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Art in the Garden: The Art of

J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 5

DALE CHIHULY

African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives

AT FA I R C H I L D T R O P I C A L

from the DAVID C.

B O TA N I C G A R D E N ,

DRISKELL Center

CORAL GABLES

AT P O L K M U S E U M

OF ART, LAKELAND

Lesley Dill:

And Still We Rise:

FAITH & the DEVIL AT A P P L E T O N M U S E U M

OF ART, OCALA

RACE, CULTURE

American Chronicles:

and VISUAL CONVERSATIONS AT O R A N G E

The Art of

COUNTY REGIONAL

NORMAN ROCKWELL AT TA M PA M U S E U M O F A R T

A L S O I N S I D E . . . The

New

HISTORY CENTER, ORLANDO

Cici & Hyatt Brown

Museum of Art, D AY T O N A B E A C H


Feed your kids the Arts. Studies have shown that involvement in the arts helps kids increase test scores and promotes academic achievement. For 10 Simple Ways to get more art into your child’s life, visit AmericansForTheArts.org.


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2015

Vo l . 5 , N o . 4

RIGHT: DALE CHIHULY, FLOAT BOAT, 2014. ON THE COVER : DALE CHIHULY, SOL DEL CITRÓN, 2014.

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40 Coral Gables

Art in the Garden: The Art of

J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 5

DALE CHIHULY

ART IN THE GARDEN: THE ART OF DALE CHIHULY

i e w

Perspectives

AT FA I R C H I L D T R O P I C A L

from the DAVID C.

B O TA N I C G A R D E N ,

DRISKELL Center

CORAL GABLES

AT P O L K M U S E U M

OF ART, LAKELAND

Lesley Dill:

And Still We Rise:

FAITH & the DEVIL AT A P P L E T O N M U S E U M

OF ART, OCALA

RACE, CULTURE

Renowned American glass artist, Dale Chihuly, has returned to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden to unveil his most extensive garden exhibition to date in Miami as part of Art at Fairchild, the Garden’s seasonal program that invites international artists to display their works throughout the 83-acre tropical oasis. OnV

African American Art Since 1950:

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American Chronicles:

and VISUAL CONVERSATIONS AT O R A N G E

The Art of

COUNTY REGIONAL

NORMAN ROCKWELL AT TA M PA M U S E U M O F A R T

A L S O I N S I D E . . . The

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HISTORY CENTER, ORLANDO

Cici & Hyatt Brown

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2015

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

56 Ocala

70 Sarasota

82 Lakeland

96 Orlando

FAITH & THE DEVIL

The Ringling Museum of Art brings recycling to light in a major exhibition that focuses on the use of cast-off or disposed materials in the creation of new thought-provoking works of art.  

ART SINCE 1950

RACE, CULTURE

LESLEY DILL:

Lesley Dill’s largescale installation, Faith & the Devil, hosted by the Appleton Museum of Art, investigates the philosophical and existential conundrums of evil and underlying faith in the world.

RE:PURPOSED

AFRICAN AMERICAN

Polk Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition will take visitors on a visual journey through time, exploring the evolution of African American art over the span of six decades.

108 Tampa AMERICAN

AND STILL WE RISE: AND VISUAL

CONVERSATIONS

Using the powerful medium of story quilts, the Orange County Regional History Center presents an unparalleled multivoice account of what it means to be Black in America.  

CHRONICLES: THE ART OF NORMAN

ROCKWELL

RIGHT: NORMAN ROCKWELL, THE ART CRITIC, 1955. COVER ILLUSTRATION FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST, APRIL 16, 1955.

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Tampa Museum of Art offers a rare opportunity to see a comprehensive retrospective of work by Norman Rockwell, whose masterful paintings documented our changing society in the small details and nuanced scenes of ordinary people in everyday life.

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TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): LESLEY DILL, FAITH AND THE DEVIL (DETAIL INCLUDING LUCIFER), 2013; KEITH MORRISON, POSSE, 1994; NICK CAVE, SOUNDSUIT (DETAIL), 2008; PEGGIE HARTWELL, LUCY TERRY PRINCE: THE GRIOT’S VOICE, 2012.


Y e l S e L

l L i D FaiTh & the DeVil

January 24-March 22 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd. Ocala, FL 34470-5001 352-291-4455 AppletonMuseum.org Follow Appleton Museum

EVERGLADES: AMERICA’S WETLANDS APRIL 7-JULY 5

Conservation Photography by Mac Stone


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2015

Vo l u m e

5,

No. 4

Profile

136

ONE WAY: PETER MARINO

Acclaimed architect Peter Marino’s multifaceted relationship with art is the focus of a new installation at Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach.

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COMMENTARY

10

MUSE

Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach presents a series of eyeopening landscape portraits by renowned documentary photographer, Colin Finlay.

Spotlight

138

KABAS AND COUTURE

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Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville highlights designer fashions and traditional forms of dress in Ghanaian culture.

Museum exhibitions

Fo r m

CALENDAR

ON VIEW DESTINATION: THE CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM OF ART

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GALLERY

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

PICTURED: N.C. Wyeth, Dance of the Whooping Cranes, ca. 1938.

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An innovative expansion to the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach will be the new permanent home for the most extensive collection of Florida art anywhere in the world.

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OBJECT: SCULPTURES, PRINTS, AND DRAWINGS BY MICHAEL BOLES

Pensacola Museum of Art presents an impressive body of work by artist and educator, Michael Boles.


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C O M M E N T A R Y

WE CONTINUE TO BE AMAZED BY THE

breadth and depth of what Florida’s art and cultural venues offer viewers each year. Thanks to a myriad of visually rich and thought-provoking shows, we can experience the world—for better or worse— through the powerful art of visual storytellers who share their visions and experiences with us. We are pleased to kick off the 2015 season with many exciting new shows you won’t want to miss. We think you’ll agree, there’s something for everyone—so help us spread the love and tell your friends. And a Happy New Year to all! Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director diane.onviewmagazine@gmail.com

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on iew M A G A Z I N E

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney

Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb

Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Contact Us:

editorial.onviewmagazine@gmail.com www.onviewmagazine.com

prepare to be dazzled. Chihuly at Fairchild

through A brand new exhibition 5.31.15

Dale Chihuly. Cattails, 2013.

#ChihulyAtFairchild

Photo by Chihuly Studio.

10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, Florida 33156-4296 • 305.667.1651 • www.fairchildgarden.org

ADMISSION Chihuly at Fairchild: Free for Fairchild Members and Children Under 5. Non-Members: $25 Adult, $18 Senior, $12 Children 6-17. Tropical Chihuly Nights: Fairchild Members: $25 Adult, $12 Member Children 6-17. Non-Members: $35 Adult, $25 Senior, $16 Children 6-17. Chihuly Day/Night Combo Ticket: (Admits entry between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 9:00 p.m.) $50 Adult, $35 Senior, $22 Children 6-17. Admission is free for Children under 5.


MUSE

Colin Finlay: Of Consequence On view

01.23.15

through

SOUTHEAST MUSEUM D ay t o n a B e a c h

of

04.19.15

at

P H O T O G R A P H Y,

w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g

F

OR THE PAST 25 YEARS,

Colin Finlay has documented the human condition, covering war and conflict, disappearing traditions, the environment in both its glory and devastation, genocide, famine, religious pilgrimage, and global cultures. The images presented in this exhibition span the course of Finlay’s career and serve to spread awareness, understanding, and an open dialog surrounding some of the world’s most pressing issues. Opposite: Colin Finlay, Self Portrait. All images courtesy of the Artist.


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MUSE “Our third world war is with ourselves, and the consequences of humanities’ weight upon the environment. Our melting worldwide glaciers, the emotional and physical scar that war has left on our environment, and the quality and the consequence of life that we all must bare is uniquely ours. Before us, oil, coal, lead, aluminum, and gold stand as statues of consumption, reflecting back upon us a visage of Easter Island. ...I have spent the last 25 years as witness to the unfolding of our collective consequences. The images are my testimony.”– C. F i n l ay Colin Finlay is regarded as one of the foremost documentary photographers in the world. The Scotland-born native has been awarded the prestigious Picture of the Year International (POYi) honor six times. His work has been honored by presBANGLADESH: Steel recycling foundry melting scrap metal from de-commissioned ships. Many ship breaking yards operate in developing nations with lax or no environmental law, enabling large quantities of highly toxic materials to escape into the general environment, causing serious health problems among ship breakers, the local population, and wildlife.

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BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII: Lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano with new growths of ferns growing within. Volcanoes are so widely considered to be agents of destruction that their contribution to the development of Earth is often overlooked.

tigious organizations such as the Lucie Award/IPA, New York Art Directors Club, Photo District News (PDN), Applied Arts, International Center for Photography, and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. His photographs have been featured in Vanity Fair, TIME, U.S. News and World Report, American Photo, Los Angeles Times Magazine, Asia Week, World Health Organization, UNICEF, Photographic Magazine, Communication Arts and Discovery, and are in the permanent collections of the George Eastman House, J. Paul Getty Museum, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA and MOCA, Los Angeles. Finlay has documented the human condition with compassion, empathy and dignity. In pursuit of his passion, he has circled the globe twenty-seven times, in search of that one photo that will be a testament to the depth of human will and compassion, of continued on pg. 18...

hope, and of an informed collective consciousness. OnV

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MUSE MUSE ICELAND: Melting glacial ice is freeing volcanic magma from deep below the ground, and as ice sheets continue to shrink, scientists believe that we will see more eruptions in Alaska, Patagonia, and Antarctica.


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MUSE MUSE ICELAND: Melting glacial pond. Lying just below the Arctic Circle, Iceland is one of the fastest-warming places on the planet— as much as four times the Northern Hemisphere average.


MUSE ...continued from pg. 13 Finlay’s environmental portraits appear almost dreamlike. Beautiful and breathtaking with a surreal, almost painterly quality that is rich with color and texture, the images capture the breadth and depth of seemingly unearthly landscapes. It is only when the true subject is revealed that we are hit with a harsh reality—the impending destruction of our planet. The images pose an odd juxtaposition—that such magnificent imagery could stem from utter devastation is unsettling and yet, this is what draws us closer. Drawing the public’s attention to such crises is what he hopes will provoke deeper thought, questions, and conversations concerning environmental and other global issues. For Finlay, it’s important that people see what’s happening: “We need to be able to look at it. And we need to not be able to turn away. That’s my

ALBERTA, CANADA: Tar Sands, Keystone Pipeline Origin. Tar sands leak chemicals into the soil and water, wrecking vast areas of boreal forest. Canada accounts for one-fourth of the original boreal forest remaining on earth.

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ARIZONA: Copper tailing ponds in Green Valley, AZ. There are an estimated 3,500 tailings ponds worldwide. An estimated 39 percent of tailing pond dam failures happen in the US—a rate higher than anywhere in the world.

job as a photographer, to make sure that [we] don’t turn away.” To capture his amazing environmental landscapes, Finlay takes to the skies. One of his biggest challenges is repressing his fear of heights long enough to hang out of helicopters and photograph the devastation below. “There are perspectives that are only going to come from committing to that seat in the helicopter, opening up the door, and looking at the vastness of what’s below,” he says. Finlay sees the human condition as both a journalist and a storyteller. “These photographs can get into the hearts and minds of people, and hopefully they pass them on to someone else. ...It’s all about creating awareness and documenting what is first and foremost a topic we care about—it’s my drive, my passion, and my cause.” More of Colin Finlay’s work can be found at www.colinfinlay.com. On View OnV

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

AVON PARK

CORAL GABLES

SFSC Museum of Florida Art & Culture

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Thru 01.23.15

Thru 05.31.15

Aquiferious: Margaret Ross Tolbert

Art in the Garden: The Art of Dale Chihuly + Satyendra Pakhalé: Fish Chairs

www.mofac.org 01.28.15–03.04.15

Flight: Aloft in the Everglades

www.fairchildgarden.org

and Jessica Osceola

www.mofac.org 03.11.15–05.01.15

www.mofac.org

At Home: Seminole Reservations and Contemporary Native Art— Elgin Jumper

01.26.15–04.05.15

Izhar Patkin: The Wandering Veil www.bocamuseum.org

BOCA RATON

Boca Raton Museum of Art

01.26.15–04.05.15

Surrealism and Magic www.bocamuseum.org

(See story on pg. 40.) Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami Thru 01.18.15

Transformative Visions: Works

Image from Flight: Aloft in the Everglades at SFSC Museum of Florida Art and Culture, Avon Park: Rebecca Reeve, Untitled from Marjory’s World.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 6 }

Coral Gables continued...

by Haitian Artists from the Permanent Collection www.lowemuseum.org Thru 03.29.15

Weaver’s Stories from Island Southeast Asia www.lowemuseum.org

the Lowe Art Museum

A Survey of Works

www.lowemuseum.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org 03.05.15–05.23.15

CORAL

Comic & Pop Art

SPRINGS

BEACH

Museum of Arts & Sciences Opening 02.08.15

Coral Springs Museum of Art

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Thru 02.21.15

03.05.15–05.23.15

Lew Lautin: The Magic Behind the Image

Lagemann & Verbicky

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

03.07.15–05.23.15

Thru 02.21.15

Mark Shepard

Sergey Fedotov:

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Thru 04.26.15

ArtLab @ The Lowe: Conquest and Coexistence: The Cultural Synthesis of Spanish Colonial Art

DAYTONA

Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art www.moas.org

(See story on pg. 122.) Southeast Museum of Photography Thru 02.15.15

Alejandro Almaraz: Portraits of Power www.smponline.org

www.lowemuseum.org Thru 02.15.15

Judith Fox: Sea of Dreams

Thru 05.24.15

1+2: Colección Jumex in Dialogue with

www.smponline.org

Image from 1+2: Colección Jumex in Dialogue with the Lowe Art Museum at Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables: Joseph Kosuth, No Number #001, 1989, Colección Jumex, México.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 6 }

Daytona Beach continued...

the Senses: Beauty, Form and Function

01.23.15–04.19.15

Colin Finlay: Of Consequence www.smponline.org

(See story on pg. 10.)

www.morikami.org

DUNEDIN

02.27.15–05.10.15

Andy Warhol: The Photographs

Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.smponline.org

01.16.15–03.01.15

02.27.15–05.10.15

Black + White

The Growth of a Collection, Part II: 2002-2014 www.smponline.org

DELAND

www.dfac.org 01.16.15–03.01.15

Richard Haas: Works on Paper

Art of Light, Perception & Movement

www.moartdeland.org

www.moartdeland.org

www.dfac.org

01.16.15–04.05.15

01.16.15–04.05.15

Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida 01.16.15–04.05.15

Richard Frank Watercolors: Homage www.moartdeland.org

William Crutchfield: Satirical Commentary www.moartdeland.org

DELRAY BEACH

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

01.23.15–04.12.15

Thru 01.18.15

Richard Anuszkiewicz:

Japanese Design for

Private Language

01.16.15–03.01.15

Vadis Turner: Condensation www.dfac.org 01.16.15–03.01.15

Ya La’ford + Nathan Beard www.dfac.org

Image from Richard Anuszkiewicz: Art of Light, Perception & Movement at Museum of Art–DeLand, Florida: Richard Anuszkiewicz, Four On Four, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60”.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 4 o f 1 6 }

the William J. Glackens Collection

Martin Z. Margulies Collection

NSU Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale

www.moafl.org

www.moafl.org

02.26.15–05.31.15

03.08.15–08.02.15

Thru 02.01.15

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Aesthetic Decisions

www.harn.ufl.edu

www.moafl.org

Thru 06.28.15

GAINESVILLE

Copia: New Photographs in the Harn Collection

FORT LAUDERDALE

Café Dolly: Picabia, Schnabel, www.moafl.org Willumsen www.moafl.org

Thru 03.22.15

Thru 02.28.15

American Scene Photography:

Highlights from

Harn Museum of Art

Thru 06.07.15

Patterns Past and Present: Arts of Panama

www.harn.ufl.edu


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 6 }

Gainesville continued...

Thru 07.26.15

Open Book

Art, Technology and the Natural World

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.): As Far As the I Can See

03.27.15–05.24.15

02.03.15–05.24.15

Monet and American Impressionism

www.artandculturecenter.org 03.27.15–05.24.15

www.harn.ufl.edu 02.24.15–08.23.15

Kabas and Couture: Contemporary Ghanaian Fashion

Thru 01.18.15

02.07.15–03.13.15

Bhakti Baxter: Returning What Was Borrowed

Abracadabra: 8th Annual Exhibition and Fundraiser

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Regina Jestrow: Linens www.artandculturecenter.org

JACKSONVILLE

Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

Thru 01.18.15

02.07.15–03.13.15

Dave Muller: Rock ‘n’ Old

Ernesto Kunde: Intertwined

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 01.18.15

02.07.15–03.13.15

Kubiat Nnamdie: Looking Glass

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Annie Buckley: The People’s Tarot

yardbird records pop-up record store installation Curated by Michael Dean

02.07.15–03.13.15

Erica Mendoza: Visual Love Letters

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Tom Virgin:

www.mocajacksonville.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

(See story on pg. 138.) HOLLYWOOD

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood Thru 01.18.15

Thru 03.01.15

Project Atrium: Angela Strassheim

Thru 03.30.14

Image from Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.): As Far As the I Can See at Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Jose Alvarez, The Encounter #2, 2014, acrylic, enamel, ink, colored pencil, feathers, quills, and collage on canvas mounted on dibond, 43-1/2 x 67-1/2”, courtesy the artist and Gavlak.

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

01.24.15–04.26.15

White www.mocajacksonville.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

French History in Florida www.cummer.org

Thru 02.08.15

Perspectives on the St. Johns River www.cummer.org

Best Dressed: Clothing and Fashion in the Cummer’s Permanent Collection

01.30.15–04.22.15

Project Atrium: Angela Glajcar

www.cummer.org

www.cummer.org

Thru 02.22.15

02.24.15–10.18.15

Working Title: A Faculty Exhibition

www.mocajacksonville.org

450 Years of

Reflections:

www.polkmuseumofart.org

02.03.15–04.26.15

John Hee Taek Chae www.mocajacksonville.org 03.28.15–06.28.15

Chile Lillies, Kathy Sosa, 2007.

December 13 - March 14

Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting

LAKELAND

Polk Museum of Art Thru 01.24.15


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 6 }

Lakeland continued...

Thru 02.26.15

03.28.14–05.24.15

Produced In-House: PMoA’s Graphicstudio Collection

Ukiyo-e to Shin Hanga: Japanese Woodcuts from the Syracuse University Art Collection

www.polkmuseumofart.org Thru 03.14.15

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Her Ethereal Self: Portraits by Kathy Sosa

The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

www.polkmuseumofart.org Thru 03.14.15

01.31.15–04.25.15

Revival: Paintings by Gabrielle Wu Lee

Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art

www.polkmuseumofart.org

MAITLAND

MELBOURNE

http://textiles.fit.edu

Art & History African American Museums, Art Since Maitland 1950: Perspec01.10.15–03.22.15 tives from Art and the the David C. Subconscious: Driskell Center Salvador Dalí www.polkmuseumofart.org and Andre Smith

Foosaner Art Museum Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray

ArtCenter/ South Florida

(See story on pg. 82.)

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

www.artcentersf.org

03.21.15–06.27.15

www.artandhistory.org

01.10.15–03.22.15

MIAMI

Thru 02.01.15

Lujan Candria: Medianoche

Image from Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray at Foosaner Art Museum, Melbourne: Nickolas Muray, Frida on White Bench, New York, 1939, digital pigment print on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag paper, 14-3/4 x 10-1/8”, courtesy of the Nickolas Muray Photo Archives.

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Miami continued...

Jewish Art Collectors

Special Collections

http://jmof.fiu.edu

www.mdcmoad.org

Bass Museum of Art

MDC Museum of Art + Design

Pérez Art Museum Miami

of Painting: Prints and Multiples from the Holding Capital Group Collection

Thru 01.18.15

www.pamm.org

Thru 05.03.15

Thru 02.01.15

One Way: Peter Marino

Shen Wei: In Black, White and Gray

Project Gallery: Leonor Antunes

Thru 03.01.15

Thru 02.01.15

Thirty Years on the Road www.artcentersf.org

www.bassmuseum.org

(See story on pg. 136.) www.mdcmoad.org Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami Thru 03.15.15

Andra Ursuta www.icamiami.org

www.pamm.org Thru 01.25.15

Adler Guerrier: Formulating a Plot

Thru 02.08.15

Zine-o-mania: A World of Fanzines from the University of Miami

Geoffrey Farmer: Let’s Make the Water Turn Black www.pamm.org

www.pamm.org Thru 04.05.15 Thru 03.01.15

Beyond the Limited Life

Project Gallery: Nicole Cherubini www.pamm.org

Thru 03.15.15

Thru 04.19.15

Pedro Reyes

Project Gallery: Mario García Torres

www.icamiami.org

Jewish Museum of Florida

www.pamm.org

Thru 03.08.15

Thru 10.04.15

The Chosen: Selected Works from Florida

Project Gallery: Gary Simmons www.pamm.org

Image from Project Gallery: Leonor Antunes at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Leonor Antunes, a secluded and pleasant land. in this land I wish to dwell, 2014, photo: Nick Ash, courtesy of the artist, Air de Paris, Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo, and Isabella Bortolozzi Galerie, Berlin.

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C A L E N D A R

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Miami continued...

02.06.15–05.03.15

Boom:

Tápies: From Within

Downtown

www.pamm.org

Architecture,

Miami 1920s-1930s

02.19.15–07.26.15

www.wolfsonian.org

Project Gallery: Diego Bianchi

Thru 03.08.15

www.pamm.org

Pose and Propaganda:

02.26.15–05.31.15

Political Posters

Victoria Gitman: Desiring Eye

from the

www.pamm.org

Middle East

Contemporary and Afghanistan

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

www.wolfsonian.org

Thru 01.18.15

The Children’s

Wang Qingsong: ADinfinitum

Crusade

http://thefrost.fiu.edu 02.14.15–05.24.15

Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 03.15.15

www.wolfsonian.org 02.14.15–04.26.15

Entelechy

Monica Bengoa: Exercices de Style (Exercises in Style)

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Thru 04.05.15

The Wolfsonian– Florida International University

02.14.15–04.05.15

Thru 03.08.15

Myth and Machine: The First World War in Visual Culture

Carlos Estevez:

Boom, Bust,

www.wolfsonian.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Image from John Costin: Florida Birds at Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center: John Costin, Roseate spoonbill, sm etching.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 6 }

NAPLES

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

The Baker Museum, Artis—Naples

Thru 01.25.15

01.17.15–04.12.15

Navigating

Face to Face:

Density: The

Artists’ Self-

Thru 01.18.15

Abstract Work of

Portraits from

Fine Lines:

Lore Vanelslande

the Collection of

American

http://artisnaples.org

Jackye and

01.17.15–02.28.15

Drawings from

John Costin: Florida Birds

the Brooklyn

Thru 02.01.15

Museum

Exploring

www.naplesart.org

http://artisnaples.org

America: Western,

01.31.15–04.26.15

Wildlife and

Florida

Curtis Finch, Jr. http://artisnaples.org

01.17.15–02.28.15

Thru 01.18.15

Contemporary

Contemporary

Members’ Gallery: Mother Nature

On Paper

Art from the

http://artisnaples.org

http://artisnaples.org

National Museum

www.naplesart.org

of Wildlife Art

01.31.15–05.03.15

Thru 01.25.15

and the

The Discreet

George

Stone-hollow

Charm of the

01.17.15–02.28.15

Boorujy

Collection

Bourgeoisie:

Wild Florida

http://artisnaples.org

http://artisnaples.org

Magritte and

www.naplesart.org

the Belgian Surrealists

03.13.15–04.18.15

http://artisnaples.org

Members’ Gallery: Order/Disorder

02.19.15–05.17.15

www.naplesart.org

Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces

03.14.15–04.18.15

from the École des

National Art Encounter

Beaux-Arts,

www.naplesart.org

http://artisnaples.org

Paris

Image from Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: Jacques-Louis David, Erasistratus Discovers the Cause of Antiochus’ Disease, 1774, oil on canvas, 47-1/4 x 61”, © École des Beaux-Arts, Paris 18. Photo courtesy American Federation of Arts.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 6 }

and Reflections by Dale Kennington

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Atlantic Center for the Arts

www.mennellomuseum.com

Thru 02.07.15

Art & Artifact: Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography

ORMOND BEACH

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens 02.07.15–03.29.15

A Treasury of Indian Miniature Paintings

www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

OCALA

Culture & Visual Conversations

01.09.15–02.08.15

www.thehistorycenter.org

The Zen Zone: Shibori & Bonsai

(See story on pg. 96.)

www.ormondartmuseum.org

Orlando Museum of Art

PALM BEACH

www.appletonmuseum.org

Appleton Museum of Art Thru 02.01.15

ORLANDO

01.29.15–05.10.15

Recent Acquisitions to the Appleton Collection

Orange County Regional History Center

Maya Lin: A History of Water

01.15.15–03.30.15

www.omart.org

www.appletonmuseum.org

Highwaymen Paintings

01.24.15–03.22.15

www.thehistorycenter.org

Lesley Dill: Faith and the Devil

The Mennello Museum of American Art

02.07.15–05.03.15

01.23.15–06.07.15

And Still We Rise: Race,

Real-Lifes: Observations

www.appletonmuseum.org

(See story on pg. 56.)

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum 01.27.15–04.19.15

Bouguereau’s ‘Fancies’: Allegorical and Mythological Works by the French Master www.flaglermuseum.us

Image from Maya Lin: A History of Water at Orlando Museum of Art: Maya Lin, Water Line, 2006, aluminum tubing and paint, 19’ x 30’ x 34’9”, © Maya Lin, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photography by Colleen Chartier.

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{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 6 }

Pa l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Society of the Four Arts

the Farnsworth Art Museum

Thru 01.11.15

www.fourarts.org

ToulouseLautrec and La Vie Moderne: Paris 1880-1910

PANAMA CITY

Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida

www.fourarts.org

Pensacola Museum of Art

Journey Along the Underground Railroad

Thru 01.31.15

www.pensacolamuseum.org

PENSACOLA

Stefani Joseph: The Alice in Wonderland Series www.pensacolamuseum.org

Thru 01.23.15 01.24.15–03.29.15

American Treasures from

52nd Bay Annual Exhibit www.vacnwf.org

02.06.15–04.04.15

Color in Freedom:

OBJECT: Sculptures, Prints, and Drawings by Michael Boles www.pensacolamuseum.org

(See story on pg. 140.)

Smithsonian Institution

65 east central blvd.

.

Quilts by the women of color quilters network touring through 2017.

thehistorycenter.org

Mammy’s Golden Legacy (2012); Artist, Laura R. Gadson

240 Million African Slaves Ago (2012); Valarie Pratt Poitier

More than 60 story quilts. 400 years of history.

Far Into the Night: Weary Blues (2012); Artist, Sherise Marie Wright

Lucy Terry Prince: The Griot’s Voice (2012); Peggie Hartwell

UPCOMING EXHIBITION February 7 - May 3, 2015

02.20.15–04.18.15


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 6 }

01.16.15–02.28.15

PONTE VEDRA

Re-Riding History: From the Southern Plains to the Matanzas Bay

BEACH

The Cultural Center 01.09.15–02.01.15

Celebrate Art 2015: 9th Annual Juried Artist Member Exhibition

www.flagler.edu/crispellert

ST. PETERSBURG

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

www.ccpvb.org

Thru 01.18.15

Art in China Now

SARASOTA

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

Thru 02.22.15

Expressive Bodies: Works from the Ringling Permanent Collection

Beth Lipman: Precarious Possessions www.ringling.org Thru 02.28.15

Thru 03.22.15

www.ringling.org

Seeing the Unseen: Photography and Video

Thru 03.29.15

De Vos Banners www.ringling.org

02.04.15–06.01.15

Evolution of Commercial Printing

Jamie Wyeth’s Portraits of Rudolf Nureyev www.fine-arts.org

www.ringling.org 01.17.15–05.03.15

www.ringling.org

African American Life and Family

(See story on pg. 70.)

www.fine-arts.org

02.13.15–05.17.15

Re:Purposed

ST. AUGUSTINE

Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College

02.07.15–05.31.15

Monet to Matisse: On the French Coast www.fine-arts.org

Image from De Vos Banners at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Fr. De Vos, Acrobats and Clowns, ca.1900, oil on canvas, gift of Howard Tibbals, 2005. SN1134.1.

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{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 6 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Dalí Museum

from the Collection of Patrick M. Rowe

Photographic Arts

Picasso / Dali, Dali / Picasso

AND

Witness to War

Elger Esser: Combray

Tampa Museum of Art

www.thedali.org

www.mofa.fsu.edu

www.fmopa.org

Thru 01.11.15

Thru 02.16.15

TAMPA

Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts

Florida Museum of

www.fmopa.org

Thru 03.29.15

01.02.15–04.26.15

TALLAHASSEE

Modernism

Ezra Stoller: Photographing

Renoir to Chagall: Paris and the Allure of Color www.tampamuseum.org

02.13.15–03.29.15

03.07.15–05.31.15

Florida State University Institute on World War II: The Human Experience

American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

A N D C O M PA N I O N

(See story on pg. 108.)

www.tampamuseum.org

EXHIBITIONS

Bill Mauldin: An Artist on the Front + The Design of War: World War II Propaganda Posters & Flags

University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum 01.16.15–03.07.15

Enhanced! www.ira.usf.edu

Image from American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell at Tampa Museum of Art: Norman Rockwell, Triple Self-Portrait, 1959, cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 13, 1960, ©1960 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 5 o f 1 6 }

Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

01.16.15–03.07.15

Jerzy Kedziora

Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones

www.ansg.org

www.ira.usf.edu

02.18.15–03.29.15

TARPON SPRINGS

Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art Thru 02.28.15

Dance Tampa Bay: Photography by Tom Kramer www.spcollege.edu/museum

VERO BEACH

Vero Beach Museum of Art

Embracing Space & Color: Art On & Off the Wall

Thru 02.01.15

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Restoring the Spirit: Celebrating Haitian Art

01.18.15-02.15.15

40th Annual International Miniature Art www.verobeachmuseum.org Society of Florida Exhibition 01.24.15–05.24.15 www.spcollege.edu/museum Environmental Photography 03.01.15–05.03.15

65th Annual Florida Artists Group (FLAG) Exhibition www.spcollege.edu/museum

02.20.15–06.07.15

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Florida en Plein Air: New Works by Mary Page Evans—Nudes, Seascapes and Gardens www.ansg.org

Armory Art Center 01.17.15–01.31.15

W. PALM BEACH

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens Thru 02.08.15

Patricia Nix: An Icon of American Art

Andy Mayer www.armoryart.org 02.14.15–03.21.15

Armory Faculty Show www.armoryart.org 03.07.15–04.11.15

N.A.W.A. Florida Thru 03.01.15 Members Natural Balance: Exhibition The Sculpture of www.armoryart.org www.ansg.org

01.24.15–05.17.15

Howard Ben Tré: New Sculpture www.verobeachmuseum.org

Image from Restoring the Spirit: Celebrating Haitian Art at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Daniel Orelus, Crocodiles, 35-1/4 x 49-1/4, Collection of Figge Art Museum, courtesy of Curatorial Assistance.

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C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 6 o f 1 6 }

We s t P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Norton Museum of Art Thru 02.15.15

Coming Into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast www.norton.org

(See story in the October-December 2014 issue on pg. 38.)

Thru 04.05.15

Pastures Green: The British Passion for Landscape

at Rollins College

www.norton.org

Kara Walker: Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated)

03.19.15–06.24.15

www.norton.org 02.08.15–05.03.15

The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects www.norton.org

Imaging Eden: Photographers Discover the Everglades

02.19.15–05.24.15

High Tea:

01.17.15–04.05.15

cfam.rollins.edu 01.17.15–04.05.15

www.norton.org

WINTER PARK

Thru 02.15.15

Master Prints: Durer to Matisse

Glorious Manifestations East and West

Cornell Fine Arts Museum

Peter Schreyer: Returning Home cfam.rollins.edu 01.17.15–04.05.15

Tobi Kahn: Reverie

www.norton.org

cfam.rollins.edu Thru 02.15.15

Picasso’s Muses

The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

www.norton.org Thru 03.29.15

Thru 04.12.15

Klara Kristalova: Turning into Stone

Large Birds of Florida: The Art of John Costin

www.norton.org

O n V iew

www.polasek.org

Image from The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Beth Rudin Dewoody, © Harry Benson.

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MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art www.etrafineart.com

Artist: ANDREA DASHA REICH

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

INSPIRED BY THE

organic shapes and planes in nature, Reich’s artworks are a woven interplay of rich color spectrums that explore the depth and intimacy of the abstract world we live in. Her works are an indication of how this prolific multimedia artist sees the world. PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: Jose Alvarez BROWARD-BASED ARTIST, JOSE ALVAREZ, EXPLORES THE

construction of belief systems and his own personal journey—a complex intersection of science, mysticism, illusion, and paranormal phenomena—giving tangible form to his visual inquiry between the fantastic and the philosophical. Above (left to right): Andrea Dasha Reich, Multi-Colored Vessel, epoxy resin, pure pigments, approx. 10-15” x 8-12”, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art; Jose Alvarez, The Arrival #2, 2014, acrylic, ink, colored pencil, feathers, quills, organdy, collage on paper, 31 x 44”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

CORAL GABLES

MIAMI

Gallery: ArtSpace/ Virginia Miller Galleries

Gallery: Fredric Snitzer Gallery

www.virginiamiller.com

www.snitzer.com

Exhibition: Leon Berkowitz: Cascades of Color, Paintings from 1965-1986

Artist: MAURICIO GONZALEZ

ON VIEW THRU 02.28.15

MAURICIO GONZALEZ

This exhibit includes a cross-section of Leon Berkowitz’s oeuvre, ranging from the artist’s earlier striped canvases to his mature, misty abstractions.

continues to represent his world through the language of his sculptures and paintings, always with the desire to see his surroundings with new eyes and present these images in a new, objective way.

MIAMI

Gallery: Adamar Fine Arts www.adamargallery.com

Exhibition: Andy Warhol: Seen and Unseen ON VIEW THRU 01.31.15

Andy Warhol’s silkscreening process is explored from conception to final print with never-before-seen works and iconic images.

Clockwise from top: Leon Berkowitz, Midday Moon No. 4, 1978, oil on canvas, 70 x 56.5”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace/Virginia Miller Galleries; Mauricio Gonzalez, Pink Wax and Purple Figure, 2014, C-print, jewelry, casting wax and oil on aluminum panel, 24 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery; Andy Warhol, Queen Elizabeth (unique), 1985, screenprint on Lenox Museum Board, 40 x 32”, courtesy of the artist and Adamar Fine Arts.

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Exhibition: TAMMY KNIPP: MAIL BARCODE IN THE KEY OF Bb ON VIEW 01.03.15-02.14.15

In the alt_space, this installation reflects Tammy Knipp’s research of the development of bar codes. In collaboration with a musician, a soundtrack was arranged which invites viewers to experience the sensory processing of coded information.

MIAMI

Gallery: Dina Mitrani Gallery www.dinamitranigallery.com

Exhibition: Thomas Jackson: Emergent Behavior ON VIEW 01.17.15 - 03.06.15

“ By constructing installations from unexpected materials and placing

them where they seem least to belong, I aim to tweak the margins of our visual vocabulary, and to invite fresh interpretations of everyday things.”—T homas J ackson From left: Tammy Knipp, installation view from the exhibition, Mail Barcode in the Key of Bb, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; Thomas Jackson, Cheese balls, 2012, archival pigment print, courtesy of the artist and Dina Mitrani Gallery.

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{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: David Castillo Gallery

Gallery: Durban Segnini Gallery

www.davidcastillo gallery.com

www.durbansegnini.com

Artist: Shinique Smith

Exhibition: MANOLO VELLOJÍN: THE SPIRITUAL SIDE OF GEOMETRY 


SHINIQUE SMITH’S

ON VIEW THRU 02.2015

exuberant paintings, sculpture, and largescale installations capture the power of human expression and resilience.

Colombian artist, Manolo Vellojín, wrote that his intent with his geometric paintings was to “transfigure emotions.” The symbolism, composition and color of a good portion of his works are inspired by religious ornaments.

ST. PETERSBURG

Gallery: Chihuly Collection www.moreanarts center.org

Exhibition: Italian Traditions ON VIEW 01.23.15–04.19.15

This collection of works by renowned glass artists showcases the influence of traditional Muranese techniques, originated in Murano, Italy, on contemporary works.

Clockwise from top: Shinique Smith, Higher Ground, 2013, acrylic and paper collage on panel, 48 x 48 x 2”, courtesy of the artist and David Castillo Gallery; Manolo Vellojín, Relicario-1, 1981, acrylic on linen and stripes overlaid, 23.6 x 23.6”, courtesy of the artist and Durban Segnini Gallery; Stephen Rolfe Powell, courtesy of the artist and Morean Arts Center.

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ARTin GARDE Dale Chihuly, Reichenbach Floats, 2014.


the

EN On view

through 05.31.15 ... The Art of DALE CHIHULY

at

FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN,

Coral Gables

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Art in the Garden

R

R E N O W N E D A M E R I C A N G L A S S A RT I S T,

Dale Chihuly, has returned to Fairchild Tropical Botanic

Garden in Coral Gables to unveil his most extensive garden exhibition to date in Miami as part of Art at Fairchild, the Garden’s seasonal program that invites in-

ternational artists to display their works throughout the

83-acre tropical oasis. The exhibition, which has been in the planning for almost two years, will be on view through May 31, 2015.

Dale Chihuly, Blue Fiori Sun, 2014, 6 x 10 x 11’. All photography by Benjamin Thacker.

Chihuly previously exhibited work in the Garden during the 2005-2006 and 20062007 Art at Fairchild seasons. These past showings were tremendously successful, resulting in substantial increases in attendance and membership

“Suffice it to say, there wasn’t a day that went by that a visitor didn’t ask, ‘When is Chihuly coming back?’ ” —Nannette Zapata, F airchild ’ s chief operating officer and art curator

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for the Garden. “Suffice it to say, there wasn’t a day that went by that a visitor didn’t ask, ‘When is Chihuly coming back?’” said Fairchild’s chief operating officer and curator of art, Nannette Zapata. The 2014-2015 Art at Fairchild season debuts new works by the artist, including a new sun installation, Sol del Citron, which features forms and colors that have never before been presented, and a neon installation, Tropical Neon, designed specifically for the Garden to take advantage of its beautiful long vistas. A variety of related activities will also be held throughout the season, including special night viewings every


Above and opposite: Dale Chihuly, Sol del Citrón, 2014, 15 x 14.5 x 14’.


Art in the Garden Thursday and Sunday evening from 6:00-9:00 pm, when visitors can stroll along the paths and see the glass lit up in a magnificent symphony of color. Visitors to the Garden will have an opportunity to view Chihuly’s works of art installed throughout many of the Fairchild’s exhibits, including the lush Rainforest, sprawling Palm Collection, picturesque Bailey Palm Glade Vista, and the new Wings of the Tropics exhibit, with hundreds of colorful and exotic butterflies. Viewers will be captivated by the luminous glass sculptures reflecting off the surface of the palm-lined lakes and nestled amid the broadleaf plants and shimmering orchids of the continental US’s only outdoor Rainforest exhibit. Chihuly’s glistening glass sculptures stand tall alongside stately cycads and palms, and lay low among vibrant bromeliads. Bright water lilies float beside them in the Victoria Amazonica Pool, uniting art with the magnificent colors of the tropical landscape. The works range in size from garden glass that is a few feet tall to towers that are well over 35 OnV

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Art in the Garden

feet. “The beauty of Dale’s work is that it takes various forms,” said Zapata. “He’s unafraid to go very large scale with towers and very small scale with garden glass. He’s also fearless when it comes to their installation application. He floats his works, towers them, and then subtly nestles them into the landscape. These various applications allow visitors to experience monumental sculpture as well as the delicate relationship between art and nature.” As one can imagine, the preparation and installation of Chihuly’s work is carefully orchestrated. Each work is blown and built full-scale in the artist’s Ballard, Washington, studio, then dismantled and prepared for shipment. The same team that builds the work in the studio then travels to the exhibition site to implement the complete design. “We work very closely with Chihuly Studio and various electrical and structural engineers to ensure that all of the works are properly installed and secured,” noted Zapata. “It’s always very interesting to watch


massive cranes carry the tower armature over some of the world’s rarest tropical plants— there’s always a moment when you realize you’re holding your breath, but the Chihuly team and our installation team are the best in the world, and the

experience is as enriching and rewarding as it is technically involved.” For Zapata, the favorite part of any installation is anticipating what the exhibition design will look like, and then seeing it actually realized. “It’s like being a choreOnV

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Above; and opposite: Dale Chihuly, Walla Wallas, 2014; and Tropical Neon, 2014, 21 x 56 x 4’.

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ographer or a symphony conductor—you know what all of the players or pieces will do, and then when they do what you anticipate, it’s a satisfaction unlike any other.” Chihuly’s 2014-2015 Art at Fairchild exhibition is, in es-

Chihuly’s 2014-2015 Art at Fairchild exhibition is, in essence, a culmination of his work in outdoor settings. 48

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Art in the Garden sence, a culmination of his work in outdoor settings. “I am pleased to be returning to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden with the most comprehensive exhibition of my work ever presented in a garden,” Chihuly said. “The lush plantings and tropical set-

ting at Fairchild provides such a beautiful environment and many wonderful opportunities for me to exhibit my work.” Born in 1941 in Tacoma, Washington, Dale Chihuly was introduced to glass while studycontinued on pg. 52...

Opposite; and below: Dale Chihuly, White Belugas, 2014; and Neodymium Reeds, 2014.


Art in the Garden

Dale Chihuly, Float Boat, 2014, 3 x 13.5 x 4’.

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Art in the Garden

“[Chihuly is] unafraid to go very large scale with towers and very small scale with garden glass. He’s also fearless when it comes to their installation application.” —Nannette Zapata

Dale Chihuly, Fire Orange Baskets (detail), 2013.

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...continued from pg. 49. ing interior design at the University of Washington. After graduating in 1965, Chihuly enrolled in the first glass program in the country, at the University of Wisconsin. He continued his studies at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where he later established the glass program and taught for more than a decade. In 1968, after receiving a Fulbright Fellowship, he went to work at the Venini glass factory in Venice. There he observed the team approach to blowing glass, which is critical to the way he works today. In 1971, Chihuly cofounded Pilchuck

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Dale Chihuly, Scarlet and Yellow Icicle Tower, 2013, 33 x 7 x 7’.

Glass School in Washington State. With this international glass center, Chihuly has led the avant-garde in the development of glass as a fine art. He is renowned for his ambitious architectural installations around the world, in historic cities, museums and gardens. Chihuly’s work is included in more than 200 museum collections worldwide. Major exhibitions include Chihuly Over Venice (1995-96), Chihuly in the Light of Jerusalem (1999), and Garden Cycle (2001-14). His work has been exhibited at the de Young Museum in San Francisco (2008); the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2011); and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (2013). Chihuly Garden and Glass, a long-term exhibition, opened at Seattle Center in 2012. Fairchild’s new Chihuly show coincides with the opening of the Garden’s Adam R. Rose and Peter R. McQuillan Arts Center, a 3,000-squarefoot multi-purpose facility. Previously without an indoor arts center, Fairchild has had to pass up opportunities to exhibit works on paper by Botero and


Art in the Garden

Right and below: Adam R. Rose and Peter R. McQuillan Arts Center; Courtesy of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

Opposite: Satyendra Pakhalé, Fish Chairs.

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pop artist, Roy Lichtenstein, to accompany their outdoor exhibits. This new venue will allow the presentation of works on paper as well as live music and other offerings best suited for the indoors. “We have the opportunity to introduce people to chamber music, good art, and poetry in a setting that’s very welcoming,’’ said Fairchild’s chairman, Bruce Greer. During the 2014-2015 Art at Fairchild season, it will be home to the Chihuly Gallery. Also on view as part of Design at Fairchild is an exhibition curated by Cristina Grajales of New York’s Cristina Grajales Gallery, featuring 40 limited edition Fish Chairs by designer, Satyendra Pakhalé, who is represented by the internationally renowned ammann//gallery from Cologne, Germany. Pak-

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halé has partnered with creative director, Guilio Cappellini, of the Italian design firm, Cappellini, to produce the designs, which are displayed among more than 700 species of tropical flowering trees in the Arboretum. Pakhalé is from India and refers to himself as a “cultural nomad,” working out of the Netherlands and traveling to exhibit his collections in museums, galleries, and public spaces worldwide. He takes inspiration from his travels, the people he meets, and the cultures he learns from. He studied design at the Indian Institute of Technology and the Art Center College of Design in Switzerland. He also helped create the Master Programme in Design for Humanity and Sustainable Living at the Eindhoven Design Academy in the Netherlands. O n V iew


On view 01.24.15 –

03.22.15 at Appleton M

Le Sl DilLF &D th e

www.appletonmuseum.org


Museum of Art , College of Central Florida, Ocala

l EY Faith De vil OnV

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A LESLEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

A SCULPTOR, PHOTOGRAPHER, PRINTMAKER, AND

performance artist, Lesley Dill has spent 20 years exploring the human form, language, and sensory experience. In her work, she uses text as a mode of communication, as a physical subject, and as a symbol by painting it onto bronze sculptures, stitching it into paper, and sculpting it in metal. The words of poets, including Emily Dickinson, Franz Kafka, Salvador Espriu, and Tom Sleigh inspire and find physical form within her visceral works. Lines of text appear on disembodied heads, hands, and dresses— Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (detail including Lucifer), 2013. Wall-mounted drawings and painted mannequin. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.

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Above and opposite: Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (details including Refuge, River of Blood of Blinde Desire, and Lucifer), 2013. Wall-mounted drawings, fabric, and painted mannequin. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.

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all recurring motifs in Dill’s oeuvre—communicating the artist’s interest in the politics of the figure, psychology, and faith. Dill calls herself a collector and a creature of language: “I’m interested in the alchemy of language, the uncertainty of meaning, and the resonance within our bodies when a metaphor clicks...Language is a manifestation of the human need to reach out. As much as my work is about language, it’s

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also about what the image does to you, and how the two together make a whole.” Dill’s large-scale installation, Faith & the Devil, hosted by the Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida in Ocala, on view from January 24, 2015 through March 22, 2015, investigates the philosophical and existential conundrums of evil and underlying faith in the world. The source and lynchpin for this investigation is Big Gal Faith,


Tongues on Fire: Visions and Ecstasy (2000-2001), followed by another year-long project for a Boulder museum exhibition called Interviews with the Contemplative Mind. In 2008, she conceived, produced, and directed Divide Light, an opera based on the language of Emily Dickinson, performed in San Jose, CA. In 2010, Dill created an installation based on the life of Sister Gertrude Morgan, a street preacher, artist, and poet who worked in New Orleans during the ’60s and ’70s, called Hell Hell Hell/ Heaven Heaven Heaven: Encountering Sister Gertrude Morgan & Revelation at Arthur Roger Gallery in

an eight-foot tall female figure centered in the gallery. Her wild “word hair” and lavish 26-foot-wide dress of drawn images and words express the main themes of the exhibit: cruelty and violence, lust, forgiveness, reflection, and transcendence. Dill has worked with these themes across a decade of large-scale projects and exhibitions, including a year-long community & museum project in Winston-Salem, NC, called

LESLEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

The visual echoing of letters in Dill’s practice alludes to mantras, prayers, and poetry, all of which are commonly recited repeatedly to enforce meaning and memory.


“Language is a manifestation of the hu New Orleans. While her early works display an ephemeral lightness of touch and a quiet spirituality, her recent pieces open fresh avenues into materiality, using the metaphors of language and clothing to explore the elusive boundaries separating mind,

LESEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

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body, and spirit. As the artist explains in her statement, “There are a number of roads I move along. I use the words of poets; the vernacular stories as told to me of visionary experience; the words of folk artist and preacher, Sister Gertrude Morgan; my own


uman need to reach out.” —Lesley Dill experiences from years of living in India as well as my childhood visionary experience; and as-told-to me stories from Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan, and Liberia. The language for this installation is collected from poets, both historic and current, and from transcripts given to me

by a video journalist that document his recent work in Liberia and South Sudan. It has been a challenge to align the firsthand stories of war and corruption with my investigation of spiritual life. The word ‘faith’ is, in itself, a continued on pg. 66... OnV

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Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (installation view), 2013. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.

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Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (detail including Big Gal Faith, and Drunk with the Great Starry Void), 2013. Mannequin, wall-mounted drawings, and fabric. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.


LESLEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

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LESLEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

Opposite and below: Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (details including Big Gal Faith and Eaters and Eaten in the Radiant Garden of Sorrow and Rapture), 2013. Mannequin, wall-mounted drawings, and fabric. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.

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...continued from pg. 63 conflict. Inside it is a tension between equanimity and fear of horrors, whether from the outside world or the interior mental world. Faith is an active word, as it requires a taking on of evil in an attempt to comprehend the incomprehensible. This project, Faith & the Devil, is a walk through a person’s mind—encompassing a world in which unfathomable actions of dismemberment and cruelty coexist with times of refection and illumination. My theme of faith should in

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no way be mistaken for a kind of earnestness or naive surrender. I believe the soul is huge, hungry, and ravenous, and faith contains as much fear as optimism and crazy grace. I am drawn to explore these things—the big story.” Lesley Dill received her BA from Trinity College in 1972 and a MFA from the Maryland Institute of Art in 1980. Her work has been widely exhibited and collected, and can be found in the collections of the Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; Cleveland


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LESLEY DILL: Faith & the Devil

SPECIAL EVENT: Lesley Dill will present an Artist’s Talk on Thursday, January 29, 2014, from 6:00-7:30 pm at the Appleton: www.appletonmuseum.org Below: Lesley Dill, image courtesy of the artist and Fine Arts Center Gallery, University of Arkansas.

Museum of Art, OH; Kemper Museum, Kansas City, MO; New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and Whitney Museum of American Art; among many others.

She is the 2013 recipient of the SGC International Lifetime Achievement in Printmaking Award from Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, WI, and she received a Rockefeller Foundation Multi Artists


Production Award with Tom Morgan in 2007. Dill lives and works in Brooklyn, NY, and is represented by the George Adams Gallery in New York and the Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans. O n V iew

Above: Lesley Dill, Faith and the Devil (detail including Thoughtful Man), 2013. Wall-mounted drawings and fabric. Courtesy of the artist and the University of Arkansas.

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R E:P U R O n v i e w 0 2 . 1 3.1 5 - 0 5 . 1 7 .1 5 a t T h e J o h n &


Aurora Robson Everything All At Once Forever, 2011; Installation comprised of 16 sculptures— each made out of plastic debris (PET plastic), rivets, tinted polycrylic, and mica. © Aurora Robson; Image courtesy of the artist.

P O S E D M a b l e R i n g l i n g M u s e u m of A rt , Sarasota OnV

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Re:Purposed

TRASH TO TREASURE.

The Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota brings recycling to light in a major exhibition that focuses on the use of cast-off or disposed materials in the creation of new thought-provoking works. Re:Purposed features a selection of work by established artists such as El Anatsui and Nick Cave, in addition to emerging and midcareer artists such as Jill Sigman and Mac Premo, who consistently “re-purpose” garbage or detritus in their respective practices.  Evolving from Marcel Duchamp’s early 20th century development of the “readymade” and continuing the tradition of assemblage, these artists reinvent non-traditional materials to create artworks— encouraging new thinking about the objects and materials that surround us. Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2013; Mixed media, including hats, bags, and rag rugs, 110 x 36 x 32”; Inventory #NC13.030. © Nick Cave; Photo by James Prinz Photography; Image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

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Re:Purposed

Re:Purposed brings these inventive artists together for the first time and presents their work across three themes: “Identity,” “Index,” and “Environment.”

Vanessa German, Reality Check: To Call Police Use This Phone, 2013; Mixed-media assemblage. © Vanessa German; Image courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York.

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Organized by Matthew McLendon, curator of modern and contemporary art at The Ringling, the exhibition will be on view from February 13, 2015, through May 17, 2015, and features works by El Anatsui, Nick Cave, Matt Eskuche, Vanessa German, Emily Noelle Lambert, Mac Premo, Aurora Robson, Daniel Rozin, Alyce Santoro, and Jill Sigman. “Over the past several years, I’ve encountered a range of artists who, while working with very different materials and genres, all incorporate and reinvent cast-off materials in their creation of new artworks,” McLendon said. “This practice of making art, which expands traditional assemblage, deserves more attention. We wanted

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to bring a core group of these artists together and, through this exhibition, give them a critical platform and voice to introduce our visitors to their work.” Showcasing approximately 20 works of art, Re:Purposed brings these inventive artists together for the first time and presents their work across three themes: “Identity,” “Index,” and “Environment.” McLendon selected these themes as points of entry into this diverse and complex body of work, which encompasses expanded notions of sculpture, collage, and monumental installations—all made within the last ten years.   Each theme presents different aspects and motives for the re-purposing of garbage in discrete artistic practices,


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Above: Emily Noelle Lambert, Fortress, 2012; Wood, plaster, acrylic. © Emily Noelle Lambert; Image courtesy of the artist and Lu Magnus Gallery, New York.

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and they commonly serve as a reminder of our close connections to the materials we use to create and facilitate our lives. As part of The Ringling’s “Art of Our Time” initiative, Re:Purposed showcases artists who transcend traditional boundaries in

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both medium and practice and serves as a platform for a series of symposia that will bring leading curators, museum professionals, and artists together in conversation about evolving museum practice. “The Ringling is proud to present a robust program of


Re:Purposed

exhibitions and performances that highlight the wide range of contemporary art practices at work today,” said Steven High, executive director of The Ringling. “Last year’s R. Luke DuBois—Now exhibition highlighted the work of an artist who used unconven-

tional materials—often big data and complex codes—to create dynamic, mixed-media works; and with Re:Purposed, we are continuing that trajectory of showcasing contemporary artworks made of ‘nontraditional’ materials, and this time, demonstrating the complex and powerful meanings imbedded in the everyday objects that surround us.” For the theme of “Environment,” the exhibition highlights contemporary artists who have used the re-purposing of discarded materials to voice concerns about the environmental consequences of late-capitalist consumption as well as to propose alternative futures that redefine people’s relationship with garbage. An especially prominent work is choreographer and artist Jill Sigman’s site-specific piece for her ongoing The Hut Project (2009-present), for which Sigman creates huts made from found materials that she collects in each project location. To create The Hut Project for The Ringling, Sigman spent several weeks in Sarasota, FL, collecting materials

Below: Emily Noelle Lambert, Tongue Between Teeth, 2012; Wood, steel, acrylic, ceramic. © Emily Noelle Lambert; Image courtesy of the artist and Lu Magnus Gallery, New York.


Re:Purposed from across the area to compile for the new work.  For “Identity,” McLendon selected artists whose works underscore our construction of identities and personae through the collecting of objects, whether bought or scavenged. A selection of Nick Cave’s Soundsuits, constructed out of objects collected at flea markets and antique shops, and visual and performance artist Vanessa German’s complex sculptures, created from materials such as vintage matchbox covers and whiskey stirrers, illustrate how the “object biography”—or the accumulation of biographical associations embodied by an object—easily become entangled with the biographies of both the artist who adopts and re-uses them and the viewers that encounter them in an entirely new form. Extending from the concept of “Identity” is “Index,” which is explored through works that demonstrate the profound indexical nature of the objects that people cast-off and discard. A particularly notable example is the installation of

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This page and opposite: Nick Cave, Soundsuit, 2008; Mixed media, 94 x 35 x 35”; Inventory #NC09.014. © Nick Cave; Photo by James Prinz Photography; Image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

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Re:Purposed

Mac Premo, The Dumpster Project, Governors Island, 2012; Mixed media. © Mac Premo; Image courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York.

Mac Premo’s monumental work, The Dumpster Project. Triggered by his need to move to a smaller studio, Brooklynbased artist, Mac Premo, catalogued and photographed nearly 500 objects that he collected

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for his collage practice over the past decade—including everything from a diving mask to a baseball Yarmulke—and he installed these objects as one monumental collage piece in a 30-yard dumpster. For


Re:Purposed, the dumpster will be located on the grounds of The Ringling, inviting visitors to enter the dumpster and explore the large-scale piece at their own pace. Accompanying the exhibi-

tion is a fully illustrated catalogue published by Scala Arts Publishers, Inc., featuring an introduction by Matthew McLendon and interviews with the artists represented in the show. O n V iew OnV

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African American Art Since 1950 :

Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center h on view

03.21.15-06.27.15

a t POLK MUSEUM of ART , Lakeland www.polkmuseumofart.org

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A

African American Art Since 1950

RICH PROFUSION OF

great African American artworks, including sculpture, paintings, prints, photography, collage, and mixed media, will be on display at the Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland from March 21, 2015 through June 27, 2015 in a new exhibition that will take visitors on a visual journey through time, exploring the evolution of African American art over the span of six decades. A collaborative effort with the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park, African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center showcases works from a generation of artists who opened up the possibilities for

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African American art—from pursuing pure abstraction to providing a forum for art as political activism. The exhibition also presents the newest voices in African American art which utilize a variety of media and possess a hybrid approach to cultural and social identity. For decades, African American artists have increasingly emerged as a powerful creative


Previous spread: Benny Andrews, Morning Song Study #1 from the Musical Interlude series, 1999; Mixed-media collage, 29-3/4 x 22”; © Estate of Benny Andrews/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY; David C. Driskell Center Collection; Permanent loan from the David C. Driskell Collection. Left: Vanessa German, Tar Baby Jane & Doowop: Everything Useful for Your Modern Household, 2010; Mixed media, 32 x 39-1/2”; © 2011 Vanessa L. German; David C. Driskell Center Collection; Purchased with funds from the C. Sylvia and Eddie Brown Arts Acquisition Fund. Photography by Greg Staley.

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African American Art Since 1950

force—and major contributors to contemporary American art. This broad yet highly illuminating survey shows how this art has evolved, shifted, and grown. Featuring works in a variety of media, the exhibition celebrates sixty of the most

Featuring works in a variety of media, this exhibition celebrates sixty of the most important modern and contemporary African American artists. Keith Morrison, Posse, 1994; Oil on canvas, 54 x 60”; © 2011 Keith Morrison; David C. Driskell Center Collection; Gift of Margaret Burnwalt. Photography by Greg Staley.

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important modern and contemporary African American artists, and presents a vivid sampling of the range of expression of these American voices. Over thirty-five years ago, when prominent artist, collector, and scholar, David C. Driskell, developed the 1976

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African American Art Since 1950

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exhibition, Two Centuries of Black American Art: 17501950, organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, he introduced the tremendous depth and breadth of African American art and creativity to an international audi-

Visually and thematically rich, this presentation brings to the nation the next pivotal chapter of African American art. ence. African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center, curated by Dr. Robert E. Steele and Dorit Yaron, the David C. Driskell Center’s former executive director and deputy director, respectively, and independent scholar, Dr. Adrienne L. Childs, pays tribute to the legacy of this landmark exhibiOnV

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Stephanie Pogue, Dancing Goddesses, n.d.; Color viscosity etching, 2/10, 17-1/2 x 23-3/4”; © 2011 Dr. William H. Pogue; David C. Driskell Center Collection; Loan from Dr. and Mrs. William H. Pogue. Photography by Greg Staley.

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African American Art Since 1950

tion and brings to the nation the next pivotal chapter of African American art. “This exhibition is much more than the honoring and acknowledgment of the seminal scholarship of Dr. Driskell,” said Professor Curlee R. Holton, executive director

These contemporary artists use a wide array of media to provide a fresh perspective on questions of cultural and social identity.

Margo Humphrey, The Last Bar-B-Que, 1989; Lithograph, 26 x 38-1/2”; © 2011 Margo Humphrey. Permanent loan from the David C. Driskell Collection Photography by Greg Staley.

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of the David C. Driskell Center. “It speaks to the ongoing creative innovations and artistic achievements of some of America’s finest art makers. Artworks are not only aesthetic objects, they are also historical documents that are as well monuments to our collective social, emotional, cultural,

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political, and philosophical realities.” Renowned names such as Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, Faith Ringgold, William T. Williams, and Sam Gilliam are coupled with excit-


ing new visionaries, including Kara Walker, Lorna Simpson, and Chakaia Booker. Collectively, their work reflects the growing prominence—and complexity—of the field of African American Art over the

last sixty years. The show is organized around three central themes: The first introduces the work of artists who were contemporaries, collaborators, and students of David C. Driskell. Beginning OnV

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in the 1950s and ’60s, Sam Gilliam, Romare Bearden, and others explored what it meant to be an African American artist by experimenting with abstraction or turning to the art of the African Diaspora, when African

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people dispersed throughout the Americas and Caribbean during the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Their efforts opened up the possibilities for future generations of African American artists. The second theme addresses


African American Art Since 1950

and Willie Cole. Increasingly global in their approach, these contemporary artists use a wide array of media to provide a fresh perspective on questions of cultural and social identity. Highlights from the exhibition include works featuring and inspired by music, such as Morning Song Study #1 from the Musical Interlude series, by Benny Andrews (shown on pg. 83); history and memorythemed works, including challenging and contemplative pieces like Tar Baby Jane & Doowop: Everything Useful for Your Modern Household, by Vanessa German (shown on pg. 85); beautiful abstract the influence of postmodern theory on our understanding of identity, especially as it relates to race, sexuality, and gender. Finally, the exhibition focuses on the efforts of emerging artists, like Sanford Biggers

Romare Bearden, Morning, 1975; Collage on paper, 13-1/2 x 17-1/2”; © Romare Bearden/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY; Gift of David C. Driskell. Photography by Greg Staley.

Visitors to this show will gain a greater understanding and appreciation of important works of African American art history. OnV

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African American Art Since 1950

Right: Radcliffe Bailey, Until I Die/Georgia Trees and the Upper Room, 1997; Color aquatint with photogravure and chin collé, 35-1/2 x 24”; © 2011 Radcliffe Bailey; Gift from the Jean and Robert E. Steele Collection.

pieces highlighting the female form, such as Dancing Goddesses, by Stephanie Pogue (shown on pgs. 88-89); as well as expressive and, at times, humorous works, including Margo Humphrey’s The Last Bar-B-Que (shown on pgs.

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90-91), a reinterpretation of Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, with a distinctly Caribbean/African American twist. With its varying styles and types of media, this visually and thematically rich exhibition presents a wonderful


Right: Allan L. Edmunds, Dr. J., 1987; Offset lithograph, A/P, 30 x 21-1/2”; © 2011 Allan L. Edmunds. Gift from the Jean and Robert E. Steele Collection. Photography by Greg Staley.

opportunity for visitors to view and gain an understanding and appreciation of so many important works of African American art history. Accompanying the presentation is a catalogue with essays that highlight the relationships OnV

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among artists in the exhibition and the institutions that have impacted the field, a timeline of major events in African American art since 1950, a checklist, color reproductions of all the works in the exhibition, and short artist biographies. O n V iew J

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Orange County Regi

Orlando’s

And St

Race, Culture and V — — — — — — — — More than 80 story quilts. 400 years o 96

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ional History Center presents...

till We

Visual Conversations — — — — — — — — f history. On view 02.07.15 – 05.03.15 www.thehistorycenter.org


1746: Lucy Terry, an enslaved person, becomes the earliest known African American poet when she writes about the last Native American attack on her village of Deerfield, MA. Abijah Prince, a freed slave, bought Lucy’s freedom and married her. They would become parents of six children, and Mrs. Prince would become the family spokesperson who protected their personal and family rights. Her poem, Bar’s Fight, will not be published until 1855.

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AND STILL WE RISE: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations

— — — — — — — — — —

U Unrivalled

in breadth and scope, together in one sweeping collection, And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations provides an unparalleled multivoice account of people and events that have marked the evolution of what it means to be Black in America. Using the powerful medium of story quilts, this exhibition narrates nearly four centuries of African American history, from the first slave ships to the first African American president, and beyond. Hosted by the Orange County Regional

History Center in Orlando, this historical presentation brings together 69 quilts from more than 50 artists of the Women of Color Quilters Network (WCQN) in the largest-ever exhibition of African American quilts.

Peggie Hartwell, Summerville, SC; Lucy Terry Prince: The Griot’s Voice, 2012; Materials: Cotton fabric, cotton batting, cotton thread, nylon thread; Techniques: Hand appliqué, machine appliqué, machine embroidery, machine quilting; 47-1/2 x 48”.

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1918: The United States Army organizes two African American divisions, the 92nd and the 93rd, through which some forty thousand African American soldiers see combat. General John J. Pershing gives to the 16th Division of the French Army the troops of the 93rd Division, including the 369th Infantry Regiment, the “Harlem Hellfighters,” under the command of Colonel William Hayward. The Harlem Hellfighters fight at Chateau-Thierry and Belleau Wood. They spend 191 days in combat, longer than any other American unit in the war, during which they neither surrender an inch of Allied territory nor lose a soldier to capture. The French government awards the entire regiment, plus 171 men and officers individually, either the Croix de Guerre or the Legion of Merit for their courage and valor. No African American soldier will receive a World War I Congressional Medal of Honor, America’s highest award for military heroism.


AND STILL WE RISE: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations

“And Still We Rise tells compelling stories in visually fascinating ways. The exhibit blends history and art in a very meaningful way.” —M ichael P erkins , C urator , OCRHC The exhibition is curated by artist, historian, and national lecturer, Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, and organized by the Cincinnati Museum Center, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, and WCQN. Mazloomi, who is also the founder of WCQN, was inspired to curate the exhibit to educate the general population about the ascendant influence of African American culture on the American cultural landscape. The exhibition constitutes an unprecedented commentary in cloth, dispelling the problem of restricted African American artistic and historical agency by voicing a chronological account of the OnV

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Dawn Williams Boyd, Atlanta, GA; La Croix de Guerre, 2010; Materials: Assorted fabric, silk ribbon, found objects; Techniques: Machine piecing, appliqué, hand embroidery, hand embellishment; 70 x 47”.

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1940: Hattie McDaniel is the first African American actor to be nominated for an Academy Award, which she wins in the category of Best Supporting Actress for her role in Gone with the Wind. No other African American actor will be awarded an Oscar until Sidney Poitier wins in 1958, and the next African American woman to win the award will be Whoopi Goldberg in 1991.

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AND STILL WE RISE: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations

struggles and triumphs of a marginalized people. “In addition to grappling with historical issues, the quilts are exemplary works of art,” wrote Aleia Brown, curator of the National AfroAmerican Museum and Cultural Center. “Though the work is united under one message, the quilts are eclectic in style and perspective. Each of the artists share their different techniques, experiences and approaches in their work. It is truly a celebration of African American creativity.” Since 1991, the master artists of WCQN, designated as cultural envoys, have

worked with the United States Department of State to exhibit quilts and teach workshops in Africa, South America and Europe. The quilts represent the artists’ mastery of a diverse range of fiber art techniques, among them: free-motion quilting, embroidery, needlepoint, appliqué, fiber collage, fusing, and hand beading. Reflecting each artist’s unique story, training, and style, the materials incorporated into the textile narratives include cotton, batik, organdy, metal, newsprint, beads, found objects, photo transfers, buttons, shells, wood, and vintage fabrics.

Laura R. Gadson, New York, NY; Mammy’s Golden Legacy, 2012; Materials: Cotton fabric, acrylic paint, buttons, beads, cotton batting; Techniques: Applique, embroidery, hand painting, machine quilting; 51 x 50-1/2”.

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1926: Langston Hughes publishes The Weary Blues, his first book of poetry. The title stanza of the poem reads: “I got the Weary Blues/ And I can’t be satisfied--/ I ain’t happy no mo’/ And I wish that I had died.” A pivotal force in the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes will go on to become one of the 20th century’s most recognized American writers.

Above: Carolyn L. Mazloomi, curator, And Still We Rise.

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AND STILL WE RISE: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations

“One quilt is more spectacular than the next. And each is a history lesson, made accessible.” —C incinnati E nquirer “And Still We Rise is a breathtaking visual experience that evokes a myriad of African American experiences and triumphs,” said Dr. Clarence G. Newsome, president of the Freedom Center. “I am touched by the amazing response from visitors who have been forever changed by the presentation of history in this unique, awe-inspiring way.” Story quilting is an art form that has derived in part from a long, rich history in Ohio, and goes beyond the simple quilting patterns many people may be familiar with.

Story quilting expands on traditional textile-arts techniques to record, in fabric, events of personal or historical significance. Through the accessibility of their colors, patterns, symbols, and style, these quilts reveal stories that enable conversations about sensitive topics from our history, creating open conversation of racial reconciliation in America. Visitors of all walks of life can relate to this tactile storybook and leave with a deeper understanding of American history. “The exhibition gives voices to personal, authentic, and

Sherise Marie Wright, Calumet City, IL; Far Into the Night: Weary Blues, 2012; Materials: Cotton fabric, embroidery floss, cotton batting; Techniques: Hand embroidery, machine quilting; 41-1/2 x 34”.

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1653: Indentured servants and enslaved African and Native American workers build a twelve-foot high wall across Manhattan Island to protect the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam from English invasion. The site where the original wall stands will later become Wall Street.

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AND STILL WE RISE: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations

“...each historic moment communicated through the visual experience of And Still I Rise will resonate in your soul!” —Dr. Myrah Brown Green, Executive Director of Arts & Culture, City College of New York unique histories of African American men and women— from relating painful stories of enslaved ancestors, to highlighting contemporary political leaders, and drawing attention to social challenges our nation continues to face today,” said Mazloomi.“By shining a spotlight on modern fiber artists who operate at the very top of their medium and harnessing the power of story quilts to relate emotional narratives of African-American experiences, And Still We Rise celebrates the unique contributions that diverse groups make to the fabric of our nation.” On View OnV

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Valarie Pratt Poitier, Natick, MA; 240 Million African Slaves Ago, 2012; Materials: Cotton fabric, cotton batting, metal chain, beads; Techniques: Machine embroidery, appliqué, machine quilting; 50-1/2 x 50”

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Norman Rockwell, Triple Self-Portrait, 1959. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 13, 1960. Š1960 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


AMERICAN CHRONICLES the art of

Norman

ROCKWELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

03.07.15-05.31.15 at the

TAMPA MUSEUM of ART w w w. t a m p a m u s e u m . o rg

ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR AMERICAN ARTISTS

of the past century, Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) worked within the realm of both aesthetics and commerce. An astute visual storyteller and a masterful painter, he chronicled our changing society in the small details and nuanced scenes of ordinary people in everyday life, providing a personalized interpretation— albeit often an idealized one—of American identity. Anxiously OnV

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Norman Rockwell, Day in the Life of a Little Girl. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, August 30, 1952. Š1952 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

awaited and immediately understood, his seamless narratives seemed to assure reader engagement with the many publications that commissioned his work—from The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies’ Home Journal, and Boys’ Life to Look, which featured his most powerful assertions on the social issues of his day. The complexities of artistic production remained hidden to his enthusiasts, who were compelled by his vision and content to enjoy his art in the primary form for which it was intended. What came between the first spark of an idea and a published Rockwell image was anyone’s guess, and far more than his public would have ever imagined. For many Americans, Rockwell’s icons of living culture were Norman Rockwell, No Swimming, 1921. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, June 4, 1921. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

first experienced in the most unassuming of places, in the comfort of home, or on the train ride at the end of a long day. Created for the covers and pages of our nation’s periodicals rather than for the walls of galleries and museums, Rockwell’s images were intimately understood by a vast and eager audience who saw the best in themselves reflected in his art and in the stories that he chose to tell. Beneath it all, Rockwell’s hopeful and admiring attitude toward humanity was the hallmark of his work. He loved to paint Norman Rockwell, Freedom from Want. War Bond Poster. Story illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943. ©1943 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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Norman Rockwell, Christmas Homecoming. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, December 25, 1948. Š1948 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


Norman Rockwell, Art Critic. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, April 16, 1955. Š1955 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

pictures that conveyed stories about people, their attitude toward each other, and his feelings about them. In 1943, a Time reporter said, “He constantly achieves that compromise between a love of realism and the tendency to idealize, which is one of the most deeply ingrained characteristics of the American people.” In 1977 Rockwell received the Presidential Medal of Freedom for having portrayed “the American scene with unrivaled freshness and clarity,” and with “insight, optimism and good humor.” In a rapidly changing world, Rockwell’s art had been a reassuring guide for more than six decades, and it continues to resonate today. Organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell represents fifty-six years in the artist’s career and features many iconic works, some from his personal collection—from carefully choreographed reflections on childhood innocence in such paintings as “No Swimming” (shown on pg. 111) to powerful, consciousness-raising images like The Problem We All Live With (shown on pgs. 118-119), which documented the traumatic Above: Bill Scovill, 1955. Photograph of Norman Rockwell with preliminary studies for The Art Critic in his Main Street, Stockbridge, MA, studio. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

realities of desegregation in the South. The Tampa Museum of Art’s presentation of American Chronicles offers a rare opportunity for Florida art lovers to see a comprehensive retrospective of this prominent American artist. The entire collection of 323 Saturday Evening Post covers, which document Norman Rockwell’s almost fifty year career at the magazine, will be displayed together with his oils on canvas, photographs and papers. In addition, viewers will find an array of intriguing archival portraits of Rockwell continued on pg. 121... Above: Reference photos for Norman Rockwell’s Going and Coming, 1947. Photos by Gene Pelham. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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Norman Rockwell, Going and Coming. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, August 30, 1947. Š1947 SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


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American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

Norman Rockwell, The Problem We All Live With, 1963. Illustration for Look, January 14, 1964. ŠNorman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


Norman Rockwell, Murder in Mississippi, 1965. Painting intended as the final illustration for Southern Justice by Charles Morgan, Jr., Look, June 29, 1965, unpublished. ŠNorman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.


American Chronicles: The Art of NORMAN ROCKWELL

...continued from pg. 116 throughout his life, and rarely or never-before-seen black-andwhite photographs of Rockwell’s studios with photographs by Rockwell’s assistants, Gene Pelham, Louie Lamone, and Bill Scovill, that captured the artist and his models at work during the height of his career. The creation of his 1965 painting, Murder in Mississippi, is told in step-by-step detail, illuminating the artist’s working process. Research materials, handwritten notes, reference photographs, preliminary studies, the final painting, a magazine tearsheet of the published image, and portraits of the artist in the midst of creation, all make for a captivating and in-depth documentation of Rockwell’s working process and methods. Transcending generations, this exhibition provides the opportunity for all visitors, young and old, to discover and rediscover Rockwell’s reflections of 20th-century America. His contributions to our visual legacy—many of them now icons of American culture—have found a permanent place in our national psyche. O n V iew Above: Norman Rockwell, Murder in Mississippi (study), 1965. Preliminary sketch published as the first illustration for Southern Justice, by Charles Morgan, Jr., Look, June 29, 1965. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections.

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The Cici & Hyatt Brown Museum of Art Opening to the public February 8, 2015, an innovative expansion to the Museum of Arts & Sciences in Daytona Beach will be the new permanent home for the Cici and Hyatt Brown collection of more than 2,600 paintings of Florida. The unprecedented collection is the most extensive collection of Florida art anywhere in the world. www.moas.org

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OAS DAYTONA BEAC

ON VIEW DESTINATION: The CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM of ART, Daytona Beach

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What

was once a barren

piece of land off Nova Road in Daytona Beach, FL, has now been transformed with an expansion of the Museum of Arts & Sciences (MOAS) that will be forever known as the Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art. The new Museum, scheduled to open on February 8, 2015, will give both the local community as well as visitors to the area a chance to discover old Florida. “This is a chance for people to see Florida as it once was,” said Cici Brown. “It’ll never be that way again.” The Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art will be more than just a traditional art museum. It will be a history museum, with the history of Florida told through

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Pictured: Exterior renderings of the new Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, Daytona Beach

Images courtesy of RLF Architects of Orlando.


OAS DAYTONA BEAC

ON VIEW DESTINATION: The CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM of ART, Daytona Beach

works of art. A work of art in itself, the design of the new Museum is reflective of the Florida artwork that will make its home inside. As visitors make their way towards the building, they will notice lush landscaping featuring native grasses, magnolias, oaks, and cypress trees—all complimenting the

neighboring existing heritage trees that were preserved throughout the construction process and incorporated into the site’s design. Enveloped in trees, visitors will see that the Museum’s building truly identifies with old Florida. Designed by RLF Architects of Orlando, the Museum salutes the Florida

Pictured: Renderings of the Museum’s grand Entrance Hall (below) and Outdoor Patio (right). Images courtesy of RLF Architects of Orlando.


cracker architectural style, complete with an aluminum roof that will quickly age to resemble weathered tin. “We wanted a building that was old Florida,” said Hyatt Brown. While construction was underway, the project team—consisting of RLF Architects and Bomar Construction Inc. of Ormond Beach—was tasked with keeping the look of the Museum natural to Florida. Powered by natural gas, the building is highly energy efficient and was built to with-

stand the extreme weather conditions possible in Central Florida. Entering through the front doors of the Museum, visitors will arrive in the Museum’s grand Entrance Hall, with the tall wood-beamed ceiling high above, and just a single piece of art—a 30-ft.-wide panoramic painting of Florida’s natural landscape from the Panhandle down to the Keys—to greet them. To the left, guests can browse through the new gift shop, or stop in the café for a OnV

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The new Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art will include a large barn-shaped structure with a roughly 52-foot-tall ceiling and mezzanine that will showcase the collection’s signature pieces in about 3,500 square feet of space. There will be six smaller galleries ranging from 750 to 1,600 square feet that will rotate portions of the full collection in 10-year spans. There will also be a café with outdoor seating overlooking a natural preserve, gift shop, and meeting rooms.

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“ This is a as it onc

ON VIEW DESTINATION: The CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM of ART, Daytona Beach

sandwich or coffee that can be enjoyed on an outdoor patio overlooking the nature preserve. Past the entrance hall is the Museum’s two-level Permanent Gallery, complete with staircase to a mezzanine level that significantly increases the space available to hold the most notable paintings from the Brown’s collection. From there, visitors can enter into one of the six changing gallery spaces, where paintings from the collection will be selected to illustrate themes and stories that are indicative of Florida and reflected in the artwork. The Brown Collection consists of over 2,600 paintings of Florida and is the most extensive collection of Florida art in the world. The size and scope of the collection means that it is perfect for using to illustrate the many stories that can be told about the geography and natural history of Florida. While artists or styles can be highlighted and discussed, visitors can also learn about Florida’s weather or native wildlife through creative theming OnV

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Hyatt and Cici Brown pose with som Shown at right: John James Audub Photo: Nigel Cook.

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chance for people to see Florida e was.” —Cici Brown and interpretation. Initially, around 400 paintings from the collection will be on display, but every painting in the collection is scheduled to be exhibited during the Museum’s first decade. “It’s going to change often,” said Cici Brown. “We don’t want things to stay in the storeroom collecting dust. There’s too much history in there.” The journey that resulted in the Brown’s impressive collection of Florida art did not just happen overnight. It all started in the mid-1990s when Cici and Hyatt Brown purchased an 1839 painting of the gates of St. Augustine, the oldest work in their collection. After the purchase of another painting of the same scene, the couple worked with art dealers to search throughout the United States and Europe to expand those two pieces into a collection that experts say is unmatched in breadth and quality. “This has been a long safari for us, but fun,” said Hyatt Brown, who served eight years as a Florida State legis-

me of their collection of Florida paintings in their Ormond Beach home. bon, Brown Pelican, Plate CCLI, ca. 1835. Hand-colored aquatint, etching and engraving.

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ON VIEW DESTINATION: The CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM of ART, Daytona Beach

Pictured (top to bottom): Martin Johnson Heade, St. Johns River, Sunset with Alligator, ca. 1887, oil on canvas, 13 x 26”; Herman Herzog, Near Cedar Key (Florida), ca. 1890; oil on canvas; 14” x 18”.


lator, and was speaker of the house from 1978 to 1980. Cici Brown was always an art lover and became very involved with the Museum of Arts & Sciences in the early 1970s while Hyatt Brown’s interest was in Florida history and the

disappearing landscape that he saw happening right in front of his eyes. Starting their collection of Florida art was the marriage of their two passions —Cici’s interest in the quality of art and the techniques behind the paintings, and

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Hyatt’s interest in the history that the paintings represented. “They’re more interesting to me than they would be just to an art aficionado,” Hyatt said. Many of the art works collected show locations and buildings that Hyatt remem-

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bers from his childhood, but that have now vanished over the years. Around six or seven years ago, Cici and Hyatt Brown decided that they wanted to find a permanent home for their new sizeable collection of paintings. Their 40-year relationship with the Museum and their desire to share their collection of art with the public meant that the Museum of Arts & Sciences was a natural partner in making their dream come true. “This gift from Hyatt and myself is to the citizens of Daytona Beach, Volusia County, and the state of Florida,” said Cici. The Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art is a world class Museum right here in Daytona Beach. “It is a true demonstration of the breadth of our collections,” said MOAS Executive Director, Andrew Sandall. “The Museum of Arts & Sciences has so much to offer the community between our state-ofthe-art Planetarium, our extensive collection of Coca-Cola, and other Americana donated OnV

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Clockwise from left: N.C. Wyeth, Dance of the Whooping Cranes, ca. 1938, oil on composition board, 30 x 22-1/4”; J. Ralph Wilcox, South Beach Street, Daytona, ca. 1900, oil on canvas, 20 x 24”; Louis Comfort Tiffany, Natural Limestone Bridge at Arch Creek, Miami, 1920, oil on canvas; 18 x 24”.

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ON VIEW DESTINATION: The CICI & HYATT BROWN MUSEUM of ART, Daytona Beach

by the Root Family—and now, this remarkable display of Florida art. We are excited to share Cici and Hyatt’s world class collection with the public in such a distinctively Florida location.” Collections of art often tell a story. And in rare cases, collections can tell many stories in great depth, not only about the subject matter in the collection, but about the collectors themselves. And certainly each piece in a collection, when viewed in isolation, tells an incredible story. The collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown not only tells the story of the history of Florida, its environment, and the many chapters contained within those deep subjects, it also tells us a lot about the individuals who assembled the collection. The historical significance of many of these paintings cannot be underestimated. Together, this couple have amassed a collection that is not only historical in nature, but also incredible in its beauty. It represents the very best of Florida art. O n V iew OnV

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Clockwise from left: Thomas Hart Benton, Negro and the Alligator, 1927, oil on paper board, 45-1/2 x 33”; Emmett John Fritz, Keys Shrimper, ca. 1965, oil on canvas, 16-7/8 x 21”; Frederic Remington, General’s Compliments: Orders from Headquarters (A Squadron in the War), 1898, ink wash on paper, 22 x 30-1/4”.

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PROFILE {PETER

“ONE WAY: PETER MARINO”

explores the renowned American architect’s multifaceted relationship with art. Counting the likes of Andy Warhol and Yves Saint Laurent as his early clients, Peter Marino has built a reputation for creating retail environments that incorporate specially-commissioned, site-specific works of art in high-end boutiques around the world—for Chanel, Dior, Louis Vuitton, Bulgari, and Ermenegildo Zegna. Curated by Jérôme Sans, the exhibition examines the interplay between Marino’s iconic architectural designs and his personal collection of contemporary art, his series of cast-bronze boxes, and newly commissioned works by artists, Gregor Hildebrandt, Guy Limone, Farhad Moshiri, Jean-Michel Othoniel, and Erwin Wurm. The exhibition begins with displays of human hearts— conveying the notion of life and celebrating the importance of art in one’s personal journey and culture—as well as Hil-

MARINO}

Exhibition:

One Way: Peter Marino On view through 05. 03. 15 at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach www.bassmuseum.org

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P R O F I L E

debrandt’s Orphische Schatten (Orphic Shadows), a sitespecific installation that employs hundreds of videotape strips culled from copies of Jean Cocteau’s classic film, Orphée. Hildebrandt’s installation continues inside the museum galleries, plunging the Bass Museum’s “white cube” into shimmering darkness, extending Cocteau’s poetic play with imagery of mirrors and passageways to the “Underworld.” These corridors of tape guide visitors through a selection of works from Marino’s personal collection of contemporary art, including pieces by Loris Gréaud, Keith Haring, Richard Ser-

ra, Rudolf Stingel, and Andy Warhol, among others. The exhibition also features sections dedicated to Pop Art, iconic portraiture and photography, and Marino’s recently designed series of cast-bronze boxes that are presented within leather-clad walls—a nod to the architect’s penchant for dressing in full-on biker gear. One Way comes to a suitably mythological conclusion with the recreation of Christophe Willibald Gluck’s opera, Orfeo ed Euridice, a collaboration between Marino; his wife, Jane Trapnell; Michal Rovner; Francesco Clemente; and others. O n V iew

opposite page: Manolo Yllera, Peter Marino’s Double Portrait (detail), 2013; Photo: Courtesy of Manolo Yllera; Artwork in Background: © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All Rights Reserved / Dacs, London / Ars, NY 2014. this page (clockwise from above): 1. Guy Limone, Red, Black And Grey-White Tapestry, 2014; (inset) Andy Warhol, Human Heart, circa 1979; 2. Guy Limone, Red, Black And Grey-White Tapestry (detail), 2014; 3. & 4. peter marino, bronze boxes, 2014, Photos by Maggie Nimkin; 4. Jean-Michel Othoniel, Black Rosaries (detail), 2014, Courtesy of the artist; Photo by Philippe Chancel.


SPOTLIGHT {GHANAIAN

“KABAS AND COUTURE”

offers an unprecedented look at the 50-year history and contemporary social impact of one of Africa’s most vibrant fashion industries. The exhibition features the work of internationally noted Ghanaian designers and their respective brands such as Aisha Ayensu, Christie Brown; Ajepomaa Mensah, Ajepomaa Design Gallery; Kabutey Dzietror and Sumaya Mohammed, Pistis; and Brigitte Merki, BM – Brigitte Merki; further illustrating the influence of Ghanaian cultural production on the global fashion community. The exhibition also premieres two original garments from Accra’s first Paris-trained designer, Chez Julie, whose innovative creations have paved the runways for Accra’s current generation of fashion designers. Kabas and Couture highlights the intersections between designer fashions and traditional forms of dress in Ghanaian culture, with runway garments displayed alongside historical textiles such as a batakari smock and kente cloth. As part of the

FA S H I O N }

Exhibition:

Kabas and Couture: Contemporary Ghanaian Fashion On view 02.24. 15–08. 30. 15 at Harn Museum of Art,UF, Gainesville www.harn.ufl.edu

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S P O T L I G H T

exhibition, the Harn will trans- Accra provide additional context form one of its galleries into a for the works on display. recreation of a Ghanaian texAmong the exhibition’s hightile and seamstress shop to il- lights are rare examples of garlustrate the importance of Gha- ments created by Juliana “Chez na’s everyday fashions, partic- Julie” Kweifio-Okai, Ghana’s ularly the kaba, which typically first Parisian-trained fashion consists of an elabodesigner to emerge “Kabas and rately embellished, in Ghana during the Couture” hightailored blouse worn post-colonial era. lights designer with a wrapped or The remaining gartailored skirt. As a ments represent the fashions and form of dress that traditional forms best of Accra’s ehas become a symmerging fashion of dress in bol of national idenGhanaian culture. designers, includtity for Ghanaian ing Aisha Ayensu, women, the kaba actively re- who won the 2009 Emerging sponds to the shifts in local and Designer of the Year award international fashion trends. at Arise Africa Fashion Week Visitors can experience the in Johannesburg, South Afriprocess of commissioning a kaba ca, and who recently designed and will be able to “try on” sever- garments for the dancers of al kaba fashions. Videos and pho- Beyonce’s “Mrs. Carter Show” tography from fashion shows in world tour. O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. Batakari cocktail dress; Aisha Ayensu, Christie Brown; 2009 Arise Africa Fashion Week runway collection; 2. Satin and wax print evening gown; Kabutey Dzietror and Sumaya Muhammad, PISTIS; 2011 Vlisco Dazzling Graphics runway show. this page (clockwise from above): 1. Wax print “Akwadzan”; Juliana “Chez Julie” KweifioOkai, late 1960s; 2. Cocktail dress; Ajepomaa Mensah, Ajepomaa Design Gallery; 2014 ready-to-wear collection; 3. Leather and wax print evening gown; Ajepomaa Mensah, Ajepomaa Design Gallery; 2011 Vlisco Delicate Shades runway show; 4. Lace and patchwork wax print dress; Kabutey Dzietror and Sumaya Muhammad, PISTIS; 2012 ready-to-wear summer collection.


FORM {MICHAEL

A NEW EXHIBITION AT PMA

offers an impressive collection of freestanding bronzes, metal relief sculptures, ink-jet prints, and drawings by Pensacola-based artist and educator, Michael Boles. Boles utilizes digital technology to produce intricate free-form wall sculptures consisting primarily of aluminum and copper sheets combined with nontraditional materials such as pigmented silicone, automobile paint, and horsehair as well as wood, metal rivets, and found objects. Over the last decade, Boles has produced hundreds of compelling sketches, more than he could feasibly convert into relief sculptures. These sketches have recently been utilized in a different way—to make ink-jet prints. “I had previously toyed with the idea of making prints from my reliefs or sketches, but never acted on it...I spontaneously decided to color one of my sketches on the computer, not for a sculpture but for its own aesthetic value. I liked what I saw, and I was intrigued by the possibilities.” The characteristics of his inkjet print series include the use of

BOLES}

Exhibition:

OBJECT: Sculptures, Prints, and Drawings by Michael Boles On view 02.20. 15–04. 18. 15 at Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacolamuseum.org

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bold colors, organic shapes, and an interplay of positive and negative spaces. His subject matter often straddles the border between abstract and nonrepresentational art and draws on many visual sources as diverse as Paleolithic figurines, ancient art from Mesoamerica and the Mediterranean, and 20th-century trends of abstractionism. His designs often suggest human figures or clothing, but in an ambiguous or distorted manner. The titles of his works can be mysterious, revealing, or humorous—cultivating a sense of playfulness through their openended associations. The centerpiece of the exhibition is Daphne, an over-lifesize, freestanding bronze sculpture depicting the virgin huntress

from ancient Greek mythology. Its creation opened new directions for Boles’ artistic growth and is one of three large freestanding bronze sculptures included in the show. What sets Boles apart as a contemporary artist is his unique, but consistent, personal vision that manifests in all of his work, coupled with skills of craftsmanship. A prolific artist who has experienced professional success both through major commissions and his inclusion in numerous private collections, Boles communicates with the viewer in a visual language that unifies all of his designs. This language is guided by his notion of the “object,” in which all compositions are approached with a sculptor’s understanding of form. O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. The Generation of X, 2011, aluminum and copper; 2. The Venus of Newgrange, 2009, aluminum, copper, and chrisacola. this page (clockwise from above): 1. Daphne, 2014, hollow-cast bronze; 2. Huitzilopochtli, 2014, ink-jet print; 3. Yellow Prime, 2012, ink-jet print; 4. The Artemis Identity, 2014, ink-jet print. images courtesy of the artist; Photos by Christopher White, Pensacola, Fl. special attribution: This article is composed of excerpts from an Essay written by Christina Glover.


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On View 01-03.2015  

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