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Natural Fashion:

Art

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the Body PH O T OGRA PHS B Y HAN S S ILV E STE R AT T HE FLO RIDA M US EUM O F PHOTO GRA P H IC A RT S , TAMPA

F E B R U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 1


CONTENTS Fe b r u a r y/ M a rc h

2011

Vo l . 1 , N o . 6

ON THE COVER : Hans silvester, NATURAL FASHION, NO. 35, 2006/2007, C-PRINT RIGHT: Hans silvester, NATURAL FASHION, NO. 184, 2006/2007, C-PRINT IMAGES Courtesy of the Artist and

Fe a t u r e s

Marlborough Gallery, NY

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F E B R U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 1

Natural Fashion:

Art

and the Body PHOTOGRAPHS BY HANS S I LV E S T E R AT T H E F L O R I DA MUSEUM OF P H O T O G R A P HIC A R T S, TA M PA

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NATURAL FASHION: ART AND THE BODY, PHOTOGRAPHS BY HANS SILVESTER An unprecedented series of images portraying the Omo people’s imaginative body decoration and embellishments are elegantly presented in this exhibition of work by German photographer, Hans Silvester, on view February 10th through April 10th, at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa.

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

48 Miami

ISAAC JULIEN: CREATIVE CARIBBEAN NETWORK

The Bass Museum of Art features the works of Isaac Julien, whose subtle yet complex narratives explore China’s ancient past and present and reflect on the cultural impact of global migration.

58 Sarasota

GARDENS IN PERPETUAL BLOOM

The Ringling Museum of Art hosts an exhibition of floral prints illuminating the art of botanical illustration in Europe and America from 1600-1850.

66 Hollywood

74 West Palm Beach

Cristina Lei Rodriguez’s lush sculptures play with the real and the fake in Forever, at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood.

Catch a rare glimpse of vintage “bling” as the Norton Museum of Art goes glitz and glam with a dazzling display of costume jewelry by Kenneth Jay Lane.

CRISTINA LEI RODRIGUEZ: FOREVER

FABULOUS FAKES

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ISAAC JULIEN, MAZU, SILENCE (TEN THOUSAND WAVES) [DETAIL], 2010, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY, LONDON AND METRO PICTURES, NY; HYBRID AMARYLLIS REGINA VITTATA, 1824, ENGRAVING & COLORING BY WILLIAM SAY; CRISTINA LEI RODRIGUEZ, FLORIDA HOTTIE, 2006, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST;

On View Destination:

KENNETH JAY LANE, FLAMINGO

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2010

BROOCH (DETAIL), 1990s, PHOTO:

90 On View presents highlights from the 9th

edition of Art Basel Miami Beach—a four day art extravaganza which took place in December. In case you missed it, check this out... OnV

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ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE LEFT: jim Isermann, installation view; Praz-Delavallade, Paris, France; Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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CONTENTS Fe b r u a r y/ M a rc h

2011

Vo l u m e

1,

No.

5

COMMENTARY

6

MUSE

6

Fo c u s

82

STUART ROME

Stuart’s eloquent b&w prints lead the viewer into a game of hide and seek through hidden worlds. Exhibition

Quotations from artists reveal profound thoughts on love and art.

86

A GENIUS FOR PLACE

Museum exhibitions

The grandeur and grace of historical American landscapes, from the Country Place Era, are presented in a series of images by Carol Betsch.

34

Spotlight

9

CALENDAR

GALLERY

88

A selection of gallery artists

Retrospective

84

DOROTHY GILLESPIE

Dorothy is best known for her luminous, cut aluminum installations, which have been exhibited and sold worldwide. And, at age 90, she’s still a vibrant force.

PICTURED: dorothy gillespie, Ode to an Emerald Isle (detail), Enamel on Aluminum

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BRUCE MOZERT

Bruce’s playful photography and creative spirit have left a legacy of unique underwater images, from the 1950s, of “Florida’s Original Tourist Attraction,” Silver Springs.


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Spring!

M A G A Z I N E

S pring is just around the corner and , with it , comes a sense of renewal and new beginnings—and through art, new discoveries. Inside this issue, there’s lots to explore. Our cover story, Natural Fashion: Art and the Body, on pg. 38, brings to light the fascinating rites and rituals of the people of the Surma and Mursi tribes living in the Omo Valley of Southern Ethiopia, who share an amazing gift for body painting and creating elaborate adornments from nature, as documented in a series of compelling images by German photographer, Hans Silvester. Isaac Julien: Creative Caribbean Network, on pg. 48, features the US premiere of the installation, Ten Thousand Waves, by acclaimed artist and filmmaker, Isaac Julien, who poetically weaves together fact, fiction and film essay genres against a background of Chinese history, legend and landscape. As we transition into spring, Gardens in Perpetual Bloom, on pg. 58, celebrates the flourishing art of botanical illustration in Europe and America from 1600 to 1850, while an “artificial paradise” of lush, intricate sculptural landscapes, by Cristina Rodriguez, plays with the organic and the man-made in Cristina Lei Ridriguez: Forever on pg. 66. Adding an element of glitz and glam to our lineup is a dazzling display of vintage “bling” by the master of costume jewelry, Kenneth Jay Lane, in Fabulous Fakes, on pg. 74. And, just in case you missed it, On View Destination presents highlights from Art Basel Miami Beach 2010, on pg. 90...whew!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Writer

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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Love Q U O TAT I O N S

F

OR CENTURIES, LOVE HAS

been the inspiration and driving force behind some of the world’s greatest artistic achievements. Its influence is profoundly evident in the quotations of many artists, who have commented on its power and effect upon their lives, their work and humanity. In the spirit of St. Valentine’s Day, we thought we’d share a few... “In our life there is a single color, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the


MUSE

Love involves a peculiar unfathomable combination of understanding and misunderstanding. color of love.”
~ M arc C hagall “I want to touch people with my art. I want them

to say ‘he feels deeply, he feels tenderly.’”
~ V incent V an G ogh “Love involves a peculiar unfathomable combination

of understanding and misunderstanding.” ~ D iane A rbus “The love of art in its many forms lives on and enables us to enjoy the past, the present, and look with confidence to the future.” ~ J ohn K urtz “Hatred is a parasite that devours all. One doesn’t build upon hatred, but upon love.” ~ H enri M atisse “A lady friend of mine asked me,‘Well, what do you love most?’ That’s how I started painting money.” ~ A ndy W arhol

PICTURED: marc Chagall, lovers in the lilacs, 1930, oil on canvas, richard s. Zeisler collection, New York

“Love is one of those experiences that is utterly exciting and yet, at times, most bewildering; certainly not too different from our own personal experience of art, as it is created, observed and contemplated.” ~ K irk W assell “Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it.” ~ F ernand L éger “Love is the greatest refreshment in life.” ~ P ablo P icasso O n V iew

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02-03.2011 BOCA RATON Thru 04.17

California Impressionism: Paintings from The Irvine Museum Boca Raton Museum of Art

Exhibitions

C O M P I L E D

Museum, arguably the most important collection of West coast American Impressionism. The colorful collection of more than 60 paintings presents the work of more than 44 artists, including: William Wendt, Guy Rose, Dona Schuster, Granville Redmond and Alson Clark.

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appreciate the quality of these costumes up close—some of which only fleetingly glanced on the screen. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 48.)

and film with 43 extraordinary period costumes worn by lumiwww.bocamuseum.org nous film stars: Sandra This exhibition presBullock, Johnnie ents masterpieces of Thru 04.17 Depp, Robert Downey California Impression- CUT! Costume Jr., Colin Farrell, ism from The Irvine and the Cinema Nicole Kidman, Heath Boca Raton Ledger, Vanessa Museum of Art Redgrave, Maggie www.bocamuseum.org Smith, Kate Winslet, CUT! Costume and the Renée Zellweger Cinema explores the and others. This exintersection of fashion hibition allows us to

Thru 05.01

Latin American Art from the Museum’s Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art

1. Granville Redmond, Flowers Under the Oaks, n.d., oil on canvas, 20 x 25”, private collection, courtesy of The Irvine Museum. 2. Keira Knightley wore this costume as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, in The Duchess (2008), Costume Design by Michael O’Connor, Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design 3. Roberto Matta, Etoile Des Jardins [Star of the Gardens], 1995, carborundum etching on handmade paper, edition #100/125, 40 x 40”, permanent collection, gift of Nordstamp Publishers

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Boca Raton continued...

www.bocamuseum.org

This sampling of Latin American art, from the Museum’s collections, features 20 works by many of the most important 20th century Latin American artists, including: Enrique Castro-Cid, Carlos Cruz-Díez, Julio Larraz, Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Zúñiga. Thru 06.19

Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso Boca Raton Museum of Art

University of Miami

www.bocamuseum.org

Fine prints have been admired for their great artistic diversity and technical virtuosity since their origin in the 15th century. Examples by masters of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries include works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Francisco de Goya and Pablo Picasso, each of whom is celebrated for his pioneering experiments in graphic art. CORAL GABLES

www.lowemuseum.org

French sculptors Claude and FrançoisXavier Lalanne as part of its renowned, annual visual art program. The Lalannes’ sculptures create an extraordinary element of surprise and wonder set within Fairchild’s botanic paradise. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 72.)

Miami resident Rafael Soriano is one of the major Latin American artists of his generation of modernists, and one of the premier painters of Cuba. His work embodies a style best described as “Oneiric Luminism”

by which Soriano Les Lalanne at combines a purely Fairchild abstract form of light, Fairchild Tropical Thru 03.27 form, space and shadBotanic Garden Rafael Soriano: ow, with an interest www.fairchildgarden.org Other Worlds in poetic and metaThe Fairchild TropiWithin, a 60 Year physical impulses. cal Botanic Garden Retrospective (See story in the Dec. hosts a series of Lowe Art 2010/Jan. 2011 issue premiere works by Museum, on pg. 92.) Thru 05.31

1. Pablo Picasso, Faune dévoilant une dormeuse (Jupiter et Antiope, d’après Rembrandt), [Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt)], 1936, etching with aquatint on paper, 12-3/8 x 16-3/8”, Boca Raton Museum of Art Permanent Collection, bequest of Isadore and Kelly Friedman 2. FrancoisXavier Lalanne, Mouton Transhumant (Brebis), 1988, The Palmetum at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, epoxy stone and bronze, 35.425 x 41 x 15.375”, edition of 250, courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and artist, rendering by Spine3D 3. Rafael Soriano, Quimerica Luz (Chimerical Light), 1992, oil on canvas, 50 x 60”

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Coral Gables continued...

Thru 03.27

Useable Art: African Aesthetics in Daily Life from the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

enced animation art, such as the animated titles in the original Pink Panther films of the 1960s. The droll, ironic sense of humor, so typical of the French, can be found throughout Gring’s elegantly painted illustrations.

DAYTONA BEACH

the beauty and artistry of the nomadic and semi-nomadic peoples of Central Asia who dwell in rugged isolation yet whose instinctive craftsmanship and love of natural materials created some of the most seductive art-

www.lowemuseum.org

While the containers, textiles, tools, and assorted furnishings presented in this exhibition consist of objects that serve some purpose of daily living, they are also appreciated for the appeal of their forms, the beauty of their patterns and quality of their craftsmanship.

02.18-05.22 Thru 04.10

C’est la Vie: Robert Gring’s France Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

C’est la Vie is a lighthearted exhibition of 34 gouache paintings by French illustrator Robert Gring, whose “Cartoon modern” style is now recognized as an important offshoot of modernism that strongly influ-

Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen Tribes from Central Asia and... Turkoman Carpets from the Falasiri Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

A dual exhibition of Turkoman jewelry, carpets and rugs, gives a rare glimpse into

works of 19th century Oriental Europe. Thru 02.27

The Weird and Wonderful: Unique Decorative Arts from the Lightner Museum, St. Augustine

1. Africa, Fulani people (Ghana, Chad, Cameroon, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Burkina Faso and Guinea-Conakry), Cattle Herder’s Hat, collected between 1960-1973, raffia, leather and dye, 8” h x 15-1/4” diameter, gift of Professor and Mrs. Robert R. Ferens 2. Robert Gring, Untitled, ca. 1950, 12 x 8” 3. Yomud Tribe, Asyk (Hair Ornament) [detail], dated 1880-1920, gift of Mr. Stephen Van C. Wilberding, 2009, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

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Daytona Beach continued...

Museum of Arts & Sciences

richly ornamented objets d’art. Thru 05.29.2011

images and narratives. (See story in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 90.)

Images: Found and Lost

Thru 02.06.2011

www.moas.org

Otto C. Lightner left behind an outstanding legacy through art objects and artifacts with international flair, relating to science and industry of the late 19th century. This exhibition explores and highlights some of his most exciting and historic purchases and includes: swan and Sphinx-decorated Egyptian revival furniture; oversized Oriental and European porcelains; Tiffany, Gallé and Brilliantcut glass; and other

Odyssey: Linda Connor Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Using a large-format view camera, Linda Connor reveals the spirit embedded in Southeast everyday life, presMuseum of ents compelling comPhotography binations of timelesswww.smponline.org ness and captures the Images: Found and dynamic relationship Lost presents the mural- between the natural sized photographs of world and the sacred. Lorna Bieber. Lorna’s process incorporates a range of traditional and non-traditional photographic techniques resulting in hauntingly beautiful and moving

02.19-05.13

Signs and Wonders: Stuart Rome Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Signs and Wonders is concerned with the relationship between people and their environment. Stuart Rome’s eloquent black and white prints resonate with a precision and draftsmanship that belies the teeming energy and vitality present in the hidden details of a location. (See story on pg. 82.)

1. The Mandrill, Meissen porcelain, 19th century, 3’ h, from the collection of Lightner Museum, St. Augustine 2. Lorna Bieber, Tree/Tree Trunks, 2005-6, gelatin silver print, 68 x 42”, courtesy of Lorna Bieber, Box Gallery, Santa Fe, NM and C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, MD 3. Linda Connor, Muhammad Ali Mosque, Cairo, Egypt, 1989 4. Stuart Rome, FL09-8-1, Turtle Tracks, Florida Everglades, 2009, aluminum/ silver leaf pigment print, stonehenge paper, 24 x 30” and 10 x 10”, images courtesy of the artist and gallery 339

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Daytona Beach continued...

Thru 02.06

Spirit: Bill Armstrong Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Bill Armstrong creates de-materialized or ephemeral images representing a

Thru 05.29

The Mark of Water—Florida’s Springs and Swamps: Karen Glaser Southeast Museum of Photography

D e LAND

DELRAY BEACH

02.12-04.24

03.08-06.05

Dorothy Gillespie Florida Museum for Women Artists www.floridamuseumfor

Kimono: Art, Fashion and Society Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

womenartists.org

www.morikami.org

www.smponline.org

Karen Glaser’s large-scale photographs of Florida’s completely different wilds provide a world—a spirit world unique view, shot or parallel universe. By from a vantage combining collaged point unfamiliar to images with extreme most—landscapes blur, Armstrong conshot underwater jures a world of aband combined with stract color fields and elements of street figures which appear shooting, documento enter into another tary, the pictorial and dimension. the ethereal.

Dorothy Gillespie’s illustrious career in art spans over 50 years. This installation vividly transforms the Museum with an array of colorful paintings, collages, murals and sculpture. (See story on pg. 84.)

Presented in this exhibition are an array of kimono and fashionable accoutrements. The garments are displayed alongside various woodblock prints and paintings reflecting a broad range of kimono fashions and

1. Bill Armstrong, Mandala 451 2. Karen Glaser, Pollen Skin, 2009 3. Dorothy Gillespie, Untitled, 1989, courtesy of the artist 4. Adolescent Girl’s Ceremonial Kimono with Floral Motifs and Crest-like Emblems of Wisteria and Mandarin Orange Motifs, stencil-printed (kata-yuzen) design on figured silk (rinzu), Japan, Showa Period, 1960s, 56.5” h, 43.25”w, .5”d, gift of Eisha Nakano

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Delray Beach continued...

time periods, including those worn by geisha and courtesans in the late Edo Period (1600-1868). Thru 02.20

Modernity and Nostalgia: Woodblock Prints by Yoshu Chikanobu Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

This exhibition presents 60 single-sheet and triptych prints from Yōshū Chikanobu on subjects ranging from customs and manners of Japanese women to the Sino-Japanese War to nostalgic representations of the feudalistic Edo Period. (See story

in the Dec. 2010/Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 78.) FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 02.27

Tom Wesselmann Draws Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Tom Wesselmann was one of the originators of Pop Art and helped define the visual identity of America in the 1960s. The exhibition, which spans from 1959 to 2004, includes more than 100 works, many large in scale and created from materials not usually associated with drawing, including: steel, aluminum, fabric and molded plastic. (See story in the Oct./Nov. 2010 issue on pg. 64.)

One of the largest collections of art, documents and historically significant objects from the Vatican ever to tour North America, Vatican Splendors presents spectacular paintings, mosaics, sculpture, Papal jewels, intricately embroidered silk

Thru 04.24

Vatican Splendors: A Journey Through Faith and Art Museum of Art / Ft. Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

vestments, uniforms of the Papal Swiss Guard, as well as an elaborately decorated gold and silver reliquary containing bone fragments of Saint Peter and Saint Paul.

1. Yoshu Chikanobu, Mirror of the Ages: Kenmu (1334-35, 1336-37), 1897, woodblock print, ink and color on paper, loaned by the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College 2. Tom Wesselmann, Drawing for Mouth # 3, 1963, charcoal on paper, 48 x 63-1/2”, ©The estate of Tom Wesselmann, courtesy of Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale 3. Bust of an Angel, Giotto di Bondone, after 1304, polychrome mosaic, The Reverenda Fabbrica of Saint Peter, Vatican City State, photo © Città del Vaticano

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GAINESVILLE

tions, contemporary fashion and works inspired by traditional practices.

hibition, Lopez-Miro combines portraiture, landscape and still life.

sometimes very realistic and other times very abstract. (See story on pg. 66.)

03.05-04.10 HOLLYWOOD Thru 02.20

02.08-05.08

Africa Interweave: Textile Diasporas Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Whether worn for work, masquerades, sacred ceremonies, or adorning the home or shrine, textiles are one of the most vibrant art forms on the African continent. This exhibition illustrates the continuity of textile designs and techniques from past to present, highlighting innova-

Christiaan Lopez-Miro: All Roads Lead to Cassadaga Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Cristina Lei Rodriguez: Forever Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 02.20

artandculturecenter.org

artandculturecenter.org

artandculturecenter.org

The works in this series present a tapestry of images of a small town whose unique residents are all psychics, mediums and healers. With this ex-

Forever presents a survey of sculptures and installations from 2003 through 2010. Delving into the aesthetics of desire that are part of the consumer products that surround us, her works are primarily sculptural landscapes,

Lea Nickless: Water & Oil Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

The works on paper presented in Water & Oil focus on the environmental calamity in the Gulf of Mexico. Floating oil pigment on water and capturing the moment on paper creates works oddly reminiscent of NASA satellite imagery of the area.

1. Kuba people, Woman’s Dance Skirt, 20th century, raffia fibers, natural dye, gift of an anonymous donor 2. Christiann Lopez-Miro, Spiritual Piano, 2008, C-Print, 30 x 30” 3. Christina Lei Rodriguez, Community on the Edge (detail), 2004, from the collection of Arturo Mosquera 4. Lea Nickless, Blood and Sand, oil pigment on paper, 22 x 15”

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Holly wood continued...

03.05-04.10

Louise Erhard: Yes, No, and Everything in Between

JACKSONVILLE Thru 04.03

The Art of Seating: 200 Years of American Design Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

The Art of Seating Art and presents the history, Culture Center innovation and conof Hollywood struction of American artandculturecenter.org chair design from the Louise Erhard’s 1800s to the present. creation of space and Each of the chairs place is executed in the exhibition are through collage. Her chosen for their beauty use and manipulation and historical context of common imagery of architectural elements is intended to create visual representations of the everyday struggle with one’s ego and the desire to rise above it.

with important social, economic, political and cultural influences. Thru 04.24

A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

Massachusetts. (See story on pg. 86.) Thru 12.31

Re-opening of the Tudor Room

www.cummer.org

A Genius for Place features large-format photographs, by photographer Carol Betsch, of well-known American estates, including: Gwinn and Stan Hywet Hall in Ohio, Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, DC, Delaware’s Winterthur, the Edsel Ford Grosse Pointe Shores estate in Michigan, Val Verde in California and Naumkeag in

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer will unveil a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnish-

1. Louise Erhard, Satin and Lace (detail), 2010, paper and resin on board, 38 × 38”, courtesy of the artist 2. Designed by Thomas E. Warren, manufactured

by the American Chair Company, Troy, NY; Centripetal Spring Arm Chair, ca. 1850; courtesy of The Jacobsen Collection of American Art; photo by Michael Koryta, Photographer, and Andrew VanStyn, Art Director of Photography 3. Boy with Dolphin from East Staircase, Gwinn, 1995, photograph by Carol Betsch from A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era, organized by the Library of American Landscape History 4. Interior of Cummer Home, ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

ings, a fireplace and a selection of art from the Cummers’ home to recreate the domestic sphere in which their collection was originally displayed.

A selection of these paintings and sculptures is highlighted to honor the legacy of the Cummer family.

www.cummer.org

When the museum opened in 1961, the nucleus of its permanent collection consisted of 60 works of art collected by Ninah and Arthur Cummer.

Thru 03.26

Humberto Calzada Polk Museum of Art

LAKELAND

Thru 05.22

The Cummer Legacy The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

of artworks assembled, poured and shaped by this heavy material.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Cuban-born artist Humberto Calzada is known for his dream-like paintings of architectural structures. The surreality in Calzada’s work lies in a broken boundary between Thru 04.17 landscape and arHeavy Metal chitecture and the Polk Museum Hopper-esque quietof Art ness of his painted www.polkmuseumofart.org environments. Metal is a valuable material for artists seeking a durable, rigid and slick result. Polk Museum of Art presents a fine assortment

Thru 03.26

The Big Picture Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Beautifully engaging, this exhibition features the largest works in the Polk’s Permanent Collection. 02.05-05.22

Women’s Views Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Featured in this exhibition are works from the Museum’s Permanent Collection

1. Peter Paul Rubens (Flemish, 1577 - 1640), The Lamentation of Christ, ca.1605, oil on copper, 11 x 9-1/2”, bequest of Ninah M. H. Cummer 2. Jorgen Aguerrevere, Novus Mundus, PMoA Permanent Collection 3. Artwork by Humberto Calzada 4. Artwork by Theo Wujcik

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Lakeland continued...

that were created by female artists. MIAMI

tive video panels and new media technologies to highly integrated plaza and flooring designs, this exhibit explores a cross section of innovative public art commissions currently being implemented in Miami-Dade County.

that drawings done digitally and by hand are not mutually exclusive activities but deeply complementary ones. The joint exhibition is comprised of sketchbooks, associated paintings, design drawings and architectural models that explore the interrelationships of

02.25-04.03

Thru 02.20

Not the Usual Suspects: [New] Art in [New] Public Spaces ArtCenter / South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Rendered in various media, from interac-

Visual Thinking in the Digital Age: Paintings and Drawings of Errol Barron Faia and Jacob Brillhart Aia ArtCenter / South Florida www.artcentersf.org

This exhibition illustrates and examines the role of hand drawing and painting in the digital age by two architects who believe

drawing, painting and architecture. Thru 03.06

ISAAC JULIEN: Creative Caribbean Network Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

In subtle yet complex narratives, Julien’s body of work is a meditation on the cultural impact of global migration. His installations are presented on an epic scale. Poetic and art-historical references are interwoven into frank portrayals of human drama. This exhibition features the US premiere of the installation Ten Thousand Waves along with films and photographs from earlier series Paradise Omeros, Baltimore and Vagabondia. (See story on pg. 48.)

1. Artwork by Miriam Schapiro 2. Ivan Toth Depeña, proposal for Stephen P. Clark Government Center lobby, anticipated completion: fall/winter 2011, Miami-Dade County Public Art Collection 3. Jacob Brillhart, Versailles, Miami Beach, 2005, watercolor, 10 x 14” 4. Isaac Julien, Green Screen Goddess (Ten Thousand Waves) [detail], 2010, Endura Ultra photograph, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2”, courtesy of the artist, Victoria Miro Gallery, London and Metro Pictures, NY

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Thru 04.10

Focus Gallery: Robert Rauschenberg Miami Art Museum

early horse paintings MAM presents a new of the mid-1970s to exhibition in the Foher most recent body cus Gallery section of of work, and explores its Permanent Collec- a number of central tion installation, dedi- motifs that have occated to works by the curred throughout her late Robert Rauschen- 35-year career. berg, one of the first artists to incorporate Thru 02.13 mass media imagery Bruce Weber: into his artwork. Haiti / Little Haiti www.miamiartmuseum.org

Thru 03.06

Susan Rothenberg: Moving in Place Miami Art Museum

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Haiti/Little Haiti includes approximately 175 photographs of www.miamiartmuseum.org Miami’s Haitian comMoving in Place munity, from 2003 to features a select group the present, by photogof 25 paintings, rang- rapher Bruce Weber. ing from Rothenberg’s Although best known

for his fashion photography and celebrity portraits for Vogue and Vanity Fair, Weber also considers himself a street photographer in the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson. These photographs put a human face on the consequences of the United States’ immigration policy and the

Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Open Process is an exhibition featuring new work by young Miami artists commissioned by MOCA. The featured artists are given access to resources provided by MOCA, including the museum’s archives and collection, and receive professional guidance as they research and create new projects within the context of the museum. Thru 02.13

struggles of Haitian immigrants. 03.18-06.05

Open Process: New Work by Miami Artists Museum of Contemporary

Jonathan Meese: Sculpture Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

This mid-career survey of German artist, Jonathan Meese, focuses on his sculp-

1. Susan Rothenberg, Pin Wheel, 1988, 95 x 142-3/4”, Collection Miami Art Museum, promised gift of Mimi Floback 2. Bruce Weber, Parishioner at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church, Little Haiti, Miami, May 11th, 2003

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thefrost.fiu.edu

“The true is the name of whatever proves itself to be good in the way of belief, and good too, for definite, assignable reasons.”

duce significant trends and movements of new Ital-

—W illiam J ames 

tural work and also includes early works of miniature dioramas and tableaux that combine sculpture with painting and models for opera stage sets.

As of 24-03-07 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

The Tale of the Unknown Island: Ester Villalobos and Mar Solis The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 04.17

Gran Torino: Italian Contemporary Art The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 04.03

Thru 03.13

Gran Torino presents the work of a selected group of artists from Torino, Italy, one of Europe’s most vibrant cities and also one of the most dynamic centers of contemporary art. The exhibition is an engaging cultural initiative by the Museum to intro-

ian art to the North American public. Thru 03.13

My Eyes Have Seen: Robert Farber The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum thefrost.fiu.edu

This exhibition is an impressionistic journey of sublime photographic imagery that evokes timeless emotion and takes the viewer into aesthetic realms.

Spanish artists, Esther Villalobos and Mar Solís, interpret— through photography and sculpture—“a journey into the un-

known,” inspired in José Saramago’s book The Tale of the Unknown Island. In the exhibition, the artists visually explore the themes of memory and dreams, roots and growth, death and notions of renewal.

1. Jonathan Meese, DER KÄMPFER de LARGE (Der Zueshagen von Troja de NEUTRAL), 2008, bronze, 266 x 130 x 210cm, edition 1 of 3 +1 AP, collection of Carlos and Rosa de La Cruz, photo courtesy of Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin 2. María Brito, As of 24-03-07, 2007, mixed media installation, 88 x 103 x 141”, courtesy of the artist 3. Enrico Iuliano, Composition for glass objects on Vespa, 2005, Vespa, glass, zinc, steel sheet, hydraulic, 122 x 70.9 x 41.3”, courtesy of the artist 4. Mar Solís, El Bosque que navega (The sailing forest), 2010, Fir, 620 x 4, 30 x 190 cm, courtesy of the artist

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advertising, political propaganda, and labor iconography. Thru 02.20 Ongoing

Art and Design in the Modern Age: Selections from the Wolfsonian Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Nearly 300 works on display provide insight into the ways design has influenced and adapted to the modern world. The installation explores the many focal points of The Wolfsonian’s collection, including designreform movements, architecture, urbanism, industrial design, transportation, world’s fairs,

Speed Limits The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

One hundred years ago, the Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism proclaimed that “the world’s magnificence has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed.” Speed Limits probes the powers and limits of the

modern era’s cult of speed. The exhibition features a variety of media, including: posters, books, drawings, clocks and appliances, paintings, video and sound installations. (See story in the Aug./ Sept. 2010 issue on pg. 72.) NAPLES Thru 02.20

Cuba on My Mind Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

ary Cuba. This exhibition features work by Cuban and CubanAmerican artists. Thru 02.20

Grand Valley State University Presents
Mathias J. Alten: Discovery of an American Impressionist

www.naplesart.org

Visual artists in Cuba are creating compelling contemporary works exploring ideas and their feelings about the human condition and life in Revolution-

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

On view is a selection of paintings by Math-

1. Radio, Excellence 301, ca. 1940–45, manufactured by Sonora, France, Bakelite, metal, glass, paper, 11.25 x 18 x 9”, The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami Beach, FL, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection 2. Edmond van Dooren (1896-1965), Cityscape (detail), ca.1920, Antwerp, graphite and mixed media on paper, The Wolfsonian-FIU, The Mitchell Wolfson, Jr. Collection 3. JAMA (José Andres Matos)
The Conflict, 2004
mixed media on canvas: acrylic, crayon,
63 x 89” 4. Mathias Alten,
Cabanal Scene, 1921,
oil on canvas,
24 x 30”,
courtesy of Grand Valley State University, gift of George H. and Barbara Gordon

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

ias Alten, a German native who migrated to Grand Rapids, Michigan. Alten is a celebrated American regionalist—often referred to as the “Dean of Michigan Painters.” Thru 06.30

Albert Paley Sculpture Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Albert Paley is one of the most widely respected sculptors of his era. In addition to his smaller works, Paley is also known for his often colossal entry gates that masterfully blend both sculptural and

architectural elements. This exhibition consists of approximately 24 recent sculptures and a selection of drawings.

Thru 06.30

Thru 03.27 Thru 06.30

Louise Nevelson: Dawn’s Forest Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Sordid and Sacred: The Beggars in Rembrandt’s Etchings Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Thirty-five rare etchings by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, executed Dawn’s Forest conbetween 1629 and sists of a series of 1654, are presented sculptures by Louise in this survey. These Nevelson (1899-1988), etchings illustrate one of the most imRembrandt’s techportant and influential nical brilliance as figures in postwar a printmaker, and American art, and the reveal him as a poet most internationally as well as an artist, celebrated woman an idealist and also artist of her time. a realist.

The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This jewel of an exhibition recreates the atmosphere of Olga Hirshhorn’s art-packed house in Washington, DC, known as “The Mouse House,” and features intimatesized works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Giacometti, de Kooning and many others.

1. Albert Paley, Interlace, 2006, formed and fabricated bronze, 3.6 x 4.5 x 1.3’,
© Albert Paley 2. Louise Nevelson, Dawn’s Forest (detail), 1986, painted balsa-plywood,
collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of GA-Met, a joint venture Georgia-Pacific, LLC,
© 2010 Estate of Louise Nevelson /Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn, left: A Peasant in a High Cap, Standing Leaning on a Stick, 1639, etching, 3-1/4 x 1-3/4”; right: A Beggar Woman Leaning on a Stick, 1646, etching, 3-5/8 x 2-5/8” 4. Image courtesy of Naples Museum of Art

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 03.27

The Paintings and Drawings of Lynn Davison Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

Aging, bulky forms, bearing the scars of real life, are the dominant subject in Davison’s art. Her unique style, combined with her striking narratives, adds even more potency to her already

compelling and evocative figures. Thru 03.13

The View Project Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

Photographer Joyce Tenneson asked colleagues to send her images of places that “speak to our heart in an unforgettable manner,” and also

requested each photographer write a statement describing exactly what makes these particular images memorable to them—see if you agree.

www.appletonmuseum.org

tures a variety of works from Robert Rauschenberg, an American Master whose art consists of a combination of mediums interlaced with objects and materials from everyday life. OCALA

Thru 04.10.11

Thru 03.27.11

Beyond Soho: The Abstractions of Michael Fellerman Appleton Museum of Art

Thru 03.20

View more than 45 works by New York artist Michael Fellerman. Included are sculptures, which frame the environment with linear, structural elements, as well as drawings, paintings and reliefs, which represent an exciting example of 20th century American abstraction.

Works by Robert Rauschenberg Naples Museum of Art

Pan Magazine: A Graphic Arts Time Capsule of Avant Garde Europe, 1895-1900 Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

On exhibit are 80 remarkable original art nouveau prints from this important

www.thephil.org

This exhibition fea-

1. Lynn Davison, Party Time, 2009, oil on canvas, 60-1/2 x 72”, ©2009 Lynn Davison, courtesy of the artist 2. Patti Bose, Red Saree, Taj Mahal, India, 1997, © Patti Bose, courtesy of the artist and Tenneson Studio 3. Robert Rauschenberg, Big and Little Bullys (Ruminations), 1999, Intaglio, 45 x 57”, edition of 46,
© Estate of Robert Rauschenberg/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 4. Michael Fellerman, Untitled

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publication from the late 19th century.

waterways and natural environs and preparatory sketches, by well known Florida artist Christopher Still, are showcased in this exhibition, along with a selection of the finest works by noted wildlife photographer Carlton Ward Jr.

residence through the experiences, firsthand accounts, and one-ofa-kind artifacts of the largely unrecognized people crucial to the

American Visions explores how artists have represented American life and culture over the past century. Works by Ansel Adams, Richard Estes, Malcolm Morley, Earl Cunningham and many others are included. Thru 06.30.2011

Thru 03.20.2011

Visions of The Gulf: Paintings by Christopher Still and Photography by Carlton Ward Jr. Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

More than 35 paintings of Florida’s

ORLANDO 03.19-05.29

The Working White House: 200 Years of Tradition and Memories Orange County Regional History Center www.thehistorycenter.org

The Working White House gives exhibition visitors a rare view of the inner workings of America’s most renowned

everyday lives of our first families. Thru 06.30.2011

American Visions: Changing Viewpoints Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Aztec to Zapoctec II: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Aztec to Zapotec II features more than 180 works drawn from the OMA’s comprehensive Art of the Ancient Americas Collection and gives a rare glimpse into the life and culture of numerous civilizations

1. Mademoiselle Marcelle Lender en Buste by Comte Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864-1901) 2. Carlton Ward Jr., Roseate Spoonbills 3. Chef Cristeta Comerford, 2005, Cristeta Comerford is the first woman to hold the position of White House executive chef, White House Photo 4. Jane Hammond, Untitled, 1993, oil on canvas with metal leaf, 70 x 80”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1993

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from the North, Central and South American regions. Thru 06.12

Currents in Contemporary Art: Process and Materials Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

A hallmark of contemporary art is its diversity and acceptance of varied approaches

to creating art. Additionally, artists have borrowed styles and imagery from the past, other cultures and popular media. Among the artists represented are: Ursula von Rydingsvard, John Chamberlain, Frank Moore, Chuck Close and Howardena Pindell. Thru 06.05

Life Stories: American Portraits Past and Present Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Life Stories explores how styles and purposes of portraiture have changed over time, reflecting changing social values and the shift of emphasis from formal to casual representations of the

individual. Paintings, photographs and sculpture—spanning a period of over 200 years—are on display, including works by Benjamin West, Rembrandt Peale, John Drawing from the Singer Sargent, Childe OMA’s Permanent Hassam, Robert Henri, Collection and from important local, private and public collections, this exhibition examines the roles of men and women and how they are portrayed visually. Featured works are divided into four themes: Magnetism, Domesticity, Power Cindy Sherman, and and Enhancements. Elizabeth Peyton. 02.03-05.01 Thru 06.05

XX-XY/Gender Representation in Art Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

1934: A New Deal for Artists The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

This exhibition recog-

1. Seated Figure Urn, AD 300-600, Zapotec; Oaxaca, Monte Alban, Mexico, ceramic, 12”, Gift of Howard Phillips 2. John Chamberlain, Lazzarini’s Pie, 1990, painted metal, 46 x 70 x 46”, Acquisition Trust Purchase, 1991, © 2010 John Chamberlain / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 3. Robert Henri, Rosaleen, 1928, oil on canvas, 28 x 20”, on long-term loan from Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc. 4. Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1967, screenprint on paper; edition of 250, 36 x 36”, gift of Council of 101, © 2010 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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nizes the 75th anniversary of the federal Public Works of Art Project. From midDecember 1933 to June 1934, the New Deal program employed artists during the Great Depression and encouraged them to depict the American Scene. Included are 56 works, ranging from portraits and city scenes to landscapes and images of rural

life, created by artists from across the US. PALM BEACH Thru 03.20

A Return to Palm Beach:

the New-York Historical Society The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

Jewels from the Marjorie Merriweather Post Collection The Society of the Four Arts

Drawn from the treasures of the American art collection, Hudson River Masterpieces from the New-York Historical

www.fourarts.org

As the Town of Palm Beach turns 100 and The Four Arts celebrates its 75th anniversary, this exhibition showcases the jewelry collection and style of legendary Palm Beach icon Marjorie Merriweather Post.

Society showcases 45 important 19th century landscape paintings by Hudson River School. PENSACOLA Thru 03.27

Thru 03.20

Hudson River School Masterpieces from

Paul Strand: The Mexican Portfolio Pensacola Museum of Art

www.pensacola museumofart.org

Highlighted in this exhibit is Strand’s work from his second journey to Mexico, in 1966, when he deepened his involvement with Mexican art, society and revolutionary politics through his photographic studies and work in film. PONTE VEDRA BEACH 02.25-04.09

The Works of Ryan Ketterman & Stephen Heywood The Cultural Center

1. Ross Dickinson, Valley Farms, 1934, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum Transfer from the U.S. Department of Labor 2. Amethyst Necklace and Earrings, New York, 1951, Cartier (firm), amethysts, turquoise, diamonds, gold, platinum, 8-1/2”h (necklace); 1-1/2” (earrings), Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, bequest of Marjorie Merriweather Post, 1973, photo by E. Owen 3. Jasper Francis Cropsey, Greenwood Lake, New Jersey, 1871, oil on canvas, 20 x 33”, The Robert L. Stuart Collection, on permanent loan from the New York Public Library 4. Paul Strand, photogravure, 1933

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P o n t e Ve d r a B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.ccpvb.org

Using bold colors, deliberate compositions, clean lines and a touch of dramatic flair, Ryan Ketterman strives to find the spirit of life in every subject he photographs. Stephen Heywood’s ceramic work is influenced by

the simple geometric shapes of architectural structures. SARASOTA Opening 02.19

Crosscurrents of Design: Asian Export Ceramics The John and

Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Botanical Illustration in Europe and America 1600-1850 The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

02.03-02.06

Ringling in Bloom The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Floral art springs to life in the 21 galleries of the Museum. Highlights include: fresh floral arrangements

Comprised of more Asian export ceramics than 100 flower prints, were created in areas Gardens in Perpetual that are now known Bloom features the as Thailand, Vietnam, products of a fruitChina and Japan. ful collaboration of Combining indigbotanists, horticulturists, enous traditions and painters, and printmakborrowed designs, ers from the 17th-19th these decorative and centuries. (See story, practical objects which includes Ringling from area designers, document the crossin Bloom, on pg. 58.) inspired by the Musecultural exchange of um’s signature paintmaterial goods and ings and decorative art artistic motifs that befrom its permanent gan centuries ago and collection; the bouquets still continues today. of internationally acclaimed floral designer, Thru 04.24 René van Rems; and Gardens in 2011 spring fashions Perpetual Bloom: from Lilly Pulitzer. www.ringling.org

1. Ryan Ketterman, Beer Can Island at Long Boat Key on Florida’s Gulf Coast, ©Ryan Ketterman 2. Japanese, early Meiji (1868-1912) period, painting 1868-1870, Montgolfier Balloon with Enameled Decorations, porcelain 3. Hybrid Amaryllis Regina Vittata, 1824 (English, active 1810-1850), engraving and coloring by William Say (English, 1768-1834) 4. Spiral bouquet of Black Baccara roses by René van Rems, courtesy of René van Rems

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Thru 04.11

Tumbling & Twisting Talents Under the Big Top The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

This display of posters and ephemera

illustrates some of the amazing ground acts featured with American circuses. ST. PETERSBURG

from the Collection of BNY Mellon Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Drawn from the prestigious BNY Mellon Collection, Romantics to Moderns represents a veritable survey of British art, featuring 70 watercolors and drawings by 48 British artists, dating from the mid-18th century to 1935. This outstanding exhibition demonstrates the grand scale with which British artists presented their highly finished works.

Thru 05.01

Romantics to Moderns: British Watercolors and Drawings

TAMPA 02.10-04.10

03.05-04.24

PLACE: Contemporary Ceramics by Jennifer Forsberg, Sarah Lindley, and Jeanne Quinn Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Natural Fashion: Art and the Body, Photographs by Hans Silvester Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

www.fine-arts.org

This dramatic exhibition brings together 3 large-scale ceramic installations by Jennifer Forsberg, Sarah Lindley, and Jeanne Quinn, for the first time. The striking objects created for Place express and interpret notions of space with 3 complementary approaches: form, structure, and air.

www.fmopa.org

The stunning works of German photographer Hans Silvester function as sociological and anthropological documents as well as images of extreme beauty. (See story on pg. 38.)

1. Barnum & Bailey: Miss Duray Leonara Contortionist, Strobridge Lithographing Co., Tibbals Digital Collections 2. Alfred William Hunt, Ullswater at Midday, 1863, Collection of BNY Mellon 3. Jeanne Quinn, Everything is Not as it Seems, 2009, porcelain, wire, and electrical hardware, ŠJeanne Quinn 4. Hans Silvester, Natural Fashion, No. 86, 2006/2007, C-print

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

his exploration of mythology. His work offers a highly personalized interjection into the story of modernism.

Thru 02.27

American Modernism from the Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Mark S. Kauffman Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

American Modernism examines the developments in American art, from 1910 through the latter decades of the 20th century, with an emphasis on the struggle between a lingering representational mode and an emerging modernist aesthetic.

and Fortune magazines, Herb Snitzer has spent nearly 5 decades capturing the world around us. Upon the publication of a new collection of his images, Glorious Days and Nights, the TMA presents a selection of Snitzer’s worldfamous jazz images.

Thru 07.17

Realism: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Herb Snitzer: A Jazz Memoir Tampa Museum of Art

Otto Neumann: A Reluctant Modernist Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org

www.tampamuseum.org

St. Petersburg resident and former photojournalist for Life, Look

German artist, Otto Neumann, exposed his psyche through

02.12- 11.20

Worlds Apart: Myth & History, Gods & Mortals, Heroes & Hybrids Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Drawn from the Museum’s antiquity collection, Worlds Apart explores the many intersecting spheres of the world of classical antiquity.

Thru 02.27.2011 Thru 05.15

stellar examples of the Photo-Realist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural installations by leading contemporary artists.

Realism provides a compelling view of the realist tendencies in the visual arts of the last 30 years. The exhibition juxtaposes

Thru 03.10

Trenton Doyle Hancock: WE DONE ALL WE COULD AND NONE OF IT’S GOOD

1. Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir by Herb Snitzer, published by University Press of Mississippi 2. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

VERO BEACH Thru 05.22

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

American Masterworks: 150 Years of Painting from the Butler Institute of American Art Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.ira.usf.edu

www.verobeachmuseum.org

New and selected works, by Trenton Doyle Hancock, are presented in this exhibition. The Texas-based artist is best known for his ongoing narrative and theatrical installations that thrust the viewer literally and figuratively into his personal, idiosyncratic and, at times, heretical weave of words and images.

American Masterworks presents a selection of American art from the 19th century to the late-20th century including stellar works by Albert Bierstadt, John Sloan, Childe Hassam, Charles Burchfield, Reginald

Marsh, Edward Hopper, Andy Warhol and Chuck Close. Thru 05.08

Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Celebrating 25 Years presents an engaging look at the Museum’s outdoor sculpture collection. The works include: welded sculpture by John Henry and David Hayes, kinetic sculpture by Jerome Kirk, bronze work by

Thomas Ostenberg and the Museum’s most recent sculpture acquisition, Hanneke Beaumont’s Bronze #56. Thru 05.22

Impressions: Selections from the Manoogian Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

This exhibition brings together a group of paintings, some on view for the first time in Vero Beach, which capture an “impression” of their subject matter rather than a detailed realistic portrayal of it.

1. Trenton Doyle Hancock, Give Me My Flowers While I Yet Live, version 1, 2010, mixed media on paper, 7-1/2 x 7-5/8” 2. Frank Weston Benson, Red and Gold, 1915, oil on canvas, 51 x 59”, collection of the Butler Institute of American Art, courtesy of International Arts 3. Jane Manus, End of the Day, 1988, painted and welded aluminum, 86 x 58 x 42”, gift of Janet and Clark Daugherty 4. Edward W. Redfield, Road to the River, oil on canvas, 32 x 40”, courtesy of the Manoogian Collection

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Emperor and Exchanges of Buddhist Gifts Norton Museum of Art

influenced the creation of Buddhist art in the court of this Chinese emperor.

www.norton.org

02.03-05.01

In 1777, the Panchen Lama presented a set of paintings to the Qianlong Emperor. This sparked elaborate 02.12-04.24 exchanges of gifts Vero Promises between the Chinese Vero Beach court and the lamas of Museum of Art Tibet, culminating with www.verobeachmuseum.org the Panchen Lama atIn honor of the Mutending the celebraseum’s 25th Anniver- tion of the emperor’s sary, Vero Promises 70th birthday in 1780. showcases a selection This installation exof promised gifts to plores how the art and the Museum celebrat- traditions of Tibet ing this momentous occasion. W. PALM BEACH Thru 03.20

Celebrating 70: The Qianlong

Fabulous Fakes: The Jewelry of Kenneth Jay Lane Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Thru 03.06

Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Drawn from the London-based archive Catch a rare glimpse of John Kobal, this of the work of Kenexhibition reveals neth Jay Lane, a the importance of stalwart of the fashphotography in manuion world, whose facturing the myth “fabulous fakes” of Hollywood—a have been worn by magical place, inhabFirst Ladies and ited by glamorous Hollywood royalty. stars, where dreams (See story on pg. 74.) came true. (See story

1. Richard Diebenkorn, High Green, Version II, 1992, color spit bite and soap ground aquatint with soft ground and hard ground etching and drypoint, 52-5/16 x 33-1/2”, collection of Georgia Welles 2. Seated Figure of the Buddha Amitayus China, Qing dynasty, Qianlong, dated 1761, gilt bronze, traces of polychrome decoration 8-1/2 x 4-5/8 x 3-3/4”, purchase, the R.H. Norton Trust in honor of the Elizabeth Norton Society and our volunteers who serve in education, the library, membership, museum store, office support, special events and visitor services 3. Kenneth J. Lane, Starfish brooch, 1980s, photography by Erik Gould, courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design and Kenneth Jay Lane 4. Scotty Welbourne, Humphrey Bogart for High Sierra, Warner Brothers, 1940

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 4 o f 2 5 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

in the Dec. 2010/ Jan. 2011 issue on pg. 58.)

the Strangely Unexpected Norton Museum of Art

Thru 03.13

the Brooklyn Museum Norton Museum of Art

WINTER PARK

www.norton.org

Now WHAT? Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Now WHAT? provides a snapshot of this moment in contemporary artistic practice, showcasing some of the most

engaging work being made today.

www.norton.org

Stare examines that singular moment when we cannot look away. It is about the shock that only a photograph can invoke and the minutiae within the image that can only be discovered when the viewer gets up close and personal.

To Live Forever reveals what the Egyptians believed they would find in the next world and contrasts how the rich and the poor prepared for the hereafter. Featured are objects that illustrate a range of strategies the ancient Egyptians developed to defeat death, including mummification and various rituals performed in the tomb.

Thru 03.13

STARE: The Pleasures of the Intensely Familiar and

02-12-05.08

To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from

Thru 03.27

Piety & Magnificence: Themes in Italian Art, 1350-1700 Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Some of the Cornell’s most treasured masterpieces are on display, featuring a selection of works ranging from the Italian Renaissance up to the mid-18th century.

1. Image courtesy of the Norton Museum of Art 2. John Coplans (1920–2003), Back of Hand, No. 1, 1986, gelatin silver print, 41 x 38”, © The John Coplans Trust 3. Mummy Cartonnage of a Woman Roman Period, 1st century C.E. Linen, gilded gesso, glass and faience 22 11/16 x 14 5/8 x 7 1/2 in. (57.6 x 37.2 x 19 cm) possible place collected: Hawara, Egypt, Africa Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund 4. Cosimo Rosselli, Madonna and Child Enthroned (detail), ca. 1475-80, tempera, oil and gold gilding on panel, collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 5 o f 2 5 }

W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Photography of Bruce Mozert The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Thru 03.27

REMIX 2 Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

This installation REMIX 2 includes the www.polasek.org features the newly photography of NicoDepicting beautiful restored Daffodil Terlai Howalt and Trine Thru 03.27 models in real-life race and approximateSøndergaard. Together The Edge of Vidomestic situations ly 250 objects from, they explore “the sion: Abstraction under the crystal clear or related to, the hunt” as a classical art in Contemporary waters of the Silver collection of art and Photography architectural objects Cornell Fine from Louis Comfort Arts Museum at Tiffany’s celebrated Rollins College Long Island home, cfam.rollins.edu Laurelton Hall. Also The Edge of Vision included are: prizeshowcases photowinning leaded-glass graphs and photowindows, iconic theme, while Trine’s based installations River, Bruce Mozert’s Tiffany lamps and “STRUDE” images featuring the work of photographs are a custom furnishings. examine how folk cos- 19 contemporary pho- retro look at simpler O n V iew tume can communicate tographers who base times. (See story on cultural meaning and their practice in some pg. 88.) codes. Also featured form of abstraction. are works by Chakaia Opening 02.19 Booker, whose pieces 02.01-04.17 Louis Comfort depict themes in AfriSilver Springs: Tiffany’s can American art. The Underwater Laurelton Hall cfam.rollins.edu

1. Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard, The Giant Hill, 2005, digital c-print, 19-5/8 x 23-5/8”, edition 2/5, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum 2. Ellen Carey (American, b. 1952), PushPins, 2002, chromogenic photogram (with holes), courtesy the artist/Jayne H. Baum Gallery, NY. The Edge of Vision is organized by Aperture Foundation, a non-profit organization whose purpose is to advance photography in all its forms and to foster the exchange of ideas among audiences worldwide 3. Bruce Mozert, photo from Silver Springs: The Underwater Photography of Bruce Mozert, Bruce Mozert/ University Press of Florida 4. Capital from Laurelton Hall’s Daffodil Terrace, ca. 1914–15, cast and cut glass, concrete

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SARASOTA

Gallery: Hodgell Gallery www.hodgellgallery.com

Artist: LATCHEZAR BOYADJIEV

gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

“THE MAIN FOCUS

of my work is to create dynamic shapes supported by sensual lines that will gradually evolve from an idea on paper to a sculpture in glass— and, combined with light, it will have a powerful impact on the viewer.” MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: Andrea Dasha Reich

“…I LIVE IN EVERY PAINTING THAT LEAVES MY STUDIO...

Each is a small tiny slice of the pieces of the world, people, and life that I was so fortunate to brush my hand over. This is my art, and this is my story.” From left: Latchezar Boyadjiev, Woman 1, courtesy of the artist and Hodgell Gallery; Andrea Dasha Reich, Marie Antoniette,
48 x 70”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Addison Gallery www.addisongallery.com

Artist: Madeline Denaro

MADELINE’S WORK IS

very much about process. A painter committed to abstraction for over two decades, Denaro finds the image secondary to the art making. Working intuitively, she enters a realm of the unknown where there is more of a following than any real choice. SARASOTA

Gallery: Dabbert Gallery

NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Artist: LANNY BERGNER

www.dabbertgallery.com

Artist: Nat Krate

LANNY’S ELEGANT

NAT IS A STORY-

teller in paint and canvas. While best known for his paintings of the female form, which he employs as a metaphor to reflect on the human condition, his florals reveal a sensuous quality similar to that derived from the human figure.

mesh sculptures float in space with an ethereal glow, as lyrical geometric or amorphous interior forms draw viewers in for a closer look.

Clockwise from top left: Madeline Denaro, Perfume, acrylic on canvas, 65 x 63”, courtesy of the artist and Addison Gallery; Lanny Bergner, Fruitfully Red, bronze, brass screen wire, glass frit,
44 x 10.5”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art; Nat Krate, Kalanchoe XXVII, 2007, oil on canvas, 48 x 60”, courtesy of the artist and Dabbert Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

MIAMI

Gallery: Fredric Snitzer Gallery www.snitzer.com

Artist: LORIEL BELTRAN LORIEL’S ORGANIC

sculptural forms, which resemble tree branches, tree rings and roots, convey the notion of passing time. The artist’s process involves dribbling and JACKSONVILLE BEACH

Gallery: J. Johnson Gallery www.jjohnsongallery.com

Artist: Cecilia Paredes

A NATIVE OF PERU, CECILIA’S ARTISTIC CAREER BEGAN AS layering paint into large accumulations, which are then sliced into cross sections, revealing the layers within the forms.

a painter but her creative concepts evolved, revealing themselves first in three-dimensional objects, then through photography. In Cecilia’s latest work, the representation of her body is part of the landscape. “I wrap, cover or paint my body with the same pattern of the material and ‘re– present’ myself as part of that landscape. Through this act, I am working on the theme of building my own identification with the entourage or part of the world where I live or where I feel I can call home.”

From left: Loriel Beltran, Untitled (silver branch) [detail], tree branch, acrylic and enamel paint, courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery; Cecilia Paredes, Blue Landscape, 2007, photo performance with body paint, 38 x 47”, edition of 7, courtesy of the artist and J. Johnson Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

MIAMI

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery

Gallery: Giovanni Rossi Fine Arts

www.elainebakergallery.com

www.giovannirossi fineart.com

Artist: Mira Lehr

MIRA USES NATURE-

based images to explore the possibilities of painterly experiments. Subtle color harmonies, combined with veils of Japanese paper, contrast with the splashes, drips, and fluidity of the grounds. The tensions balanced between the abstract and the illusion, and the hidden and the revealed, add to the mystery and resonance of the work.

Artist: LUCIANA ABAIT UNDER THE SURFACE,

Luciana explores themes of presence and absence and concepts of freedom

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries www.artfusiongallery.com

Artist: Alberto Gulías Sanmartin

ALBERTO PRESENTS A

world of ancient cultures, languages, and symbols through his paintings, collages and sculptures. Each of his works possess a wealth of detail and hidden aspects which draw the spectator into the artist’s fertile imagination.

and confinement through surreal and theatrical atmospheres she creates using architectural landscapes found underwater in swimming pools.

Clockwise from top: Mira Lehr, Passage Into the Light (diptych), 2007, mixed media on canvas, 72 x 80”,
courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; Luciana Abait, Grey Bubbles 1, courtesy of the artist and Giovanni Rossi Fine Art; Alberto Gulías Sanmartin, El Jardin de los Corazones de Oro, 118 x 118 cm, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries

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On view 02.10-04.10 at the

FLORIDA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS, Tampa • www.fmopa.org

NATURALÊ FASHION:

Art and the Body Photographs by

Hans Silvester OnV

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T NATURAL FASHION: Art and the Body

THE FLORIDA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS PRESENTS THE WORK

of German photographer Hans Silvester in an unprecedented exhibition of photographs depicting the extraordinary body paintings of the people of the Surma

and Mursi tribes living in the Omo Valley of Southern Ethiopia. The scene of

tribal conflicts and guerrilla incursions, the Omo Valley is also home to fascinating rites and traditions that have survived for thousands of years. The nomadic

people who inhabit this area share an amazing gift for body painting and creating elaborate adornments from nature. Accompanied by a driver, cook and a

guide, Silvester embarked on several month-long sojourns with these tribes who are so isolated that Kalashinikov rifles are their sole modern commodity. PREVIOUS PAGES: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 86, 2006/2007, C-PRINT OPPOSITE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 86, 2006/2007, C-PRINT IMAGES Courtesy of the Artist and Marlborough Gallery, NY

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NATURAL FASHION:

Art and the Body

ABOVE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 86, 2006/2007, C-PRINT OPPOSITE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 69, 2006/2007, C-PRINT IMAGES Courtesy of the Artist and Marlborough Gallery, NY

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In this region of East Africa, abundant flowers, papyrus, and wild fruit trees invite creativity and spectacle, inspiring fanciful and ephemeral selfdecoration, to which the Omo react spontaneously—flowers, leaves, grasses, roots, shells and animal horns are quickly transformed into lavish accessories; and pigments, made from powdered stone, plants, berries, and river mud, are used to paint their bodies. Lacking mirrors, they rely on others to create their presence—mothers paint babies, and children

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and adults paint one another. Executed quickly, the abstract, vibrantly patterned motifs reflect a sophisticated vocabulary of finger-painting and hand-printing techniques. The tribes’ daily paintings are an essential expression of their lives—more elemental to them than music or dance. Fascinated by the Surma and Mursi tribes’ painting practices, and astounded by the primal elegance of their art, Silvester captures the diverse and extraordinary effects the Omo achieve through their


NATURAL FASHION:

Art and the Body

BELOW: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 157, 2006/2007, C-PRINT OPPOSITE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 115, 2006/2007, C-PRINT IMAGES Courtesy of the Artist and Marlborough Gallery, NY

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ancient tradition. Through the memorialization of the vivid, yet intricate designs that adorn the faces and bodies of his subjects, he strives to underscore the beauty and purity of nature as well as the human need for expression and the endlessly creative ways that people can achieve this with the most basic of elements. Silvester’s direction, especially with the tribal children, is sublime. Beyond the spectacle of their intricate adornments are unforgettable sets of

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primordial eyes peering into the camera lens. For Silvester, his immersion into the lives of the Surma and the Mursi tribes is about discovery, connection and preservation. As a photographer long concerned with the state of the environment and the world, this project is very personal. He described his work with the Surmas and the Mursis, “… what’s most important for me is saving, in some way, as much as possible of this truly living art, which is mobile, changing,


NATURAL FASHION:

Art and the Body

ABOVE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 67, 2006/2007, C-PRINT OPPOSITE: NATURAL FASHION, NO. 10, 2006/2007, C-PRINT IMAGES Courtesy of the Artist and Marlborough Gallery, NY

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subject to infinite variation, and whose constituent elements are simple and form a link between man and nature. It seems to me that our modern painting found the purpose of these elements, this simplicity, and used it as its foundation.” Silvester’s riveting visual documentary is a priceless record of a unique and increasingly fragile way of life, one threatened by conflict, climate change and tourism. Born in 1938 in Lorrach, Germany, and based in southern France, Silvester is recog-

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nized for a wide-ranging oeuvre and a protracted study of his subjects, most frequently nature, animals and the environment. His series of photographs, Les Peuples de L’Omo, published in book form by Editions de La Martinière, Paris, in 2006—and in an English edition by Harry N. Abrams Inc.—was honored as the Photography Book of the Year at the festival La Nuit du Livre in Paris. A selection of photographs from the series has been exhibited at prestigious venues throughout France. O n V iew


MASTER/Plan


ISAAC J Creative Carib

on view through 03.06 at the B A S S M U S E U M


JULIEN: bbean Network O F A RT , Miami Beach OnV

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ISAAC JULIEN:

Creative Caribbean Network

PREVIOUS PAGES: YISHAN ISLAND, MIST (TEN THOUSAND WAVES) [DETAIL], 2010, ENDURA ULTRA PHOTOGRAPH, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2” THIS PAGE: MAZU, SILENCE (TEN THOUSAND WAVES) [DETAIL], 2010, ENDURA ULTRA PHOTOGRAPH, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2” IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY, LONDON AND METRO PICTURES, NY

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I

ISAAC JULIEN USES A VARIETY OF

artistic disciplines, drawing from and commenting on film, dance, photography, music, theatre, painting and sculpture, to create a unique

poetic visual language in audio visual film installations. ISAAC JULIEN/

Creative Caribbean Network, at the Bass Museum of Art, presents the

most comprehensive exhibition of

the artist’s work in the last ten years and features the US premiere of OnV

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ISAAC JULIEN:

Creative Caribbean Network

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WAVES (TEN THOUSAND WAVES) [DETAIL], 2010, ENDURA ULTRA PHOTOGRAPH, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2”, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY, LONDON AND METRO PICTURES, NY

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the installation Ten Thousand Waves along with films and photographs from earlier series Paradise Omeros, Baltimore and Vagabondia. Ten Thousand Waves, a 9-screen installation shot on location in China over a period of four years, poetically weaves together stories linking China’s ancient past and present. Through an architectural installation, the work explores the movement of people across countries and continents and meditates on unfinished journeys. Julien collaborated with some of China’s leading artistic voices, including: the legendary siren of Chinese cinema, Maggie Cheung; rising star of Chinese film, Zhao Tao; poet, Wang Ping; master calligrapher, Gong Fagen; artist, Yang Fudong; acclaimed cinematographer, Zhao Xiaoshi; and a 100-strong Chinese cast and crew. The film’s original musical score is

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GREEN SCREEN GODDESS (TEN THOUSAND WAVES) [DETAIL], 2010, ENDURA ULTRA PHOTOGRAPH, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2”, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY, LONDON AND METRO PICTURES, NY

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ISAAC JULIEN:

Creative Caribbean Network by fellow East Londoner, Jah Wobble and The Chinese Dub Orchestra and contemporary classical composer, Maria de Alvear. Filmed on location in the ravishing and remote Guangxi province, the famous Shanghai Film Studios and various sites around Shanghai, Ten Thousand Waves combines fact, fiction and film essay genres against a background of Chinese history, legend and landscape. Through formal experimentation and a series of unique collaborations, Julien seeks to engage with Chinese culture through contemporary events, ancient myths and artistic practice. The original inspiration for Ten Thousand Waves was the Morecambe Bay tragedy of 2004, in which 23 Chinese cockle-pickers died. In response to this event, Julien commissioned poet Wang Ping to write Small Boats, a poem that is recited in the work. In the subsequent years, Julien has spent time in China, slowly coming to understand the country and its people’s perspectives. Through conversations with academics, curators and artists in China and the UK, Julien uncovered a symbolic body of material which he has used to create a work that explores modern and traditional Chinese values and superstitions—these are encapsulated in a fable, The Tale of Yishan Island, which tells the story of 16th Century fishermen lost and in danger at sea. At the heart of the legend is the goddess Mazu, played by Maggie Cheung, who comes from Fujian Province, from where the Morecambe Bay cockle pickers originated, and OnV

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ISAAC JULIEN:

Creative Caribbean Network

GLASS HOUSE, PRISM (TEN THOUSAND WAVES), 2010, ENDURA ULTRA PHOTOGRAPH DIPTYCH, 70-7/8 x 94-1/2”, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, VICTORIA MIRO GALLERY, LONDON AND METRO PICTURES, NY

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leads the fishermen to safety. The film links the Shanghai of the past and present, symbolizing the Chinese transition towards modernity, aspiration and affluence. Following ideas surrounding death, spiritual displacement and the uniquely Chinese connection with “ghosts” or “lost souls”, Mazu’s spectral figure traverses time and space, serving as a guide through the interlocking strands of the installation. Mirroring the goddess of the fable, a ghostly protagonist, Zhao Tao, leads viewers through the world of Shanghai cinema via the Shanghai Film Studio, to a restaging by Julien of scenes from the classic Chinese film The Goddess /Ma

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(1934), and finally to the streets of Modern and Old Shanghai. Isaac Julien was born in 1960 in London, where he currently lives and works, and graduated from St. Martin’s School of Art in 1984, where he studied painting and fine art film. Julien came to prominence in the film world with his 1989 drama-documentary Looking for Langston, gaining a cult following with this poetic exploration of Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance. This following was expanded in 1991, when his film Young Soul Rebels won the Semaine de la Critique prize for best film at the Cannes Film Festival. OnV

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Julien was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2001 and, in 2003, won the Grand Jury Prize at the Kunst Film Biennale in Cologne for his single screen version of Baltimore—a mixture of 1970s “blaxploitation” cinema with a surrealistic allegory about race, class and history. Julien’s work is represented in museum and private collections throughout the world, including: the Tate, London; the Museum of Modern Art, NY; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Guggenheim Museum, NY; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; and the Brandhorst Museum, Munich. O n V iew

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Gardens in Perpetual Bloom t h ro u g h 0 4 . 2 4 a t

THE JOHN & MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART, S a r a s o t a

µp l u s µ

RINGLING I N BLOOM on view 02.03-06 w w w. r i n g l i n g . o r g

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T h ro u g h 0 4 . 2 4 . 11

Gardens in Perpetual Bloom The masterful engravings of Georg Dionysus Ehret, the 18th century’s most accomplished botanical artist, and the exquisite color-printed engravings of Pierre-Joseph Redouté, the premier draftsman of flowers for Marie-Antoinette and Josephine Bonaparte, are among the more than one hundred flower prints featured in an illuminating exhibition developed by the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston OPPOSITE: HYBRID AMARYLLIS REGINA VITTATA, 1824 (ENGLISH, ACTIVE 1810-1850), ENGRAVING AND COLORING BY WILLIAM SAY (ENGLISH, 1768-1834)

and hosted by The John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota. Gardens in Perpetual Bloom explores the flourishing art of botanical illustration in Europe and America from 1600 to 1850.

PREVIOUS PAGES: LOTUS WITH DUCK, DESIGN BY UNIDENTIFIED ARTIST (CHINESE, CENTURY UNKNOWN), ETCHING & COLORING BY UNIDENTIFIED ARTIST (FRENCH, 18TH CENTURY); BUFF, OR HUMES BLUSH CAMELLIA/MYRTLE-LEAVED CAMELLIA, FROM MONOGRAPH ON THE GENUS CAMELLIA (LONDON: J&A ARCH, 1819) BY SAMUEL CURTIS, DESIGN BY CLARA MARIA POPE, ETCHING BY WEDDELL, COLLECTION OF THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON, BEQUEST OF KATHARINE LANE WEEMS

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Gardens in Perpetual Bloom

ABOVE: WATERMELON WITH CATERPILLAR AND MOTH, DESIGN BY MARIA SIBYLLIA MERIAN (GERMAN, 1647-1717), ETCHING AND COLORING BY PIETER SLUYTER (DUTCH, 1675-CA. 1713) OPPOSITE: LARGE SUNFLOWER (FLOS SOLIS MAIOR), 1713 EDITION, DESIGN POSSIBLY BY BASIL BESLER (GERMAN, 1561-1628), ENGRAVING BY UNIDENTIFIED ARTIST (GERMAN, EARLY 17th CENTURY), COLORING BY UNIDENTIFIED ARTIST (GERMAN, 18TH CENTURY)

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Originally developed as an aid to professional herbalists in the 17th century, botanical illustration soon blossomed into an art. The first flower books were medicinal guides and illustrated volumes documenting the gardens of the well-to-do. In the 18th century, the botanical book took on a more scientific cast, following the classification of the plant kingdom by Swedish botanist, Carl Linnaeus. Botanical books were also created out of a decorative impulse, fulfilling the desires of artists and craftsmen for new visual resources. Until the mid-19th century, gardening was not the popular pastime it is today, however, with the burgeoning of affordable, mass-produced botanical publications came a growing popularity of gardening as an amateur hobby. Gardens in Perpetual Bloom traces the transition of the study and appreciation of flowers from the world of monks, horti-

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culturists, botanists and princes to the everyday gardener. On display are the products of a fruitful collaboration of botanists, horticulturists, painters, and printmakers. Requiring technical virtuosity and complex techniques to achieve an amazing range of line and tone, these colorful works reveal the detail, structure, texture, tone and lifelike appearance of a monumental sunflower, a magnificent iris, an exotic lily, or a single elegant rose, executed with an originality of design and composition. “The exhibit Gardens in Perpetual Bloom at the Ringling Museum is a rare opportunity to see a large variety of botanical illustrations during its peak period by trailblazing artists,” says T. Marshall Rousseau, Interim Director for the Ringling Museum.“Taking it a step further, we’re also connecting the story of these beautiful images to our renowned gardens.”


02.03-06

Ringling in Bloom

In celebration of the Gardens in Perpetual Bloom exhibition, the Ringling Museum is showcasing Ringling in Bloom, February 3rd through the 6th, a four-day celebration of floral arts at the Museum that includes fresh floral arrangements inspired by the Museum’s signature paintings and decorative art from its permanent collection; demonstrations and workshops on creating beautiful bouquets by master floral designer René van Rems; and the unveiling of Lilly Pulitzer’s 2011 Spring Collection of fine art inspired silhouettes in the Museum of Art Courtyard. Visitors can also take guided tours of the Ringling’s renowned gardens and grounds. For information, call 941.360.7399. O n V iew

SPRING 2011

TOP: PETER PAUL RUBENS (FIGURES), FLEMISH, 1577-1640; OSIAS BEERT THE ELDER (FLOWERS), FLEMISH, 1580-1624; PAUSIAS AND GLYCERA, CA. 1612-1615, OIL ON CANVAS, THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART; LEFT: LILLY PULITZER’S SPRING 2011 CATALOG COVER, COURTESY OF LILLY PULITZER OPPOSITE: SPIRAL BOUQUET OF BLACK BACCARA ROSES BY RENÉ VAN REMS, COURTESY OF RENÉ VAN REMS

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CRISTINA LEI RODRIGUEZ:

FOREVER at the

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

03.04-04.10

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Cristina Lei Rodriguez: FOREVER

CRISTINA LEI RODRIGUEZ’S SCULPTURAL

works are admired for their unique visual textures

and for their dualities between the natural and the man-made—an “artificial paradise” inspired by the natural beauty and glitz of her native Miami surroundings. Her creations engage and provoke viewers through a mixture of organic and plastic forms in PREVIOUS PAGES: FLORIDA HOTTIE, 2006, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST OPPOSITE: WITHERING FORMALITY, 2009, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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which elements contort and intertwine around one

another in controlled, complex assemblages, dripping with epoxy resin­. Yet beneath a lush and sugary surface, Cristina’s work evokes feelings about the nature of beauty and the human condition.

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ABOVE AND OPPOSITE: LUXURY DEVELOPMENT (DETAIL), 2005, MIXED MEDIA, FROM THE COLLECTION OF DEBI WECHSLER

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Cristina Rodriguez: Forever, at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, presents a survey of sculptures and installations chronicling the artist’s evolution from 2003 through 2010. Among the featured works are Greenhouse, a large-scale, site-specific arrangement of sculpture inside a geodesic dome, which was included in the Athens Biennale in 2009, and Art Basel Miami Beach Art Projects in 2009; a group-

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ing of small works; and a selection of major works from past solo shows. Rodriguez is also debuting a new body of work entitled Gravity and Decomposition. Silvia Cubina, Director of the Bass Museum of Art, described Rodriguez’s work as “intricate sculptures and installations [that] play with the real and fake, while exploring the preciousness of materiality.” Inspired by artificial flowers and how they are always por-


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Cristina Lei Rodriguez: FOREVER

trayed perfectly in bloom— a fantasy frozen in time— Rodriguez began working with plastics and realized she could alter the mass-produced material to make it appear

density of materials and embellishments combined with an intense color palette verges on pandemonium, the formal qualities of the sculptures are evidence of the control of the

Nature, beauty, glamour, decomposition and waste all play an important role in an unfolding narrative of aesthetic tension.

OPPOSITE (LEFT TO RIGHT): THE GOLDEN AGE; GNARLED; EXTRA; 2009, MIXED MEDIA, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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to be in a process of growth or decay—nature, beauty, glamour, decomposition and waste all play an important role in an unfolding narrative of aesthetic tension. Throughout the last seven years Cristina’s work has delved into the aesthetics of desire that are part of the consumer products that surround us. The works are primarily sculptural landscapes, sometimes very realistic and other times very abstract. While, at points, the sheer

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artist’s hand and eye. Born in Miami in 1974, Cristina Lei Rodriguez received her BA from Middlebury College, VT, in 1996 and an MFA from California College of Arts and Crafts in 2002. Her work has been featured in numerous group and solo exhibitions throughout the US and abroad. Cristina currently lives and works in Miami and is represented by Fredric Snitzer Gallery in Miami and Team Gallery in New York. On View


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02.10-04.10

The Jewelry of KENNETH JAY LANE

FAKES

at the

NORTON

MUSEUM OF ART,

We s t P a l m Beach

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C Fabulous Fakes

CATCH A RARE GLIMPSE of vintage “bling” as the Norton Museum of Art goes glitz and glam with Fabulous Fakes: Jewelry by Kenneth Jay Lane. Lane, who continues to lead the industry as the major American maker and designer of costume jewelry, is a stalwart of the fashion world and widely credited with making costume jewelry as glamorous as million-dollar baubles. Hundreds of his creations­—the likes of which have been worn by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Nancy Reagan, Diana Vreeland, Britney Spears and countless other women from every walk of life—are featured in this dazzling display. A compelling figure and master of the bon mot, Lane is not only a long-established presence in society circles but a charming and wildly popular showman on QVC. He has outfitted First Ladies and Hollywood royalty in his fakes, and his early pieces now fetch hundreds of thousands at auction. His 1996 memoir, Faking It, is considered an industry bible.

PREVIOUS PAGES: MAHARANI-STYLE NECKLACE, ABOUT 1980 (COPY OF JACQUELINE KENNEDY ONASSIS’S VAN CLEEF AND ARPELS NECKLACE GIVEN TO HER BY ARISTOTLE ONASSIS AS A WEDDING PRESENT IN 1968), PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE OPPOSITE: MERMAID NECKLACE, PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE

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Fabulous Fakes CHOKER NECKLACE, PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE

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“I am particularly pleased that my retrospective exhibition will be at the Norton Museum,” commented the designer. “Palm Beach is one of the last bastions of glamour and where many of my friends and clientele live. When I began almost 50 years ago, I never imagined that my work would become vintage and collectible.” Almost all of the 350 pieces in the exhibit are vintage, made between 1963 and 1993 and are in the personal collection of Ken-

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neth Jay Lane. The show begins in the early 1970s when his avantgarde jewelry was featured by the famous editor, Diana Vreeland, in Vogue magazine. The history of KJL continues in his revival of several spectacular 1920s Art Deco pieces of jewelry that he began to reproduce in the late 1970s. The exhibit includes reproduction pieces Lane made of many famous designers of “real” jewelry, in addition to photos of the women who made KJL jewelry famous. OnV

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STARFISH BROOCH, 1980s (AN IDENTICAL PIECE WAS ONCE WORN BY JACQUELINE KENNEDY ONASSIS), PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE

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FLAMINGO BROOCH (DETAIL), 1990s (INSPIRED BY THE DUCHESS OF WINDSOR’S 1940 CARTIER ORIGINAL), PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE

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People admire Lane’s fabulous fakes and there are KJL clubs all over the world for collectors of vintage and new items, including Buenos Aires, South America and China. After earning a BA in Advertising Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1954, Lane briefly worked in the Vogue art department before embarking on a career as a shoe designer for Christian Dior and Arnold Scaasi. In the early

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Fabulous Fakes

1960s, he created several costume jewelry pieces to match his bejeweled shoes, and a legend was born. The first designer to make beautiful and witty jewelry affordable to the masses, Lane considers himself a fine jeweler who works in plastic, rhinestones, and other inexpensive materials. “I believe every woman has the right to be glamorous,” he has said. “Style has little to do with money.” O n V iew OnV

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SNAKE BRACELET, 1960s, PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK GOULD, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF ART, RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND KENNETH JAY LANE F

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FOCUS { S T U A R T

STUART ROME’S ACCLAIMED

R O M E }

Exhibition

Signs and Wonders: Stuart Rome On view February 19th – May 13th at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach www.smponline.org

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landscape images draw their inspiration from the writings, journals and illustrations of many of the great progenitors of natural science. In his latest exhibition, Signs and Wonders, Rome explores the relationship between people and their environment and examines the visual evidence, present in the landscape, of our cultural priorities and history. His eloquent black and white prints lead the viewer into a game of hide and seek through hidden worlds. Born in 1953 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Rome received his B.F.A. from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1977, where he studied with renowned American landscape photographer John Pfahl, and an M.F.A. degree in Photography from Arizona State University in 1980. As a student, Rome was inspired by the book The Pencil of Nature by Henry Fox Talbot— the first commercially published book illustrated with photographs. “The pictures made from fossil records and animal tracks are, amongst other things, an


F O C U S

improvisation on that work, to mering, three-dimensional qualwhich I’ve added a shape-shift- ity to his images. The prints’ aping aspect, making these still pearance is meant to hold the lifes seem polymorphous and attention long enough to expechanging, revealing shapes and rience the changeable nature of structures not immediately dis- the imagery. The digital photocerned. There is also an implied graphs have a foothold in the time gap between the tracks and 21st Century, yet possess a qualfossils: the photoity of early photographs collapsing graphic processes. thousands-to-milRome’s work has lions of years, with been exhibited at only a few signs of the Philadelphia our own fleeting huMuseum of Art, man imprint to be the Center for Creseen,” said the artist. ative Photography Early in his cain Tucson, the Mureer, Rome worked seum of Fine Arts, Stuart Rome on projects photoHouston, the InterSEES the graphing ancient LANDSCAPE as national Museum art treasures in Latin of Photography at a living America and Asia, George Eastman PATTERN. as well as contemHouse in Rochesporary trance rituals in Haiti ter, the New Orleans Museum and Indonesia. These experi- of Fine Art and the Santa Barbaences sensitized him to pat- ra Museum of Modern Art. His terns of imagery within nature, work is also held in leading phoand provided insight into the tography collections such as the artworks and cultures he had San Francisco Museum of Modbeen capturing on film. ern Art and the Yale Art Museum. In his recent work, Rome cre- Rome is currently a professor of ated a digital printing process on photography at Drexel Universilver leaf, which adds a shim- sity in Philadelphia. O n V iew

opposite: FL09-8-1, turtle tracks, florida everglades, 2009* above (top to bottom): 1. FL09-22-6, florida everglades, 2009* 2. FL09-12-1, florida everglades, 2009* 3. FL5-12, florida keys, 2008* *aluminum/silver leaf pigment print, stonehenge paper, 24 x 30” and 10 x 10” left: stuart rome by sarah rome. images courtesy of the artist and gallery 339


RETROSPECTIVE { D O R O T H Y

G I L L E S P I E }

Exhibition

Dorothy Gillespie On view February 12th – April 24th at Florida Museum for Women Artists, DeLand www.floridamuseumforwomenartists.org

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THE FLORIDA MUSEUM FOR

Women Artists is presenting a selection of colorful paintings, collages, murals and sculpture celebrating the illustrious career of Dorothy Gillespie, a prominent figure in contemporary American art since the 1950s and one of the leading women artists of her generation. Gillespie is best known for her luminous, cut aluminum installations, which have been exhibited and sold worldwide. And, at age 90, she’s still a vibrant force. Gillespie believes artists are the ultimate adventurers. She possesses the refinement and sophistication of a woman who has seen and done a great deal— her travels have taken her on safari in Kenya, to Egypt and across the Indian Ocean. Yet she also possesses a true artist’s love for the simple joys of movement, color and form.
Upbeat and lively, her striking, usually large-scale, abstract artworks are often constructed out of curled ribbons of colorcharged aluminum that draw viewers into explosive moments of transformation, dy-


R E T R O S P E C T I V E

namically frozen in time.
 it weren’t for my participaBorn in Roanoke, VA, in tion in ‘happenings,’ I probably 1920, Gillespie believed she wouldn’t paint the way I do towas destined to become an art- day,” the artist said. “After ‘hapist. “I think artists are born,” penings,’ my paintings started she says. “It’s not a thing you to come off the wall and intrude choose to do, it’s something you into the spectator’s space.” have to do.” She studied art at Gillespie has had numerthe Maryland Instious solo and group tute College of Art exhibitions, art in in Baltimore, MD, public places comthen moved to New missions, various York City in 1943, teaching positions, where she attendand has been the ed the Art Student’s recipient of a mulLeague of New titude of honors York and Stanley and awards. Dorothy William Hayter’s In 2003, New GILLESPIE’S Atelier 17. York’s Rockefellillustrious Gillespie has CAREER SPANS er Center celebratdemonstrated an ed Gillespie’s work over uncanny ability to with a major out50 YEARS. be on the forefront door installation. of trends, yet always maintain Whether featured at the Gugher own unique style. She start- genheim Museum or at Walt ed out as a painter, but experi- Disney World, her dazzling mented with environments and work has been an inspiration “happenings”—art events in- to generations. She is reprecorporating environment and sented locally by Arts on Dougspectators as active and im- las Fine Arts and Collectibles portant ingredients in the pro- in New Smyrna Beach and diduction of random events—in vides her time between OrlanNew York during the 1960s.
“If do and NYC. O n V iew

opposite: Ode to an Emerald Isle (detail), Enamel on Aluminum above (top to bottom): 1. untitled, 1989, enamel on aluminum, 16 x 16 x 16” 2. Shadows in the Royal Garden (detail), enamel on aluminum, 17 x 126 x 1-1/2” left: dorothy gillespie, courtesy of the artist


EXHIBITION { L A N D S C A P E

A GENIUS FOR PLACE IS A

A R T }

Exhibition

A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era On view through April 24th at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville www.cummer.org

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collaboration between Robin Karson, a landscape historian and Carol Betsch, a landscape photographer. Of the hundreds of historical landscapes studied for this survey, a limited group was selected to represent the chronological development of an important movement in American landscape art. Over the course of five years, Karson and Betsch traveled to each site, selecting views that reflected the designers’ intentions and expressed the spirit of each place. The country place era was a time, during the early 20th century, when wealthy American industrialists, such as Edsel Ford and Henry F. du Pont, pursued rural life in settings of great beauty. While most 19th century residential landscape design was guided by a naturalistic approach, championed by such landscape architects as Frederick Law Olmsted—the designer of New York City’s Central Park—America’s capitalists were eager to enlist a new, formal design vocabulary. Prestigious landscape designers, in-


E X H I B I T I O N

cluding Charles Platt and Beatrix Robert Woods Bliss in WashJones Farrand, collaborated with ington DC, designed by Beattheir wealthy patrons to create rix Farrand; Naumkeag, the esestate gardens that embraced tate of Mabel Choate in Stockthe Olmstedian concept of ge- bridge, MA, designed by Fletcher nius loci (the spirit or genius Steele; Ford House, the estate of of the natural surroundings), Eleanor and Edsel Ford in Grosse while incorporating a new and Pointe Shores, MI, designed by inspired use of hisJens Jensen; Val torical form and Verde, the estate Beaux Arts spatial of Wright S. Ludprinciples. A Genius ington in Santa Barfor Place examines bara, CA, designed seven important by Lockwood de landscape achieveForest; Stan Hyments from the era wet Hall, the esand explores design A Genius for Place tate of Gertrude concerns of the time, and Frank SeiberCAPTURES such as the tension the GRANDEUR ling in Akron, OH, between formality designed by Warren and GRACE and naturalism; the Manning and Ellen of a bygone era. role of travel; the Shipman; and Wincontributions of women to the terthur, the estate of Henry F. du emerging profession; and the im- Pont in Winterthur, DE, designed pact of painting, sculpture, music by Henry F. du Pont and Marian and cinema on landscape design. Cruger Coffin. The seven gardens included The grandeur and grace of in the exhibition are: Gwinn, the these landscapes are presented estate of William Gwinn Mather in a series of toned, b&w photoin Cleveland, OH, designed by graphs and color Iris prints—all Charles Platt, Warren Manning produced by Betsch, whose imand Ellen Shipman; Dumbarton ages are exceptional works of art Oaks, the estate of Mildred and in their own right. O n V iew

opposite: Rose Garden, Dumbarton Oaks, 1999* above (top to bottom): 1. Formal Terrace from the East, Stan Hywet, 1996* 2. Boy with Dolphin from east staircase, Gwinn, 1995* left: Crabapple at Edge of Great Meadow, Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, 1996* *Photography by Carol Betsch from A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era, organized by the Library of American Landscape History


SPOTLIGHT { B R U C E

BRUCE MOZERT’S PLAYFUL

M O Z E R T }

Exhibition

Silver Springs: The Underwater Photography of Bruce Mozert On view February 1st – April 17th at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens,Winter Park www.polasek.org

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photography and creative spirit have left a legacy of unique underwater images, from the 1950s, of “Florida’s Original Tourist Attraction,” Silver Springs. Forty black and white photographs are on display at the Albin Polasek Museum— The collection is on loan from Bruce Mozert and is also included in the book Silver Springs: The Underwater Photography of Bruce Mozert , by Gary Monroe. Mozert developed impactful and memorable images that not only required creative prop work, but also required inventive experimentation with homemade camera housings and lighting systems. He began shooting underwater before the invention of regulators and would submerge in a diving helmet tethered to a hose, through which air was pumped, by hand, from the surface. Eventually he attached the hose to a compressor, essentially inventing the first compressed air system. Mozert was born in Newark, Ohio, in 1916. Upon returning from military service, he came


S P O T L I G H T

to Silver Springs to work in its tom boats, about to launch on publicity department. The park, their tours. originally opened in 1878, had Thousands of Mozert’s become a tourist mecca famous glossy 8 x10” prints were sent for its 99.8% pure headspring across the nation by wire servicwaters that remain at 72 degrees es from the early 1940s through year round. the 1970s, making him one of Beginning as a commercial the most published photographotographer, Mozphers at the time. ert became an artHe had hundreds of ist by default. His national magazine staged underwacovers and his photer pictures at Siltographs were feaver Springs attured in Life, Time, tracted a lot of atLook, and National tention. His talent Geographic. Mozert’s images and imagination Mozert also shot CAPTURED were so exception- the WONDROUS some of the underal that he remained water footage for CLARITY of its chief photograthe cult classic, Silver Springs’ pher, as well as an Creature from the waters. integral member of Black Lagoon and the park’s dynamic marketing made still photographs for the team, for more than 40 years. production of The Yearling. “Everything has a picture in He worked for television netit, a sellable picture,” Mozert works including ABC Sports, once said. “All you got to do is NBC’s Mike and the Mermaid use your imagination.” Not only and CBS’s Sea Hunt. At the did he create Silver Springs’ age of 94, Mozert continues to publicity stills and corporate work in his photography stuadvertisements, he also cap- dio in Silver Springs, Florida, tured on film the steady stream and has no plans to slow down of tourists waiting in glass-bot- anytime soon. O n V iew

opposite and above: photos from silver springs: the underwater photography of bruce mozert, bruce mozert/ university press of florida left: bruce mozert, undated photo, bruce mozert/ university press of florida


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Art Basel 2010 Miami Beach...

EACH DECEMBER, THE INTERNATIONAL ART WORLD

descends upon Miami Beach for what promises to be the mother of all art fairs, a virtual explosion of creativity featuring the best, the newest, or the most salable works of art—and this year was no exception as the ninth edition of Art Basel Miami Beach wowed spectators during a four day art extravaganza, which took place December 2nd-5th at the Miami Beach Convention Center. More than 250 galleries from North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa exhibited works by over 2,000 artists. This year the show attracted 46,000 visitors, a record number. Art collectors, art lovers, museum directors, curators and cultural journalists from all over the world enjoyed a program of special exhibitions, panel discussions, private collection tours, and satellite events. Following are highlights from several of the main fair’s special exhibition sectors. Enjoy! O n V iew

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : A RT B A S E L M I A M I B E A C H

PREVIOUS SPREAD: DAVID ZINK YI, NEUSILBER (NEW SILVER), 2010; JOHANN KÖNIG, BERLIN, GERMANY THIS PAGE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Louise Bourgeois, Heart, 2004; Greve, St. Moritz 2. Mungo Thomson, Negative Space (STScIPRC200512b) [detail], 2006, Custom mural installation, Installation size variable; Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 3. Piotr Uklanski, Untitled (Menorrhagia), 2008, Ink on canvas, 300 x 300 cm; Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, Paris, France OPPOSITE: DAN COLEN, THE SPACE BETWEEN HER BELLY BUTTON AND HER BREAST, 2010, PAPER AND MYLAR CONFETTI AND BEVA ON CANVAS, 48 x 36”; GAGOSIAN GALLERY, NY, NY

Art Galleries Sector

A

ART GALLERIES INCLUDED

more than 250 of the world’s leading art galleries for modern and contemporary art from North America, Latin America, Europe, South Africa and Asia featuring 20th and 21st century artworks. Painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, print, photography, film, performance, video and digital art by more than 2,000 artists were featured in works ranging from editioned pieces by young artists to multi-milliondollar museum-calibre masterpieces.

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Art Galleries Sector continued...

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Michelangelo Pistoletto, Twenty-two Less Two, 2009, Mirror, wood, 22 elements, 300 x 200 cm each; Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy 2. Hans Hartung, T 1989 - A4, 1989, Acrylic on canvas, 71 x 56”; Cheim & Read, NY, NY 3. Gilbert & George, Jack Freak Pictures, 2009, Exhibition view; Galleria Alfonso Artiaco, naples, Italy 4. Cerith Wyn Evans, S=U=P=E=R=S=T=R=U=C= T=U=R=E (‘Trace me back to some loud, shallow, chill, underlying motive’s overspill…’), 2010, Mixed media, Dimensions variable; White Cube, London, UK OPPOSITE: Man Ray, Emak Bakia, 1924-46, wood & string sculpture, 76 cm high; Galerie 1900-2000, Paris, France

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Monica Bonvicini, SCALE OF THINGS (to come), 2010, Metal tubes, plates, and chains (zinccoated), clamps, 393 x 192 x 485 cm, Edition of 3 + 1 AP; Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, Germany 2. Daniel Buren, Photo-souvenir, 2010, exhibition View detail; kamel mennour, Paris, France 3. Yayoi Kusama, Reach up to the Universe - Dotted Pumpkin (Blue), 2010, exhibition view detail, Aluminium, paint, 78-3/4 x 59-1/8 x 59-1/8”; Victoria Miro, London, UK OPPOSITE: LUCIO FONTANA, CONCETTO SPAZIALE, 1962, OIL (ROSA) ON CANVAS WITH LACERATIONS, 36-1/4 x 28-3/4”; ACQUAVELLA GALLERIES, INC., NY, NY

Art Galleries Sector continued...

images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Nova Sector

I

IN THE ART NOVA SECTOR,

fifty emerging and established galleries from seventeen countries presented new works by either two or three artists. In all, recent pieces by one hundred and thirty-one artists were on display, providing viewers the chance to see pieces fresh from studios around the globe—and making the sector an ideal place to spot the newest artistic tendencies.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 1. Laura Vinci, Lux, 2008, 700 glass parts, Variable dimensions; Galeria Nara Roesler, São Paulo, Brazil 2. Marguerite Teplin, installation view; Mary Mary, Glasgow, UK 3. Karmelo Bermejo, The Grand Finale. Bank Loan Granted to an Art Gallery Used to Pay a Fireworks Display at the Closing Ceremony of Art Basel Miami Beach, 2009; 2009 C-print, 125 x 180 cm; Maisterravalbuena galeria, Madrid, Spain 4. Blake Rayne, Untitled, 2010, installation view, Silkscreened acrylic on dye-printed linen with polyester ribbon, 77 x 51”; Sutton Lane, London, UK 5. Rob Wynne, We Are Not Alone, 2010, Poured and mirrored glass, 567 pieces, 115 x 95”; Gavlak, Palm Beach, FL images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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Art Positions Sector

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THE NEW CRITERIA FOR

Art Positions created a platform for a single major project from one artist, allowing visitors to the exhibition an opportunity to discover ambitious new talents. The Art Positions sector presented 14 young galleries from seven different countries, showcasing cuttingedge single projects by each of the artists.
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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Dario Escobar, Obverse & Reverse, Leather soccer balls, steel; Josée Bienvenu Gallery, Ny, NY 2. Hany Armanious, Mystery of the Plinth, 2010, Polystyrene, polyurethane, epoxy, silicone, pigment, 96.5 x 92.5 x 43.3”; Foxy Production, Ny, NY 3. Jorge Méndez Blake, Proposal for a Library Addition to El Lissitzky’s ‘About Two Squares’, 2010, Drawings, vinyl, wood, resin, plexiglass, Dimensions variable; Meessen De Clercq , Bruxelles, Belgium 4. Fernanda Fragateiro, MR10 Double Chair, 2009, After Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich, Polished Stainless Steel, Güttermann silk thread; Arratia, Berlin, Germany images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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Art Kabinett Sector

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ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

introduced Art Kabinett in 2005, as a platform for the show’s gallerists to display the curatorial aspect of their work, with special exhibitions drawn from the gallery’s program. This year, Art Kabinett presented viewers with a mix of twenty-one carefully curated exhibitions in a separately delineated space within the booths of the galleries. Exhibition concepts included thematic group exhibitions, art-historical solo shows and showcases for rising stars. The projects featured a wide array of artists, ranging from emerging artists to historical figures. O n V iew

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Pascale Marthine Tayou, installation view; GALLERIA CONTINUA, SAN GIMIGNANO, ITALY; image Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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Art Kabinett Sector continued...

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ABOVE: Jim Isermann, installation Arnaud, Sao Paulo, Brazil 2. Zaha hadid,


view; Praz-Delavallade5, Paris, France OPPOSITE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Sergio Camargo, installation view; Gabinete de Arte Raquel , installation view; Galerie Gmurzynska, Zug, Switzerland 3. Fabrice Samyn, installation view; Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf, Germany images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

On View 02-03.2011  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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