Thru 04.22.12

Thru 02.11.12

A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

Woven and Wrapped: Kimonos, Clothing and Culture from Early 20th Century Japan Pensacola Museum of Art

www.flaglermuseum.us

A New Light on Tiffany features more than 50 Tiffany lamps, windows, mosaics, enamels and ceramics designed by Clara Driscoll as well as numerous objects made under her direction by the “Tiffany Girls.”

02.04-04.15.12

Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch The Society of the Four Arts

BEACH 02.24-04.07.12

Clyde Butcher: Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

www.fourarts.org

This exciting exhibit features the only existing photograph of Billy the Kid, as well as stagecoaches, paintings and sculptures. Clothing, guns and photographs illustrate social concepts that shaped the era, such as the power of the brothel and the attitudes that led to Native American displacement.

PONTE VEDRA

www.pensacola museumofart.org

A wide sampling of kimonos explores the history, styles and symbolism of the traditional Japanese garment.

In the tradition of Ansel Adams’ iconic large-format blackand-white photographs of Yosemite and Yellowstone, Clyde Butcher composes his works at pristine and untarnished locations across the Big Cypress Swamp, creating arresting compositions

1. Wisteria lamp, designed by Clara Driscoll, ca. 1901, 18-1/2” diam., New-York Historical Society, gift of Dr. Egon Neustadt 2. Photograph of Billy the Kid, from the collection of William I. Koch, photo: Kyle Bajakian 3. Red Uchikake (bridal) kimono for a young bride, Blair-Murrah 4. Clyde Butcher, Gaskin Bay 5, 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108”, collection of the artist

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P o n t e Ve d r a B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

that distinctly mark him as the foremost landscape photographer of natural Florida. SARASOTA 02.17-06.03.12

the greatest and most influential artists of all time—the Flemish Baroque master, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). ST. PETERSBURG Thru 04.29.12

www.fine-arts.org

Mummy cases and sacred works, tomb and

logical exploration and worldwide fascination with the rediscovered ancient culture. TALLAHASSEE 02.10-03.25.12

New Gifts from the Archives of Judy Chicago Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

Thru 04.10.12

Ancient Egypt— Art and Magic: Treasures from the Fondation Gandur pour l’Art Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

temple reliefs, papyrus fragments, alabaster vessels and rare objects comprised of precious stones make this one of the most dramatic shows ever presented at the MFA.

www.mofa.fsu.edu

Forever in a Moment: 19th Century Photographs of Egypt Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

In early 2011, Judy Chicago gifted to the Museum works from her Birth Project, which includes a series of 84 needlework

www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition presents photographs of Egypt created during the 19th century, a period of great archaeo-

www.ringling.org

Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master showcases the work of one of

pieces addressing the subject of birth from various viewpoints—

1. Peter Paul Rubens, image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 2. Lid from an Anthropoid Sarcophagus (detail),
wood, gessoed and painted,
Dynasty XXI-XXII, 1080-720 BC,
image ©Sandra Pointet 3. Antonio Beato, Travelers at the Great Pyramids (detail), ca.1870,
albumen print,
gift of Dr. Robert L. and Chitranee Drapkin from The Ludmila Dandrew and Chitranee Drapkin Collection 4. Judy Chicago, Birth Pattern #3, 1981, ink on paper, 11.5 x 20.5”, collection of Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts, photo: Jon Nalon

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C A L E N D A R

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Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

the historical, the mythological, the symbolic, the spiritual, the real, the painful and the joyous. 02.10-03.25.12

Thread of Life Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

tives and statements, ecological landscapes and installations that address such topics as civil rights, natural and man-made disasters, and human narrative from birth to poetic elegy. (See story on pg. 42.)

terpretations of the natural world.

Thru 05.06.12

Don Zanfagna: Cyborgs

TAMPA

02.10-03.25.12

Thru 02.11.12

Turkomen Jewelry from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

Bud Lee’s America Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Spanning a career that began in 1965, Lee’s

www.mofa.fsu.edu www.mofa.fsu.edu

Thread of Life is characterized by mixed media, new materials, digital images from jacquard looms and inventive applications of fabric. Artists have created exciting narra-

images of celebrities, war, landscapes and Americana have appeared in Life, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, Rolling Stone, New York Times and Vogue.

Exceptional silver and gilt ornaments from the Turkomen tribes of Iran, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan reflect the Turkomen aesthetic and relate to their mythological in-

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Artist, architect and designer, Don Zanfagna’s lifework both defies established categories and challenges rote notions of the role of the artist in society. The thrust of his Cyborg series is to awaken viewers to the possible

1. Lanny Bergner, Beneath the Waves 2, 2011, stainless steel mesh, wire, 27 x 18 x 8” 2. Western Yomud Tribe, Articulated Headpiece with Pendants (Ildirgic), 1880-1920, silver, gold, carnelian, Wilberding Collection of Turkomen Tribal Jewelry 3. Bud Lee, Clint Eastwood 4. Don ZanFagna, Cyborg Notes 56

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

dangers that might lurk in our futures if we allow computers to become too close.

Southern Recollections Tampa Museum of Art

www.ira.usf.edu

www.tampamuseum.org Thru 05.06.12

John Cage 33 1/3— Performed by Audience Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

In celebration of Cage’s centennial, this exhibition honors and reinterprets the artist’s original audience participation work entitled “score.” Museum visitors are invited to act as DJs and create a musical mix by playing records and “performing” the work.

This exhibition spans the career of Romare Bearden (1911-1988), regarded as one of the most important African-American artists who worked in the US during the 20th century. Bearden’s mastery of collage as well as his development of narrative and thematic explorations of his native South are highlighted. (See story on pg. 112.)

Thru 03.18.12

William Pachner: Works from the 1960s Tampa Museum of Art

For decades, Mark Dion has created drawings, prints, cabinets of curiosity, archaeological digs and sprawling installations about the discrepancy between perceived knowledge and scientific inquiry. Mark

www.tampamuseum.org

The Museum celebrates the abstract works of artist, teacher and visionary, William Pachner, a major force in the development of the Tampa Bay region’s art scene.

Dion: Troubleshooting is a focused survey of his ecologicallythemed works.

Thru 03.03.12

Mark Dion: Troubleshooting University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Thru 05.06.12

Romare Bearden:

TARPON SPRINGS Thru 02.19.12

Telling Stories

1. Romare Bearden, Carolina Morning, 1974, mixed media collage on board, 30 x 22”, in memory of Elaine Lebenbom and Dr. Miriam Mansour 2. Wiliam Pachner, The Sacrifice, 1962 3. Mark Dion, The South Florida Wildlife Rescue Unit: The Uniforms, 2006, two mannequins, clothing, custom patches, assorted gear, dimensions variable, Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Lin Lougheed

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C A L E N D A R

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Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

nized artist whose paintings and prints often contain complex metaphors drawn from Western art history, as well as traditional Japanese art.

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

Celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art, this survey of works recognizes the contributions of major donors and the building of the Collection in various media.

02.05-05.13.12

Beyond Reality: Hyperrealism and American Culture Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Beyond Reality presents American art that is closely associated with the concept of photo-realism as well as ultra-illusionistic paintings and

WEST PALM BEACH 02.01-02.26.12

02.18-06.03.12

sculpture. (See story on pg. 56.)

Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings Vero Beach Museum of Art

02.18-06.03.12

VERO BEACH

colored glass, creating a stunning display of light and shadow.

Cycle of Change: Tom Nakashima’s Treepile Paintings Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Tom Nakashima is a nationally recog-

André Masson (1896-1987) Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

French painter, André. Masson’s versatile oeuvre includes his famous sand pictures, illustrations of books and stage designs. He is also considered the inspiration behind Abstract Expressionism.

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Stephen Knapp’s Lightpaintings seem to emerge out of deep space, with varied hues of light passing through a series of irregular panels of

03.01-04.01.12

The Art of Edwina Sandys: A Retrospective Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

1. Davis Cone, Thompson, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 55 x 39”, courtesy of Monica and Richard Segal 2. Tom Nakashima, Westwood Road Nocturne, 2006, magazine collage and chalkline on canvas, 9 x 14’, collection of the artist 3. Stephen Knapp, Inner Vision, 2011, light, glass and stainless steel, 13’ x 12’ x 10”, collection of the artist

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

This English artist’s appeal lies in her diverse subject matter and clearly recognizable style, using positive and negative images to powerful effect.

comes from organic, natural matter. His sculptures serve as a play between light fluid shapes and the seemingly insurmountable weight of metal.

has been installed in the center of the Museum’s European galleries, displayed in the context of Old Master works—the inspiration for the installation. (See story in the December 2011/January 2012 issue on pg. 55.)

Thru 05.27.12

Thru 03.11.12

Cocktail Culture Norton Museum of Art

www.armoryart.org

The inspiration for Mehler’s artwork

Thru 03.04.12

Jenny Saville Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This selective exhibition of canvases www.norton.org and drawings, datDecorative arts, photog- ing from 1999-2011, raphy, fashionable brings Saville’s cocktail attire and mature work together accessories by major for the first time. designers are included in this first-of-its-kind, Thru 05.27.12 exhibition, which exStudio Glass:

Thru 04.06.12

Curved: Herbert Mehler Sculptures Armory Art Center

plores the social ritual of drinking and entertainment through the lens of fashion and design. (See story in the December 2011/ January 2012 issue on pg. 78.)

Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation Norton Museum of Art

Works from the Museum Collection Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

For this exhibit, the Museum commissioned Lipman to create a large-scale glass construction which

www.norton.org

1. Edwina Sandys, courtesy of Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens 2. Herbert Mehler, WV718 & 765 (2006, 2010) 3. Beth Lipman, One and Others 4. Larry Salk, Summer Cocktail Party with English Butler, 1961,
watercolor, gouache, ink on paper,
gift of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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C A L E N D A R

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We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

separated from conventional photographic practice, Tacita Dean’s photo-based works are nonetheDramatic works by less dependent upon Dale Chihuly, Wilthe found and often liam Morris and Toots authorless image. Zynsky, are featured alongside other outThru 03.25.12 standing examples of The Corning contemporary studio Museum of glass. (See story in Glass Hot Glass the December 2011/ Roadshow January 2012 issue Norton on pg. 44.) Museum of Art

Workshop (1736-1796)
 Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Objects in various me-

cfam.rollins.edu

dia, including painting, Enjoy live demonstra- jade, ceramic, glass tions of hot glassand metalwork, are on making techniques, display—all created workshops and glassfor the greatest art colblowing performances lector in 18th century by the world’s preChina, the Qianlong miere mobile “hotshop.” Emperor. www.norton.org

02.03-05.06.12

Tacita Dean Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Spare, sublime, and

Thru 02.19.12

The Emperor’s Orders: Designs from the Qianlong Imperial

Artists from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

WINTER PARK Thru 05.13.12

A Room of One’s Own: Women

This exhibition features paintings by Grandma Moses and Jennie Augusta Brownscombe; prints by Georgia O’Keeffe, Faith Ringgold and Nancy Graves; and three-dimensional work by Anna H. Huntington and Jennifer Bartlett. Thru 05.13.12

British & Modern: Art by the Bloomsbury Group and Their Contemporaries Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

1. Dale Chihuly, Green Macchia with Lemon Yellow Lip Wrap, 1994,
blown glass, 23 x 38”,
purchase acquired through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Adler, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rand Araskog, Mrs. Nanette Ross, Mrs. Frances Scaife, and
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sterling 2. Tacita Dean, Fernweh (detail), 2008, gravure in 8 parts on Somerset White Satin 400g, 39-1/2 x 46-1/2” each, 90-1/2 x 98-1/2” framed, ©Tacita Dean, courtesy of the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, NY/Paris and Frith Street Gallery, London 3. Portrait of the Imperial Guard Uksiltu/Keshiki Batu Luwuke Shier (detail), the 29th of 100 portraits of Meritorious Officers participating in the East-Turkestan campaign (1755-1759),
ink on silk, Qianglong seal, dated 1760 with honorific calligraphy in Manchu and Chinese by Liu Tong xun (1700-1773), 60 x 38”,
Private Collection

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C A L E N D A R

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

DC-based artist, Charles Ritchie, explores the limits of vision in his intimate images of dusk, twilight and night.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This culminating research project by Ana Engels, CFAM’s Thru 04.08.12 2011-12 Fred Hicks Likewise, as Fellow, features Paintings and drawings technical experts, works by the popular by Vanessa Bell, Dun- but not (at all) contemporary artist. can Grant, and others by way of culture/ working in the UK in an installation Thru 04.15.12 the early 20th century, by Leigh-Ann are on display. Pahapill Thru 05.13.12

Dust and Shade: Drawings by Charles Ritchie Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

This site-specific exhibit by Canadian artist, Leigh-Ann Pahapill, explores how language and thought influence our experiences of objects and space.

Sam Gilliam: Contingencies

Opening 02.14.12

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru 05.13.12

as well as ancient African, Asian and Egyptian harps are presented, along with an interactive, hands-on installation and live musical performances.

Artful Strings –  Four Centuries of Harp Making The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

American, European

A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850–1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stained-glass firm Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle-Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. On View

1. Vanessa Bell, Portrait of Mary St. John Hutchinson, 1915, oil on canvas, 31 x 21-3/4”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum 2. Charles Ritchie, House: 5 February 2011, 10:30 am, 2011, watercolor and graphite on Fabriano paper sheet/image: 4 x 6”, frame: 12 x 14” 3. Image courtesy of The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, photo: Douglas Nesbitt

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MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts www.dlfinearts.com

Artist: DANIEL GONZALEZ

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

GONZALEZ CREATES

sewn banner-paintings, embroidered and filled with sequins. They carry within them echoes of the street’s humors: they get angry, they protest, they declare their ideas without the fear of exposing their feelings. They are advertising flags for intimate moments made of thoughts and emotions.

NAPLES

Gallery: Gardner Colby Gallery www.gardnercolbygallery.com

Artist: Kevin Sloan

“AT THE CORE OF MY WORK IS A DEEP CONCERN AND

respect for our planet and especially its “silent inhabitants”—the animals and plants we share this world with,” says Sloan. “Through allegory and symbolism, I attempt to express this concern and also remind viewers of the wonders of this extraordinary world.” Kevin Sloan’s one man show will be on view at Gardner Colby Gallery February 9th-20th. From left: Daniel Gonzalez, Happiness Before Civilization - Bird, 2009, hand sewn sequins on canvas, 24 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts; Kevin Sloan, The Rare Flower, acrylic, 30 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Gardner Colby Gallery

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{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Pavo Real Gallery www.pavoreal.com

Artist: Tim Cotterill

TIM “FROGMAN” COTTERILL’S

beautifully crafted bronze frogs depict a childlike playfulness with their bright patinas and humorous per- B O C A R A T O N sonalities. These highly coveted sculptures are sold in more than 200 gal- Gallery: leries throughout the world. Join the artist for a special appearance at Elaine Baker Pavo Real Gallery at Town Center in Boca Raton on Feb. 10th and 11th to Gallery celebrate the 17th anniversary of the gallery showcasing his work. www.elainebakergallery.com Artist: JUN KANEKO MIAMI AN EXHIBITION OF

Gallery: Bernice Steinbaum Gallery

works by Jun Kaneko opens February 9th at Elaine Baker Gallery. Best known for his large-scale ceramic sculptures and installations, Kaneko creates imaginative pieces that reflect his strong command of form and color, and a longstanding interest in optics and perception.

www.bernicesteinbaumgallery.com

Artist: Enrique Gomez de Molina

AESTHETIC BRILLIANCE IS inter-

twined with sobering undertones of environmental and ethical issues in This Is Not Taxidermy, an exhibit of fantastical creatures by sculptor, Enrique Gomez de Molina, on view through February 29th at the Bernice Steinbaum Gallery.

Clockwise from top left: Tim Cotterill, Penny, copper patina, 2.75 x 3 x 2.5”, courtesy of the artist and Pavo Real Gallery; Jun Kaneko, Untitled, 2011, ceramic, 100 x 48 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; Enrique Gomez de Molina, Taxidermy Hybrids 7, courtesy of the artist and Bernice Steinbaum Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

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MIAMI

Gallery: Charest-Weinberg charestweinberg.com

Artist: FERNANDO MASTRANGELO
 CHAREST-WEINBERG

presents Black Sculpture, on view through February 29th, featuring the work of Fernando Mastrangelo, who is renowned for his exploration and creation of narratives inspired by politics, human rights, ancient history, philosophy and the environment.

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries www.artfusiongallery.com

Artist: David Harry

ART FUSION GALLERIES IS HOSTING ODYSSEY 2012,

its premiere exhibition of the new year. On display are the creations of a select group of forty emerging to mid-career contemporary international artists whose works reflect a vibrant, distinctive and provocative energy. Eclectic and diverse, this presentation is guaranteed to appeal to a wide array of contemporary art lovers. The exhibit will be on view through March 19th. From left: Fernando Mastrangelo, Untitled, 2009, black and white sugar, 24 x 18”, courtesy of the artist and Charest-Weinberg; David Harry, Out of the Blue, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 20”, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries

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JACKSONVILLE BEACH

BOCA RATON

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary

www.jjohnsongallery.com

www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

Artist: Carlos Betancourt

MIAMI PHOTOGRAPHER,

Carlos Betancourt, assembles explosive compositions consisting of thousands of photographs of objects, people, flowers and other elements that occupy the glitzy realm of beauty for which he is known. His newest works are on view in a solo exhibition, February 10th-April 6th, at J. Johnson Gallery. SARASOTA

Gallery: Dabbert Gallery www.dabbertgallery.com

Artist: James Griffin

Artist: BRENDA HOPE ZAPPITELL “I OBSERVE EVERYTHING

in my life in great detail and am heavily influenced by nature, in particular the sky. My mark-making, though serendipitous, reflects these influences. I want the viewer to believe that my vision expands beyond the work itself to a universe I have created.”

DABBERT GALLERY PRE-

sents Luminous Color, A Journey, on view February 3rd-27th, featuring the work of James Griffin. Griffin’s love of color and design is evident in his paintings, along with vigorous brushwork that reveals his excitement with paint in all its textural glory.

Clockwise from top: Carlos Betancourt, Re-Collections XVI, 2011, print on fine art paper, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery; Brenda Hope Zappitell, Serendipitous Moment I, 2010, acrylic with cold wax on birch panel, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; James Griffin, Mysterious Transformation, 72 x 54”, oil on canvas, courtesy of the artist and Dabbert Gallery

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Judith Content, Cenote Turquesa (detail), 2011, silk, photo: James Dewrance Fiber artist, Judith Content, utilizes a contemporary interpretation of the Japanese dye technique, Arashi Shibori. Her hand-dyed, quilted silk wall pieces often depict elaborate landscapes that are inspired by the mystery and majesty of the Pacific coastline.

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A R R A T I V E

T E X T I L E S

F I N E A R T S , Florida State University, Tallahass e e

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Right: Miriam Schapiro, Grandma Bolero, 1980, fabric and mixed media collage, 16 x 20”, courtesy of Flomenhaft Gallery, New York A leader in two art movements: the “Feminist Art Movement” and “Pattern and Decoration,” Miriam Schapiro transforms such commonplace elements as lace, fabric scraps, buttons, rickrack, sequins, and tea towels into sophisticated compositions she calls “Femmages,” that speak to women’s experiences.

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Thread of Life

IN THE LATTER HALF OF THE 20 t h CENTURY,

a powerful movement revolved around the pioneer artists of the ’60s and ’70s who re-claimed media that had been historically

sidelined. Artists such as Judy Chicago, Miriam Schapiro and Faith Ringgold, among others, brought everything that textile

arts signified into the political consciousness of the contemporary art world. Their efforts are the inspiration behind the

Museum of Fine Arts’ 2012 Spring exhibition, Thread of Life. “I once worked with an art historian who believed an idea

could rise or fall on its title,” said A. Palladino-Craig, Director

of the Museum of Fine Arts. “That has always seemed like truth

to me, and so Thread of Life, which implies a linear universal as well as the medium of the exhibition, went through a number

of revisions before our basic premise was distilled down to the belief that a familiar, unassuming medium can be a triumph of

individual expression, and that the variation in expression can be as endlessly variable as the artists themselves.”

Weavers, painters, sculptors and needleworkers have cre-

ated exciting narratives and statements, ecological landscapes

and installations addressing such subjects as civil rights and

Above: Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach #2 (detail), 1990-92,

imprisonment, the sweatshop, natural and man-made disasters,

silkscreen on silk/24, 66 x 65”,

their work, we can draw threads of metaphor and allusion, con-

“Faith Ringgold’s

and the human narrative from birth to poetic elegy. Through

nection, historical precedent and future potential in any direction we choose.

The sampling of works presented on the following pages

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courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York

unforgettable Tar Beach speaks to children’s rite of passage through life’s challenges. It celebrates the freedom to soar.” —Viki D. Thompson Wylder, Co-Curator, “Thread of Life”

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Thread of Life

“Historical narrative associated with to listeners in a way that s Audiences like stories and there is more 46

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Pictured: Stephanie Liner, Momentos of a Doomed Construct, 2009, upholstery, fabric, foam, plywood, live models, dimensions vary Stephanie Liner’s works are volumes and spaces energized by pattern and tint to make reference to the human form, sometimes clothing a mannequin shape, sometimes incorporating live models.

h an artifact brings home significance simple text can never do. e than one story told in this exhibition.” —A. Palladino-Craig, Director, Museum of Fine Arts


Thread of Life

Above (top to bottom): Susan Etcoff Fraerman, Bound For Glory I, 1998, 9 x 6.5 x 3”; medium: fiber; technique: off loom bead weaving, right angle weave, applied beads Bound For Glory II, 1999, 9.5 x 5 x 3”; medium: fiber; technique: off loom bead weaving, right angle weave, applied beads

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The Blues (paired with form altered for deformity), 2001, 9 x 14 x 4�; medium: fiber; technique: off loom bead weaving, right angle weave, applied beads Photography by Tom Van Eynde

Susan Etcoff Fraerman creates delicately beaded shoes, a metaphor for the life of the wearers. In some of her sculptures, the shoes represent lotos-blossom slippers, those intricately decorated small artifacts that hid such unbelievable torment (from the late 10th century until 1911, when foot-binding was outlawed in China) in the service of an ideal of feminine beauty. This oppression, for Fraerman, is ironically echoed in the haute couture heels of contemporary dress.

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Thread of Life

Linda Pigman Fifield, Kentucky Wild Flower, 2006, glass beads on armature, 3 x 3.25� Working with micro-components, Linda Pigman Fifield invokes the beaded objects of Native American needlework on vessel-shaped armatures to depict a clear vibrant imagery.

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Thread of Life

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Lanny Bergner, Forest Hollow, 2011, and detail, stainless steel mesh, glass frit, wire, 33 x 15 x 10” Unique statement demands unique imagery: Lanny Bergner’s “thread” is the fiber of screen mesh re-invented in shapes of nature (cocoons, sea creatures, conifers), precise and organic at the same time.


Thread of Life

Laura Breitman, Autumn Burst, 2011, and detail, fabric collage, 42 x 39” Laura Breitman’s astounding collages are brilliant land- and cityscapes that use fabric in the same way that the computer screen uses pixels. At a distance they replicate the scenery the artist has selected, but up close they are fitted like mosaics to build the hues and values of recognizable shape.

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beyond

H Y P E R R E A L I S M On view

02.05-05.13.12

A N D

at the V E R O B E A C H

Cheryl Kelly, Blue Delahaye, 2011, oil on aluminum panel, 16 x 48�, courtesy of Bernarducci.Meisel.Gallery


reality :

A M E R I C A N MUSEUM OF ART

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Beyond Reality

Marc Sijan, Lady in Black, 2009, polyester with oil paint, clothing and accessories, lifesize, collection of the artist

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“Beauty, like truth, is relative to the time when one lives and to the individual who can grasp it.” ­

—G u s tav e C o u r b e t

BEYOND REALITY, AT THE

Vero Beach Museum of Art,

presents a fascinating selection of American art closely associated with the concept of photo-

realism as well as ultra-illusionistic paintings and sculptures

that add an expressive dimen-

sion to the understanding of realism. The show demonstrates

connections between contemporary American hyperrealism and

20th-century material culture in John De Andrea, Tara, 2002, polychromed bronze, 4-1/2 x 13-1/2 x 28”, courtesy of Monica and Rick Segal


Beyond Reality light of French realist painter Gustave Courbet’s concept that “Beauty, like truth, is relative to the time when one lives and to the individual who can grasp it.” Pieces of art on loan from nationallyrecognized artists as well as museums and major private collections include works by Richard Estes, Duane Hanson and Robert Bechtle, among others. “There’s a wow factor to the work in this exhibition, but there’s also much more to these works of art than meets the eye. They tell us a lot about the material culture of America—what we take for granted, and what we value,” says Jay Williams, curator of the show. As an art movement, hyperrealism has spanned a broad

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Above: Richard Estes, Union Square, Looking North, 1993, acrylic on board, 9 x 16-1/4” Left: Rackstraw Downes, 69th Street and Broadway, 1977, oil on canvas, 15-3/4 x 34” Images courtesy of Monica and Rick Segal

range of subject matter, materials and stylistic variations. The term “hyperrealism” was first coined by art dealer, Ivan Karp, and some of his contemporaries, around 1970. The term appeals to many contemporary art historians because it comprises all styles of highly OnV

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detailed realism, including works of art in three dimensions, as in the sculptures of Duane Hanson, John De Andrea and Marc Sijan. Nearly all hyperrealist painters have used photographs for reference, but some, including Richard Estes and Robert F

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Beyond Reality

Below: Susan Sykes, Red Café no. 2, 2010, oil on canvas, 24 x 36”, courtesy Bernarducci.Meisel.Gallery

Bechtle, seem to retain more of the look of a photograph in their work, while others, like John Baeder and Davis Cone, subtly manipulate or exaggerate what was present in their reference photos. Highlights from the exhibition include paintings such as Richard Estes’ Union Square Looking Northeast (1993), which have generally been

termed “photorealist.” In truth, very few cameras and no human eye can perceive visual reality as it is portrayed in Estes’ paintings, which appear to be in sharp focus throughout. The human eye and most photographs selectively focus on only a portion of the visual field, leaving other areas out of focus or distorted. Moreover, human beings rarely divorce


Right: Davis Cone, Lane/Wintry Morning, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 14-1/2 x 21-3/4”, courtesy of Monica and Rick Segal

“ There’s a wow factor to the work in this exhibition, but there’s also much more to these works of art than meets the eye.” — Curator, Jay Williams their emotions or psychological preferences from the act of seeing. People always seem to notice details that appeal to them for one reason or another—a fact that many painters use to their advantage. Some ultra-illusionistic paintings and sculpture add a subtly expressive dimension to the viewer’s understanding of OnV

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realism by appealing to their subjective associations. None of the painters represented in the show seem to have been satisfied with simply reproducing photographic images. Even the hyperrealist sculptors in the exhibition who capture the three-dimensional appearance Continued on pg. 66 e b r u a ry

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Beyond Reality

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Linda Bacon, Grab Your Pardner, 2007, oil on linen, 49 x 84�, courtesy of Bernarducci.Meisel.Gallery


Beyond Reality of the human form have never been interested in having their work seen only as beautifully crafted reproductions of reality. Their works of art are often subjective as well, even though this content operates on an unconscious level. Marc Sijan’s superrealistic sculptures are homages to humanity’s fascination with its own forms. “The process of exploring the human figure is deeply emotional,” says Sijan. His work celebrates the individual, and in discovering version after version of the human figure, he notes, “there is always something of oneself lying just under the surface.” What is it about contemporary life that makes these works of art so appealing? And with visual reality all around us, why do we find these super-real distillations of experience so fascinating? Beyond Reality does not offer definitive answers, but it does make us want to return to these paintings and sculptures again and again to ponder the relationship of this genre of art to our society’s values and ideals. O n V iew

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John Baeder, Pullman, 1974, oil on canvas, 60 x 72�, courtesy of the Sydney and Walda Bestoff Collection


ALBERT Sketches

03. 31 - 0 6. 23.12 at POLK MUSEUM OF


T&PALEY Steel

F ART, Lakeland •

w w w. p o l k m u s e u m o f a r t . o r g

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Sketches & Steel Previous pages: The Sentinel (detail), 2003, formed and fabricated steel, stainless steel, bronze, 73’ x 30’ diam., Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, courtesy of Paley Studios Ltd. Right: Splayed Bench, 1992, forged and fabricated steel with mahogany, PMoA Permanent Collection

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A

Text by Sandra Dimsdale Horan

ALBERT PALEY’S COLOSSAL

sculptures appear at once hefty

and gravity defying, as if steel shapes were tossed skyward with

abandon to form these massive

structures. And so it is somewhat surprising to learn that before

starting each sculpture, he completes a number of sketches and

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cardboard models. Sketches & Steel, a new exhibition at Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland, focuses on both sides of Paley’s creative process: the plan and the sculpture. “Having the opportunity to see an artist’s creative process is so rare, and yet it provides valuable insight into an artist’s intention and an artwork’s

Sketches & Steel

artist for more than 30 years at his studio, Paley Studios, Ltd., in Rochester, NY. Art patrons and publications have called him “the sculptor’s equivalent of Jackson Pollock” because the diversity of his work defies categorization. His techniques include both hand-forging and the use of hydraulic presses. Whether

“Having the opportunity to see an artist’s creative process is so rare, and yet it provides valuable insight into an artist’s intention and an artwork’s vitality.” —Adam Justice, Curator of Art, PMoA vitality,” said Adam Justice, Curator of Art at PMoA. “To see a creative mind at work also reforms our opinions of not only that artist’s work, but of the medium in general. By organizing an exhibition of sketches and steel sculptures by the renowned Albert Paley, we will allow our audiences a unique glimpse into the thought processes of one of the most important sculptors working today.” Paley has been active as an

he is building a free-standing sculpture or an ornamental gate, his work is often praised for the way it is integrated into the architecture and the location. Commissioned by both public institutions and private corporations, Paley has completed more than 60 sitespecific works, including the Portal Gates for the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC; a sculpture and plaza OnV

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Tribute to Volunteerism, 2004, installation view, Lake Mirror in downtown Lakeland, FL, formed and fabricated steel and polychrome, 12’ x 9’2” x 41’, City of Lakeland (See artist’s sketch and model on pg. 77.)

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Sketches & Steel


designed for Adobe Systems in San Jose, CA; a plaza sculpture for AT&T in Atlanta, GA; and the main entrance gates for the Naples Museum of Art. He also created Tribute to Volunteerism, which sits at Lake Mirror in Lakeland, FL—just a few blocks from Polk Museum of Art. For the Sketches & Steel exhibition, Paley’s initial sketches will be on view alongside the small scale models or maquettes he produced to create his large scale, site-specific pieces. By understanding Paley’s process, viewers will gain a new perspective on his constructed steel creations. Paley’s use of steel has been likened to industrial poetry. He was the first metal sculptor to receive the American Institute of Architects’ coveted Lifetime Achievement Award, the AIA’s highest award to a non-architect. The AIA’s announcement called him the “nation’s most important artist working in metal today.” AIA Gold Medalist Kevin Roche, FAIA, who has incorporated Paley’s sculptures into his buildings, said of Paley: “He is an outstanding sculptor, designer and craftsman,

and has created a very substantial body of work which cannot only stand alone as art but, at the same time, adds substantially to the architectural environment in which it is included. In this regard, he has no equal today.” Paley earned both his BFA OnV

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Above and opposite: Portal sketch and the artist with Portal sculpture, Vancouver Sculpture Biennale 2005-2007, forged and fabricated steel, courtesy of Paley Studios Ltd.

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Sketches & Steel

Paley’s initial sketches will be o maquettes he produced to creat Above:

Epoch sketch and steel model, courtesy of Paley Studios Ltd. Epoch sculpture is installed near the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

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and MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Rochester in 1989, the State University of New York at Brockport in 1996, and St.

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Lawrence University in Canton, NY, in 1997. Paley holds the Charlotte Fredericks Mowris Endowed Chair at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He has been widely published and lectures frequently.


n view alongside the small scale models or te his large scale, site-specific pieces. Works by Albert Paley can be found in the permanent collections of many major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and the Victoria

and Albert Museum in London. Polk Museum of Art’s Collection includes Paley’s Splayed Bench (shown on pg. 70), a piece of forged and fabricated steel and mahogany that sits in the Museum’s lobby. O n V iew OnV

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Above: Tribute to Volunteerism sketch and steel model, courtesy of Paley Studios Ltd. Tribute to Volunteerism sculpture is installed at Lake Mirror in downtown Lakeland, FL

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Vintag

B

The blending of contemporary voices with historical underpinnings is a distinguishing feature of three new shows at the Southeast Museum


CURRENT & UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS...

ge Blends SURFLAND:

FLUIDRIVE:

[HYPHEN]-AMERICANS:

Joni Sternbach

MODERN DAGUERREOTYPES

CONTEMPORARY TINTYPE PORTRAITS

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Curtis Wehrfritz

Keliy Anderson-Staley

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Page 92

of Photography in Daytona Beach... OnV

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C Vintage Blends

Curtis Wehrfritz, Secret Heart, collaboration with Lisa Mann, daguerreotype image, ©Curtis Wehrfritz

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CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHERS

are using the daguerreotype and tintype processes, along with other out-dated production methods, to move the hands-on aspect of photography back from the brink of disappearance, towards a more personalized experience. Both spontaneous and unpredictable, these processes produce a distinctive appearance that echoes important traditions of 19th century anthropological photography, while also providing the “gift of chance.” The raw nature of these methods is evident in the characteristic flaws that emerge in the final prints—each unique marking helps to tell the story of the image capturing process as much as the subject portrayed, allowing an intimacy with the medium that’s unavailable with digital photography. For those that embrace this unpredictability, the world is transformed in exciting and unexpected ways. The Southeast Museum of Photography presents the work of Joni Sternbach, Curtis Wehrfritz and Keliy Anderson-Staley, three contemporary artists who possess a passion for the beauty, mystery and evocative qualities of these early processes, and have shared in the revitalization of an important era in photographic history.

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Exhibition

SurfLand: JONI STERNBACH On view through April 22nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g LANDSCAPES, SEASCAPES,

and the human imprint on these views, have engaged Joni Sternbach over the last decade. Her vintage process has lured surfers to pose for her camera and has resulted in what the photographer calls “part performance, part laboratory.” Captured directly on the shoreline, Sternbach’s images possess the immediate quality of a singular print, created then-and-there, as she captures portraits of surfers in tintype, a 19th century technique little changed since its invenContinued on pg. 87

Kazzie, The Pass, OZ, 2011, ferrotype on aluminum print, 10 x 8”, © Joni Sternbach, courtesy of the artist


Vintage Blends

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Vintage Blends: SURFLAND

SurfLand presents a unique synthesis of subject matter and photographic technique. Using the instantaneous wetplate collodion process, Sternbach creates one-of-a-kind tintypes that are imbued with a feeling of ambiguity, timelessness and mystery. 84

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Steve, Santa Barbara, CA, 2009 (detail), ferrotype on aluminum print, 10 x 8�, ŠJoni Sternbach, courtesy of the artist


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Vintage Blends: SURFLAND

tion and first used during the American Civil War. The procedure is labor intensive, with chemistry mixed and applied to metal plates just seconds before each exposure, meaning that the chemicals must be hand-applied, exposed and developed before the plate dries. The exposure time is also very long, requiring stillness on behalf of the subject, for many seconds. The large camera appears to slow down time, so that her subjects possess a distilled and timeless grace and beauty that seems so far removed from the energy, movement and animation we commonly associate with the surfing life. Far from typical surfer action shots, the combination of historic process and contemporary subject yields direct and timeless images of individuals standing on the verge of sea and land. The resulting images catalogue a highly diverse and eclectic tribe of mariners that has long fascinated the photographer.

Wayne & Brandon, Santa Barbara, CA, 2008, ferrotype on aluminum print, 10 x 8�, ŠJoni Sternbach, courtesy of the artist


Exhibition

Fluidrive: Modern Daguerreotypes CURTIS WEHRFRITZ On view through April 22nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g CURTIS WEHRFRITZ’S

work in the Fluidrive series spans over six years and is concerned with forms of lyrical and allegorical story-telling. Wehrfritz’s daguerreotype images are very much concerned with an overt theatricality and an implied narrative structure in the events, scenes and characters that are depicted. “Fluidrive is focused on the use of ritual,” says Wehrfritz. “I am interested in a lyric image that can be revisited by As Above So Below - Phillip, daguerreotype image, ©Curtis Wehrfritz


Vintage Blends

“The modern daguerreotype plays on the history of the photograph and has the power to re-engage the audience in a dialogue about images. The use of vernacular, lyric and theater has been strangely absent in fine art photography in recent years and I think they never stopped being relevant.”

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Vintage Blends: FLUIDRIVE

the viewer in the way one revisits the feelings created in a song or prose. The daguerreotype is kind of a reliquary that you can hold in your hands and use like a prayer box. The fact that these “mirrors” last forever and have the ability to render subjects almost as a hologram puts us in a discussion with our own memories.” Wehrfritz is a photographer, film maker and cinematographer based in Toronto, Canada. His education, experience and career have been principally in the world of video and cinema with a number of awards, accomplishments and major achievements to his credit, including a Canadian JUNO award (the equivalent of a Grammy) for his video work with Leonard Cohen. In recent years, Wehrfritz has moved his career into visual art, live performance and theatrical art and installations. The daguerreotype work started as a form of unique documentation for these performances. His interest in the historical form of daguerreotypes was initiated

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during a three-year apprenticeship with Mike Robinson, a Toronto native who is world-renowned for his expertise in the field. The process dates to the earliest form of photography and is named after one of its two inventors. Pure silver-clad plates are hand polished and buffed until they are almost flawless mirrors. Light sensitive halogens are created by exposing the silver plates in fuming boxes of Bromine and Iodine. These plates are then exposed in the camera and developed in the fumes of heated Mercury. “My photo-based work seeks to create touchstones to an inner story,” says the artist. “Through this, I have become fascinated by the idea that image-making mimics the mechanics of the eyes. In 170 years, the use of optics and their records have become the modern backbone of our recorded perception. The development of early daguerreotypes, moving pictures and finally, digital recordings, have formed a strange concoction of pulleys and levers that continue to mimic the methods of perception of the human brain.” As Above So Below - Andrea, daguerreotype image, ©Curtis Wehrfritz


Exhibition

[hyphen]Americans: Contemporary Tintype Portraits KELIY ANDERSONSTALEY On view March 2nd through May 2nd at the Southeast Museum of Photography w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g THE PORTRAITS IN THIS

exhibition are of contemporary Americans, but each one is made as a unique and unreproducible tintype image. These subjects appear as if they have been transported from an earlier and more serious time, when the making of an image was a slow, difficult and rare event. The long exposures necessary to make these collodion images create a very different kind of photographic event to the spontaneous “snapshot”

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Vintage Blends aesthetic to which we have become so accustomed. With faces that emerge from the dark and resonant space of the frame, these subjects present themselves to us in a way that is both unfamiliar and riveting. So many of these portraits show each sitter with a deliberate gravity and with such remarkable clarity that the reflective metal image draws us more deeply into the sitter’s space and time than we are prepared for. Each image in this project presents a face and is titled with a first name. The title of the project alludes to the hyphenated character of American identities (Irish-American, African-American, etc.), while only emphasizing the shared American identity. Although the heritage of each individual might be inferred from assumptions we make about features and costumes, the viewer is encouraged to suspend the kind of thinking that would traditionally assist in decoding these images in the context of American identity politics. Tia, tintype, ŠKeliy Anderson-Staley, courtesy of the artist


Vintage Blends:

[HYPHEN]-AMERICANS “Like the photographers of the 1850s, I use hand-poured chemistry that I mix according to original recipes, period brass lenses and wooden view cameras to expose positive images directly onto blackened aluminum and glass. The individuals I photograph look contemporary, but there is also something anachronistic about these images—a confusion about their place in history— as if they have been detached from time and the viewer cannot quite put them back in their proper context. Yet, with their contemporary dress, tattoos and modern expressions, they can only truly belong to the current moment,” says Anderson-Staley. “The 19th century collodion process was frequently used for ‘scientific’ ethnographic studies of the human face, many of which were based in racist assumptions about physiognomy. In using this process, I hope to make the history of portrait photography one of my primary subjects. The project draws attention to the fact that images of ourselves exist within a

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history of images. Our identities are linked to the visual history of social difference, a history in which photography has not always played an innocent role. Each portrait is a fairly straightforward likeness, and my sitter knows that it is for a project, that it will become part of a ‘collection’ of hundreds of images, but they also participate in shaping the image that represents them. These resulting images are often exhibited among dozens of portraits, portraying Americans in all their variety. Echoes and patterns of similarity and difference can be found across the collection, but each portrait reminds us of the persistent uniqueness of human faces, and the common human denominator comes to the foreground.” Anderson-Staley was raised in Maine, studied photography in New York City and currently lives and teaches photography in Arkansas. She has been making wet plate collodion tintypes and ambrotypes for seven years and has been a frequent presenter, guest artist and lecturer at colleges, universities and art centers across the US. O n V iew Dulce, tintype, ©Keliy Anderson-Staley, courtesy of the artist


m a r i k o

k u s u m o t o :

On view

02.07-0

M O R I K A M I M U S E U M A N D J A PA N E S E

Bloomingdales (interior detail), nickel silver, sterling silver, brass, copper, decal, diamond, closed: 7-1/2 x 8 x 6�, open: 7-1/2 x 16 x 13-1/2�, 2007,


u n f o l d i n g

05.06.12

at the

G A R D E N S , Delray Beach

photo: Dean Powell

s t o r i e s

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Unfolding Stories

MORIKAMI MUSEUM AND JAPANESE GARDENS

invites you to enter the enchanting world of Japanese metal sculptor, Mariko Kusumoto, to view her extraordinary and intricate metal sculptures

and fantastical constructions.
Using a wide range

of metal-smithing techniques, Kusumoto creates worlds that delight and amaze all who are fortunate enough to have the opportunity to experience

them. Her miniature universe is filled with doors that open, parts that move and make music, compartments and drawers, as well as characters and components that tempt visitors to open, move and

Above and opposite: Bloomingdales (box exterior and

interior detail), nickel silver, sterling silver, brass, copper, decal, diamond, closed: 7-1/2 x 8 x 6, open: 7-1/2 x 16 x 13-1/2”,

play with the pieces.

2007, photo: Dean Powell

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Unfolding Stories In her artist’s statement, Kusumoto explains, “Most of my pieces are interactive, which is an essential aspect of my work. Because I like to surprise people, the viewer must keep opening things to see the secrets inside, or push,

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pull, or wind-up something to see movement or hear sounds. You never know what will happen until you get involved with the piece.”
 Each box is presented as a closed object, then opened and manipulated so that its story “unfolds.”

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Many of the pieces within each box were created in the form of brooches, necklaces and bracelets that can be worn, taking on a very different aspect in the narrative of each box.
 Highlights from the exhibit

2012


include Kusumoto’s recreation of Bloomingdale’s department store, inspired by an 1886 illustrated catalog, in which the seven floors of the building open like pages of a book; Tokyo Souvenir, which replicates virtually anything a

Pictured: Tokyo Souvenir (wearable pieces in individual containers), box interior and interior detail, nickel silver, sterling silver, brass, copper, resin, decal, found objects, closed: 7-1/2 x 9-1/2 x 8-1/4”, open: 7-1/2 x 35 x 20”, 2008, photo: Dean Powell

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Unfolding Stories


Opposite and right: Kisekae Doll III (front and interior detail), copper, bronze, brass, sterling silver, nickel, silver, wood, rice paper, coral, 3-1/4 x 16-3/4 x 9-1/4”, 1998, Photo: M. Lee Fatheree

traveler to Japan would want to experience; the girl and boy dolls of Kisekae Doll III who reside in a three-part antique Japanese wooden sewing box which houses a delightful array of interchangeable wardrobes and parts; and Kaitenzushi, an interactive rotating sushi stand, complete with dining implements, food and lots of hidden surprises. Each of Kusumoto’s works is created with astounding detail and artistry, taking anywhere from three to six months to complete. “It is a tedious job, so you have to enjoy it, to have a sense of humor,” says the artist. Kusumoto’s Japanese identity and heritage play important roles in her art, but the OnV

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most pronounced element that strongly inspired the artist was the 400-year old Buddhist temple where Kusumoto’s father served as a priest, and where she grew up. “I was always surrounded by the beauty of nature and ancient things…I was also fascinated by the elaborate metal and wood ornaments…throughout the temple,”
she explains. The allure of the gold-colored ornaments that gleamed in the darkened temple played an early role in her inspiration to use metal in her work. “Her applications of finishes, use of color, and blend of textures, produce a surface that emits a glow reminiscent of these gleaming ornaments of her

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Unfolding Stories

Above and opposite: Kaiten Zushi (and interior detail), copper, brass, sterling silver, nickel silver, bronze, found objects, acrylic paint, enamel, 24K gold leaf, 13 x 12 x 12”, 2004, photo: M. Lee Fatheree

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childhood,” wrote art historian, Don Davidson, in the exhibit’s accompanying catalogue. 
 Kusumoto studied oil painting and printmaking in Tokyo and received an MFA in printmaking from the Academy of Art College in San Francisco in 1995. It was while living in San Francisco that she took courses in metal work and became completely hooked. “I really liked it,” she says. “I completely changed direction.” Working in a studio that is part science lab, part flea market and part curio cabinet, where insect exoskeletons and seedpods share space in wall cases with anatomy models, antique watch cases and c om

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dissected bisque baby dolls, Kusumoto is surrounded by objects of inspiration. Kusumoto will host a workshop on Sunday, February 12, 2012, where participants will learn about her art, creative process and personal cultural influences and in turn, reflect on their own life and heritage. Using Japanese paper arts, students will make an origami container, emulating Kusumoto’s work, and fill them with clay works of art, representing a personal memory or cultural association. Students will also participate in a tour led by Kusumoto of her Unfolding Stories exhibit. For details visit www.morikami.org. O n V iew

2012


PROFILE { P H I L L I P

WITH THE RELENTLESS

E S T L U N D }

Exhibition

Phillip Estlund: Subprime/Subtropics On view March 24th-May 27th at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

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onslaught of recent natural and man-made disasters, it is no wonder that contemporary artists have taken inspiration from destruction, sending messages of hope and warning through visual narratives that juxtapose both real and imagined forces at play. Phillip Estlund’s new solo exhibition, Subprime/Subtropics, presents sculptures and twodimensional collages that embody both the psychological and physical markings left behind by man-made and natural disasters. By taking the raw detritus from hurricanes and tornadoes or man-made waste from old construction, he collects and reconfigures these materials as formal sculptures that reflect the regional architectural vernacular of South Florida. For Estlund, destruction becomes a creative force with aesthetic value. “I live in South Florida and the sculptures are a response to post natural-disastrous conditions,” explains Estlund. “I began making these pieces following a series of hurricanes that hit my region. The hurricanes par-


P R O F I L E

alleled more personal events in pieces of wood and rusted metmy life and now I’m working on al that have some kind of existpieces inspired by the recent oil ing markings which ultimately spill in the gulf and the fear, in- relate to architectural forms or sanity and apocalyptic visions some type of landscape. that I prescribed to—internalizEstlund’s influences are ing/mirroring nature is what is artists and architects such as going on here. A co-occurring Buckminster Fuller’s notion of aspect in the work is the hous- utopia and human possibility, ing market bubble and burst as Gordon Matta-Clark’s aesthetalluded to in titles icized architectural such as Blowout, elements, Pop Art Subprime/SubtropSurrealism, and the ics, and Conjoined deliberate irratio(A total loss).” nality of Dada. Estlund also Born in 1974 in works extensively Athens, Greece, in two-dimensionEstlund received al collage. His withis BFA from the For Estlund, ty and disquieting DESTRUCTION Maryland Instiimages combine tute, College of BECOMES a nature-made with Art, in Baltimore, CREATIVE force man-made and are MD. His work has with aesthetic value. infused with beaubeen exhibited at ty and playfulness. His imagery MOCA, North Miami; Gagis recycled from old books on osian Gallery, New York; Art landscapes, field guides, mod- Basel, Miami Beach; Museo ernist architecture, hunting and de Arte de El Salvador; and Art fishing, and “Do-it-Yourself” and Culture Center of Hollyhome improvement. Images of wood. He is represented by Gavfine upscale interiors, people lak Gallery, Palm Beach, and in leisure and recreational ac- lives and works in New York tivities are collaged onto found and West Palm Beach. O n V iew

opposite page (top to bottom): 1. orange crush (detail), 2007, collage on wood, 14.25 x 16.5” 2. nature study, 2009, collage on paper, 13 x 20” Above (top to bottom): 1. Conjoined (a total loss), 2009, wood, rubber, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and glue, 36 x 50 x 29” 2. subprime/subtropic, 2008, wood, cardboard, glue, latex paint and urethane foam, 21 x 34 x 26” left: PHILLIP ESTLUND images courtesy of the artist and gavlak gallery, Palm beach


MILESTONE { W I L L

TO MARK THE 100th BIRTH-

day of pioneering painter, printmaker and educator, Will Barnet (born May 25, 1911), Boca Raton Museum of Art presents an exhibition of nearly 50 works that explores the momentous evolution of Barnet’s art, from realism to abstraction, during one of the most distinguished careers in American art—and at the age of 100, he still possesses the continuous capacity for reinvention and new perspectives. “...I love moving on and finding fresh ways to use color and form,” said Barnet. “That’s been my excitement.” His career as an artist and America’s foremost printmaker has evolved from 1930s “social realism” to 1940s “cubism” to 1950s “geometric abstraction” and since 1961, “figurative realism.” His highly original work builds upon the foundation of his Indian Space abstract works of the 1950s, based upon Native American-inspired organic and geometric pictograph forms within a flat, seamless space.

B A R N E T }

Exhibition

Will Barnet at 100: Eight Decades of Painting and Printmaking On view March 27th-May 20th at the Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

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M I L E S T O N E

In the 1960s, Barnet’s work in the US, including The Metshifted from abstraction to fig- ropolitan Museum of Art, Muurative work, when he creat- seum of Modern Art and Whited some of his most iconic and ney Museum of American Art beloved pieces. in New York, National Gallery Barnet grew up in Bever- of Art in Washington, DC, and ly, MA, and studied at the Museum of Fine Arts in BosSchool of the Museum of Fine ton. Abroad he is represented Arts, Boston. Propelled by in the collections of The Brita scholarship to ish Museum, The the Art Students Ashmolean MuseLeague, the aspirum, Oxford, and ing artist left BosVatican Museums. ton for New York There have also City in 1931 with been innumeraa portfolio heavy ble critical studon seascapes and ies of his works in family cat portraibooks, catalogues AT 100, Will ture—and 10 doland magazine arBarnet is STILL lars in his pocket. ticles. CREATING the By 1936, he was esBarnet resides WORKS OF A tablished as a proin Manhattan with true American fessional printer his wife of 59 years, MASTER. and the youngest Elena. He has three instructor of graphic arts to sons: Peter, Richard and Todd, ever hold faculty rank at the and one daughter, Ona, who League. As a teacher, Barnet has modeled for many of his elevated printmaking to an art images. form, and throughout his caWill Barnet at 100 is orgareer, he has been an inspira- nized by The Harmon-Meek tion to generations of artists. Gallery in Naples, FL, which His work has been exhibited in has represented Barnet since virtually every major museum 1973. O n V iew

opposite: Midnight, 1983-1984, oil on canvas, 49 x 29”, Private collection, Naples, Fl above (top to bottom): 1. final study for Meditation and Minou, 1976, watercolor and collage, 30-1/2 x 36-1/2”, courtesy of Harmon-Meek Gallery, Naples, FL 2. Danbury Series 8H, 1947, watercolor, 14 x 20”, Private Collection, Naples, FL left: will barnet, photo by Anne Sager, courtesy of harmon meek gallery, naples, fl


FOCUS { M A R K

IN HIS UPCOMING SHOW AT

MOCA, Jacksonville, Mark Licari will take viewers on a journey into the wildly imaginative diary of his mind, a world full of sea creatures, crawling bugs, exploding volcanoes and the degenerative forces that cause all things to enter into a state of disarray and decay. “Things breaking down, or a transferral of energy from one thing to the next, is fascinating to me,” says Licari. “I see dripping, cracking, rusting and perpetual motion all around and have yet to really understand it. There is obviously some kind of science behind it, but I believe there is definitely some art behind it too.” In addition to creating striking works on paper, elaborate lithographs and amusing sculptures, Licari also creates dramatic wall drawings that break out of the picture frame to take over entire rooms. His show at MOCA, Jacksonville, will consist of a drawing executed directly onto the gallery walls, using acrylic paint and ink. The work will be created onsite in the seven days leading up to the opening. “I will approach

L I C A R I }

Exhibition

Project Atrium: Mark Licari On view March 24th-July 8th at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

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F O C U S

the project with the spontaneity how to continue and complete and intuition that I use to execute the mural come to mind as I am a small drawing on paper,” he working on it.” says. “Influences such as JackBorn in 1975 in Atlanta, GA, sonville’s history and surround- Licari received a BFA from the ings as well as my personal expe- University of Colorado, Boulder, riences in the areas will be woven and an MFA from the Universitogether with the architecture of ty of Southern California, where the MOCA atrium space.” he focused on drawing, instalThrough the immediacy of lation and sculpture. While he drawing, Licari orenjoys working in chestrates a cast of a variety of media, characters and scedrawing is always narios that attempt at the root of his creto intertwine the natative process. “For ural world with the me, the work starts man-made world in with drawing as the a way that exposfirst step,” he says. es absurdities and Licari’s work Licari’s drawings weaknesses as well has been exhibitwill TRANSas wonder and poed at the Monterey FORM the gallery tential. Ultimately, Museum of Art, walls at MOCA, the exhibition will CA; Baldwin GalJACKSONVILLE. reveal a story that lery, Aspen, CO; unfolds and shifts as the artist Galerie Valerie Cueto, Paris; draws his way through the space. and Gagosian Gallery, Bever“The wall drawings are very ly Hills. His work is also held in loosely planned,” Licari adds. “I collections at Gemeente Musemostly just start out with some um, The Hague, Netherlands; and ideas and a few sketches. Then, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, once I start, ideas and imagery New York. He lives in Los Anbegin to unfold. There is a lot of geles and is represented by Honintuition involved, and ideas of or Fraser, Los Angeles. O n V iew

opposite page: False Starts, Repairs and Overhauls, 2012, Ink on wall; Disjecta, Portland, OR; Photos: Mark Stein Above: Flows to Bay, 2008, Ink and Acrylic on wall; Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA; Photos: Rick Pharaoh below: 6th Street Mural, 2011, Acrylic on wall; The Standard hotel, Los Angeles, CA left: THE ARTIST AT WORK


RETROSPECTIVE { R O M A R E

B E A R D E N }

Exhibition

Romare Bearden: Southern Recollections On view through May 6th at the Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

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TA M PA M U S E U M O F A RT

presents Romare Bearden: Southern Recollections, an exhibition of works that spans the career of internationally renowned artist, Romare Bearden (1911-1988), widely regarded as one of the most important African-American artists who worked in the US during the 20th century. Works assembled from public and private collections highlight Bearden’s mastery of collage as well as his development of narrative and thematic explorations of his native South, a source of inspiration throughout his career. Bearden spent many summers during his childhood with his paternal grandmother and great grandparents in Mecklenburg County, NC, and absorbed stories and observations about the rituals of daily life—the relentless toil of cultivating crops, tending lush gardens and mixing herbal remedies, blue wash day Mondays, Friday night fish fries, Saturday night revival meetings, and church-going Sundays. These experiences, which stood in stark contrast to the ur-


R E T R O S P E C T I V E

ban rhythm of his parents’ New es of his memories of the South. York City household, left an inBearden returned to the South delible impression on him.
 in the 1970s as his career was be
In the early 1940s, Bearden ginning to gain momentum. This began giving visual form to his homecoming in his late mid-life boyhood memories. The works proved bittersweet. The region in his Southern Series, painted was undergoing urban renewal, in tempera on brown paper, are and many traces of Bearden’s characterized by strong colors, past had been erased. Perhaps flattened perspective and styl- this nostalgic experience imbued ized, highly formal him with a greatcompositions. er sense of urgenIn the mid-1960s, cy to both celebrate he made use of a and eulogize a lost wide range of art way of life, a theme practices, both Westthat would inform ern and non-Westhis artwork for the ern. His studies of rest of his life. He masters of Europedeveloped a com“Southern an,African and Clasplex iconography Recollections” sical Chinese art enthat spoke to these COINCIDES abled him to draw developments. WITH the on styles that he felt Bearden’s work CENTENNIAL were timeless and has been featured of Bearden’s birth. historically durable. in solo exhibitions His use of collage, which empha- at New York City’s Metropolitan sizes distortions, reversals, tele- Museum of Art, Whitney Musescoping of time, and Surrealis- um ofAmericanArt and Museum tic blending of styles, enabled of Modern Art, and Washington, Bearden to convey the dream- DC’s National Gallery of Art. In like quality of memory and ac- 1987 he was awarded the Native imagination and was there- tional Medal of the Arts by Presfore a perfect vehicle for imag- ident Ronald Reagan. O n V iew

opposite: Carolina Morning, 1974, Mixed media collage on board, 30 x 22”, In Memory of Elaine Lebenbom and Dr. Miriam Mansour, Photo Courtesy Franklin Riehlman Fine Art above (top to bottom): 1. The Train, 1974, Collage on paper, 15.25 x 19.5”, Collection of The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC, Made possible through a Gift from Bank of America 2. Gospel Morning, 1987, Collage of watercolor, paper and fabric on board, 28 x 31.25”, American Masters Collection I, Managed by The Collectors Fund, Kansas City, Mo images ©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, Ny, NY left: Romare Bearden, ©Marvin E. Newman, Courtesy of Romare Bearden Foundation


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Art Basel 2011 Mi a m i B e a c h . . .

I N D E C E M B E R , T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L A RT W O R L D

once again descended upon Miami Beach for what is considered to be the mother of all annual art fairs, Art Basel Miami Beach. The event dazzled spectators with a virtual explosion of creativity during the four day art extravaganza, which took place December 1st-4th at the Miami Beach Convention Center. More than 260 galleries from North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa exhibited works by over 2,000 artists. This year the show attracted 50,000 visitors, a new record. Art collectors, art lovers, museum directors, curators and cultural journalists from all over the world enjoyed a program of special exhibitions, panel discussions, private collection tours, and satellite events. On the following pages, On View presents highlights from several of the main fair’s special exhibition sectors. Enjoy the show! O n V iew

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PREVIOUS SPREAD: Robert Indiana, ART, 1972–2001, Polychrome aluminum, 244 x 244 x 122 cm; GALERIE GMURZYNSKA, ZUG

Art Galleries Sector

A

THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. installation view detail; Helly Nahmad Gallery, New York 2. Robert Rauschenberg, Story Brake (Urban Bourbon), 1993; Gagosian, New York 3. Jorge Pardo, Untitled (installation view detail); neugerriemschneider, Berlin

ART GALLERIES INCLUDED

20th and 21st century artworks from more than 200 of the world’s leading art galleries for modern and contemporary art in North America, Latin America, Europe, South Africa and Asia. Painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, print, photography, film, performance, video and digital art by more than 2,000 artists were featured in works ranging from editioned pieces by young artists to multi-million-dollar museum-calibre masterpieces.

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OPPOSITE: INSTALLATION VIEW DETAIL; TONY SHAFRAZI GALLERY, NEW YORK images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Galleries Sector continued...

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. installation view; The Modern Institute, Glasgow 2. Yoshitomo Nara, installation view; Stephen Friedman Gallery, London 3. installation view; Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art, New York 4. installation view detail; L & M Arts, New York OPPOSITE: ROB PRUITT, OK, 2010; Brown, New York images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. John Miller, installation view detail; Praz-Delavallade, Paris 2. Vanessa Beecroft, exhibition View; Lia Rumma gallery, Milan 3. Subodh Gupta, Installation view, 2011; Hauser & Wirth, Zurich

Art Galleries Sector continued...

OPPOSITE: ANTONY GORMLEY, SHY VIII, 2010; KELLY, NEW YORK images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Nova Sector

I

IN THE ART NOVA SECTOR,

42 emerging and established galleries from 17 countries presented new works by either two or three artists. In all, recent pieces by 104 artists were on display, providing viewers the chance to see pieces fresh from studios around the globe—and making the sector an ideal place to spot the newest artistic tendencies.

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LEFT TO RIGHT: 1. installation view detail; Galerie Kamm, Berlin 2. Marcelo Moscheta, Terminillo, 2011; Galeria Leme, São Paulo images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Positions Sector

A

ART POSITIONS CREATED

a platform for a single major project from one artist, allowing visitors to the exhibition an opportunity to discover ambitious new talents from all over the globe. The Art Positions sector presented 16 young galleries from 9 different countries, showcasing cutting-edge single projects by each of the artists.


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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 1. Icaro Zorbar, Can You Hear Me Now?, 2011; Casas Riegner, Bogotá 2. Rosana Ricalde, Cidades invisíveis, Lisboa, 2011; Baró Galeria, São Paulo 3. installation detail; Kavi Gupta, Chicago/ Berlin 4. Cinthia Marcelle, Utopic reserve (installation detail), 2011; Silvia Cintra + Box4, Rio de Janeiro images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Kabinett Sector

A

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

introduced Art Kabinett in 2005, as a platform for the show’s gallerists to display the curatorial aspect of their work, with special exhibitions drawn from the gallery’s program. This year, Art Kabinett presented viewers with a mix of 20 carefully curated exhibitions in a separately delineated space within the booths of the galleries. Exhibition concepts included thematic group exhibitions, art-historical solo shows and showcases for rising stars. The projects featured a wide array of artists, ranging from emerging artists to historical figures.

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LOUISE BOURGEOIS, INSTALLATION VIEW; FONDATION BEYELER, RIEHEN, SWITZERLAND; image Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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Art Kabinett Sector continued...

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OPPOSITE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Tiago Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna 3. Elmgr


Hans-Peter Feldmann, installation view; 303 Gallery, New York

Carneiro da Cunha, installation view; Galeria Fortes Vilaça, são Paulo, Brazil 2. Angela de la Cruz, installation view; reen & Dragset, installation view; Galería Helga de Alvear, Madrid; images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Robert Melee, It Sitting, 2008, Bronze, Enamel paint, 78 x 126 x 110”; Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York 2. Zhang Huan, 49 Days No. 1, 2011, Gray brick, steel, 345 x 335 x 250 cm; Blum & Poe, Los Angeles 3. Robert Indiana, ART, 1972–2001, Polychrome aluminum, 244 x 244 x 122 cm; GALERIE GMURZYNSKA, ZUG

Art Public Sector

A

A R T P U B L I C PRESENTED

outdoor sculptures, interactive performances, site-specific installations and public artworks, within an open and public exhibition format. This year, to mark its 10th edition, Art Basel Miami Beach inaugurated a new collaboration with the Bass Museum of Art, which transformed the recently redesigned Collins Park with unique artworks and performances by renowned artists and emerging talents, whose works directly engaged viewers and interrupted the daily routine of passersby in poetic and surprising ways.

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OPPOSITE PAGE: Damien Hirst, Sensation, 2003, Acrylic paint on bronze, 78 x 124.5 x 65”, L & M Arts, New York images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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On View 02-03.2012  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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