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John Baeder’s

AMERICAN ROADSIDE

AT V E R O B E A C H M U S E U M O F A R T


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2016

Vo l . 6 , N o . 4

PICTURED RIGHT AND COVER IMAGE BELOW: JOHN BAEDER. PHOTO BY JIM McGUIRE, ©McGUIRE PHOTOGRAPHY. IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND

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J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 6

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JOHN BAEDER’S AMERICAN ROADSIDE INSIDE...

John Baeder’s

AMERICAN ROADSIDE

AT V E R O B E A C H M U S E U M O F A R T

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John Baeder is best known for his photorealist paintings and prints of mid-century diners. Originally considered mere source material for his paintings, Baeder’s photographs have emerged as stand-alone works of art. American Roadside, the artist’s first solo exhibition of photographic works, is a personal tribute to the character of small-town America.

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B EAUTY’S L EGACY GILDED AGE PORTRAITS IN AMERICA

On Exhibit January 26 - April 17

h e n r y

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER MUSEUM palm beach, florida

www.FlaglerMuseum.us (561) 655-2833

Nellie McCormick Flagg, ca. 1906 by James Montgomery Flagg Collection of New-York Historical Society Sponsored by:


Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

52 West Palm Beach 64 Ocala O’KEEFFE,

STICKWORK

STETTHEIMER,

TORR, ZORACH:

WOMEN MODERN-

ISTS IN NEW YORK

This new exhibition coming to the Norton Museum of Art, will look at the art and careers of modernists, Georgia O’Keeffe, Florine Stettheimer, Helen Torr, and Marguerite Zorach— together for the first time.

Appleton Museum of Art will be hosting an on-site installation and multimedia exhibition of monumental-scale environmental works by award-winning sculptor, Patrick Dougherty.

76 St. Petersburg

88 Tampa

ARCHITECTS OF

HISTORIES

DISNEY AND DALÍ: THE IMAGINATION

This immersive multimedia show at The Dalí Museum reveals the unlikely alliance between two of the most renowned artists of the 20th century.

100 Tallahassee CUBAN ART IN

THE TWENTIETH

CENTURY: CULTURAL

GITANA (GIRL), CA. 1940, OIL ON CANVAS.

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SANDRA CINTO

Two new exhibitions of Brazilian contemporary art to be presented by USF Contemporary Art Museum (USFCAM) will showcase works by artists whose approaches address the varied histories of Brazil.

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

AVANT GARDE

VÍCTOR MANUEL GARCÍA,

+

IDENTITY AND THE INTERNATIONAL

RIGHT:

HISTÓRIAS/

The Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts’ upcoming showcase of colorful works by Cuban modernist painters will offer visitors an insider’s view of Cuba’s dynamic culture.

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GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, RED FLOWER (DETAIL), 1919, OIL ON CANVAS; PATRICK DOUGHERTY, SUMMER PALACE, 2009, PHOTO: ROB CARDILLO; PHOTOGRAPH OF SALVADOR DALÍ AND WALT DISNEY IN SPAIN, 1957; SANDRA CINTO, UNTITLED (DETAIL), 2014, PERMANENT PEN AND ACRYLIC ON CANVAS.


Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts Anne Frank A History for Today January 4-February 7, 2016

© AFF Basel / AFS Amsterdam

Developed by the Anne Frank House and sponsored in North America by The Anne Frank Center USA. Sponsors: Holocaust Education Resource Council, The Dorothy and Jonathan Rintels Charitable Foundation, and The Peace on Earth Gift.

Builder Levy Cultural Identity and the International Avant-Garde February 12-March 27, 2016

José A. Bencomo Mena, detail of La Ceiba (The Ceiba Tree), 1949, oil on board.

Segundo J. Fernandez, Curator An historical progression of paintings, sculpture and mixed media from the Colonial, Republican and PostRevolutionary periods of Cuban Art to the present day. Opening Nights Festival 2016

These MoFA exhibitions are projects sponsored in part through COCA’s Cultural Grant Program funded by the City of Tallahassee and Leon County.

Appalachia USA February 12-March 27, 2016

Builder Levy, detail of Miners, Coal Cars and Preparation Plant, 1971.

New York-based photographer Builder Levy presents life and labor in coal mining communities. Organized by The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, The State Art Museum of Florida. Conversation with the Artist February 25, 7pm.


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2016

Vo l u m e

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No.

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COMMENTARY

WILD at Old School Square / Cornell Art Museum in Delray Beach.

PROFILE

Lily Prince: Dream State at The Naples Depot Museum.

MUSE

Art & Sole: Fantasy Shoes from the Stuart Weitzman Collection presented by Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach.

128

SPOTLIGHT

22

CALENDAR

Special exhibitions.

38

GALLERY

CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM : SELECTIONS FROM THE IRVINE MUSEUM

A selection of gallery exhibitions and artists. PICTURED: Guy Rose, Laguna Eucalyptus, ca. 1917.

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112 The Museum of Art-DeLand brings together a sublime collection of works portraying the splendor of California as it was before huge population growth and mass urbanization. .

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Nina Surel: Sailing to Byzantium at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood.

130

FOCUS

Warhol On Vinyl + Warhol Prints + In and Out with Andy at Boca Raton Museum of Art.


MUSEUM of ART - DeLAND

TO U R.

S H O P.

JOIN.

“I have visited many of the world’s foremost art museums and they are indeed spectacular. And yet, the Museum of Art in Deland, Florida, is my favorite. Unlike its global cousins, it is intimate and approachable. I can talk with the staff and director, and get close to the art in a way that is impossible elsewhere. I invest in the museum’s vision – its exhibitions and educational work - and can see its impact on the community, and that makes me feel part of something important and worthwhile.” – Ian Williams, Museum of Art – DeLand Board Trustee, top right

A p r o ud s u pp o rte r o f th e A rts

H A M P TO N I N N & S U I T E S D e L A N D A newly opened hotel in charming DeLand, Florida, the Hampton Inn & Suites Deland, is ideally located less than two miles from a vibrant downtown community, featuring award-winning restaurants, shops and boutiques, and more than 50 festivals per year. Whether traveling for business or pleasure, appreciate the easy access to the beaches or downtown Orlando and enjoy the many thoughtful amenities in our spacious guest rooms and suites, including a refrigerator. Unwind while watching the 39-inch HDTV, and stay connected with free WiFi access. Relax after a long day on the clean and fresh Hampton bed®. Start the day with Hampton’s free hot breakfast and enjoy access to our contemporary fitness center and outdoor swimming pool. Business travelers can utilize the business center and host events and presentations for up to 40 guests in one of our flexible meeting rooms. DeLand is also known for their fabulous restaurants. We’ll happily recommend great area options during your stay.

Museum of Art - DeLand 100 N. & 600 N. Woodland Blvd. DeLand, FL 386.7344371 Hampton Inn & Suites Deland 20 Summit Oak Place, DeLand, FL P 386.279.7808 F 386.279.7811 MoArtDeLand.org | Hampton.com


C O M M E N T A R Y H a pp y n e w y e a r ! . . . a n d w e l c o m e t o On View’s 2016 winter edition. We hope you’ll take a few moments to cozy up with a nice warm beverage and share in the fun of previewing the coolest new shows coming to Florida this season. We kick off the issue with a special presentation that is sure to warm the heart. John Baeder’s American Roadside (on pg. 40) is a loving photographic tribute to the character of small-town America. Among this season’s featured highlights are two stunning displays of modernist art: O’keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York (on pg. 52) compares the contrasting visions of four John Baeder’s trail-blazing female painters, and Cuban Art in the Twentieth Century: Cultural Identity and the International Avant Garde (on pg. 100) boasts colorful works by renowned Cuban modernist painters. Monumental environmental installations are presented in Stickwork (on pg. 64), showcasing the architectural sculptures of Patrick Dougherty who enlists the help of scores of area volunteers to bend and weave tree saplings into dreamlike structures, and Sandra Cinto: Site-specific Installation (on pg. 96), which features an intricate and mesmerizing environment that meditates on the theme of water. There’s more cool stuff ahead...so grab a hot chocolate and dig in! Diane McEnaney

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Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

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Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

on iew FLORIDA

Paul Atwood

J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 6

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

INSIDE...

AMERICAN ROADSIDE

AT V E R O B E A C H M U S E U M O F A R T

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com Advertising

advertising.onviewmagazine@gmail.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com

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WILD

January 14 – April 17, 2016

“The Wave,” Alex Beard

The beauty and protection of the natural world have inspired the contemporary art in this group show. Twelve internationally recognized artists and more than 20 local artists from Plein Air Palm Beach are participating. A portion of proceeds from the sale of artwork will benefit The Watering Hole Foundation, which supports endangered wildlife and was founded by featured artist, Alex Beard.

OldSchoolSquare.org 51 N Swinton Ave | Delray Beach, FL | 561 243 7922

Tuesday–Sunday, 10 am–4:30 pm Closed Mondays & major holidays

FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA


Jane Carroll, Decked in Dahlias. Photo: Lucas Zarebinski.


MUSE On view

&

03.08.16-04.10.16

Art Sole: FANTASY SHOES from the STUART WEITZMAN COLLECTION a t BASS MUSEUM of ART’s bassX satellite space: MIAMI BEACH REGIONAL LIBRARY

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T MUSE

HE PERFECT DIVERSION FOR

shoe lovers, fashionistas, and art aficionados, Art & Sole: Fantasy Shoes from the Stuart Weitzman Collection features over 150 of the most inventive examples of fantasy art shoes in a stunning collection curated by Jane Gershon Weitzman, the shoe-loving wife of American designer, Stuart Weitzman. Since opening its doors in 1996, luxury shoe brand Stuart Weitzman’s Madison Avenue flagship store has showcased footwear created by internationally renowned artists, designers, and craftsmen. Its displays of specially commissioned fantasy shoes quickly became a destination, drawing crowds from all over the world to its magical windows.


Anthony Rosiello, Fence Me In. All images courtesy of Stuart Weitzman. Photography by Lucas Zarebinski.

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Presented by Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach, Art & Sole opens March 8, 2016, and will remain on display through April 10, 2016, as part of bassX (Xtension/Xpansion/Xciting), held in a pop-up gallery space across the street from the Bass Museum in the Miami Beach Regional Library (227 22nd Street, Miami Beach), echoing the early incarnation of the Bass Museum of Art’s Art Deco building as a library from 1930 to 1964. The Miami Beach Regional Library will continue to host various bassX programming and events during the Bass Museum’s year-long expansion project, which is expected to be completed in fall, 2016. The selection of shoes included in Art & Sole represents the best of more than a thousand works that Jane Gershon Weitzman discovered and commissioned to appear in the store over the years. An avid collector of fantasy footwear, Weitzman views the humble shoe as an art form in its own right. She has traveled the globe seeking out and commissioning the weird, the wonderful, and

Above: Firoozeh Bowden, Tin Can Alley. Opposite page: Robert Steele, Corrugated Curves VI.

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“Before long, I began to travel around the country looking for artists to make fantasy shoes for our store windows.” —J. G ershon W eitzman

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MUSE

the downright unwearable. “All of the shoes are made by artists I found while traveling,” said Weitzman. “I began to collect them, and since I was involved in dressing the windows of our first retail store, I thought, why not create a space around one of these pieces of art?” These “fantasy shoes,” as Weitzman refers to them in the pages her book, Art & Sole, published by HarperCollins, were quickly noticed by loyal customers and local passersby alike, and as time went on, Weitzman said, “I started to be approached by artists who were interested in creating shoes for the store windows.” As Weitzman wrote in the forward of her book, “The challenge was to keep raising the creativity level and to make the shoes we intended to exhibit even more extraordinary than the last group. I found very talented artists who made shoes out of unexpected materials and I always urged them to take their work further...Finding the artists became addictive for us—as was the thrill of seeing their finished pieces...Our customers loved the shoes. There were often crowds standing in front of the windows, looking in. Their excitement and comments motivated us to bring in even more showstopping shoes for them.” This curated collection of “extreme heels” features shoes made from highly unique materials—feathers, paper,

This page (top to bottom): Jane Carroll, Petal Pusher; Robert Tabor, Little Red Fire Island Wagon. Opposite page: Robert Tabor’s yellow taxicab-inspired shoe.

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Art & Sole celebrates the artistic potential of footwear, elevating shoes from utilitarian objects to striking, sculptural works of art. 18

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ceramic, metal, resin, playing cards, corrugated cardboard, Swarovski crystals, fresh flowers, and even frosting— with remarkable, intricate construction. Whether it’s a platform made of dahlias, a glass bootie or a pump made from pure gold, these shoes are pure fantasy—each is a true showpiece celebrating the artistic potential of footwear, elevating shoes from utilitarian objects to striking, sculptural works of art. Some of these pieces have since been sold and some have remained in Weitzman’s personal collection. Among the artists featured in the collection are Joanne Bedient, Nina Bentley, Firoozeh Bowden, Jane Carroll, Charlene Clark, Wendy Costa, Dan Crowley, Graham Scarborough Davidson, Ann Johnson, Evelyn Kaplan, Joan Klimo, Linda Leviton, Katherine Mathisen, Joan

Above (top to bottom): Joan McClutchy de Vidargas, By Any Other Name; Douglas Wilson, Automata VI. Opposite page: Keith Winchester, Gilt to the Hilt.

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McClutchy de Vidargas, Daniele Pollitz, Kevin Radu, Anthony Rosiello, Robin Roth-Murphy, Robert Steele, Robert Tabor, Dante Taparelli, Tommaso Tastini, Sylvia Weinstock, and Drake Phillip Wesson. Art & Sole brings together inventive and beautifully crafted footwear in a stunning show-

“Art & Sole, is the result of many years of hard work and fun that went into creating [the store] displays.” —J. G ershon W eitzman


MUSE

case where fashion and fantasy collide­—a thrill for shoe and art lovers alike. Jane Gershon Weitzman was the executive vice president of Stuart Weitzman and the first vice president of Stuart Weitzman Retail. She spearheaded philanthropy for the company by generating funds to support breast and ovarian cancer research and awareness. Her efforts were brought to life through innovative charity events on the brand’s website, such as the Stuart Weitzman Celebrity Breast Cancer Shoe Auction and its retail stores. She also serves on the Trust Board of the Boston Children’s Hospital. O n V iew

Above (top to bottom): Jane Gershon Weitzman; The book, Art & Sole, by Jane Gershon Weitzman (HarperCollins, 2013). Opposite page (top to bottom): Irene Reed, Tutti Frutti; Sharon von Senden, Jewels at Work.

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

AVON PARK SFSC Museum of Florida Art and Culture

www.mofac.org 02.10.16–04.28.16

Visions of Florida: The Photographic Art of Clyde Butcher

BOCA RATON

01.26.16–05.01.16

Thru 02.14.16

Museum of Art

Bob Colacello: In and Out with Andy

www.bocamuseum.org

(See story on pg. 130.)

01.26.16–04.10.16

+

Dames: Portraits by Norman Sunshine

Warhol on Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987

Warhol Prints from the Collection of Marc Bell

(See story on pg. 130.)

(See story on pg. 130.)

Boca Raton

CORAL GABLES Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.lowemuseum.org 02.16.16–04.10.16

Thru 01.17.16

John Raimondi: Drawing to Sculpture

The Portrait Transformed: Drawings & Oil Sketches from

Image from Visions of Florida: The Photographic Art of Clyde Butcher at SFSC Museum of Florida Art and Culture, Avon Park: Clyde Butcher, Ochopee, 1986. Courtesy of Venice Gallery & Studio.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 6 }

Coral Gables continued...

Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud Thru 01.31.16

Liliane Tomasko: Mother-Matrix-Matter

+

03.12.16–05.28.16

Thru 02.21.16

Yuroz

Jack Mitchell and Robert John James Audubon: Pavlik Collection/Karshan A Selection of Prints from Center of Graphic Art the MOAS Collection

DAYTONA BEACH Museum of

02.11.16–07.02.16

Arts & Sciences

Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World

www.moas.org

Thru 02.28.16

Southeast Museum

Faces from the Past: Portraits from the MOAS Collection

of Photography

www.smponline.org Thru 02.07.16

ANIMALIA: Henry Horenstein (See story in the

Thru 04.10.16

October/December 2015

ArtLab @ The Lowe— GER•MANIA!

issue on pg. 56.)

+ On Assignment: Robert Snow – At Sea with OCEARCH

CORAL SPRINGS Coral Springs

01.22.16–04.17.16

Museum of Art

Richard Sexton: Terra Incognita – Photographs of America’s Third Coast

www.coralspringsmuseum.org 01.02.16–01.30.16

Superintendent’s AP Art Studio Exhibition

+

The Civil Rights Movement Revisited: Three Portfolios from the Permanent Collection

Thru 02.27.16

Daniel Itzler

+

Sandra Muss

Image from Richard Sexton: Terra Incognita – Photographs of America’s Third Coast at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Richard Sexton, Ascension. Quadtone pigment print, 14.5 x 22”.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 6 }

Daytona Beach continued...

Southeast Museum of Photography

www.smponline.org 02.24.16–05.15.16

Gary Metz: Quaking Aspen–A Lyric Complaint

+

Fred Stein: In Exile – Paris and New York

D e LAND Museum of Art– DeLand, Florida

www.moartdeland.org 01.15.16–04.03.16

James Couper: Landscapes from the Frost Museum

DELRAY BEACH

www.morikami.org

01.17.16–02.07.16

Thru 01.31.16

41st Annual International Miniature Art Exhibition

Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani

Old School

+

Square /

Selections of American Prints from the John H. Surovek Collection

Cornell Art

+

Museum

Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066

+

www.oldschoolsquare.org 01.14.16–04.17.16

01.17.16–03.01.16

Love, Magnified

+

Will Barnet Print Retrospective

WILD

01.22.16–04.10.16

Morikami

Dunedin

02.12.16–02.28.16

California Impressionism

Museum and

Fine Art Center

(See story on pg. 112.)

Japanese Gardens

www.dfac.org

Quilters’ Crossing Small Quilt Challenge

(See story on pg. 124.)

DUNEDIN

Rich Entel’s Cardboard Menagerie

Image from Will Barnet Print Retrospective at Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida: Will Barnet, Summer Idyll, 1976, color lithograph and serigraph, ed. 300.

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{ P g. 4 o f 1 6 }

Dunedin continued... 02.26.16–05.15.16

02.28.16–07.03.16

DFAC Faculty Exhibition

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta

03.13.16–04.17.16

Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society

GAINESVILLE Harn Museum of Art

LAUDERDALE NSU Art Museum /

Michael Kenna: Haiku

www.harn.ufl.edu

03.20.16–08.28.16

Chuck Close Photographs FORT

Thru 06.05.16

02.02.16–07.17.16

Thru 08.21.16

Framing Nature: The Living World in Art

Contesting Terrain Thru 09.18.16

Thru 08.07.16

Thru 02.29.16

William J. Glackens: A Modernist in the Making

Dawoud Bey: First-Year Florida Re-Visited

Fort Lauderdale

Into the Fold: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Horvitz Collection

www.nsuartmuseum.org 02.07.16–06.05.16

HOLLYWOOD

Bellissima: Italy and High Fashion 1945-1968

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 02.07.16

www.artandculturecenter.org

War Horses: Helhesten and the Danish Avant-Garde During World War II

Thru 01.24.16

Gustavo Oviendo: The New Past

+

Michael Namkung: Levitation and Gravitas

Thru 02.14.16

The Indestructible Lee Miller

+

December 2015 issue

Nina Surel: Sailing to Byzantium

on pg. 118.)

(See story on pg. 128.)

(See story in the October/

Image from Chuck Close Photographs at NSU Art Museum /Fort Lauderdale: Chuck Close, Self Portrait, daguerreotype.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 6 }

Holly wood continued...

JACKSONVILLE Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

www.mocajacksonville.org Thru 01.17.16

2015 Art Ventures Grant Recipients 01.23.16–04.10.16

The Other: Nurturing a New Ecology in Printmaking Thru 01.24.16

Smoke and Mirrors: Sculpture and the Imaginary 02.13.16–05.15.16

+

Art and Culture

02.13.16–03.27.16

Center of Hollywood

Kelley Johnson: Something That Hovers and Pulses Just Under the Surface

Maynard Monrow: Still Life

+

Nolan Haan: The Futility of Envy

Kiki Valdes: Cartoons, Cowboys, Abstractions and More

+

In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

Rocky Grimes: On the Run

Time Zones:

www.artandculturecenter.org Thru 01.24.16

Oliver Wasow: Studio Portraits

+

Santiago Rubino: Light Out of Darkness

+

+

Image from In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Flowers, 1970. Screenprint, 38 1/8 x 38 1/8”, 2006.161. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer, © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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{ P g. 6 o f 1 6 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

James Rosenquist and Printmaking at the Millennium

Photographs by Amanda Rosenblatt

Thru 05.15.16

Thru 03.27.16

Rockwell Kent: The Shakespeare Portfolio

Thru 02.28.16

Museum of Art

Thru 10.02.16

Matter Makes Space: Michiko Fujii Fowler

Project Atrium: Ian Johnston

& Gardens

David Hayes: The Sentinel Series

Thru 03.27.16

The Cummer

www.cummer.org 01.29.16–04.17.16

03.19.16–06.26.16

Project Atrium: Shinique Smith Thru 03.27.16

Allegory of Fortune:

Archipenko: A Modern Legacy

LAKELAND

Russell Young– Forever Young: A Retrospective

Polk Museum of Art

(See story in

Thru 05.01.16

www.polkmuseumofart.org

the October/

Julien De Casabianca: The Outings Project

Thru 01.24.16

December 2015

Androids

issue on pg. 106.)

OnView 8.125x5.1875.pdf 1 12/14/2015 10:18:06 AM


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 6 }

Thru 01.31.16

MAITLAND

Dina Shenhav: D.O.A.

Art & History Museums, Maitland

www.artandhistory.org

Bass Museum

01.15.16–02.21.16

of Art

Art Legends of Orange County: The Grand Experiment

www.bassmuseum.org

03.04.16–05.01.16

03.08.16–04.10.16

ART31-Material World: Glass Rubber & Paper

Fantasy Shoes from the Jane Gershorn Weitzman Collection

01.24.16–02.28.16

Jérémy Gobé

MELBOURNE

(See story on pg. 10.)

Foosaner Art Museum

Institute of

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Contemporary Art,

01.16.16–03.13.16

Miami

Caminos Transitados / Paths Taken: A Retrospective of Francisco Gordillo Arredondo Baba Oñi 03.19.16–05.15.16

Touching Strangers: Photographs by Richard Renaldi

The Ruth Funk Center for

MIAMI

www.icamiami.org Thru 01.17.16

Shannon Ebner: A Public Character

Textile Arts

ArtCenter/

http://textiles.fit.edu

South Florida

01.23.16–05.07.16

www.artcentersf.org

Reimagined: Innovations in Fiber by Alex Trimino and Carrie Sieh

Thru 01.24.16

Thru 01.31.16

MIA_BER: You Are Leaving the American Sector

Alex Bag 02.18.16–06.12.16

John Miller

Image from Fantasy Shoes from the Jane Gershorn Weitzman Collection at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Jane Carroll, Decked in Dahlias. Photo: Lucas Zarebinski.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued...

MDC Museum of

Pérez Art

Thru 01.17.16

Art + Design

Museum Miami

www.mdcmoad.org

www.pamm.org

Project Gallery: Jeff Wall

Thru 01.31.16

01.14.16–06.26.16

CINTAS Foundation Fellow Finalist Exhibition + Award Announcement

Project Gallery: Romare Bearden

A Universe of Fragile Mirrors Thru 02.21.16

02.11.16–11.13.16

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz:

Nari Ward: Sun Splashed

+

Project Gallery: Bik Van der Pol

+

Macchietta, Small Sketches by Karen Rifas

Thru 03.06.16

Thru 03.27.16

03.17.16–01.15.17

Steven and William Ladd: Mary Queen of the Universe

Project Gallery: Matthew Ronay

Firelei Báez: Bloodlines

03.24.16–09.11.16

Michele Oka Doner: How I Caught a Swallow in Mid-Air

Thru 08.21.16

Recent Acquisitions + Highlights from the MDC Permanent Art Collection

Thru 04.24.16

Carlos Alfonzo: Clay Works and Painted Ceramics

Thru 08.28.16

Childhood Memories from the Other Side of the Water: Photographs by Eduardo Del Valle

Thru 08.21.16

Project Gallery: Sheela Gowda

Image from Firelei Báez: Bloodlines at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Firelei Báez, Ciguapa Pantera (to all the goods and pleasures of this world), 2015. Courtesy the artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco. Photo: Oriol Tarridas.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 6 }

Miami continued...

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu 01.11.16–03.19.16

Danny Lyon: Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement 01.23.16–04.17.16

The Art of Video Games Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum Thru 02.28.16

Carola Bravo: Blurred Borders

Thru 05.08.16

+

Margin of Errors

Ramón Espantaleón: The Temptation

NAPLES

The Art of Purvis Young and The HighwayMen

The Baker Museum,

+

Artis—Naples

Members’ Gallery – A Hint of Purple

www.artisnaples.org 01.27.16–04.20.16

Florida Contemporary

The Wolfsonian–

Naples Art

FIU

Association at

02.21.16–02.20.17

www.wolfsonian.org

The von Liebig

Thru 02.28.16

Art Center

Lyman Whitaker: Kinetic Exhibit

Philodendron: From Pan-Latin Exotic to American Modern

www.naplesart.org 01.23.16–02.27.16

03.12.16–04.16.16

Interior and Exterior Realities:

The 51st Founders Juried Award

Thru 01.31.16

Celebrating 15 Years of Collecting 02.13.16–06.19.16

Naples Collects

Images from Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: Fashioning the ’70s at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: Above left: Halston, Floor-length dress, sequinned polyester, 1974, USA. The Museum at FIT 80.128.12. Gift of Celanese. Photograph © The Museum at FIT. Above right: Yves Saint Laurent, Evening dress, off-white silk satin, 1978, USA. The Museum FIT 91.235.4. Gift of Marina Schiano. Photograph © The Museum at FIT.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 6 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . . Thru 03.06.16

www.atlanticcenter

Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: Fashioning the ’70s

forthearts.org

+

Dressed and Undressed: Selections from the Permanent Collection

100 Years of Animation Art from Around the World

Thru 02.06.16

Brad Temkin: Rooftop – A Second Look

OCALA

01.16.16–04.17.16

History Center

Patrick Dougherty: Stickwork

www.thehistorycenter.org

(See story on pg. 64.)

100 Years of Hannibal Square: Historic and Contemporary Photographs of West Winter Park Exhibition

Thru 02.21.16

Thru 03.30.16

Museum of Art

01.23.15–04.24.16

Paco Pomet

www.appletonmuseum.org

Paradise Park Remembered: Photographs by Bruce Mozert and others

Thru 07.24.16

Dawn’s Forest: The Sculpture of Louise Nevelson

Journey Into Imagimation:

Orange County Regional

Appleton

01.16.16–04.10.16

ORLANDO

The Naples Depot Museum

www.colliermuseums.com 01.02.16–01.30.16

Lilly Prince: Dream State (See story on pg. 126.)

NEW SMYRNA BEACH Atlantic Center for the Arts Image from Patrick Dougherty: Stickwork at the Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala: Patrick Dougherty, Summer Palace, 2009. Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Photo: Rob Cardillo.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 6 }

Orlando continued...

Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org 01.23.16–04.24.16

Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment 03.12.16–06.05.16

Art Legends of Orange County: Paintings by Steve Lotz

+

InFlux Exhibition Series: Will Cotton Art Museum

Gilded Age Portraits in America

The Mennello

& Gardens

Museum of

www.ormondartmuseum.org

American Art

01.22.16–02.28.16

The Society of the

www.mennellomuseum.com

Outside the Lines

Four Arts

01.15.16–04.10.16

www.fourarts.org

Albert Paley: Forging Sculpture 1979-2015

01.23.16–03.06.16

PALM BEACH The Henry

ORMOND BEACH

Bill Cunningham: Facades

03.19.16–04.17.16

Power & Piety: Spanish Colonial Art

PANAMA CITY Panama City Centre for the Arts

Morrison Flagler

+

www.pccentreforthearts.com

Museum

Invitation to the Ball: Marjorie Merriweather Post’s Fancy Dress Costumes

01.22.16–03.11.16

www.flaglermuseum.us

Ormond

01.26.16–04.17.16

Memorial

Beauty’s Legacy:

53rd Bay Annual– Juried Art Competition and Exhibition

Image from Women of Vision: National Geographic Photographers on Assignment at Orlando Museum of Art: Beverly Joubert, Lessons of the Hunt, 2007. A leopard’s spotted coat provides camouflage in the dense forest.

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C A L E N D A R

PENSACOLA

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 6 }

Museum of

Thru 02.29.16

Art

Glittering Grandeur: Spectacles Under the Big Top

Pensacola

www.ringling.org

Museum of Art

01.15.16–04.17.16

www.pensacolamuseum.org

Samurai: The Way of the Warrior

02.23.16–04.09.16

Funky Turns 40

PETERSBURG Museum of Fine Arts,

Thru 02.27.16

02.05.16–05.01.16

Collection in Context: Women Creating

Ink, Silk and Gold: Islamic Art from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

03.04.16–04.15.16

ST.

03.04.16–06.20.16

St. Petersburg

Cirque/Cyrk/Cirkus: Circus Posters Across Europe

www.fine-arts.org

Thru 10.06.16

Walker Guest House Replica

Thru 01.24.16

Marks Made: Prints by American Women Artists from the 1960s to the Present

Annual Members Juried Exhibition

PONTE VEDRA BEACH The Cultural Center

www.ccpvb.org 01.08.16–02.19.16

Celebrate Art 2016: Juried Artist Member Exhibition

SARASOTA The John and Mable Ringling Image from Beauty’s Legacy: Gilded Age Portraits in America at The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, Palm Beach: George Peter Alexander Healy (American, 1813 –1894), Jeannie Ovington (1863-1926), 1887. Oil on canvas. New York Historical Society. Gift of the Estate of Ina Love Thursby, through Walter M. Brown, 1944.18.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 6 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.fine-arts.org 02.13.16–05.29.16

Contemplating Character: Portrait Drawings and Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud

+

The Art of the Classical Guitar Thru 02.14.16

Thru Spring 2016

01.08.16–01.31.16

Piotr Janowski: Curiosity

Dalí Revealed: Candid Moments from the Artist’s Life

The Annual Art Faculty Exhibition

Thru 03.13.16

50 Artworks for 50 Years

TALLAHASSEE Florida State

02.12.15–03.27.15

Photographic

Appalachia USA – Photography of Builder Levy

Arts

University

+

www.thedali.org

Museum of

01.23.16–06.12.16

Fine Arts

Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination

www.mofa.fsu.edu

Cuban Art in the Twentieth Century – Cultural Identity and the International Avant-Garde

(See story on pg. 76.)

Anne Frank: A History for Today

Florida Museum of

The Dalí Museum

01.04.16–02.07.16

TAMPA

(See story on pg. 100.)

www.fmopa.org 01.02.16–03.25.16

Sandra Gottlieb 02.2016–04.2016

Gohar Dashti: Iran Untitled and Stateless

Image from Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape at Tampa Museum of Art: Jaume Plensa, See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil, 2010. Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, 2015. Photo: Dean Dixon. © Jaume Plensa. Courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 6 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Tampa Museum of Art

www.tampamuseum.org Thru 01.24.16

The Figure Examined: Masterworks from the Kasser Mochary Art Foundation

Echoes of Antiquity: Revisiting and Reimagin- University ing the Ancient World of South Florida Contemporary

+ Sandra Cinto: Chance and Necessity

the Gadsden Arts Center

(See both stories

Thru 02.07.16

starting on pg. 88.)

Allen Leepa: Masterworks of Abstract Dialogue

TARPON SPRINGS

+

Ralph Wickiser: A Retrospective

01.24.16–05.15.16

Art Museum

Jaume Plensa: Human Landscape

www.ira.usf.edu

Leepa-Rattner

01.15.16–03.05.16

Museum of Art

Histórias/Histories: Contemporary Art from Brazil

www.spcollege.edu/museum

Thru 02.28.16

02.21.16–05.15.16

Prints by Leonard Baskin

02.12.16–05.30.16

Public and Private—

Vernacular Art from

HISTÓRIAS/HISTORIES

Contemporary Art from Brazil Lee and Victor Leavengood Gallery and Genevieve Lykes Dimmitt Lobby

SANDRA CINTO

Site Specific Installation West Gallery

JAN. 15 – MAR. 5, 2016

Contemporary Art Museum University of South Florida, Tampa

813.974.4133 caminfo@admin.usf.edu cam.usf.edu facebook.com/usfcamfan #usfcam Image: Caio Reisewitz, Goiânia Golf Club II, 2004 Courtesy of the artist and Luciana Brito Gallery, São Paulo


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 5 o f 1 6 }

Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

www.spcollege.edu/museum Thru 03.31.16

Steve Corrado: Baby Needs a New Pair of Shoes

VERO BEACH Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org Thru 01.17.16

Folk Art from the Morris Museum of Art 01.21.16–05.15.16

John Baeder’s American Roadside

Landscapes and Still Lifes by Heade and his Contemporaries

www.armoryart.org 01.16.16–02.13.16

Women of Vision II, National Association of Women Artists, Inc. FL Chapter

W. PALM

(See story on pg. 40.)

Armory Art Center

BEACH

County Art Teachers Association Members Exhibition 02.20.16–03.19.16

Armory Faculty Show

01.23.16–05.21.16

Ann Norton

Oscar Bluemner: Selections from the Vera Bluemner Kouba Collection

Sculpture Gardens

01.16.16–02.12.16

03.25.16–04.15.16

www.ansg.org

River: An Installation by Mags Harries and Lajos Heder

Artists-In-Residence Exhibition

01.06.16–03.06.16

Flowers

Norton 02.06.16–06.05.16

03.09.16–05.15.16

02.18.16–02.28.16

Museum of Art

Nature Illuminated:

Art in the Family Tree

2016 Palm Beach

www.norton.org

Image from Nature Illuminated: Landscapes and Still Lifes by Heade and his Contemporaries at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Martin Johnson Heade, Passion Flowers and Hummingbirds, ca. 1870–83. Oil on canvas, 15-1/2 x 21-5/8”. Gift of Maxim Karolik for the M. and M. Karolik Collection of American Paintings, 1815–1865, 47.1138.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 6 o f 1 6 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . . Thru 01.17.16

The Summer of ’68: Photographing the Black Panthers

+

This Place: Israel Through Photography’s Lens

Photographs by Mary Ellen Mark

Laura Anderson Barbata, Collaboration Beyond Borders

Museum of | American Art

www.morsemuseum.org Thru 01.24.16

WINTER

The Albin

PARK

Polasek Museum

Selections from the Harry C. Sigman Gift of European and American Decorative Art

Cornell Fine Arts

& Sculpture

(See story in the October/

Museum at

Gardens

December 2015 issue

Rollins College

www.polasek.org

on pg. 34.)

cfam.rollins.edu

Thru 04.17.16

Thru 09.25.16

01.16.16–04.03.16

Sight Unseen: Touch­able Sculp­ture

Lifelines: Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau

01.28.16–04.24.16

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: I Refuse to be Invisible

Doris Leeper: Hard Edges

+

The Charles

Transcommunality:

Hosmer Morse

O n V iew

02.06.16–05.15.16

Still/Moving: Photographs and Video Art from the DeWoody Collection 02.18.16–05.15.16

O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York (See story on pg. 52.) Thru 03.20.16

Tiny: Streetwise Revisited— Image from Doris Leeper: Hard Edges at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park : Doris Leeper, (American, 1929–2000), Multiple Images: 24 (detail), ca. 1975. Enamel on canvas, 62 x 62”. Collection of Atlantic Center for the Arts. Gift of Cobb, Cole & Bell Law Firm.

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PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Studio E Gallery www.studioegallery.com

Artist: LEON APPLEBAUM FOR THE LAST 25 YEARS,

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Leon has been developing new ideas, techniques, and designs on hot glass. His very non-traditional approach to glass working allows for the exploitation of the transparent and reflective qualities of the glass. CORAL GABLES

Gallery: ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries www.virginiamiller.com

Exhibition: Divergent Illusions ON VIEW THRU 03.25.16

Divergent Illusions includes works by Michael Roque Collins, Michelle Concepción, Carlos Garcia de la Nuez, Armando Morales, Mario Segundo Pérez, and Richard Taylor. “Each of these artists offers the sort of unique, personal statement that I am constantly seeking in the art that I choose to exhibit,” said Virginia Miller, owner and director of Greater Miami’s longest-established contemporary fine art gallery, now in its 42nd year. Above (left to right): Leon Applebaum, Transformation XI, glass, 12 x 12 x 6”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery; Installation view with paintings by Michael Roque Collins, sculpture by Richard Taylor, and paintings by Michelle Concepción and Mario Segundo Pérez, courtesy of ArtSpace Virginia Miller Galleries.

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G A L L E R Y

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: Cheers to 20 Great Years! ON VIEW 01.09.16–02.20.16

In 2016, Arts on Douglas celebrates two decades of exhibiting exceptional contemporary Florida artists. The gallery will commemorate its anniversary in January with the exhibition, Cheers to 20 Great Years! This show will bring together the works of seven artists who have been represented by the gallery since its onset in 1996. The artists featured in this special exhibition include: Heidi Edwards, Ed Harris, Rodney Lints, Tim Ludwig, Mary Schimpff Webb, Trish Thompson, Anna Tomczak, and Enzo Torcoletti. The gallery will host an opening reception honoring the artists on Saturday, January 9, 2016, from 4-7 pm. All are welcome to join in celebrating this significant occasion.

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: FLORENCE DERIVE “THE ACT OF PAINTING

is an act of liberation, of creation, and gives life to an image that, when observed, reminds the viewer of something equivalent, buried deep within himself.” — Florence Derive

Above left (top to bottom): Anna Tomczak, Resurrection Bouquet, limited edition iris print, 29.5 x 25.5”; Tim Ludwig, Teapot with Pears, earthenware, 9 x 11 x 4”, courtesy of the artists and Arts on Douglas. Above right: Florence Derive, Summer Heat (Last Blue Iris), 2013, acrylic on canvas, 51.18 x 38.19”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak.

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JOHN BA

AMERICAN On view

01.21.16 – 05.15.16

Trailer, Arizona Route 66, 1975, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

at

VERO BEACH


AEDER’S

ROADSIDE MUSEUM of ART OnV

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J o h n B a e d e r ’s AMERICAN ROADSIDE

John Baeder is best known for his unusual subject matter

often associated with roadside architecture—especially diners. The popularity of Baeder’s diner paintings and the spectacular sales of both editions of his book, Diners, spawned an avalanche of imitators. Baeder has been much more than a “diner painter,” however, as shown by his original roadside photographs, his sign series, paintings of small-town America, Nashville and Southern images, classic Las Vegas casinos, and other subjects from the heyday of 20th century automobile-oriented culture. Baeder’s exhibition, American Roadside, which opens at Vero Beach Museum of Art on January 21, 2016, comprises 23 photographs of classic roadside culture, including colorful signs, mom-and-pop motels, independent gas stations, vintage vehicles—and a classic diner. Opposite: John Baeder. Photo by Jim McGuire, ©McGuire Photography. All images courtesy of the artist and Thomas Paul Fine Art.

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Interior, 1974, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30�.


J o h n B a e d e r ’s AMERICAN ROADSIDE

The images act as a record of Americana. They are a loving tribute to the character of small towns and the one-ofa-kind restaurants that used to dot the country but that are quickly disappearing today. “Baeder’s ability to express the ways that each diner or mom-and-pop eatery was at the heart of a created community, a skill far more important than simply recording the transitory details of roadside subjects, differentiates him from his photo-realist contemporaries and makes him important to American art history,” wrote Jay Williams, curator and author of the book, John Baeder’s Road Well Taken (Vendome Press, 2015). “While Baeder has become well-known as a painter of diners, his American Roadside images reveal the breadth and depth of his vision as both a photographic artist and preservationist. Raised in Atlanta, Baeder became an art director for a New York-based ad agency at age twenty-one. Before beginOnV

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J o h n B a e d e r ’s AMERICAN ROADSIDE

Below (top to bottom): Coke Sign, 1977, C print on Kodak Endura Paper, 20 x 30”. Crown Parking, 1975, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

ning his advertising career, Baeder studied art at Auburn University and maintained his interest in photography and painting while working at the prestigious Marschalk advertising agency. After creating successful ad campaigns for clients such as Coca-Cola, he was transferred to a position at the New York offices of a sister company in the Interpublic Group, part of the largest

advertising conglomerate in the world. As Baeder’s career in advertising progressed, so did his urge to indulge his interests in photography and postcard collecting. New York’s rich cultural environment was the ideal school for a young artist who was about to launch a career in painting. Although Baeder felt increasingly pulled toward an art career, he achieved great success as an art director because of his experience and pure creativity. The scope of Baeder’s work extends well beyond his diner paintings, as evident in the range of work he has produced: black-and-white photographs from the 1960s, imaginative still-life paintings and photographs, original dinerinspired ceramics, and most recently, stunning oil paintings of classic aircraft of the 1930s and ’40s. Through the years, Baeder has found inspiration in postcard images by anonymous street photographers, hand-painted signs, scale model automobiles, and other three-dimensional objects that he has collected.


These images are a loving tribute to the character of small towns and the one-of-a-kind restaurants that used to dot the country but that are quickly disappearing today. Well before Baeder delved deeply into the work of Walker Evans, Russell Lee, and the other important Farm Security Administration photographers, he had begun to shoot black-and-white photographs with much the same

spirit and content. His eager vision also led him to storefronts, street corners, and window displays in the neighborhoods of New York City. On advertising assignments in Europe, Baeder made striking photographs while exploring OnV

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Above: George’s, 1973, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

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J o h n B a e d e r ’s AMERICAN ROADSIDE

Below: Southwest Motel, 1977, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

London, Florence, Munich, Frankfurt, Rome, and Paris. The source for many of the artist’s later diner paintings is what he calls ‘innocent images’ that he rediscovered while taking stock of his documentary photography of the 1960s. His archive contains hundreds of Kodachrome slides shot purely as documentation, not with the idea that they would be the subjects of paintings. Like his black-and-white photographs from the ’60s, Baeder’s color photographs

from the American Roadside series reflect his sensitivity toward vernacular culture, the milieu of the everyday American. Asked by art critic, Peter Frank, why he chose to use some photos as the basis for oils or watercolors while allowing others to be presented in their original form, Baeder replied with Zen-like humor: ‘There are some photographs that scream to be paintings, and some that just want to be photographs.’ Some of these photographs, such as Trailer,


Baeder’s “American Roadside” images reveal the breadth and depth of his vision as both a photographic artist and preservationist. Arizona Route 66 (1975), were commissioned for a grand exhibition at the Smithsonian, based on architect Robert Venturi’s research Signs of Life: Symbols in the American City. Baeder continued the series after the exhibition with Southwest Motel (1977), Beverly’s Luncheonette (1980),

and other color photographs in the same spirit. Baeder’s personal passion for the visual culture of America became a quest to document the essence of the nation’s identity. Like Charles Kuralt and Bill Moyers, Baeder has seen the material culture of mid-20th century America OnV

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Above: Two Windows, 1967, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

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J o h n B a e d e r ’s AMERICAN ROADSIDE

Right: Beverly’s Luncheonette, 1980, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”. Below (top to bottom):

as a grand metaphor to make his viewers understand that, in the words of Charles Baudelaire, ‘We are enveloped and steeped as though in an atmosphere of the marvelous; but we do not notice it.’” – J ay W illiams

Miss Berthier, 1973, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”. Private, 1973, C print on Kodak Endura paper, 20 x 30”.

John Baeder’s work has been featured in over 30 solo exhibitions in galleries in the US and

abroad. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the High Museum of Art, and the Detroit Institute of Arts, among others. In conjunction with the exhibition, the Museum will host a book signing on January 20,


2016, celebrating the publication of the artist’s biography, written by Jay Williams. Published by Vendome Press and distributed by Abrams, John Baeder’s Road Well Taken will be available for purchase in the Museum store.

Left: John Baeder’s Road Well Taken by Jay Williams

O n V iew

(Vendome Press, 2015).

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On view

02.18.16 – 05.15.16

@

NORTON MUSE

O’Ke Stetth Torr, Zo

W O M E N

M O D E R N I S


UM of ART, W. Palm Beach

www.norton.org

effe, heimer, Zorach:

S T S

I N

N E W

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O’KEEFFE, STETTHEIMER, TORR, ZORACH: Women Modernists in New York

ARTISTS Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986), Florine Stettheimer (1871-1944), Helen Torr (1886-1967), and Marguerite Zorach (1887-1968) all worked in a modernist style in New York between about 1910 and 1935. These women also knew one another and made insightful comments about each other’s art. In a new exhibition entitled O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York, which opens at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach on February 18, 2016, and runs through May 15, 2016, viewers will have a special opportunity to examine their art and careers in parallel for the first time. Organized by the Norton Museum of Art with the support of the Portland Museum of Art in Maine, the exhibition will feature approximately sixtyfive paintings, works on paper, and textiles made by these four modernists during this key period.

Georgia O’Keeffe, The Red Maple at Lake George, 1926. Oil on canvas. Mr. & Mrs. Michael Connors, Washington, DC.

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O’KEEFFE, STETTHEIMER, TORR, ZORACH: Women Modernists in New York

Text by Ellen Roberts, the Norton Museum of Art’s Harold and Anne Berkley Smith Curator of American Art.

Each of these American artists engaged with modernism in different, compelling ways, and the exhibition will allow visitors to compare their contrasting visions. Stettheimer, Torr, and Zorach are lesser-known, and the show will introduce viewers to their impressive work. The exhibition will also serve to place O’Keeffe’s better-known art in a new context. None of these painters wished to be seen primarily as women artists; instead, they all sought to be recognized as artists. Nevertheless, this project is necessary because their identity as women shaped the circumstances

under which they worked, the forms their art took, and especially, the way their pictures were seen by their culture. By exploring these effects, this exhibition and accompanying catalogue will reveal the significant role of women in American modernism. The historical connections between these four artists are numerous. Florine Stettheimer and Marguerite Zorach were friends, and Zorach’s drawings of Stettheimer will be in the exhibition. The Stettheimer family owned at least one work by Zorach, and Zorach also painted two of the miniature pictures for

Above (top to bottom): Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe – Hands, 1918. Platinum print. Georgia O’Keeffe, Jack-in-the- Pulpit No. IV, 1930. Oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Alfred Stieglitz Collection,

Opposite: Georgia O’Keeffe, Red Flower, 1919. Oil on canvas.

Bequest of Georgia O’ Keeffe,

Norton Museum of Art, Purchase, The Esther B. O’Keeffe Charitable Foundation, 96.5.

1987.58.3. © Board of Trustees,

© The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation/Artists Rights Society CARS), New York.

National Gallery of Art, Washington.

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O’KEEFFE, STETTHEIMER, TORR, ZORACH: Women Modernists in New York

Florine’s sister Carrie’s largescale dollhouse. Both Zorach and Georgia O’Keeffe attended the avant-garde salon that Stettheimer and her sisters held in their Manhattan home, and O’Keeffe eventually gave the eulogy at Stettheimer’s funeral. O’Keeffe was a friend of both Stettheimer and Helen

Above (top to bottom): Florine Stettheimer, Portrait of Myself, 1923. Oil on canvas laid on board. Art Properties, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University in the City of New York, Gift of the Estate

Torr, and she admired both their work. Three of these painters— O’Keeffe, Torr, and Zorach— were married to other modernist artists, who were sympathetic to the creative lifestyle and, especially in the case of O’Keeffe, helped to promote their careers. Yet all four of these painters struggled with balancing society’s expectations of them as women with their art, including Stettheimer, who, although she never married, was required to fulfill the social obligations of her upper-middle-class lifestyle. The early 20th century ushered in the era of the ‘New Woman,’ who had increasing freedom to explore the public realm: she attended universities, entered the labor force,

of Ettie Stettheimer, 1967, 1967.17.05. Florine Stettheimer, Picnic at

Above: Peter A. Juley & Son: Florine Stettheimer, ca. 1917-1920, Florine Stettheimer

Bedford Hills, 1918. Oil on canvas.

Papers, Rare Books and Manuscript Library, Columbia University, NYC.

Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

Opposite: Florine Stettheimer, Spring Sale at Bendel’s, 1921. Oil on canvas.

Gift of Ettie Stettheimer

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of Miss Ettie Stettheimer, 1951.

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O’KEEFFE, STETTHEIMER, TORR, ZORACH: Women Modernists in New York

agitated for suffrage, and in general, bypassed the traditional boundaries of genteel femininity. O’Keeffe actively worked for women’s rights, and Stettheimer, Torr, and Zorach indicated their awareness of these causes in their writings. In this environment, women artists had a new consciousness of the particular challenges they faced and actively worked to surmount them through efforts such as the New York Society of Women Artists, a modernist group founded in 1925 with Zorach as its first president, and O’Keeffe’s exhibition of the work of women artists at the Opportunity Gallery in 1927. And yet, an in-depth look at O’Keeffe’s, Stettheimer’s, Torr’s, and Zorach’s work and its contemporary recep-

tion reveals that each of them suffered from having her art viewed as expressive of essential femininity, rather than of her own artistic voice. Marguerite Zorach turned to embroidery and batik when she found the demands of oil

Above (top to bottom): Helen Torr, I, 1935. Oil on canvas. Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA. Gift of Nancy Stein Simpson, class of 1963, in memory of Samuel Stein.

Above: Portrait of Helen Torr Dove by Arthur Garfield Dove, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photographs of Arthur Dove, (ca. 1920-1946). Archives of

Helen Torr, Corrugated Building, 1929.

American Art, Smithsonian Institution, digital ID: 8280.

Oil on panel. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Museum purchase funded by

Opposite: Helen Torr, Evening Sounds, ca. 1925-30. Oil on composition board.

The Brown Foundation, Inc., and Isabel B.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The Hayden Collection-Charles Henry Hayden Fund.

Wilson in memory of Peter C. Marzio.

© 2016 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Photo: Bridgemen Images.

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O’KEEFFE, STETTHEIMER, TORR, ZORACH: Women Modernists in New York

Above (top to bottom): Portrait of Marguerite Thompson Zorach in her studio by Peter A. Juley & Son. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Marguerite Thompson Zorach,

painting difficult to balance with her responsibilities as a mother, and her reputation suffered because of her association with these media that were seen as more feminine. Florine Stettheimer preferred not to exhibit her work and would not sell it. Her refusal to engage with the public realm, coupled with her preference for delicate forms and personal subjects, made her art seem archetypally feminine, and critics consequently saw it as less important. Helen Torr and her husband, Arthur Dove, developed their modernism alongside each other, but critics described her work as imitating his. Georgia O’Keeffe created work that critics—most notably her husband and dealer, Alfred Stieglitz—interpreted as embodying general female sexuality rather than her own aesthetic vision. Such reductive understand-

ings were particularly difficult for women modernists to avoid since these artists employed degrees of abstraction, leaving the meanings of their art open to wide interpretation. Yet they were also particularly frustrating for these artists since, as modernists, they sought above all to express their individuality in their art. This first reductive conception of O’Keeffe’s, Stettheimer’s, Torr’s, and Zorach’s work still influences how we view their art today. Understanding these four artists’ work in the context of their gender reveals the factors that have limited our appreciation not only of their art, but also of American women modernists in general. This project thus makes possible a greater comprehension of women’s key role in the history of modernism. On View

Prohibition, 1920. Oil on canvas.

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Collection of Clay Center

Opposite: Marguerite Thompson Zorach, Bathers, ca. 1913-1914. Oil on canvas.

for the Arts and Sciences,

Norton Museum of Art, Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2015.72.

Charleston, WV.

Photo: Jacek Gancarz.

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ST CKW PATRICK

MULTIMEDIA EXHIBITION:

@

Patrick Dougherty; Photo: James Fraher.


WORK DOUGHERTY

: 01.16.16 – 04.17.16 PROJECT INSTALLATION: 02.02.16 – 02.20.16

@

APPLETON MUSEUM of ART, College of Central Florida www.appletonmuseum.org

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STICKWORK

T H E “ S T I C K M A N ” C O M E T H ! Internationally

renowned artist, Patrick Dougherty, bends, weaves, and flexes saplings into mammoth architectural sculptures that dynamically relate to the landscape and built environment around them. Over the last 30 years, he has created more than 260 works throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. This winter, the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida in Ocala is bringing the award-winning sculptor to Marion County for a project called Stickwork. Over the course of three weeks, from February 2-20, 2016, the artist will build a site-specific installation on the Museum grounds constructed entirely from locally-harvested tree branches and saplings. In addition to the outdoor installation, a

Above and left: Patrick Dougherty at work. Photo (above): Courtesy of North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC. Photo (left): Charles Crie. Opposite page: Little Ballroom, 2012. Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia. Photo: Megan Cullen.

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STICKWORK multimedia exhibition— featuring drawings, video, and photo documentation of his past projects—will be on display in the Appleton’s Preview Gallery from January 16 through April 17, 2016, providing audiences with a further understanding of the artist’s process and the temporal quality of his work. Dougherty’s natural sculptures are inspired by and specifically designed for each community’s natural environment. The artist visited Marion County and met with Museum staff this past summer to scout locations for gathering building materials for the project. During the first three weeks of Feb-

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ruary, the artist will return to construct the large-scale outdoor installation with the help of Museum and college staff, and a team of community volunteers. The Appleton has launched a call for volunteer assistance from individuals, school groups and other organizations to participate in this unique and engaging project. Volunteers aged 16 years and up are welcome—and no experience is necessary. As Dougherty explained, “Everyone’s had the childhood experience of playing with sticks, and it doesn’t take that long to reignite those ultimate urges.” Volunteers are critical to the suc-

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This page: Close Ties, 2006. Scottish Basketmakers Circle, Dingwall, Scotland. Photo: Fin Macrae. Opposite page (inset): Out in Front, 2013. Sarasota Museum of Art, Sarasota, FL. Photo: Dick Dickinson.


STICKWORK

Right: Call of the Wild, 2002. Museum of Glass: International Center for Contemporary Art, Tacoma, WA. Photo: Duncan Price. Below: Running in Circles, 1996. TICKON Sculpture Park, Langeland, Denmark. Photo: Hatten.

cess of each project. They help in the construction process, moving scaffolding, sorting materials, assisting in the weaving process, and cleaning up the site. Their efforts “add a lot to the energy of the sculpture,” said the artist. Dougherty plays team coach for his volunteers who “come out of the woodwork” to spend three weeks laboring by his side. “I never really know exactly how many volunteers I will have or what our materials will be—or, for example, what sort of scaffolding will be at our disposal. But being able to adapt and collaborate is part of the process,” Dougherty said in a recent interview with FLOWER magazine. Also part of the process is working out in public view, which often invites questions from passersby—and the artist is usually quite happy to engage in conversations with spectators, in fact, he draws energy from the encounters. He is often asked about the transitory nature of his


creations as the installations are not intended to be permanent. After about two years, the sculptures usually start to fade, and will ultimately disintegrate. The idea is that their ephemeral nature makes the pieces all

the more beautiful. Dougherty provides his clients with preliminary drawings for the projects, but he is not confined by them. Flexibility is key to attaining a successful outcome as rigid adherence OnV

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Birthday Palace, 2014. National Tropical Botanical Garden, Kauai, HI. Photo: Courtesy NTBG.


STICKWORK to a master drawing could potentially inhibit some of the “magic” that occurs during the building process. For Dougherty, staying open to and in tune with the location always yields better results. During the anticipated two years that the sculpture will stand, it will be a part of the Appleton’s outdoor Sculpture Walk and Garden, an ongoing project that features a dynamic and engaging collection of large-scale sculptures that activate the Museum’s exterior spaces. Born in Oklahoma in 1945, Dougherty was raised in North Carolina. He earned a BA in English from the

While Dougherty’s sculptures will ultimately disintegrate, their ephemeral nature makes the pieces all the more beautiful. University of North Carolina in 1967 and an MA in Hospital and Health Administration from the University of Iowa in 1969. He later returned to the University

of North Carolina to study art history and sculpture. Combining his carpentry skills with his love of nature, Dougherty began to learn more about primitive OnV

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Above (top and bottom): River Vessels, 2010. Waco Cultural Arts Festival, Waco, TX. Photos: Mark Randolph.

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STICKWORK

SPECIAL EVENT: On February 11, 2016, mid-way through the completion of his outdoor installation on the grounds of the Appleton Museum of Art, Patrick Dougherty will give a lecture in the Museum’s auditorium at 6 pm, commenting on his past projects, process, and inspirations. This event is free and open to the public. Below: Sortie de Cave, 2008. Jardin des Arts, Chateaubourg, France. Photo: Charles Crie.

techniques of building and to experiment with tree saplings as construction material. In 1982, his first work, Maple Body Wrap, was included in the North Carolina Biennial Artists’ Exhibition, sponsored by the North Carolina Museum of Art. The following year he had his first solo show entitled Waitin’ It Out in Maple at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. His work quickly evolved from single pieces on conventional pedestals to monumental environmental works, which required saplings by the truckloads. Over the last 30 years, he has built over 260 of these works. His sculpture has been seen worldwide—from Scotland to Japan to Brussels, and all over the United States. Patrick Dougherty has received numerous awards, including the 2011 Factor Prize for Southern Art, North Carolina Artist Fellowship Award, PollockKrasner Foundation Grant, Henry Moore Foundation


Fellowship, Japan-US Creative Arts Fellowship, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Princeton Architectural Press published a major book about Patrick and his work in 2009. This monograph, Stick-

work, has received excellent reviews and is available at www.stickwork.net. When not out in the field, Dougherty is home with his wife and son in their own Chapel Hill, North Carolina, garden. On View OnV

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Summer Palace, 2009. Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Photo: Rob Cardillo.

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ON VIEW

0 1. 2 0 1 6

THRU

0 6. 2 0 1 6 @

A r c h i t e c t s of th 76

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T H E D A L Í M U S E U M,

e

ST. PETERSBURG

Imagination

WWW.THEDALI.ORG


DISNEY and DALÍ: Architects of the Imagination

Salvador Dalí, The Broken Bridge and the Dream (detail), 1945, © Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-­Salvador Dalí, [Artist Rights Society (ARS)], 2015. Collection of The Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL, 2015.


F

ROM AN INTANGIBLE DREAM

to a phantasmagorical reality, The Dalí Museum presents Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination, on view from January, 2016, through June, 2016. This immersive and enriching multimedia exhibition tells the story of the unlikely alliance between two of the most renowned artists of the 20th century: brilliantly eccentric Spanish surrealist, Salvador Dalí, and American entertainment innovator, Walt Disney. Presented through a multimedia wonderland of original paintings, story sketches, conceptual artwork, objects, correspondences, archival film, photographs,

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DISNEY and DALÍ: Architects of the Imagination

and audio—including work from Disney studio artists Mary Blair, Eyvind Earle, John Hench, Kay Nielsen, and more—this comprehensive exhibition showcases two vastly different icons who were drawn to each other through their unique personalities, their mutual admiration, and their collaboration on the animated short, Destino. Shown side-by-side with the surrealist’s artworks are Disney art pieces such as Mary Blair’s concept artwork from the Fantasy Sequence of Maids in Cinderella, uncannily close in theme and com-

Walt Disney, ca. 1930s. Photograph courtesy of The Walt Disney Company, © Disney.

Mary Blair, Fantasy sequence of maids, Cinderella concept art, ca. 1950. Collection Walt Disney Family Foundation, © Disney.

position to Dalí’s 1945 work, The Broken Bridge and the Dream, which juxtaposes Dalí’s contemporary surrealism to Blair’s modern, graphic interpretation. “Disney and Dalí heralds a new era in art exhibitions,” said Dalí Museum executive director, Hank Hine. “Visitors can expect a multi-sensory environment of moving image, soundscapes, and the transformative aura of exquisite individual paintings.” Born three years and half a world apart, both Disney and Dalí bore boyhood imaginations grounded in their


DISNEY and DALÍ: Architects of the Imagination

upbringing in the 1900s, encouraging their lives, careers, and legacies to be paralleled on a profound level. A deeper look into the lives and artistic prominence of the surrealist and the dreamer— highlighted by hand-written letters and alongside filmed dramatizations and audio recreations—shows just how alike these two innovators were in blurring the lines between reality and dreams. Walt Disney was born in Chicago, Illinois, on December 5, 1901 and grew up in the small town of Marceline, Missouri. Dalí, who was born on May 11, 1904 in Figueres, Spain, spent his time by the

rocky bays of Costa Brava and the fishing village of Cadaqués. Their childhoods and upbringings are showcased side-by-side using family photos, portraits, found footage, and early art from both young artists. While Disney attended night classes at the Chicago

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Academy of Fine Arts, Dalí had his first public exhibition at the Municipal Theater in Figueres when he was just 15 years old. Three years later, Dalí would enroll at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid and gain a reputation for his eccentric aesthetic. As both innovators were


ahead of their time, they faced uphill battles in their early careers as seen in their constant endeavors to break ground—Disney as an animation pioneer, and Dalí as an innovative fine artist embracing emerging art forms and cinema. For Disney, the development of

new technology in cameras, sound and special effects, and advancement in motion pictures would be essential to his films. Modernism, optical effects, improvisational jazz, and the intricate aesthetics of machines would serve as poetic influences in Dalí’s creative processes. For OnV

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Above: Salvador Dalí, Study for Sentimental Colloquy, 1946, © Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-­Salvador Dalí, [Artist Rights Society (ARS)], 2015. Collection of The Dalí Museum, Inc., St. Petersburg, FL, 2015. Opposite: Willy Rizzo, Salvador Dalí photograph for Paris-­Match. Collection Gala-­Salvador Dalí Foundation.

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Salvador Dalí, Untitled, ca. 1946. © Salvador Dalí. FundacióGala-­Salvador Dalí, [Artist Rights Society (ARS)], 2015. Collection Animation Research Library, © Disney.


DISNEY and DALÍ: Architects of the Imagination

both innovators, the balance between technology and art would be vital to their craft. In 1936, Disney and Dalí’s careers would briefly intersect at the Museum of Modern Art in New York where a number of Dalí’s works were on display in the Fantastic Art, Dada, and Surrealism exhibition, in which two animation cels from Disney’s short film, Three Little Wolves, were also showcased. It is around this time when the two innovators started

to take note of each other. In 1937, in a letter to Andrê Bretton, founder of the Surrealist movement, Dalí wrote, “I have come to Hollywood and am in contact with three great American surrealists— the Marx Brothers, Cecil B. DeMille, and Walt Disney.” One of the strengths of Disney’s evolving style was his employment of European artists to enhance the storybook look of his films. He collected books of art and fairy tales to inspire his artists. After readOnV

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Above (top to bottom): Still and DVD cover image from the animated short, Destino, a Salvador Dalí and Walt Disney collaboration, ca. 1945.

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DISNEY and DALÍ: Architects of the Imagination

ing Dalí’s autobiography The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, Disney sent his copy to the artist asking for not only his autograph but also suggesting a collaboration at The Walt Disney Studios. It wasn’t until 1945 that Disney engaged Dalí to design a surrealistic animated short to be part of a packaged film in the vein of Fantasia. After

scouring Disney’s music library for a song to inspire Dalí, he chose Ray Gilbert and Armando Dominguez’s ballad “Destino” because of the title—the Spanish word for “destiny”—which sparked his imagination. Starting in January 1946, Dalí split his time between Pebble Beach and The Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California,

writing outlines and treatments, clarifying his ideas, balancing the weights between animation and live-action, drawing, and relentlessly working sideby-side with the Studios’ John Hench on this extraordinary collaboration. Over time, however, it became more apparent that there were differences in the two men’s approach of storytelling. In an article in the Los Angeles Times on April 7, 1946, Dalí described Destino as, “A magical exposition of life in the labyrinth of time,” while Disney described it as, “A simple love story—boy


meets girl.” While character and personalities were the most important elements of Disney’s stories, Dalí saw tales unfold like enigmatic dreams, the importance of characters only seen wrapped in symbolism. Less than a year after they began their partnership, The Walt Disney Studios encountered financial difficulty, and Destino was shelved. The unfinished project would languish in the Disney vaults for nearly 54 years until Walt Disney’s nephew, Roy E. Disney, unearthed the dormant project in 1999, while working

on Fantasia 2000—and he decided to bring it back to life. With a team of approximately 25 animators and guidance from John Hench himself, the production was finished and released in 2003. The newly completed Destino would go on to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 2004. Despite the disappointing end to their original collaborative effort, the friendship between Disney and Dalí endured through the coming decades. Disney adorned the walls of his Palm Springs home with Dalí’s paintings. After welcoming Dalí and his wife into his home during a vacation to California in 1951, Disney and his wife, Lillian, would travel to Spain to visit Dalí and Gala in 1957. The friendship between Disney and Dalí was born out of the mutual admiration of two visionary artists and sustained by the simple kinship of two small-town boys on a OnV

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never-ending quest to broaden the horizons of art. Their influence reverberates all around us—in films, television, stage, advertising, fashion, and art. Through dedicated work, ingenious selfpromotion, and their singular artistic visions, their names and art are forever fused in our collective imagination. Guest-curated by filmmaker, Ted Nicolaou, Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination was organized by The Walt Disney Family Museum, in cooperation with The Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, FL, the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation in Figueres, Spain, and The Walt Disney Studios. On View

Above left: Salvador Dalí and Walt Disney in Spain, 1957. Photograph. Gift of Diane Disney. Opposite: The Dalí and Disney families around the dinner table in Spain, 1957. Photograph. Courtesy of The Walt Disney Company, © Disney.

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HISTĂ“RIAS/H C O N T E M P O R A R Y

A R T

SANDRA C H A N C E

A N D

@

USF CO

Sandra Cinto,Untitled (detail), 2014. Permanent pen and acrylic on canvas.


HISTORIES F R O M

B R A Z I L

A CINTO N E C E S S I T Y

On view

01.15.16–03.05.16

ONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM, Tampa www.ira.usf.edu OnV

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On view

01.15.16–03.05.16

@ USFCAM, Tampa

HISTÓRIAS/ HISTORIES CONTEMPORARY ART FROM BRAZIL One of two new exhibitions of Brazilian contemporary art to be presented by USF Contemporary Art Museum (USFCAM), Histórias will showcase works by artists whose approaches address the varied histories of Brazil, some collective, some individual, but all rooted in reflections on the country’s complicated past and present, and vast geographical, racial, and cultural wealth and diversity. The exhibition will also offer a look at important trends in Brazilian visual arts through selected works by established and emerging artists. Jonathas de Andrade’s (Maceió, 1982) videos, installations, performances, and inter-

Opposite: Caio Reisewitz,

ventions focus on the Nordeste region, explor-

Goiânia Golf Club II, 2004.

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C-print mounted on Diasec.

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HISTÓRIAS/HISTORIES: C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t f ro m B r a z i l

Right: Jonathas de Andrade, O Levante (The Uprising), 2012-2013. Video loop. Below: Virginia de Medeiros, Meiriele from the series Fábula do Olhar, 2013. Digital photopainting printed on cotton paper, framed text, audio installation. Produced in collaboration with mestre Júlio Santos.

contemporary Brazil. Sonia Gomes (Caetanópolis, MG, 1949) creates intricate biomorphic fabric sculptures that speak of the heritage of Caetanópolis as a center of textile production, and by extension, refer to her personal and familial history. Virginia de Medeiros (Feira de Santana, Bahia, 1973) relies on documentary strategies in video, audiovisual, and photography to explore marginal and transgressive communities, and to probe the interstices between reality and fiction in representation. Photographer, Caio Reisewitz (São Paulo, 1967), portrays Brazil’s rich architectural history, from baroque to modernist, and studies the environmental changes to the state of São Paulo and its Atlantic forest, brought about by economic development. Luiz Zerbini (São Paulo, 1959) creates large-scale paintings that strikingly portray the contemporary Brazilian environment, juxtaposing modernist, geometric patterning and architecture with organic elements and detritus of everyday life. Histórias is designed to intro-

duce the Tampa Bay community to contemporary Brazilian art and artists. According to the Florida Chamber of Commerce, Brazil is Florida’s largest export trading partner, and has been visited by over 1.5 million Brazilians since 2013, creating an impact of $2.3 billion on the state’s economy. The exhibition will include


“Histórias” brings to light Brazil’s rich past and complex present in a multi-media showcase of original works by established and emerging contemporary Brazilian artists. OnV

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HISTÓRIAS/HISTORIES: C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t f ro m B r a z i l a brochure with a critical essay on the artists and their works by Agnaldo Farias, locating them in their respective cultural, historical, and environmental milieux, and siting their practices and contributions within the larger context of contemporary Brazilian visual arts. On January 15th, a morning symposium featuring artists, Sandra Cinto and Caio Reisewitz; curator, Noel Smith;

Opposite: Sonia Gomes, Sem título from Lugar para um corpo series, 2014-15. Sewing, moorings on different fabrics and steel screen. Right: Luiz Zerbini, O Suicida alto – astral, 2006. Acrylic on canvas, bronze, wood, concrete, ceramic and cotton string.

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and collaborator, Agnaldo Farias, will take place at the USF Marshall Student Center. An opening reception honoring the artists and curators will be held that evening from 7 to 9 pm at USFCAM. Related events include concerts, an artist talk with Caio Reisewitz on his work with water in Brazil, curatorial tours, and an edition of Inside Art, CAM’s online secondary school cur-


riculum that looks at critical social issues through the lens of contemporary art. Hist贸rias is curated by Noel Smith, curator of Latin American and Caribbean Art, Institute for Research in Art, with the collaboration of Dr. Agnaldo Farias, curator, critic, and professor in the Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo, University of S茫o Paulo.


On view

01.15.16–03.05.16

@ USFCAM, Tampa

SANDRA CINTO CHANCE AND NECESSITY Concurrent with USF Contemporary Art Museum’s exhibition, Histórias/Histories, São-Paulo based artist, Sandra Cinto, will create a site-specific work in the Museum’s West Gallery. The commissioned installation will meditate on the theme of water, with drawings on fabric, and feature a new suite of prints created at USF’s Graphicstudio, as well as sculptural elements. Cinto has developed a rich vocabulary of symbols and lines to create lyrical landscapes and narratives that hover between fantasy and reality. The artist renders intricate and mesmerizing environments of turOpposite:

bulent seascapes, violent rainstorms, and

Sandra Cinto, Untitled, 2013.

celestial skies that frequently engage with

Permanent pen on fabric, metal spinning tops and painted wood.

the surrounding architecture to a disorient-

Dimensions variable.

ing effect, creating the illusion of a weight-

3 am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night, The Bluecoat,

less, spiraling universe. Evoking stories of

Liverpool, Reino Unido.

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tastical landscapes serve as a metaphor for the human odyssey, while also pushing the limits and possibilities of drawing. Though Cinto has produced small-scale works, she is best known for her installations, covering entire walls with her graphic renderings of roiling waves, twinkling stars,

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and natural elements. Cinto feels a connection to the act of drawing, but does not limit herself to a single medium or to two-dimensional surfaces. Her menagerie of imagery often wanders onto nearby furniture, incorporating found objects to create an immersive environment in which domesticity meets Surrealism. In her

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work, Cinto culls inspiration from historical influences and integrates it into a commentary on contemporary society. Central to all of her work is the cycle of life—her own and that of the viewers immersed in her imagery. Under the beauty and seduction of the lines lies a darkly serious investigation of the


SANDRA CINTO: Chance and Necessity perate sea-borne immigrants. Sandra Cinto was born in Santo André, Brazil, in 1968. She studied art at the Faculdades Integradas Teresa D’Ávila, San André, Brazil. Her work has been exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions, both nationally and internationally. Among her many public projects and commissions, her most notable include One Day, After the Rain, commissioned by The Phillips Collection in Washington, DC (2012-2013), Encounter of Waters at Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Park Pavilion (2012-2014), and A Casa das Fontes (The House of Fountains), an installation conceived for Casa do Sertanista in São Paulo (2013). O n V iew endurance of the human spirit in the face of the forces of nature. Historical references, such as Géricault’s Raft of the Medusa, lead to a meditation on the human past and present: reflections on the rigors experienced by Cinto’s own family and others in their emigration to Brazil, as well as the every day tragedies of today’s des-

Left: Sandra Cinto, Imitation of water, 2010. Permanent pen on painted wall, dimensions variable. Instituto Tomie Ohtake, São Paulo. Photo: Everton Ballardin. Below: Sandra Cinto, Encounter of waters, 2012. Permanent pen on wall, vinyl cut on wooden boat, variable dimensions. Seattle Art Museum, Olympic Sculpture Park Pavilion, Seattle, USA. Photo: Robert Wade.


Fl or ida S tat e Unive rs it y

M U S E U M o f F I N E A R T S , Tallahas s e e p r e s e n t s

CUBAN ART

20

IN THE

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CUBAN ART in the 20th CENTURY

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rganized by the Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts in concert with guest curator, Segundo J. Fernandez, and Cernuda Arte of Coral Gables, Florida, Cuban Art in the Twentieth Century: Cultural Identity and the International Avant Garde will present exciting, colorful works by Cuban modernist painters who participated in a global movement in the arts, characterized by a self-conscious break with traditional art styles. The exhibition opens at the MoFA on February 12, 2016, and will run through March 27, 2016, offering Museum visitors an insider’s view of Cuba’s dynamic culture. I ntroduction

by

J uan A. M artínez ,

Professor Emeritus, Florida International University

Modern Cuban art is a complex movement which emerged in Havana in 1927 and matured during the next two decades. The Cuban modern art movement consists of a loose group of artists divided into generations who counted on the moral support of an intellectual elite and minimal economic help from the private and public sectors. In spite of

a fragile infrastructure, this art movement, along with similar movements in literature and music, played a major role in defining Cuban culture in the 20th century. The first generation of modernist artists studied in Cuba’s art academy, Academia de San Alejandro (founded in 1818), rebelled against it upon graduation, and completed their studOnV

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Previous spread: Juan Roberto Diago, Bodegón (Still Life), 1946. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. Photo: Jon Nalon. Opposite: Guido Llinás, Sin Titulo (Untitled), 1958. Oil on canvas. Private Collection, Miami, FL. Image courtesy of Cernuda Arte.

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CUBAN ART in the 20th CENTURY

Opposite: Víctor Manuel García, Gitana (Girl), detail, ca. 1940. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. Photo: Jon Nalon. Below: Carlos Enríquez, Paisaje (Landscape), 1943. Oil on canvas. Private Collection, Miami, FL. Image courtesy of Cernuda Arte.

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ies in Europe, mostly in Paris. There they found their way to Montparnasse, joined bohemian café life, studied in ateliers, visited galleries and museums, and participated in exhibitions. That generation’s direct contact with modern and pre-modern European art, and with artists from diverse countries, had a profound impact on its artistic development. However, the Cuban artists’ approach to the art they saw in ateliers, museums, and galleries was active and selective rather than imitative. Upon their return to Havana in the late 1920s and early 1930s, they developed

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their signature visual languages and launched the modernist movement. The leading members of the first generation — Eduardo Abela (18891965), Víctor Manuel García (1897-1969), Antonio Gattorno (1904-1980), Amelia Peláez (1896-1968), Carlos Enríquez (1900-1957), Arístides Fernández (1904-1934), Fidelio Ponce (1895-1949), and Jorge Arche (1905-1956) — came into their own artistic vision at a time of political turmoil and economic depression, in spite of which they ushered in a new chapter in Cuban art. The vanguardia painters, as the first generation is also known, were born about the time that Cuba became a republic, in 1902, and were part of an intellectual elite that sought reform, in some cases revolutionary change, in all aspects of Cuban life: political, economic, educational, and cultural. Inspired by the ideals of European modernism (scientific and industrial development, representative democracy, universal literacy, artistic license, etc.), they aimed to change their postcolonial society. In the visual


CUBAN ART in the 20th CENTURY

Opposite: Eduardo Abela, Dancers, ca. 1953. Oil on board. Private Collection. Photo: Jon Nalon. Below: Wilfredo Lam, El Bien Vestido (The Well Dressed), 1968. Oil on canvas. Private Collection. Image courtesy of Cernuda Arte.

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arts, these desires translated into developing an independent movement, informed of avant-garde artistic languages and committed to the personal symbolization of Cuban ethos. In the process of imagining and visualizing their young nation, they favored the most humble sectors of society: the peasant and the Afro-Cuban. They also

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leaned towards landscape and urban scenes to express a sense of place. In Cuba, the critical 1930s gave way to the hopeful 1940s. The decade began with a new constitution, free elections, and better economic conditions. While World War II was ravaging large parts of the globe, Cuba was living a period of relative stability and economic prosperity due to an increased demand for sugar in the US. The visual arts in the 1940s benefited from the acceptance of modern art gained by the previous generation, the emergence of professional art critics, an increase in private and state sponsored local and international exhibitions, and an uptick in art collecting by Cubans and foreigners. Their strongest support continued to come from the Cuban intelligentsia and professional middle class. The second generation of modernist painters — Mario Carreño (1913-2000), René Portocarrero (1912-1985), Mariano Rodríguez (19121990), Cundo Bermúdez (1914-2008), Roberto Diago (1920-1955), Amelia Peláez,


CUBAN ART in the 20th CENTURY

Right: Mariano Rodríguez, Sisters, 1949. Oil on board. Private Collection. Photo: Jon Nalon. Below: Cundo Bermúdez, Nostalgia, ca. 1940. Oil on wood. Private Collection, Miami, Florida. Image courtesy of Cernuda Arte.

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and Wifredo Lam (19021982) — the last two artists bridged the first and second generations — built on the art of their immediate predecessors while developing a more mundane, Dionysian, and symbolic (as opposed to narrative) view of self and nation. They developed a monumental and volumetric approach to form and brightened their palettes considerably, giving their figures a more tangible and sensual quality. While most of the artists of the vanguardia generation visited Paris in their formative years, those of the second generation visited Mexico City or stayed home during their apprenticeships. The previous generation’s interest in the peasant and Afro-Cuban themes, often loaded with social and political implications, lost their critical edge and new themes were invented. A number of these artists showed a preference for urban motifs, inspired by the city of Havana. Their paintings of Havana’s colonial interiors did not represent a celebration of colonialism, but an affirmation of their Spanish heritage c om

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which, at the time, was being contested by a growing recognition of Afro-Cuban culture and by North American cultural imports and way of life. The end of the 1940s closed a chapter in art in Cuba. In the following decade, the most pro-


gressive emerging artists took a turn towards abstraction, in tune with international artistic trends and their own personal and national circumstances. They reacted against the figurative and symbolic art of their predecessors, aiming for a more

“universal� expression in art. The trend towards abstraction in Cuba was part of the international shift to non-objective art at mid-century and a reaction to the cultural and political situation on the island. Twenty years of a nationalist rhetoric in OnV

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art was wearing thin and political turbulence, which began with a military coup of the right in 1952 and ended with a full-fledged leftist revolution in 1959, seems to have encouraged artists to look within rather than at the nation. a n u a ry

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The 1950s generation of modernist artists explored various approaches to abstraction. Some adapted the vocabulary of Cubism, many that of Abstract Expressionism and Informalism, and others that of Concrete Art. Its leading members were mostly responsible for introduc-

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ing in Cuba the concept of art as an autonomous aesthetic object, beyond narration and symbolism. The purpose of their art was to instill a strong emotion in the viewer. Since 1959, the modernist movement has evolved under a revolutionary turned c om

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totalitarian government, which increased support and control over the visual arts and culture in general. Two constants in the modernist movement, set during the discussed period, were synchronicity with international artistic developments and engagement with Cuban issues.


CUBAN ART in the 20th CENTURY since 1980. Following the lead of their predecessors, progressive artists of the last fifty years have imaginatively adapted vanguard forms and practices to discourse on Cuban realities. Cuban modern art of the 1930s and 1940s is recognized today, from global modernism art history texts to international auction houses, as one of the leading artistic movements of early 20th century Latin American art. Similarly, contemporary Cuban art is undergoing a boom and it is prevalent in biennials around the world and in major museums and galleries in the Americas and Europe. Today, Cuban modern art is a salient chapter in the history of global modernism and it is the foundation for internationally recognized contemporary Cuban art. O n V iew Modernist artists continued to look to New York for artistic cues, reacting to Pop Art and Minimalism in the 1960s (also New Figuration coming from Latin America), Photo-Realism in the 1970s, and Neo-Expressionism, Conceptual, Performance, and Installation Art

Left: José Mijares, Composición Geométrica (Geometric Composition), 1957. Gouache on paper. Private Collection. Photo: Jon Nalon. Below: Hugo Consuegra, La Venganza (The Vengeance), 1956. Oil on canvas. Private Collection, Key Biscayne, FL. Image courtesy of Cernuda Arte.


California

I M P R E S S I O N I S M S E L E C T I O N S from the I R V I N E M U S E U M

01.15.16-04.03.16

MUSEUM of ART–DeLAND

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CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM: S e l e c t i o n s f ro m t h e I r v i n e M u s e u m

B

EGINNING

IN

THE

MID-

19th century through the late 1930s, California became a top destination for artists from all over the world. Although these artists came from a variety of backgrounds and created artworks in many styles, they shared an intense love affair with the awe-inspiring, sublime landscapes of California. California Impressionism: Selections from the Irvine Museum is a tribute to the splendor of California as it was before huge population growth and mass urbanization. This highly anticipated

Previous spread: Guy Rose, Laguna Eucalyptus,

exhibition will open at the Museum of

ca. 1917. 40 x 30”.

Art-DeLand in its downtown galleries

Left:

at 100 N. Woodland Blvd. on January 15, 2016, and run through April 3, 2016. OnV

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CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM: S e l e c t i o n s f ro m t h e I r v i n e M u s e u m

Spanning over eighty years of artistic accomplishment, this stunning showcase brings together approximately sixty paintings and watercolors by California’s most renowned artists, including Franz Bischoff, Joseph Kleitsch, Alfred R. Mitchell, Edgar Payne, William Ritschel, Guy Rose, Henrietta Shore, George Gardner Symons, and William Wendt.

Each of these artists shared an intense love affair with the awe-inspiring, sublime landscapes of California.

Joseph Kleitsch, Red and Green, 1923. Oil on canvas, 36 x 40”, Irvine Museum.

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“These artists and their work communicate a deep involvement in the world itself—in its places and things, in the cultural values and philosophical posturing of its inhabitants, and in its intimate acknowledgment and need for nature,” said George Bolge, CEO, Museum of Art–DeLand. The diversity of landscapes c om

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CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM: S e l e c t i o n s f ro m t h e I r v i n e M u s e u m

and settings that inspired these artists stretches from Laguna to the High Sierras. Each of the works included in the exhibition has been selected from the extensive holdings of the Irvine Museum—one of the preeminent collections of California art of the Impressionist Period. In the early 20th century, California produced a unique artistic style which combined several distinctive aspects of American and European art. This style, which is often called California Impressionism or California Plein Air painting, concerned itself with light and color.   “Much of what originally made California a ‘Golden Land’ was directly linked to the environment, especially the land and water that nurtured and sustained a rare quality of life,” said Chairman of The Irvine Museum, Joan Irvine Smith. “Over a hundred years ago, the splendor of nature fascinated artists and compelled them to paint beautiful paintings. As we view these rare and remarkable paintings, we OnV

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Left: Arthur G. Rider, The Spanish Boat. 35 x 41”. Below: Anna Althea Hills, Southern California Landscape, n.d. Oil on canvas, 30 x 36”.

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CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM: S e l e c t i o n s f ro m t h e I r v i n e M u s e u m

Right: William Wendt, A Clear Day, ca. 1903. 30 x 40”. Below: George Gardner Symons, Southern California Coast. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50”, The Irvine Museum.

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are returned, all too briefly, to a time long ago when the land and its bounty were open and almost limitless.” In California, landscape painting was by far the most popular subject among its myriad painters. Where the French Impressionists yearned to capture the immediate moment, or the temporal fragment of societal activity, California’s Impressionists sought to catch the fleeting moment of specific natural light as it bathed the landscape. The goal was to capture this striking visual sensation on canvas quickly, before the light changed. The key to achieving this goal was to paint outdoors and to accentuate the role of color to produce brilliant light effects. Some of the most popular works of art in The Irvine Museum’s collection will be on display: Generally taken to be the most important of California’s Impressionist painters, Guy Rose (1867-1925) is represented by Laguna Eucalyptus, painted in Laguna Beach about c om

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1916. One of the very few artists of this period to have been born and raised in California, Rose studied art in San Francisco and Paris and adopted a French Impressionist approach to painting. For eight years, between 1904 and 1912, Rose and his wife, Ethel, lived in the


small village of Giverny and were friends and neighbors of Claude Monet. A Clear Day by William Wendt (1865-1946) serves as documentation of the beauty of an unspoiled landscape of a bygone era. One of California’s best-known landscape painters

of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Wendt was called the “Dean of Southern California” artists. His landscapes were especially known for their rich greens and browns. Southern California Coast, by George Gardner Symons (18611930) shows the coast at LaguOnV

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na Beach near today’s community of Rockledge. Symons, who became quite famous for his paintings of snow-covered hills and valleys in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, also loved to paint in southern California. A close friend of William Wendt, Symons built a

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studio-home in Laguna Beach and became an active member of the local art community. Arroyo Seco Bridge, by Franz A. Bischoff (1864-1929), was painted in South Pasadena in 1912. The bridge still stands today, connecting Highland Park with South Pasadena at


CALIFORNIA IMPRESSIONISM: S e l e c t i o n s f ro m t h e I r v i n e M u s e u m

1920s by Alfred R. Mitchell (1888-1972). The scene shows the community of La Jolla, just north of San Diego, as it looked long before the rampant development that characterize the area today. Mitchell was one of San Diego’s most important painters and most popular art teachers. In addition to numerous examples of California Impressionism, the exhibition will also display more progressive works—paintings that go somewhat beyond Impressionism and venture into Modernism. California Impressionism will be accompanied by a fully-illustrated book and a range of educational programs for adults and families. O n V iew

York Boulevard, however, what used to be the picturesque banks of the Arroyo Seco has since been completely paved over and is now the roadway of the Pasadena Freeway. Another popular painting in the exhibition is La Jolla Shores, painted in the early

Left: Franz A. Bischoff, Arroyo Seco Bridge. Oil on canvas, 30 x 40”, The Irvine Museum. Below: Alfred R. Mitchell, La Jolla Shores. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50”, The Irvine Museum.


SHOWCASE { NAT U R E - I N S P I R E D

ARTWORKS}

Exhibition:

WILD On view 01.14.16 through 04.17. 16 at Old School Square / Cornell Art Museum, Delray Beach www.oldschoolsquare.org

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“WILD” IS A GROUP SHOW

of contemporary artwork by 13 internationally recognized artists who are inspired by nature and use their talents to show the beauty and wonder of the natural world. The artists were invited to participate in the exhibition because of their respect for nature, their fascination with animals, and their attention to the beauty of the natural environment. The artwork featured in this exhibition has been presented in galleries and museums worldwide. WILD also includes paintings by more than 20 Plein Air Palm Beach artists who are inspired by and have captured the beauty of South Florida’s lush landscapes. Artists featured in WILD include: Diane Arrieta, Alex Beard, Ellen Jewett, Elizabeth Jordan, Ernesto Kunde, Caitlin McCormack, Magnus Sebastian, Ronald Shaw, Jonathan Stein, Chad Steve, Carlton


S H O W C A S E

Scott Sturgill, Carin Wagner, and Karla Walter. The idea for a show centered on the natural world came to curator, Melanie Johanson, after she discovered the work of Alex Beard, a New Orleansbased painter and illustrator, adventurer, best-selling author, world traveler, animal conservationist, and filmmaker. “I thought it was amazing

that one man could honestly make a difference in the world through the use of his artwork,” said Johanson. “I find it inspiring to think that if everyone used their talents to support a cause, great or small, what a huge difference could be made.” A portion of the proceeds from the sale of artwork in the show will go to The Watering Hole Foundation (www. wateringholefoundation.org), created by Alex Beard in support of conservation efforts. The foundation is dedicated to saving endangered wildlife and preserving the Earth’s remaining wilderness. O n V iew

opposite page: Ellen Jewett, strange and gentle, 2015, mixed media sculpture. this page (clockwise from top left): 1. ronald shaw, untitled, sculptural pottery. 2. Karla Walter, Black Velvet if You Please (detail), 2015. 3. Alex Beard, The Wave, painting. special events: January 13, 2016 at 6pm: Film Screening of Alex Beard’s short documentary– Drawing the Line, Artist Talk, and Exhibition Preview. January 14, 2016: Opening Celebration– Meet some of the artists, see the exhibit, and enjoy wine and light bites.


PROFILE {LILY

PRINCE}

“DREAM STATE” PRESENTS

Exhibition:

Dream State On view 01.06.16 through 01.30.16 at The Naples Depot Museum www.colliermuseums.com

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a collection of richly patterned abstract paintings and drawings by Lily Prince, derived from the artist’s plein air works inspired by the South Florida landscape. “Working en plein air, I attempt to take what I experience observationally in nature, translating it into a language of personal expression and universal significance,” wrote Prince in her artist statement. “It is my goal to be immersed in the landscape to record the natural beauty lurking there...I traveled to South Florida numerous winters to work en plein air. The drawings done there inspire my studio works, which are either watercolor paintings or oil pastel drawings. As winter approaches annually where I live, in New York’s Hudson Valley, I begin to long for Florida. This longing—combined with the memory and the drawings of Florida’s


P R O F I L E

weather, light, and flora—produce images in and of a ‘dream state.’ These works combine perception in the moment, memory of past space, and aspiration of future place. The repetition of marks and pattern suggest a reverberation of sound and rhythm of movement, reflecting time and its passage.” Prince received a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from New York’s Bard College Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts. She has exhibited in over 70 solo and group shows in the US and abroad. In 2014, she was

chosen to participate in Draftsmen’s Congress, a residency with The New Museum in New York City, and was one of two artists awarded a fully-funded residency at the BAU Institute in Italy, in 2013. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New York Times and New York magazine. She has lectured at such prestigious venues as Yale, Vassar, Cornell, RISD and Pratt Institute. Prince is currently working on illustrations for a book on Abstract Expressionism by Richard Klin for For Beginners Books. O n V iew

all works © Lily Prince 2015, from the Dream State series, oil pastel or watercolor on paper. Photos courtesy of Lily Prince. See more of the artist’s work at www.lilyprince.com. special events: Lily Prince’s work is currently featured in the group exhibition, Square Foot, on view through 01.09.16 at Projects Gallery in Miami. lily prince will conduct an Abstract Plein Air Landscape Drawing Workshop on Jan. 16 and Jan. 17, 2016: Old School Square, Delray Beach Center for the Arts, www.oldschoolsquare.org


SPOTLIGHT {NINA

In “SAILING to BYZANTIUM,”

Nina Surel translates William Butler Yeats’ poetic allegory of aging into an imaginary physical and spiritual journey employing sculpture, installation, sound, and video. An ordinary boat is the mode of transport from one realm to another­­— from the temporal to the eternal. While we desire to remain perfect and unchanging, we are in fact prone to the decline of physical beauty, decay, and eventual disappearance. Surel locates Yeats’ “singing masters of the soul” in the form of golden birds—the material of gold leaf is associated with the “artifice of eternity.” Surel is known for her series of mixed media portrait-landscapes in which she becomes the object and the subject of her transformation, reciting the roles of many characters within a single narrative and continuously changing appearance. “The characters embedded in these scenarios always precisely indicate an identity that lies halfway between fiction and my flesh and blood, between my-

SUREL}

Exhibition:

Nina Surel: Sailing to Byzantium On view through 01.24.16 at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

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S P O T L I G H T

thology and autobiographical reality,” stated the artist. “I employ a wide range of media, including photographs, buttons, porcelain, jewelry, and resin on wood. The use of resin freezes and unifies all the elements, pouring over figures, landscapes, and objects like a film, separating this world —this narrative universe, obtained through fragments of past epochs and styles, from pieces and shards and residues of real artistic forms and lives—from our world.” Waiving the colorful and convoluted universe of her earlier work, Surel invites us to embark on an entirely new voyage with her. “There is a lot of intimacy in this show—it’s an emotional journey,” Surel ex-

plained. “Presenting something new is not easy for an artist, but the Art and Culture Center is a great place to do this. It’s a very nurturing place.” Nina Surel was born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and has lived and worked in Miami since 2001. She studied fashion and textile design at the Architecture & Urban Planning University of Buenos Aires, and costume and set design at the Art Institute Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires. Her work has been exhibited widely in institutions, galleries, and prestigious art fairs in the US and abroad. Her work has also graced the pages of Vanity Fair, Italy; Art Nexus; Harper’sBazaar,Russia;andElle Décor, among others. O n V iew

opposite page: artist, nina surel, portrayed in Infallible Truth. this page (clockwise from top RIGHT): 1. installation view detail, Sailing to Byzantium. 2. Fleeting Beauty. 3. Sailing to Byzantium, 2015, Digital photograph, 90 x 45”. Photos courtesy of the artist and Valli Art Gallery, miami. Special Event: Artist talk January 14, 2015, 6:30 pm: a conversation with Nina Surel & Michelle Weinberg. in addition, Surel will also give a tour of her exhibition.


FOCUS {ANDY

BOCA RATON MUSEUM of ART

will be presenting three new exhibitions revolving around one of the 20th century’s most influential figures in contemporary art and culture.

WA R H O L }

01.26.16–04.10.16

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987 Throughout Warhol’s long career, he produced 60 unique album cover designs for an extremely diverse range of music from Tchaikovsky and Gershwin to the Velvet Underground. Warhol On Vinyl, organized by the CranbrookArt Museum, includes over 100 album covers, wallpaper, video, and sound. See every cover Warhol designed, from the iconic Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers to the extremely rare Giant Size $1.57 Each, his first Pop Art record cover, in the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date.

Exhibitions:

Warhol on Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987 Warhol Prints from the Collection of Marc Bell Bob Colacello: In and Out with Andy

01.26.16–05.01.16

Warhol Prints from the Collection of Marc Bell Complete silkscreen suites from the collection of Marc Bell will

Opening 01.26.16 at Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

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accompany the Warhol on Vinyl exhibition. The show includes the iconic Campbell’s Soup Cans, images of Liz Taylor, Marilyn Monroe, Elvis, and Mao as well as Warhol’s Flowers, Dollar Signs, and Camouflage.

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Bob Colacello: In and Out with Andy As the editor of Andy Warhol’s Interview from 1971 to 1983, Bob Colacello was perfectly placed to record the wild, glamorous, disco-and-drugs decade between the end of the Vietnam war and the advent of AIDS. He wrote about it in a monthly column called “Out.” In 1975, Swiss art dealer, Thomas Ammann, gave Colacello one of the first miniature 35mm cameras, a black plastic Minox small

enough to hide in his jacket pocket, and Colacello began snapping photographs too, “an accidental photographer” more akin to a secret agent than any typical paparazzo. With their skewed angles, multilayered compositions, and moody lighting, his images have an immediacy and grit not often found in the work of professional party photographers. Among his subjects are Jack Nicholson, Cher, Mick Jagger, Diane von Furstenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Warhol himself. Because space in Interview was limited, only a handful of Colacello’s pictures were published each month. This is the first solo museum exhibition of Colacello’s candid photos and includes vintage prints and selections from his book, OUT. O n V iew

opposite page: promotional image from Warhol on vinyl exhibition, courtesy of Cranbrook Art Museum. above: Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup Cans series, 1962. Giclée print on rag paper, 57 x 42”, Courtesy of Marc Bell. left: Bob Colacello, Andre Leon, Steve Rubell, and Andy Warhol, Bianca Jagger’s Birthday Dinner, Mortimer’s 1981. Gelatin silver, 16 x 20”, Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York.

On View 01-03.2016  

On View Magazine is your online source for world-class fine art museum and gallery exhibitions taking place throughout Florida. Each edition...

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