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Material

TRANSFORMATIONS

AT T H E M U S E U M O F C O N T E M P O R A R Y A R T , J A C K S O N V I L L E

PLUS

Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the GOLDEN AGE of PAINTING AT T H E O R L A N D O M U S E U M O F A R T

David Webb:

SOCIETY’S JEWELER

AT T H E N O R T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , W E S T PA L M B E A C H

AND

Graphicstudio: UNCOMMON PRACTICE at USF AT T H E TA M P A M U S E U M O F A R T


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2014

Vo l . 4 , N o . 4

58 Jacksonville MATERIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

ON THE COVER: FROM MATERIAL TRANSFORMATIONS ON PG. 58: ANGELA ELLSWORTH, SEER BONNET, CLARISSA (AGE 15) (DETAIL), 2012-2013. IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND LISA SETTE GALLERY, SCOTTSDALE

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J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 4

PAUL VILLINSKI,

Material

TRANSFORMATIONS

FABLE, 2011.

AT T H E M U S E U M O F C O N T E M P O R A R Y A R T , J A C K S O N V I L L E

PLUS

IMAGE COURTESY OF

Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the GOLDEN AGE of PAINTING

THE ARTIST AND

AT T H E O R L A N D O M U S E U M O F A R T

David Webb:

SOCIETY’S JEWELER

MORGAN LEHMAN GALLERY,

AT T H E N O R T O N M U S E U M O F A R T , W E S T PA L M B E A C H

AND

NEW YORK

Graphicstudio: UNCOMMON PRACTICE at USF AT T H E TA M P A M U S E U M O F A R T

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The Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville presents a truly inspiring exhibition featuring seven artists from around the US and Canada who cleverly transform everyday materials into extraordinary works of art.


Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

74 Orlando

92 Coral Gables

100 West Palm Beach 110 Tampa

RUBENS,

GARDEN

SOCIETY’S

REMBRANDT,

ART IN THE

GAINSBOROUGH AND THE

GOLDEN AGE OF PAINTING

Orlando Museum of Art presents an exhibition of major works by master painters from the renowned collection of The Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky.

Sculptural works in wood by Hugo França fit seamlessly into the natural landscape in this enchanting exhibit at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.

DAVID WEBB:

GRAPHICSTUDIO:

JEWELER

PRACTICE AT USF

UNCOMMON

The Norton Museum of Art hosts a dazzling retrospective featuring the unique creations of famed American jewelry designer, David Webb.

A fascinating body of work produced by the internationally renowned print atelier, Graphicstudio, at the University of South Florida, will be on view at Tampa Museum of Art. TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): JEAN JACQUES FRANÇOIS LEBARBIER, HELEN AND PARIS, 1799, COLLECTION OF THE SPEED ART MUSEUM, GIFT OF THE CHARTER COLLECTORS; HUGO FRANÇA, MACHACOS SCULPTURE IN PEQUI WOOD, 2007, PHOTO: MORGAN BROOKS; DAVID WEBB, HERALDIC

120 Orlando RIGHT: TWEETY AND SYLVESTER, © WARNER BROS. INC.

MALTESE CROSS CORAL BROOCH,

THE ART OF WARNER BROS. CARTOONS

1964, PHOTO: ILAN RUBIN;

Discover how America’s favorite cartoons pioneered a new kind of animation in this fun show at the Orange County Regional History Center.

PHOTOGRAVURE (DETAIL), 2005,

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CHUCK CLOSE, SELF-PORTRAIT/ PHOTOGRAVURE, © 2005 CHUCK CLOSE, GRAPHICSTUDIO, USF; PHOTO BY WILL LYTCH

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CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2014

Vo l u m e

4,

No. 4

Fo c u s

136

CAPTURE THE MOMENT

18

The Frost Art Museum in Miami will showcase a stunning selection of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs.

Museum exhibitions

Profile

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138

6

COMMENTARY

CALENDAR

GALLERY

STEPHEN LAWSON: IMAGES OF TIME

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

The concept of space and time is reconstructed in a series of panoramic images by Stephen Lawson at Vero Beach Museum of Art.

Spotlight

134

WARHOL: ART. FAME. MORTALITY.

The Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg hosts a new show exploring the limits of fame and mortality.

PICTURED: Barbara Sorensen, Speleothem Installation, Orlando Museum of Art, aluminum, polyurethane and resin, 17’ x 32’ x 28’ overall

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ABRACADABRA

MUSE

Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland presents Site Specifics, featuring installations by Dan Gunderson and Barbara Sorensen, who will transform the Museum’s galleries with their captivating art environments. .

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An annual fund-raising event at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood brings art lovers and artists together for a good cause.


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Cheers...

M A G A Z I N E

and to all, a happy and healthy

2014! If you’re looking for something new and fresh to see and do in the New Year, you’ve come to the right place! We are excited to share news of some very special shows opening in the next few months. Our feature coverage begins with two highly transformative shows we think are sure to impress. Site-specific installations by two Central Florida artists will immerse viewers in a captivating mix of art environments (Site Specifics: Installations by Dan Gunderson & Barbara Sorensen, on pg. 8). In a truly inspirational group exhibition, artists from the US and Canada cleverly transform everyday materials into extraordinary works of art (Material Transformations, on pg. 58). Next, we time travel back to the 17th and 18th centuries to relive the golden age of European painting in a stunning exhibition of major works by master painters from the renowned collection of The Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky (Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting, on pg. 74). And get ready to smile as we enter the world of Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote, tracing the artistic development of some familiar cartoon characters who have captured the hearts of millions, spanning generations (The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons, on pg. 120). All this and much more ahead...Cheers!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Advertising Account Representative

Carol Lieb Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director

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MUSE

Site Specifics: INSTALLATIONS by DAN GUNDERSON & BARBARA SORENSEN On view 03.22.14– 06.07.14 at

POLK MUSEUM

of

A RT, L a k e l a n d

w w w. p o l k m u s e u m o f a r t . o r g

P

OLK MUSEUM OF ART

will host a new exhibition featuring installations by two Central Florida artists—Dan Gunderson of DeLand and Barbara Sorensen of Winter Park. Working collaboratively, the artists will transform the Museum with their sitespecific installations, providing visitors an opportunity to immerse themselves in these captivating art environments. Opposite: Barbara Sorensen, Speleothem Installation, Orlando Museum of Art, aluminum, polyurethane and resin, 17’ x 32’ x 28’ overall


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MUSE MUSE

DAN GUNDERSON has been a professor of art at Stetson University for more than 35 years. Having spent 30 years almost exclusively in ceramics, his current works visually express his observation of pop culture in a variety of mediums. “I’ve always been a collector of well-designed, unique objects: old toys, American Indian crafts, ceramics, and in recent years, pop culture images such as cartoon characters and super heroes. The later objects have led me to understand our present civilization, and even past history, through products made in a particular era. All of us have a mental warehouse of memories. My desire is to trigger memories from that warehouse upon seeing an object or character remembered from one’s past.  I am always experimenting. My most recent materials challenge me in learning to use new tools and processes of working with mediums I have not previously explored. In the past, clay was a predominant medium for me, but over the years, I have incorporated metal, wood, granite, and plastic. Lately, I’ve used toys as “building blocks,” assembling them into simple recognizable symbols—an example is the Above left: Dan Gunderson. Photo: Woodruff Laputka; Above right: Dan Gunderson, Brush With Death, mixed media, 2006; Opposite: Dan Gunderson, Home, mixed-media, 2013. Photo: Woodruff Laputka

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MUSE

piece, Electric, from my Toys Are Us series. I like to alter reality and invent new experiences, making the unbelievable seem believable. Through enhanced perspective, I create a visual illusion which allows the viewer to peer into a futuristic environment. This illusion is also the result of the interplay between the scene and the performance. The scenes appear to penetrate infinitely inward, creating  more space than actually exists.  Threads that reoccur consistently throughout my work are symmetry, humor, optical kinetics, and simplicity of form and color. The ultimate goal of my art, as a visual performance, is to share my celebration of life with others.”—D. Gunderson Dan Gunderson has had solo exhibitions in New York, Chicago, Atlanta, and Washington, DC. His work is held in the collections of The Ringling Museum in Sarasota; the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, NC; and the Erie Art Museum, PA. He has received numerous awards, including a Florida Individual Artist Fellowship.

Above left: (front to back): Dan Gunderson, Electric, 2011, and Dance, 2011, mixed media; Above right: Loop de Loop, 2006, mixed media; Opposite: Dan Gunderson, The Proposal, mixed media, 2013. Photo: Woodruff Laputka

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BARBARA SORENSEN is known for creating monumental sculptural installations that draw on geological formations and classical elements, but recently she has turned her energies toward large-scale environmental vessels constructed of metals and resins as well as new, experimental mixed-media prints and two-dimensional works. Often interconnected and chromatically bold, the new series emerge from and focus on her sense of the relationships between human and landscape. Sorensen discovered clay, an ideal medium for her interest

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in textural plasticity, as an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin. After completing her degree there, Sorensen went on to work with mentors, Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner, Don Reitz, Rudy Autio, and others who were pushing the medium in fresh, sculptural directions. Today, she continues to evolve and expand her concerns in the series of works that explore her enduring interests: the natural environment and conceptual notions of the vessel. “Sorensen’s ulti-

Above: Barbara Sorensen,Topographies Installation, Orlando Museum of Art: Boat Installation, stoneware & stones, 16’ x 16’ x 2’ overall; Foothills Installation, stoneware, video & sound, 1’ x 7’ x 7’, overall; Opposite: Barbara Sorensen; Photo: Jack Mitchell

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mate subject is growth and change. Characteristics of both the physical world that surrounds us and the interior landscape we carry inside, movement, and energy are the essence of life. Sorensen’s works breathe with this truth and in turn, convey it to us.” —Eleanor Heartney, Art Critic. Sorensen’s work is in numerous museum, corporate and private collections, including the Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Winter Park; Florida State Capitol Art Collection; City of Orlando; City of Winter Park; Orlando Shakespeare Theater; Neiman Marcus Corporation; and The White House Collection, Washington, DC. Her work has been showcased at the Aspen Art Museum, CO; Mennello Museum of American Art in Orlando; San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, TX; Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, TX; University of Wisconsin-Madison; and the Museum of Fine Arts in St Petersburg. Sorensen’s recent one-person shows have been at Orlando Museum of Art; Racine Museum of Art, WI; Kouros Gallery in New York; 212 Gallery in Aspen; Elaine Baker Gallery in Boca Raton; Museum of Art-DeLand, Florida; and Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art in Tarpon Springs. O n V iew

Above: Barbara Sorensen, Dwellings V Installation, 2010, aluminum, 8.5’ x 15’ x 6’ overall; Opposite: Barbara Sorensen, Siren VIII, stoneware, 75” x 26” x 13” + 18” base

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{ S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S }

CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

www.bocamuseum.org

BOCA RATON

This portfolio of seven prints feature Pop artist James Rosenquist’s characteristic use of varied images assembled to create a dizzying collage.

01.12.14–04.13.14

Fascination: The Love Affair Between French and Japanese Printmaking Boca Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Drawing on the Museum’s collection of French lithographs and Japanese colored woodblock prints, Fascination is a study of the impacts that the “cult of Japan” had on late 19th century French printmaking.

01.12.14–04.23.14 01.12.14–03.30.14

Futurism: Concepts and Imaginings Boca Museum of Art

waves of Futurism, a dynamic movement that glorified the energy and speed of modern life.

www.bocamuseum.org

Thru 04.06.14

Futurism: Concepts and Imaginings features seven Italian artists from the first (1908-1919) and second (1920s-1930s)

James Rosenquist’s “High Technology and Mysticism: A Meeting Point” Boca Museum of Art

Pop Culture: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation Boca Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

The works on view demonstrate conceptions of Pop art as they emerged in the 1950s and 1960s, as

Image from Futurism: Concepts and Imaginings at Boca Museum of Art, Boca Raton: Giulio d’Anna (Italian, 1908-1978), Il nuotatore [The Swimmer], 1930, tempera on cardboard, 9 x 13”, from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Stefano Acunto

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Boca Raton continued...

well as the ways that contemporary artists today have extended and elaborated upon visual representations of mass culture and consumerism.

often tables and seating. Each piece uses reclaimed wood from felled, burned or dead trees found in Brazil. (See story on pg. 92.)

From ancient ceramics to contemporary paintings, this exhibition focuses on the art of Panama. 01.24.14–03.23.14

Pueblo to Pueblo: ArtLab @ The The Legacy Lowe: From of Southwest Ancient Art to Indian Pottery Modern Molas: Lowe Art Recurring Themes Museum, in Indigenous University of Panamá Miami Lowe Art www.lowemuseum.org Museum, This exhibition conUniversity of sists of seventy-four Miami Pueblo Indian pottery Thru 04.27.14

CORAL GABLES Thru 05.31.14

Art in the Garden: Hugo França Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden www.fairchildgarden.org

Hugo França’s work is showcased in the 2013-2014 season of Design at Fairchild, part of the annual Art at Fairchild exhibitions held in the Garden. Based in Brazil, França uses all natural materials to create functional and sustainable design pieces,

www.lowemuseum.org

vessels and support-

ing materials, dating from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries, illustrating the remarkable variety of pottery created during that very dynamic time of transformation. Thru 07.13.14

Terrestrial Paradises: Imagery from The Voyages of Captain James Cook Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Included in this historical exhibit are engravings featuring imagery from Cook’s voyages to the Pacific Islands and South America from 1768-1779.

Image from Art in the Garden: Hugo França at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables: Hugo França, Guaraci Chaise

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tial qualities within drawings, paintings and three-dimensional installations.

CORAL SPRINGS Thru 03.15.14

André Desjardins: Visual Emotionism Coral Springs Museum of Art

Thru 03.15.14

Snowflake Effect Coral Springs Museum of Art www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Snowflake Effect is André Desjardins is a remembrance highly regarded for his project and juried www.coralspringsmuseum.org www.coralspringsmuseum.org exhibition of two stimulating paintings This collective show Infused with serene about the mysteries dimensional winter reflects the Africanhappiness and optiof life and love. He art by area artists. American experience mism, Craig Carlalso creates bronze as told through the viv- isle’s paintings articu- 03.29.14–05.17.14 sculptures of the huSylvia Tarshis id paintings of Charles late indelible images man form, which are Coral Springs Mills, the abstract which evoke emoaugmented by natural Museum of Art sculpture of his daugh- tions reminiscent of and organic elements, ter, Denise Collins, and childhood innocence. www.coralspringsmuseum.org fusing the figurative Sylvia Tarshis has the delightful, mindful with the abstract. 03.29.14–05.17.14 been described as a paintings of his niece, 02.08.14–03.15.14 Henning Haupt “romantic poet with Edith Humphreys. Charles Mills, Coral Springs a paint brush.” This Denise Collins & 03.29.14–05.17.14 Museum of Art exhibition will feature Edith Humphreys Craig Carlisle www.coralspringsmuseum.org her beautiful floral Coral Springs Coral Springs Henning Haupt’s compositions painted Museum of Art Museum of Art work explores spain oil on canvas. www.coralspringsmuseum.org

Image from Sylvia Tarshis at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Sylvia Tarshis, Untitled (Florals)

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DAYTONA BEACH Thru 02.2014

Great Impressions: The Intaglio Process Museum of Arts & Sciences

city scenes, caricatures, and natural history studies from the 17th through 20th centuries. Artists include Rembrandt, Piranesi, Audubon, Hogarth, Manet, Renoir and Dalí.

www.moas.org

This exhibition of printed material includes portraits, landscapes, seascapes and

Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Napoleon: Empire and Heritage is a panoramic exhibition examining French art, culture, and life from the 1770s to the 1820s.

Thru 02.2014

Napoleon: Empire and Heritage

02.28.14–05.25.14

El ojo fino (The Exquisite Eye)

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

El ojo fino / The Exquisite Eye features the photography of great women photographers of Mexico, including works by Lola Álvarez Bravo, Kati Horna, Mariana Yampolsky, Graciela Iturbide, Flor Garduño, Yolanda


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Daytona Beach continued...

Andrade, Alicia Ahumada, Ángeles Torrejón, and Maya Goded.

www.smponline.org

Valley of Shadows and Dreams is the result of a five-year photographic and literary exploration of California’s Central Valley, a region known for its agricultural plenty— and the marginalization of its people.

Thru 02.02.14

Lyonia– A Florida Upland: Lee Dunkel Southeast Museum of Photography

Thru 02.02.14

www.smponline.org

Using traditional black-and-white film and gelatin silver printmaking methods, Lee Dunkel’s photographs poetically bring out the intricate patterns, textures, and shapes that compose Florida’s unique and fragile ecosystem. Thru 02.02.14

My Dakota: Rebecca Norris Webb

Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

In 2005, Rebecca Norris Webb set out to photograph her home state of South Dakota, a landscape dominated by space and silence and solitude, by brutal wind and extreme weather. My Dakota interweaves the artist’s text and photographs and was selected as

one of the best photography books of 2012 by PDN, Photo-Eye, and Time. (See story in the October/December 2013 issue on pg. 124.)

Violet Isle: A Duet of Photographs from Cuba Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

01.24.14–04.20.14

Valley of Shadows and Dreams: Ken and Melanie Light Southeast Museum of Photography

Alex Webb’s dramatic and graphic exploration of street life in Cuba is combined with Rebecca Norris Webb’s fascinating images of the unique, quixotic collections of animals she discovered there.

Image from Valley of Shadows and Dreams: Ken and Melanie Light at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Ken Light, FOOD LINE, Westside Community Center, Mendota, California, 2009, silver gelatin print, 15 x 15”

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D e LAND 01.17.14–05.11.14

Jill Cannady: Idea & Medium Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida www.moartdeland.org

One of Florida’s most recognized worldclass artists, Jill Cannady, established Florida as a legitimate contributor to the national arts scene in the ’60s and ’70s. In this retrospective, Cannady’s hot and cold wax paintings, drawings, and sculptures will fill the galleries of the Museum of Art-DeLand, Florida.

Contemporary Street Fashion in Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Breaking Boundaries features some of the most popular and imaginative clothing styles made and worn on the streets of Japan today.

Thru 02.23.14

Contemporary Kogei Styles in Japan Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

This exhibition brings together approximately 90 Kōgei-style artworks comprising ceramics, textiles, dolls, and works of metal,

lacquer, wood, bamboo, and glass created by 40 of Japan’s most influential and leading Kōgei artists of international renown. 03.11.14–05.18.14

Japanese Prints of the Shining Prince Genji Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

The Tale of Genji, the first novel in the world, was written over 1,000 years ago by the Japanese court lady, Murasaki Shikibu. Shikibu’s epic novel was a popular source of inspiration for woodblock print and illustrated book artists in the 19th century. This exhibition features over 50 such

DELRAY BEACH Thru 02.23.14

Breaking Boundaries:

Image from Jill Cannady: Idea & Medium at Museum of Art – DeLand, Florida: Jill Cannady, Sybil Informed, 2010, Encaustic on panel, 30 x 30”

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Delray Beach continued...

woodblock prints and books depicting the scenes from Shikibu’s masterpiece.

Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

DUNEDIN 01.19.14–02.09.14

The 39th Annual International Miniature Art Society Exhibition Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

This new show will feature over 900 selected works by the finest calligraphers, painters, and sculptors working worldwide in miniature today. The Miniature Art Society of Florida has cultivated an impressive resurgence in the ancient tradition of arts in miniature— DFAC’s BIGGEST small exhibit!

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 01.20.14

Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Against the Grain features nearly 90 installations, sculptures,

furniture and objects that explore some of the most cutting-edge conceptual and technical trends in woodworking today. (See story in the October/ December 2013 issue on pg. 88.)

This exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by presenting approximately 100 photographs, both black-and-white and in color, by worldrenowned photojournalist and South Florida resident, Bob Adelman. Thru 05.18.14

Spirit of CoBrA Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

01.18.14–05.04.14

www.moafl.org

Bob Adelman: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale,

Spirit of Cobra focuses on the unique meeting of a group of young artists from several European countries from 1948

Image from Bob Adelman: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement at Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University: Bob Adelman, Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King, Selma to Montgomery March, 1965, © Bob Adelman

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

to 1951, brought together by a desire to start over after the war and an interest in the legacy of the prewar avantgardes, especially Surrealism. GAINESVILLE Thru 02.02.14

Bird Mothers and Feathered Serpents: Mythical Beings of Oceania and Ancient America Harn Museum of Art

Thru 07.27.14

Cosmopolitan: Envisioning Global Communities Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition highlights multiple ways of fostering community through art by linking radically different expressions of contemporary art and culture in novel and intrigu-

ing ways. Artists from Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States work at the intersection of ethics and aesthetics, affirming notions of individual difference and communal coexistence.

KONGO across the WATERS celebrates Kongo influenced cultural traditions primarily in the southeastern United States, including Florida. Thru 06.08.14

Thru 03.23.14

KONGO across the WATERS Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Private Dramas, Public Dreams: The Street Photographs of Helen Levitt & Friends Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition features more than forty vintage photographs by the acclaimed street photographer and filmmaker, Helen Levitt, as well as WPA graphic prints from the Harn Collection, and photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson,

www.harn.ufl.edu

Using objects from the Harn Museum’s Collection, this show focuses on mythological beings in art from Oceania and Ancient America.

Image from KONGO across the WATERS at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Woyo peoples, Banana, Lower Congo, DRC, Ndunga mask, early 20th century, collection RMCA Tervuren, EO.0.0.34579. Photo: R. Asselberghs, RMCA Tervuren ©

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Gainesville continued...

Walker Evans, and Walter Rosenblum.

and investigating the intersection of place and subjectivity—the way human identities are formed in relationship to the spaces they inhabit and pass through.

Thru 06.30.14

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting Harn Museum of Art

Thru 01.12.14

www.harn.ufl.edu

This exhibition offers a glimpse into the richness of painting from different regions of India and surrounding areas during the 17th to 19th centuries. HOLLYWOOD 01.25.14–03.14.14

Abracadabra Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

ly 100 donated works in all media by artists who have been invited to participate. Abracadabra culminates with a live drawing of these outstanding artworks, in which every ticket holder goes home with an original piece of art. (See story on pg. 140.) 01.25.14–03.14.14

www.artandculturecenter.org

Now in its seventh year, this exhibition and fund-raiser is comprised of approximate-

Aline KominskyCrumb: Hair Magic and More Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Famed cartoonist, Aline KominskyCrumb’s series of portraits and related video were inspired by the notion of beauty and what women are willing to do to achieve it. Thru 01.12.14

Charles LaBelle: Selections from the Dwelling Archive Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Francie Bishop Good: Not on Allen Street Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Life’s stages and domestic moments are the subjects of Francie Bishop Good’s images. This exhibit in the Center’s main gallery presents a survey of her recent photographs.

www.artandculturecenter.org

01.24.14–03.16.14

Charles LaBelle’s interest is in locating

Johnny Laderer: Fast Fade V

Image from Francie Bishop Good: Not on Allen Street at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Francie Bishop Good, Grant, before Halloween, Bethlehem, PA, 2010; produced 2010, pigment print, courtesy David Castillo Gallery, Miami

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

via opulent and escapist themes.

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 01.12.14

Through documentation and faithful, yet slightly imagined recreation, Johnny Laderer shows how the mundane, glancedover, and left-by-thewayside, are rife with meaning.

Melissa Fredendall: Temporal Flux Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

01.24.14–03.16.14

Kristen Thiele: Smoke and Mirrors Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 01.12.14

Samantha Brooks: 1000 Missed Connections Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

Temporal Flux synthesizes diverse research in memory and reality and is the result of the artist’s quest to recreate and understand this enigmatic phenomenon.

Brooks photographs the locations of these meetings or sightings and posts them online with screenshots of the missed connection ads.

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thru 01.12.14

Inspired by personal ads on Craigslist, where individuals seek out people they met or saw in public, 1000 Missed Connections is an ongoing web-based project where Samantha

Sarah Michelle Rupert: In Search of Ever After Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

Thiele’s imagery is derived from the motion pictures of the 1930s through the 50s. She is particularly interested in how this era of film aligns with the concept of artifice

www.artandculturecenter.org

Sarah Michelle Rupert’s photo-based work in In Search of Ever After draws upon media-driven narratives and modern day fairy tales propelled by popular culture expectations. 01.24.14–03.16.14

Virginia Fifield: Them/Us

Image from Kristen Thiele: Smoke and Mirrors at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Kristen Thiele, mfp, 2012, from the series After Hours, oil on wood panel, 23.5 x 48”

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Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

Them/Us is an exhibition of large-scale drawings in charcoal by Virginia Fifield. Her work in high realism presents selectively edited drawings of animal subjects in the form of portraiture. JACKSONVILLE

dinary works of art. (See story on pg. 58.)

01.26.14–04.06.14

Material Transformations Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Material Transformations features seven artists from around the United States and Canada who cleverly transform everyday materials into extraor-

Thru 01.19.14

Mythos: From Concept to Creation—Works by Enzo Torcoletti Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Enzo Torcoletti’s sculptures reflect a symbolic diversity of the human form.

Working in stone, wood, and other materials, he completes each step of the process himself—from the design sketches to the finished casting. Thru 03.09.14

Project Atrium: Ingrid Calame— Tarred Over Cracks Museum of Contemporary Art

Ingrid Calame will complete a dramatic wall painting this fall at MOCA Jacksonville. Based on urban spills, stains, and graffiti marks painstakingly traced and rearranged in the artist’s studio, her works combine precise gestures with an equally focused use of color. Thru 01.26.14

Unseen Images, Untold Stories: The Lives of LGBT Elders in Northeast Florida Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

This exhibition raises awareness through

Image from Project Atrium: Ingrid Calame—Tarred Over Cracks at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville: Ingrid Calame, Bb-AAghch!, 2003, enamel paint on aluminum, 72 x 72”, © Ingrid Calame, courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York/Shanghai

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

story and portraiture about the unique challenges LGBT (Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) elders face, including human rights issues. 01.25.14–04.27.14

One Family: Photographs by Vardi Kahana The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This is the story of one family. It is the entire Jewish-Israeli narrative embodied in a single family. To the big question of Jewish-Israeli identity, the photographs of Vardi Kahana’s family provide a kaleidoscope of answers.

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Our Shared Past came about when guest curator, Jefree Shalev, rediscovered a box of 8-mm home movies from 1957 through 1968. Selecting 200 single frames from these movies, he then invited 32 local artists to create a new work of art, inspired by these moments.

Thru 02.16.14

The Art of Empathy: The Cummer Mother of Sorrows in Context The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

works by the Master of the Stötteritz Altar, and was declared the “most important discovery in early German painting” by art historian, Colin Eisler, when it entered the collection in 1984.

www.cummer.org

This exhibition is designed to showcase a masterwork in The Cummer’s permanent collection, Mother of Sorrows. It is one of only five known

Thru 09.30.14

The Human Figure: Sculptures by Enzo Torcoletti The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Enzo Torcoletti is an innovative young sculptor with traditional ethics of workmanship. Because he is involved in the entire sculpture sequence from conception to exhibition, each finished piece, crafted from stone, wood, or other

Thru 05.25.14

Our Shared Past

Image from One Family: Photographs by Vardi Kahana at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Vardi Kahana, Three Sisters, Tel Aviv, 1992, photograph, © Vardi Kahana, courtesy of Andrea Meislin Gallery, New York

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

materials, is truly his own creation.

from the Museum’s permanent collection illustrate the important sense of “home.”

art hidden from the viewer so that they may create their own narratives.

30 years almost exclusively in ceramics, Gunderson’s current works visually express his observation of pop culture. Sorensen is best known for her monumental sculptural installations that draw on geological formations and classical elements. (See story on pg. 8.)

Thru 02.08.14

03.22.14–06.07.14

Thru 03.08.14

Inventing Narratives Polk Museum of Art

Site Specifics: Installations by Dan Gunderson & Barbara Sorensen Polk Museum of Art

Stephen Knapp: New Light Polk Museum of Art

Thru 07.08.14

The Prints of William Walmsley The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

This exhibition highlights the works of William Walmsley, an impressive printmaker who holds the record for the longest series of prints in the history of art. He is also the inventor of florescent lithography.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

This exhibition is intended to spark creLAKELAND ative abilities within Thru 03.23.14 the viewer. The sole Home intent here is not to Polk Museum simply explain a work of Art of art to the viewer, www.polkmuseumofart.org but rather to keep the Selected artworks meaning of a work of

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Stephen Knapp’s lightpaintings are crewww.polkmuseumofart.org ated by using shards Working collaboraof fused glass, intively, these two artstalled perpendicular ists will transform the to the wall’s surface, Museum with their to reflect beams of site-specific installacolored light into tions. Having spent abstract compositions.

Image from Site Specifics: Installations by Dan Gunderson & Barbara Sorensen at Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Dan Gunderson, Brush With Death, 2006

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MAITLAND 01.10.14–02.28.14

Constructed Landscapes: Works by Jake Fernandez

Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Working across a wide range of media, which includes collage, drawing, and painting, Cuban born artist, Jake Fernandez, moves to and fro between realism and abstraction with me-

chanical precision as he documents the beauty and mystery of the landscape. 03.14.14–05.25.14

Film Stories Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Artist Nancy Cervenka takes a

lifelong passion working with movie film to new heights with sculptures that honor the disappearing medium. Cervenka manipulates long strands of coiled celluloid into one-of-a-kind twisting objects of beauty, giving new life and meaning to the movie clips.

Polk Museum of Art presents Stephen Knapp: New Light On view through March 8, 2014

800 East Palmetto Street · Lakeland, FL 33801 · 863.688.7743 · www.PolkMuseumofArt.org

Stephen Knapp, Done for the Night (Detail)

These unique works are the intersection of painting, sculpture, and technology by exploring color, light, and space.


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03.14.14–04.20.14

Thru 01.19.14

Moving Pictures Art & History Museums, Maitland

The Horse: Paintings by Frits Van Eeden Foosaner Art Museum

www.artandhistory.org

Moving Pictures is a collection of watercolor studies and digital images captured while artist, Joyce Ely-Walker, traveled es of birds by working across the country directly on multiple by train. etched metal plates, which are printed and 01.10.14–02.28.14 later painstakingly Portraits: The hand tinted. Birds of Paradise Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Portraits: The Birds of Paradise features works by Tampa master printer, John Costin. Working from photographs and sketches, Costin creates his technical imag-

MELBOURNE

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

dedicated to social commentary. 03.22.14–05.11.14

Langdon Kihn: An American Story Foosaner Art Museum

01.25.14–03.16.14

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Inciteful Clay Foosaner Art Museum

This collection includes never-beforeexhibited portraits, landscapes, and drawings, as well as Native American artifacts given to Kihn by the peoples he depicted.

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Inciteful Clay offers an unparalleled overview of an emergent movement in contemporary ceramics

Image from Moving Pictures at Art & History Museums, Maitland: Joyce Ely-Walker, Top Speed, oil on wood

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Frits Van Eeden’s current series of paintings was inspired by the iconic horse. Its form and musculature are scaffolding for Van Eeden’s experiments in color, form, and media. Thru 01.19.14

Theodore Waddell: Far West Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Theodore Waddell’s Western landscapes merge his love of painting and the Montana and Idaho plains where he lives


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and works as a cattle rancher. 01.18.14–04.26.14

Tying the Knot: Global Wedding Costume and Ritual The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts

explores the aesthetic Experiments in Gepossibilities of the ometry features the urban environment, work of artists, Xabier playing with the Basterra, Laz Ojalde, spaces, mixing video Rosemarie Chiarlone, projections and inPeter Hammar, Regi- stallations, designing na Jestrow, and Alex complex iconic buildTrimino, who exings and changing plore notions of space, the perception of the shape, and time. architecture. www.artcentersf.org

Thru 02.23.14

http://textiles.fit.edu

Tying the Knot features wedding ensembles and accessories from Asia, Africa, Europe and North America, and showcases the varying customs, textiles, and fashion associated with marriage around the world.

ated an expansive, immersive installation, including works of all media, which visitors literally “walk into” and interact with. He also uses the historical collections of the Bass Museum of Art in his installation.

Thru 01.12.14

Thru 03.16.14

Juan López: Between Walls ArtCenter/ South Florida

Piotr Ukla´nski: ESL Bass Museum of Art

www.artcentersf.org

www.bassmuseum.org

Piotr Uklański has cre-

Juan López’ work

MIAMI Thru 01.12.14

Experiments in Geometry ArtCenter/ South Florida

TIME Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

TIME is an exhibition exploring individual interpretations of time, bridging the gap between historical collections and contemporary culture. The exhibition consists of a number of projects happening throughout the duration of the show, and includes painting, photography, video, sculpture, per-

Image from Piotr Uklanski: ´ ESL at Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach: Piotr Uklanski, ´ Untitled (Its Dark in my Heart), 2012; Untitled (Warsaw Uprising ’44 Pruszków), 2008, installation view, exhibition Piotr Uklanski. ´ Czterdzieści i cztery, Zachęta National Gallery of Art, 2012, Photo: Maciej Landsberg

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formance, and objects of design.

Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

03.13.14–07.20.14

Vanitas: Fashion and Art Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Vanitas: Fashion and Art examines the theme of vanitas as expressed in avant garde ready-to-wear and haute couture, as well as in contemporary paintings, sculptures, industrial design, and new media. Thru 03.09.14

Tracey Emin: Angel Without You Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

The first American museum exhibition

dedicated to the acclaimed British artist, Tracey Emin, Angel without You explores how the artist’s neons have played an essential role in the development of her work. (See story in the October/December 2013 issue on pg. 126.) Thru 05.25.14

A Human Document: Selections from the Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry

Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

PAMM presents an extensive selection of works from the collection of Ruth and Marvin Sackner, including rare manuscripts and published works by international luminaries such as Augusto and Haroldo de Campos, Oyvind Fahlström, and Eugen Gomringer.

Ai Weiwei: According to What? reveals Ai’s practice as emerging from an ever-questioning dialogue with the social, political and cultural positions of his native China and the world at large. This exhibition features work of the last 20 years, including photography and the large-scale sculptures for which the artist is best known. Thru 02.23.14

Amelia Peláez: The Craft of Modernity Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 03.16.14

www.pamm.org

Ai Weiwei: According to What?

This exhibition presents a focused selection of works by Ame-

Image from Tracey Emin: Angel without You at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Tracey Emin, Angel without You, 2013, ©Tracey Emin, courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin Gallery and White Cube

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lia Peláez del Casalv, one of the most important Cuban painters of the modernist era. 03.13.14–08.31.14

Edouard Duval-Carrié: Imagined Landscapes Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Edouard Duval-Carrié presents a series of large-scale paintings and sculptures, executed entirely in black and silver glitter, depicting lush tropical scenes that reference specific 19th-century paintings executed in the Caribbean and Florida.

from the Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 02.23.14

www.pamm.org

For Those in Peril on the Sea (2011) is an installation by Hew Locke that consists www.pamm.org of dozens of scaledWorking primarily in down replicas of film and video, Bouships suspended from chra Khalili reflects the ceiling, creatthe nomadic and often ing the impression transnational state of of a massive exodus existence that defines taking place throughlife for many people out the architecthroughout the world. tural space above the viewer—a powerful Thru 09.28.14 initial experience for Project Gallery: visitors to the new Hew Locke PAMM.

www.pamm.org

Project Gallery: Bouchra Khalili Pérez Art Museum Miami

This exhibition presents a varied selection of photographs drawn from PAMM’s permanent collection, with a particular emphasis on the Cowles Collection, a gift of more than one hundred iconic works of the 20th century, including photographs by Edward Steichen, Andy Warhol, and Rineke Dijkstra.

Pérez Art Museum Miami

Thru 09.28.14

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Monika Sosnowska is best known for large, site-specific sculptures made of

Thru 07.27.14

Image Search: Photography

Image from Ai Weiwei: According to What? at Pérez Art Museum Miami: Ai Weiwei, He Xie (detail), 2011, porcelain, collection of the artist; installation view: Ai Weiwei: According to What? at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, 2012; Photo: Cathy Carver

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steel, concrete, and other industrial materials. Though usually abstract, much of her work draws from the distinctive built environment of Warsaw, with its defunct or re-purposed Sovietera buildings, its vast industrial zones, and its reconstructions of historic neighborhoods destroyed during World War II.

transforming exhibition that conceptually circumnavigates the islands of the Caribbean. (See story in the October/December 2013 issue on pg. 122.) 01.22.14–04.13.14

nomena that illuminate the complexity of contemporary life, particularly within her native country of Israel.

most comprehensive exhibition of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs ever assembled. (See story on pg. 136.)

Thru 04.20.14

Karina Chechik: Architectures of Light The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Project Gallery: Yael Bartana Pérez Art Museum Miami www.pamm.org

Among the most celebrated artists of her generation, Yael Bartana’s video work, both documentary and staged, explores social phe-

02.12.14–04.20.14

Thru 02.02.14

Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Humberto Castro: Tracing Antilles The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Cuban-American artist, Humberto Castro, executes an artistic journey across the Antilles in an ever

More than 150 photographs depict a tumultuous history of the world in the

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Argentine artist, Karina Chechik, presents an exhibit based on various architectural settings with religious and cultural references which combine different artistic currents, beliefs, and temporalities. 01.22.14–03.30.14

Miler Lagos:

Image from Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Babe Ruth retires his uniform #3 at Yankee stadium on June 13, 1948, by Nat Fein; New York Herald Tribune; ©Nat Fein Estate

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LAT 65.31N LONG 114.13W The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

During his residency in the Canadian Arctic (2011), Miler Lagos investigated the experiences of early Arctic explorers. His project, LAT 65.31N LONG 114.13W, developed in the geographical area from which 19th century European expeditions departed, contributes to what might be called, “The Canadian Arctic Botanical Expedition.”

The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

in the early 20th century.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

03.26.14–06.22.14

This exhibition highlights the development of multisensory experiences in art and literature, promoted by creative figures across Europe

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The exhibition, drawn from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art, explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. Thru 01.26.14

Things That Cannot be Seen Any Other Way: The Art of Manuel Mendive The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Manuel Mendive Hoyo creates paintings, sculptures and objects that appropriate, transform, and adapt the visual

02.12.14–04.06.14

Modern Beauty?: The Aesthetics of Perceptual Simultaneity

Image from Karina Chechik: Architectures of Light at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Karina Chechik, Architectures of light, Venaria Reale Palace Turin, acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 38 x 51”

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language of Africa as a means of conveying its rich mythology to a new audience, informed less about its ritual than about its aesthetics.

Armory Show at Vizcaya Vizcaya Museum & Gardens www.vizcayamuseum.org

Thru 05.18.14

Echoes and Origins: Italian Interwar Design The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Echoes and Origins is part of Rebirth of Rome, a series of exhibitions highlighting Italian art and design from the interwar period. Thru 05.18.14

The Birth of Rome The Wolfsonian– Florida

International University

International University

www.wolfsonian.org

www.wolfsonian.org

The Birth of Rome presents modern architectural and urban planning projects that cultivated the perception of a storied Italian nation rooted in a mythologized past.

Rendering War focuses on Antonio Giuseppe Santagata’s large-scale studies for mural paintings created in the 1920s and 1930s, commemorating and celebrating Italian soldiers in the First World War.

Thru 05.18.14

Rendering War: The Murals of A. G. Santagata The Wolfsonian– Florida

Thru 03.31.14

The Academic and the Avant Garde: Artists of the 1913

The Academic and the Avant Garde gathers objects and archival materials to illustrate how these artists served as a bridge between past and present. The exhibition also sheds light on the eclectic taste that shaped Vizcaya and, more generally, early 20thcentury architecture and design in America. NAPLES Thru 01.11.14

Breaking Through with Color: Artists Reveal the Power of Color Naples Art Association at

Image from Breaking Through with Color: Artists Reveal the Power of Color at Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center, Naples: Wanda Kemper, Pepper Corn, oil on canvas, 24 x 30”

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Color is the main focus of this juried awards exhibition where Naples Art Association members show off its powerful impact.

abstraction. She is best known for producing large-scale pastels Thru 01.18.14 and mixed-media Joan Brechin paintings of familiar Sonnenberg: objects seen upThe Middle Point close or from a new Naples Art vantage point. lishing Naples as a vital art community.

Association at The von Liebig Art Center

01.18.14–03.01.14

www.naplesart.org

Diamonds: The Naples Art Association’s Collection Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center

Joan Sonnenberg transcends media by combining realism and

02.01.14–03.01.14

Spring Show 2014: Arts Council of Southwest Florida

Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

This juried biennial exhibition is made possible through the Naples Art Association’s affiliation with the Arts Council of Southwest Florida, consisting of members from Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry, and Glades counties, with a combined membership of over 6,800 artists. Thru 02.16.14

Connected and Disconnected: The Sculpture of Hanneke Beaumont The Baker Museum

www.naplesart.org

The collection of mid- to late 20th century paintings, sculpture, works on paper, photography, and mixed media documents the legacy of artists who were influential in estab-

www.artisnaples.org

This retrospective of Dutch sculptor

Image from Diamonds: The Naples Art Association’s Collection at Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center, Naples: James Rosenquist, The, from the portfolio High Technology and Mysticism: A Meeting Point, 1981, lithograph print, edition 25/150, 33.25 x 34”, gift of Suzanne and George Lorch

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Hanneke Beaumont’s work, features her enigmatic bronze figures, a source of fascination and wonder since capturing international attention in the late 1990s.

Mode: The Exquisite Art of Isabelle de Borchgrave The Baker Museum www.artisnaples.org

01.04.14–04.06.14

02.22.14–04.27.14

03.15.14–07.06.14

Duchamp Family of Artists The Baker Museum

Florida Contemporary The Baker Museum

Museum to Scale 1/7 The Baker Museum

www.artisnaples.org

www.artisnaples.org

www.artisnaples.org

This new exhibit features the work of four members of the Duchamp family—Jacques Villon, Raymond DuchampVillon, Marcel Duchamp and Suzanne Duchamp—each artist who, in their own separate way, made significant contributions to 20thcentury art.

From realism to abstraction, and everything in between, Florida Contemporary features local photographers, painters, sculptors, and graphic artists who have spent a lifetime at their craft, alongside an exciting array of new artists that visitors can discover for themselves.

This installation, featuring nearly 100 dioramas devoted to current Belgian artists and art movements, recalls the Wunderkammern or “cabinets of curiosities and wonder” dating from the 17th century. Thru 01.12.14

Papiers à la

Featuring over 50 period costumes, kimonos, kaftans, and other objects intricately crafted out of paper by Belgian artist and sculptor, Isabelle de Borchgrave, Papiers à la Mode offers a fresh look at fashion history from Elizabeth I to Coco Chanel. (See story in the October/ December 2013 issue on pg. 76.) 01.25.14–05.18.14

Rediscovering Egypt: The Collection of the Dahesh Museum of Art

Image from Connected and Disconnected: The Sculpture of Hanneke Beaumont at The Baker Museum, Artis–Naples: Hanneke Beaumont, Untitled, cast iron #45, 2000; Photo: © Stefano Baroni

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

temporary platinum prints from the collecwww.artisnaples.org tion of the Southeast Rediscovering Egypt Museum of Photogracombines original phy, featuring works engravings from by Kenro Izu, Craig the Description de Barber & José Miguel l’Egypte—considered Ferreira. the seminal work of modern EgyptolOCALA ogy—with orientalist 01.17.14–04.13.14 works from the collection of the Dahesh A Celebration of Japan Museum of Art of Appleton New York City. The Baker Museum

NEW SMYRNA BEACH Thru 02.08.14

containers, kimonos, and wood block prints from the collections of the Appleton Museum of Art and Mulvane Art Museum.

tion with others from the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, and the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona Beach.

Thru 01.19.14

Age of Revolution Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

This display, organized in collaboration with the 2013 Ocala Museum of Art Civic Theater debut www.appletonmuseum.org of Les Misérables, This exhibition feabrings together works tures decorative sword from the Appleton’s guards, pen & ink 19th-century collec-

Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography Atlantic Center for the Arts

02.22.14–03.09.14

Canstruction Ocala Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Canstruction Ocala is a creative design and build competition where artists construct fantastic giant-sized structures made entirely out of canned foods. 02.01.14–04.27.14

Exploration: The Art of R. Gregory Christie Appleton Museum of Art

www.atlanticcenter forthearts.org

The ACA presents a selection of con-

www.appletonmuseum.org

Image from Selections from the Southeast Museum of Photography at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, New Smyrna Beach: José Miguel Ferreira, Paisagem do Douro I, 2008, from the series, The Port Wine Route, platinum /palladium print, 14 x 11”

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R. Gregory Christie, a nationally recognized children’s book illustrator, will present an exhibit of his works, and participate in an Artistin-Residency program at the Appleton Museum of Art. 03.01.14–07.06.14

Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein Appleton Museum of Art

www.thehistorycenter.org

Prints from the Appleton’s permanent collection will be on display. Thru 01.19.14

01.17.14–04.13.14

The Living Art of Bonsai Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

More than 160 drawings, paintings, animation cels, and related art objects trace the elaborate creative process that produced classic Warner Bros. cartoons from the 1930s through the 1960s. (See story on pg. 120.) 03.06.14–04.27.14

Isabel Manalo Orlando Museum of Art

Bonsai from the collections of members of the www.omart.org www.appletonmuseum.org Marion Bonsai Society OMA’s New Work: Michelle Stitzlein’s A Series of Biwill be on view. large-scale sculptures monthly Exhibitions are made from license of Contemporary ORLANDO plates, and piano and Art features Isabel 01.25.14–03.23.14 bicycle parts. Manalo, who creates www.appletonmuseum.org The Art of mixed-media work 02.08.14–05.11.14 The exhibition will Warner Bros. in photography that [in]justice Cartoons present 35 of the best explores issues of Appleton Orange County watercolors produced place, identity, geMuseum of Art by artists from Florida Regional History ography, nature, and www.appletonmuseum.org and around the country. Center postcolonial identity. Selections from the Florida Watercolor Society’s 42nd Annual Exhibition Appleton Museum of Art

Image from Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein at the Appleton Museum of Art: Michelle Stitzlein, Petaled Lecanora, Lichen Series, 2010; Medium: Piano keys, cooking pans, light bulbs, rubber stoppers, bottle caps, light globe, etc.; Dimensions: 60”dia. x 12”d

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Thru 02.02.14

www.omart.org

01.17.14–04.06.14

Joelle Dietrick + Owen Mundy: 1.5 x 3.5 Orlando Museum of Art

Highlighting work from Italy, France, Spain, Flanders, the Netherlands, Germany, and England, this exhibition will illustrate how the tremendous changes in religion and science, coupled with the economic growth that swept Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries, gave way to a period of incredible artistic creation. (See story on pg. 74.)

Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony The Mennello Museum of American Art

www.omart.org

OMA’s New Work: A Series of Bimonthly Exhibitions of Contemporary Art continues with an exhibition featuring a single-channel generative animation by Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy.

www.mennellomuseum.com

The evolution of Sante Fe as an art center is explored through this pictorial history of artists, the work they produced, and the prevailing artistic trends that were applied to this Southwestern

01.25.14–05.25.14

Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting from the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky Orlando Museum of Art

city’s landscape, customs, and lifestyle. ORMOND BEACH Thru 01.31.14

Explorations of the Mind & Brain Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Explorations of the Mind & Brain is a multimedia look at the intersection of art and neuroscience from San Francisco-based artist, Elizabeth Jameson. PALM BEACH 01.28.14–04.20.14

Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York

Image from Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando: George Wesley Bellows (American, 1882-1925), Santuario de Chimayo, 1917, oil on canvas, 19-1/8 x 23-1/4”, collection of Judy and Lee Dirks, Santa Fe, New Mexico

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Pa l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

The Cultural Center presents a juried artist member exhibition featuring artworks in all media.

www.flaglermuseum.us

Featured objects shed light on four centuries of silver production and use in the United States.

SARASOTA

03.22.14–04.23.14

Light in the Desert, Photographs from the Monastery of Christ in the Desert by Tony O’Brien The Society of the Four Arts

02.05.14–06.03.14

rare access to photograph daily activities and rituals that have been kept in a tradition dating back to the Middle Ages.

www.fourarts.org

01.25.14–03.09.14

The photographs featured in this exhibit capture the essence and experience of photojournalist Tony O’Brien’s year-long residency at Christ in the Desert Monastery. O’Brien was granted

The Coast and the Sea: Marine and Maritime Art from the NewYork Historical Society The Society of the Four Arts

www.fourarts.org

This exhibition features American marine paintings ranging in date from 1750 to 1904 by eminent marine artists like Thomas Birch, John Frederick Kensett and Charlton T. Chapman.

Conserved The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Featuring posters from the Tibbals Collection, this exhibition examines the life of a circus poster. 03.21.14–07.13.14

PONTE VEDRA BEACH 01.10.14–02.21.14

Celebrate Art 2014

In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Image from In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Ruth Orkin, Man in Rain, W. 88th St., NYC, 1952 (detail), gelatin silver print, gift of Paullete and Kurt Olden, 1986, MF86.54

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www.ringling.org

In the Streets: Photographing Urban Spaces explores the many ways in which 20th-century photographers responded to the rise of the modern metropolis. Thru 03.09.14

Optical Impulses The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

In the second half of the 19th century, Japan’s last years as an isolated preindustrial society were documented by early photographers. These photographs were enhanced by the selective addition of color, painted by Japanese artists who transformed them in the inspired tradition of woodblock prints.

www.ringling.org

Optical Impulses presents the art of pivotal artists who explore both the phenomenal and psychological aspects of visual perception.

01.31.14–05.04.14

R. Luke Dubois— Now

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Among the works featured in this solo exhibition is the premiere of a new video work created by the artist while in residence at The Ringling, focused on the historical links between the Ringling legacy and the greatest example of collective performance experience—the circus.

Thru 06.29.14

The Philip and Nancy Kotler Glass Collection The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

This exhibition presents an overview of a recent gift of Studio Glass to The Ringling, and includes works by Nicolas Africano, Silvia Levenson, Peter Hora, and Stanislav Libensky, among many others. Thru 03.09.14

Unfamiliar Realities The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

01.18.14–04.06.14

Picturing Japan The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

Unfamiliar Realities provides an opportunity for viewers to explore the ways in

www.ringling.org

Image from R. Luke Dubois–Now at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: R. Luke Dubois, Fashionably Late for the Relationship (video still), 2007-08

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Sarasota continued...

which photographers have exploited the particular characteristics of the medium to reframe, manipulate, or reimagine the world as captured by the lens. Thru 02.04.14

Wild West The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The American Southwest is the focus www.ringling.org of this exhibition, Wild West is an exhibi- featuring art from tion of original posters, the Raymond James printed between 1890 Financial Collecand 1950, celebrating tion, the Museum of great Wild West shows Fine Arts, and other from Buffalo Bill to area collections. A the 101 Ranch. special feature of the exhibition will be the breathtaking jewST. PETERSBURG elry of contemporary 01.18.14–05.11.14 masters, inspired by New Mexico traditional forms. and the Arts of Enchantment Museum of Fine Arts,

Thru 03.02.14

Recent Acquisitions

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

More than 40 exceptional works on paper and photographs, all added in the last five years, are on display. 01.18.14–04.27.14

Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. explores how Warhol learned from Dalí’s public visibility, and was equally

attuned to the images derived from mass culture. The exhibit includes approximately 35 paintings, 20 drawings, 50 photographs and a selection of Warhol films, including screen tests—and a special film installation providing visitors their “15 minutes of fame.” (See story on pg. 134.) TALLAHASSEE 02.14.14–03.30.14

Making Now: Open for Exchange Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

Part of Seven Days of Opening Nights, Making Now will be a surprise—an indefinable exhibition bustling with movement,

Image from Optical Impulses at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Herbert Bayer, Chromatic Twist, 1970, Screen print, gift of Jerome Singer, 1979, MF79.22.6

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Ta l l a h a s s e e c o n t i n u e d . . .

vivid artwork, and the fluorescent and incandescent glow of life. 02.01.14–03.30.14

Trevor Bell: Both Sides of the Atlantic Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University www.mofa.fsu.edu

From the Space Coast of Florida to the rugged cliffs of southwestern England, Trevor Bell has been drawn to dynamic environments. Mental images gathered throughout the world are armatures underlying his vibrant sculptural canvases.

Pirates: A Albright-Knox Photographic Art Gallery History of Tampa Tampa 1879-1955 Museum of Art Florida Museum www.tampamuseum.org of Photographic This exhibition highArts lights the work of www.fmopa.org

This exhibition presents a historic survey of works documenting Tampa’s unique past.

three modern masters—Jean (Hans) Arp, Joan Miró, and Alexander Calder— who pushed color, line, and form beyond convention.

Thru 01.19.14

Arp, Calder, and Miro: Modern Masters from the

Thru 01.19.14

Fragile Waters

Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Fragile Waters comprises black-and-white photographs by three iconic photographers and environmentalists—Ansel Adams, Ernest H. Brooks II, and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly. These artists communicate the beauty and vitality of water, and engage the viewer in affirming its intrinsic aesthetic— emotional and essential life value. 02.01.14–05.18.14

Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF Tampa Museum of Art

TAMPA

www.tampamuseum.org

Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF features more

Thru 02.23.14

Gangsters, Cigars, and

Image from Gangsters, Cigars, and Pirates: A Photographic History of Tampa 1879-1955 at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Image courtesy Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

than 110 original works by an international array of more than 25 former artistsin-residence at this print atelier in Tampa, Florida. The exhibition pairs important works spanning Graphicstudio’s 45-year history with some of its most recent collaborative endeavors. (See story on pg. 110.)

www.spcollege.edu/museum

the viewer makes a night-time visit to a mysterious, mythical cruise liner, the Sea of Tranquility.

Thru 01.19.14

Sea of Tranquillity Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

The medium-length film, Sea of Tranquillity, by Brussels-based visual artist, Hans Op de Beeck, is a combination of live video recordings of actors and digitally-generated 3D environments in which

01.17.14–03.08.14

CAM@25: Social Engagement University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum www.ira.usf.edu

USFCAM’s 25th anniversary exhibition celebrates its extensive history of exhibitions, commissions and collaborations with artists

whose practices and projects embrace an ethos of responsible social meaning, purpose, and motivation in the public sphere. Artists include Los Carpinteros (Cuba/Spain), Pedro Reyes (Mexico), and Janaina Tschäpe (Brazil/Germany). TARPON SPRINGS Thru 02.16.14

Clyde Butcher: Preserving Eden Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art

Clyde Butcher is best known for his large-format, blackand-white landscapes of Florida’s wilderness areas. This exhibition of 40 photographs and contextual panels demonstrates Butcher’s commitment to save these fragile environments through awareness. Thru 04.20.14

Dominique Labauvie: Sculpture and Design Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

French-born, internationally renowned sculptor, Dominique Labauvie, works primarily in forged steel, and creates large-scale sculptures.

Image from CAM@25: Social Engagement at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Janaina Tschäpe, Blood, Sea, 2004, (video still). Image courtesy University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

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Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

Thru 02.2014

Museums of Tampa Bay Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

This exhibition features 18 solarized photographs on loan from photographer, Joseph Constantino, of art museums in the Tampa Bay area. VERO BEACH Thru 02.02.14

Cuban Art and Identity: 1900 to 1950 Vero Beach Museum of Art

Cuba’s dynamic culture before the Castro era. 01.25.14–05.04.14

Dale Kennington: Mythologies Vero Beach Museum of Art

02.15.14–05.25.14

01.25.14–05.14.14

Picturing America: Signature Works from the Westmoreland Museum of American Art Vero Beach Museum of Art

Stephen Lawson: Images of Time Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Using film cameras that he has mechanically modified, Lawson www.verobeachmuseum.org has created fascinating Kennington’s paintwww.verobeachmuseum.org sectioned panoramas Picturing America rep- shot over varying periings engage viewers both intellectually resents two hundred ods of time. (See story and emotionally. Her years of American art, on pg. 138.) from colonial times to series of wood folding screens combines the mid-20th century, W. PALM BEACH representational illu- as America came into 02.22.14–03.22.14 sion with penetrating its own as the cultural Huguette capital of the world. emotion. Despault May & Kathleen Elliot Armory Art Center

www.verobeachmuseum.org

Echoing the rhythms of the Rhumba and the Mambo, and the colors of town and country, this exhibition offers Museum visitors an insider’s view of

www.armoryart.org

This exhibition features the large-scale drawings of Huguette Despault May and glass sculptural works of Kathleen Elliot.

Image from Dale Kennington: Mythologies at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Dale Kennington, Exposure (recto), 2005 – 2007, oil on wood panel (six panels), 94 x 144” fully extended, each panel: 94 x 24”

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

between 1900 and 1940 as Realists and Modernists conceived a new pictorial language to treat American industrialism.

01.11.14–02.15.14

Palm Beach Watercolor Society Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

Members of the Palm Beach Watercolor Society present their recent works.

Thru 01.12.14

Norton Museum of Art

Thru 02.01.14

You Are Here: DSOA Arts Alumni Exhibition Armory Art Center

www.norton.org

This dazzling showcase explores the mastery of jewelry designer, David www.armoryart.org Webb, whose creOn view is a selection ations are inextricably of works by visual arts linked to the heady alumni of the Alexand free-wheeling ander W. Dreyfoos spirit of the 1960s School of the Arts, and early 1970s. (See from 1994-2013. story on pg. 100.) 01.16.14–04.13.14

03.20.14–06.22.14

David Webb: Society’s Jeweler

Industrial Sublime:

Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940 Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

L.A. Stories: Videos from the West Coast Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

L.A. Stories brings together four artists whose work embraces and exploits the narrative potentials of video. Their works range from straightforward storytelling to the isolation of evocative narrativeladen moments that string together.

Featuring paintings by leading artists such as George Bellows, Robert Henri, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Georgia O’Keeffe, and John Sloan, this exThru 01.12.14 hibition examines the shift to urban views of New Work/ New York’s waterways New Directions:

Image from Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940 at Norton Museum of Art, W. Palm Beach: Aaron Douglas (American, 1899-1979), Power Plant in Harlem, 1934, oil on canvas, 20-1/4 x 22-1/3”, from the Hampton University Museum Collection, Hampton, Virginia

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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

Brothers. Included are significant works by artists such as Ansel Adams, www.norton.org Edward Weston, The Norton’s recent Eileen Cowin, Holly acquisitions range Roberts, and Sam from the 19th century Taylor-Wood. motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge Thru 02.23.14 Phyllida Barlow: to recent large-scale HOARD narrative works by Norton Canadian-based artMuseum of Art ists, The Sanchez Recent Photo Acquisitions Norton Museum of Art

ments she manipulates Phyllida Barlow’s to create her works. sculptural practice cen- (See story in the Octers on her attention to, tober/December 2013 and experimentation issue on pg. 120.) with, materials that are easily overlooked and 02.06.14–05.04.14 most often found in the Qing Chic: Chinese Textiles urban environment in which she lives. Card- from the 19th board, fabric, plywood, to early 20th Century polystyrene, wire netNorton ting, and cement are Museum of Art among favored elewww.norton.org

Society’s Jeweler jan. 16 – april 13, 2014 Organized by the Norton Museum of Art, this exhibition is made possible in part through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf and Richters of Palm Beach. photo © Ilan Rubin

www.norton.org


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W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

first superstar and their enduring friendship.

www.norton.org

This pendant exhibition to David Webb’s jewelry designs features a robe, embroidered silk panels, purses, and shoes that share Webb’s love of natural forms, especially flowers and animals.

WINTER PARK Opening 01.04.14

Conversations: Selections from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Thru 01.26.14

The Four Princely Gentlemen: Plum Blossoms, Orchids, Bamboo, and Chrysanthemums Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition features the recently acquired album of ink paintings of orchids and bamboo by the Qing dynasty scholar, Qian Zai (1708-1793).

cfam.rollins.edu Thru 03.23.14

The Polaroid Years: Instant Photography and Experimentation Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This survey exhibition brings together groundbreaking Polaroid pictures by 40 artists, spanning the period from the initial release of the

SX-70 camera in 1972 until the present. 02.02.14–05.25.14

To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition explores the rise of “Baby Jane” as an internationally known model and reveals the evolution of Warhol’s

To draw new relationships, the CFAM Collection’s favorites are brought together under four broad thematic categories: Religion Redefined, Gesture and Pose, A Sense of Place, and History and Myth. 01.04.14–05.11.14

Glimpses into the Golden Age Cornell Fine Arts Museum at

Image from The Polaroid Years: Instant Photography and Experimentation at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Chuck Close, 5C (Self-Portrait), 1979, five large-format Polaroid Polacolor prints, 60-1/2 x 56-5/8”, The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, © Chuck Close

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

This installation provides the opportunity for CFAM to highlight several works in its own possession by artists featured in the Orlando Museum of Art’s corresponding presentation, Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting. (See story on pg. 86.)

as tanks and helicopters set against unfamiliar mythological and hybrid creatures to explore notions of assimilation and control. 01.04.14–03.16.14

Matisse as Printmaker:

Works from the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation* Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

bition showcases the extraordinary range of Matisse’s printmaking techniques and subjects.

cfam.rollins.edu

The Holy Art of Impe­r­ial Rus­sia: Icons from the 17th Century— Early 20th Century The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

Drawn from the collection of Matisse’s son, Pierre, this exhi-

01.04.14–04.13.14

John Hitchcock: Ghosts of Brutality Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Thru 04.13.14

www.polasek.org

The sacred images on view in this exhi­ bi­tion were once read­ily found in even the hum­blest homes in pre-Soviet Russia, as well as its churches and pub­lic shrines, and seen as com­forters and pow­ er­ful guardians.

cfam.rollins.edu

Working within the discipline of printmaking, John Hitchcock uses familiar images of US military weaponry such

O n V iew

Image from Matisse as Printmaker: Works from the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park: Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Marie-Jose in a Yellow Dress (III), 1950, color lift-ground aquatint (black with four colors); Image: 21-1/8 x 16-7/16”; Sheet: 29 15/16 x 22 1/4”, Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation (1454–104051); © 2013 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. * This exhibition is organized by the American Federation of Arts and the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation

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PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Exhibition: ALL THAT GLITTERS

gallery Gallery Artists & Exhibits

ON VIEW THRU 01.25.14

Great works by wonderful artists such as Harry Benson, Frank Horvat, Patrick Demarchelier, Albert Watson, Ormond Gigli, and Massimo Listri are featured in this exceptional display of top names in contemporary photography. MIAMI

Gallery: Williams McCall Gallery www.williamsmccallgallery.com

Artist: Glenn Daidone WYNWOOD AT DARK IS AN ESSAY OF URBAN NIGHT PHOTOGRAPHS

showcasing Miami’s vanishing warehouse district. The area dates roughly to Miami’s heyday with the requisite art deco detailing which beautifully complements Daidone’s stark, surreal, dreamlike style and reflects influences of 1940’s film noir and storybook illustrations from the same period. From left: Albert Watson, Golden Boy, New York, archival pigment photograph, 1990, printed 2009, 56 x 42”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery; Glenn Daidone, Fifth Avenue, courtesy of the artist and Williams McCall Gallery

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MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: N’Namdi Contemporary

Gallery: Dina Mitrani Gallery

www.nnamdi contemporary.com

www.dinamitrani gallery.com

Exhibition: Gregory Coates

Exhibition: MARINA FONT

ON VIEW 02.08.14 –03.08.14

Marina Font’s work, her inspirations and creative processes explore issues of identity and concepts of memory and tradition through photography and installation.

ON VIEW 02.06.14–03.28.14

Gregory Coates is inventive with his usages of found materials. His art is not about the use of material, but the material itself — the material as subject matter. NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Exhibition: Night Music ON VIEW 02.03.14 –02.28.14

Artists Stephen Fox, Sarah Williams, Robert Striffolino, Carol O’Malia, Robin Luciano Beaty, Isabelle du Toit and Randall Deihl offer their take on images of the night—from dusk to dawn.

Clockwise from top: Gregory Coates, courtesy of the artist and N’Namdi Contemporary; Marina Font, Untitled, 2013, archival pigment on canvas, thread, wood panel, 16 x 12”, courtesy of the artist and Dina Mitrani Gallery; O’Malia, Balancing Act, oil on canvas, 48 x 48”, courtesy of the artist and Trudy Labell Fine Art

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NAPLES

Gallery: Gardner Colby Gallery www.gardnercolby gallery.com

Exhibition: 20 YEARS, 20 ARTISTS, 20 PAINTINGS ON VIEW 02.13.14–02.28.14

Gardner Colby Gallery will mark its 20th Anniversary with this special exhibition, featuring one special work from each of the gallery’s top 20 artists.

TAMPA

Gallery: Clayton Galleries www.claytongalleries.net

Exhibition: Ref lections ON VIEW 01.18.14 –03.01.14

Reflection can describe a physical phenomenon as well as a mental state, which is why this title works for a variety of subject imagery. This exhibition, which features works by artists, Roberta Schofield and Lynn Manos, focuses on the visual interest that physical reflections create and the projection of multiple points of view when reflected images are layered over a base image. The images attempt to capture the beauty of a fleeting moment while it is still present in one’s memory. From left: Tim Horn, Lunch with Pop, 20 x 20”, oil, courtesy of the artist and Gardner Colby Gallery; Clayton Lynn Manos, Venice-Venice #82, monotype, courtesy of the artist and Clayton Galleries

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MIAMI

MIAMI

Gallery: Etra Fine Art

Gallery: Emerson Dorsch

www.etrafineart.com

www.emersondorsch.com

Exhibition: Andrea Dasha Reich: The Crossroad

Exhibition: BEATRIZ MONTEAVARO 


ON VIEW 03.08.14 –04.12.14

ON VIEW 01.11.14–02.15.14

In this solo exhibition, Andrea Dasha Reich will merge the new with the old by showcasing her new and sensual sculptural artworks alongside the multilayered and dimensional resin paintings that she is well known for.

In recent works, Beatriz Monteavaro has taken to reappropriating her own collection of her paintings and drawings into shelters and ripped and reassembled collages in an attempt to find different uses for art in a possible postapocalyptic future.

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Studio E Gallery www.studioegallery.com

Artist: Angela Nesbit ANGELA NESBIT effortlessly captures light, movement, and texture in a brief yet poignant blur of childhood. Settled amid thick layers of paint, her simple subjects wander softly in and out of the background.

Clockwise from top: Andrea Dasha Reich, Cayenne #2, acrylic and resin, 44” diameter, courtesy of the artist and Etra Fine Art; Beatriz Monteavaro, Untitled (album cover), 2013, courtesy Emerson Dorsch; Angela Nesbit, Fun and Sun, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery

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MATERIAL

TRANSFORMATIONS on view

01.25.14-04.06.14

at the MUSEUMof CONTEMPORARY ART JACKSONVILLE w w w. m o c a j a c k s o n v i l l e . o r g OnV

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Previous pages: Kirsten Hassenfeld, Another Star, 2011, paper with mixed media; This page: Kirsten Hassenfeld, Star Upon Star, 2011, paper with mixed media. Images courtesy of the Artist.


Material Transformations

The MUSEUM of CONTEMPORARY ART Jacksonville presents Material Transformations, a truly inspiring exhibition, organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts,

Montgomery, Alabama, featuring seven artists from around the US and Canada who cleverly transform everyday materials

into extraordinary works of art. The show will be on view from January 25 through April 6, 2014.

Artists Kirsten Hassenfeld, Paul Villinski, Angela Ells-

Kirsten Hassenfeld

worth, Lucrecia Troncoso, Alison Foshee, Rune Olsen, and Johnston Foster create assemblages, installations, and sculp-

Kirsten Hassenfeld’s translucent

sumer culture. Using techniques rooted in craft, these artists

ized as “extravaganzas of the

sculptures have been character-

tures that combine various items found in popular and con-

handmade.” Since 1999,

turn away from traditional “high art.” Instead, the focus is the

Hassenfeld has used paper, the

art of transformation, elevating the mundane and the banal into

most ordinary of materials, to create ornate, obsessively detailed

the sublime.

objects that reference luxury

The artists in Material Transformations find symbolism

goods, classical architecture, and

in the very unconventional substances they use to construct

decorative arts. Described by Hassenfeld as “dreams on the

their works of art, and are inspired by the items we frequently

edge of vanishing,” her ethereal

encounter, use, and discard with rarely a second thought. While

sculptures explore her own

not necessarily political, their works embody social commenOnV

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fantasies of abundance and plenty.

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Paul Villinski, Fable, 2011, cello, aluminum (found cans), soot, wire. Image courtesy of the Artist and Morgan Lehman Gallery, New York.


Material Transformations

tary and explore multiple themes. For example, our culture’s obsession with consumer goods and its impact on our environment is a primary concern. Additionally, some artists look to nature for inspiration and their works investigate our twentyfirst century relationship to the natural world. Following this

thinking, other artists look to animals as an extension of the

Paul Villinski

natural world. While very much tied to contemporary life, through both materials and ideas, each of these artists build

“I am drawn to humble, yet evocative materials; in this case,

upon the legacy of late nineteenth century and early twentieth

crushed beer cans from the

century art movements wherein artists began moving away

streets of New York—every one of

from traditional art-making materials.

them once raised to someone’s

These artists leave behind the established hierarchies of

lips. My process of ‘recycling’ them into images of butterflies is

art, craft, and design to create engaging works that form new

a quiet physical meditation, a

associations with the remnants of our consumer culture. In the

yoga of tin snips and files and

combination of various materials, the artists favor an authen-

fingers...I try to develop a conceptual unity between

tic touch achieved through making things by hand. Removed

materials, process, and imagery:

from their normal function and modified into inventive works

metamorphosing littered beer

of art, the artists give ordinary products an extraordinary sec-

cans into flocks of butterflies mirrors the act of transformation

ond life. In their altered form, these objects become intriguing

and rebirth that butterflies

works of art that challenge us to question our relationship to

symbolize across all cultures.”

the consumer-based foundations of our modern lives. OnV

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—P. Villinski .

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Angela Ellsworth, Seer Bonnet, Clarissa (age 15), and detail (opposite page), 2012-2013, 17,443 pearl corsage pins, fabric, steel. Image courtesy of the Artist and Lisa Sette Gallery, Scottsdale.

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Material Transformations

Angela Ellsworth Angela Ellsworth is an American multidisciplinary artist whose paintings, drawings, installations and performances explore the female body in its various contexts and constraints. Her work considers subjects such as physical fitness, endurance, social ritual, religious tradition, performance art and American colonial history. Ellsworth’s Seer Bonnets: A Continuing Offense (2009-2010), refers to her rejected Mormon heritage presented through series of antiquated pioneer women’s bonnets, constructed out of thousands of pearl-tipped corsage pins embedded into fabric with their points directed inwards. The small, fetish-like objects not only refer to the tradition of craft work in the home—women’s work—but also stand as disembodied memorials to the lives suffering cruelty, submission and control.


Material Transformations Thread of Life

Lucrecia Troncoso Lucrecia Troncoso questions perceptions of materiality as she seeks to record natural phenomena through the manipulation of familiar yet elusive materials such as sponges, wire, soap and paper in her installation-based works. “My work assumes a deep respect for a material’s intrinsic qualities and evocative attributes, and moves away from representation. Thus, materials are put through a kind of product and endurance test, emphasizing and transforming their initial, marketable purposes, silencing and simultaneously amplifying them.” ­—L. Troncoso

Opposite and above: Lucrecia Troncoso, Tree of Life (antimicrobial), 2008, cellulose cleaning sponges, wire, glue.

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Images courtesy of the Artist.


Material Transformations

Alison Foshee Over the past 15 years, Alison Foshee has been exploring the artistic potential of everyday stuff. Thumbnails and pushpins burst into extravagant floral arrangements, staples trace the jagged contour of a leaf, and office labels spin out in hot, firecracker explosions. “I enjoy working these raw materials with the geeky intensity of a Rubik’s cube puzzle master and relish the challenge of finding new meanings in objects that have become banal. In the process, I try to reveal something about the materials original function that will inform its new shape and content.”—A. Foshee

Above: Alison Foshee, Raven, 2013, office labels on white paper; Opposite: Alison Foshee, Paradise Found; Rasputin’s Revenge, 2013, product labels on paper. Images courtesy of the artist.

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Material Transformations

Rune Olsen Through installations, sculptures, and flat-works, Rune Olsen conducts sociologically informed investigations into the corporeal and mental boundaries of desire, power structures and society. He started creating sculptures using newspaper, tape, and graphite more than ten years ago after searching for basic materials that are as primal as his subject matter. His beautifully composed, often shocking, sculptures convey the intensity and urgency of instinctual behavior that is both seductive and transformative.

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This page: Rune Olsen, Jealous, 2007, graphite, masking tape, blue mannequin eyes, newspaper, plastic, steel, chain, wire and acrylic medium; Opposite: Rune Olsen, Pharmakos, 2009, graphite, masking tape, blue mannequin eyes, newspaper, wire, steel and UV-resistant acrylic medium, 19 x 12 x 9�. Images courtesy of the Artist and Samsøn Projects, Boston.


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Material Transformations

Johnston Foster, Big Tipper, 2008, mixed media found materials, including trash cans, wood, scrap metal, plastic, screws.

Johnston Foster Johnston Foster’s sculptural installations are created from scavenged, recycled and redefined materials to form Pop art-inspired animals and people. The artist humorously examines American popular culture, appropriating refuse and shaping it into sculptures that relate to urban myths. His exploration is experimental and the works are not intended to be read verbatim, but rather as metaphor alluding to pluralities and possibilities. In Foster’s constructions, anything is possible and any material is fair game.

Johnston Foster, Life Psychotic II, 2009, mixed media found materials, including traffic cones, plastic, wood, carpet, textiles, and rubber.

Images courtesy of the Artist and RARE Gallery, New York.


Pierre Mignard I, Portrait of a Marshal of France, possibly François‑ Henri de Montmorency‑Bouteville, Duke of Luxembourg, probably after 1688, oil on canvas, 57-5/8 x 41-1/2,” Preston Pope Satterwhite Collection, by exchange


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Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the

Golden Age of Painting at the

Orlando Museum of Art J A N U A RY 2 5 – M AY 2 5 , 2 0 1 4 • w w w. o m a r t . o rg Above: Marie‑Victoire Lemoine, Portrait of a Lady, about 1790, oil on canvas, 28-3/8 x 23,” bequest of Alice Speed Stoll

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Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and

O the Golden Age of Painting

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

is presenting an exhibition of more than 70 major works by master painters from the renowned collection of The Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. On view January 25 through May 25, 2014, Rembrandt, Rubens, and the Golden Age of Painting illustrates how the economic growth that swept Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries fueled an amazing period of artistic creation. Tremendous changes swept Europe during the two hundred years in which the art in Jean Jacques François Lebarbier, Helen and Paris, 1799, oil on canvas, 34 x 40�, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of the Charter Collectors


Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and

the Golden Age of Painting this exhibition was produced. Religious upheavals changed the way people thought about and utilized art. Trade routes to faraway lands, such as China and India, became more established, ensuring a steady stream of exotic goods for European consumers. Advances in the sciences transformed longheld views on the way the universe worked and the place of humans within that universe. Technical aspects of art making were honed and codified, as art academies grew in number and power. These exciting times resulted in a golden age of European painting. The number of artists and the number of art collectors grew exponentially during this period, as the fine arts reached an increasingly wider audience. During the seventeenth century, a wealthy merchant class arose that could afford to have these beautiful paintings made Jacob van Ruisdael, Landscape with a Half-Timbered House and a Blasted Tree, 1653, oil on canvas, 26-5/8 x 32-3/8 x 7/8�, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, Museum purchase


Left: Brooklyn Bridge; Center: Blue Sky; Below: Iwo Jima Replica

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Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting

Some of these rare objects have never left Louisville since their acquisition by The Speed, which makes this opportunity a very special one for all those fortunate enough to see this exhibition in Orlando.

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for their homes. For the artists, it was an opportunity to flaunt their skills. Created in a time before photography, the paintings show a devotion to realistic portrayal of life, from the details of a hand to elaborate and meticulously rendered silks and velvets, which were highly valued at the time. The exhibition features art from Italy, France, Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, and England, and is comprised of brilliant portraits, religious paintings, landscapes, scenes of everyday life, still lifes, and interpretations of classical antiquity. Highlights of the exhibition include The Princes of the Church Adoring the Eucharist by Rubens and Portrait of a Forty-Year-Old Woman by Rembrandt. Also on view are works by TiepoLeft: Peter Paul Rubens, The Princes of the Church Adoring the Eucharist, ca. 1626-1627, oil on panel, 26-1/4 x 18-5/16�, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift in memory of George W. Norton IV, by his mother, Mrs. George W. Norton, Jr. and his aunt, Mrs. Leonard T. Davidson Opposite page: Jan de Bray, A Couple Represented as Ulysses and Penelope, 1668, oil on canvas, 43-7/8 x 65-3/4�, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of the Charter Collectors


Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and

the Golden Age of Painting lo, Gainsborough, Hogarth, van Dyck, Teniers, Jordaens, Tournier, Ruisdael, Mignard, Crespi, de Troy, Largillière, Boucher, Batoni, Panini and others. Some of these rare objects have never left Louisville since their acquisition by The Speed, which makes this opportunity a very special one for those fortunate to see the exhibition in Orlando. This traveling show represents a marvelous opportunity for The Speed, as well as for the museums that will host this outstanding collection of paintings. “While the Museum has frequently lent works to major Top: Dirk Valckenburg, A Cat Protecting Spoils from a Dog, 1717, oil on canvas, 39-7/8 x 31 x 7/8”, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, Museum purchase with funds from the estate of Alice Speed Stoll and anonymous donors Bottom: Jacob van Walscapelle, Floral Still Life, 1681, oil on canvas, 40-1/4 x 35-3/16”, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of Eleanor Bingham Miller and Barry Bingham, Sr., in honor of Mary Caperton Bingham


Rembrandt purchased

van Rijn, Portrait of

with funds contributed

a Forty-Year-Old Woman,

by individuals, corporations and

possibly Marretje Cornelisdr. van

the entire community of Louisville,

Grotewal, 1634, oil on panel, 27-7/16

as well as the Commonwealth of Kentucky

x 22�, Collection of The Speed Art Museum,

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Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting

Opposite page: Paolo de’Matteis, The Adoration of the Shepherds, oil on canvas, 60 x 50”, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of the Charter Collectors Below: Hendrick van Somer, Saint Jerome, 1651, oil on canvas, 39-3/4 x 49-1/2”, Collection of The Speed Art Museum, gift of the Charter Collectors with funds from the Bequest of Jane Morton Norton Funding for this exhibition has been generously provided by the Presenting Sponsors Dr. Phillips Charities and Orange County through the Arts and Cultural Affairs program.

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exhibitions around the world,” explained Charles Venable, former Director of The Speed Art Museum, “these paintings have never toured as a group because they represent the core of our permanent collection. The Speed’s current renovation and expansion project, however, presents a singular opportunity to introduce our exceptional holdings to a broader national audience.” Complimenting this historic exhibition is a companion show entitled Glimpses into the Golden Age at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park, which is featured on the following pages.

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Glimpses into the Golden Age at the

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park on view J A N U A RY

4 – M AY

11 ,

2 0 1 4

c f a m . ro l l i n s . e d u Opposite: Louis Michel van Loo, Portrait of the Comtesse de Beaufort, ca.1760, oil on canvas, 50 x 40”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

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Glimpses into the Golden Age

C Above:

Pieter Cornelisz van Slingeland, A Lady with Her Dog, 1691,

oil on panel, 6-1/2 x 5-3/8”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

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Right: Thomas Gainsborough, Portrait of Gaëtan Apolline Balthazar Vestris, ca.1781-1782, oil on canvas, 12-1/2 x 10-3/8”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum

COINCIDING WITH THE

Orlando Museum of Art’s show, Rembrandt, Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting from the Collection of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College in Winter Park presents a companion exhibition, Glimpses into the Golden Age, on view January 4, through May 11, 2014. The

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exhibition includes several works in its own collection by artists featured in OMA’s corresponding presentation, and provides a rich illustration of the distinctive character of European painting in an era when remarkable cultural, religious, and economic changes led to major transformations in art. While the Cornell Fine Arts Museum’s collection is not large, it is the only col-


Glimpses into the

Golden Age

lection in the greater Orlando area with European Old Masters paintings from this period. Comprised of the major genres of painting that were popular at this time—portraits, religious paintings, and still lifes—this exhibition illustrates both the people and the objects that made the two centuries between

The exhibition illustrates both the people and the objects that made the two centuries between 1600 and 1800 such a rich cultural age. 1600 and 1800 such a rich cultural age. Master works by Tiepolo, Gainsborough, Van Loo, and others, will grace the gallery walls in this show, curated by Amanda McRae, CFAM’s 2013-2014 Fred Hicks Fellow. “Through

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my preparation and research, I have been fascinated by the dynamic painters of the Golden Age and the stories each work reflects back onto the ever-changing time period,” said McRae. “We wanted to remind our community that the Cornell Fine Arts Museum has works from the European Golden Age and participate in a conversation with the exhibit at OMA.” On February 18, 2014, the curator of The Speed exhibit, Kim Spence, will give a lecture at CFAM to help further this conversation. Additional programming presented in collaboration with OMA will include lectures, gallery talks, and a chamber music concert by the Bach Festival Society. For info, please visit: cfam.rollins.edu or www.omart.org. O n V iew

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, St. John Gualbert (Contemplating the Crucifix), ca. 1753, oil on canvas, 24-1/2 x 17-3/4”, Cornell Fine Arts Museum


ARTin the GA

ON VIEW

The art of

through

05.31.2014:

HUGO FRANÇA

at Fairchild Tropical Bot


ARDEN anic Garden, Coral Gables • www. fairchildgarden.org

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Art in the Garden

C Previous pages: Hugo França, Babitonga settee, 2012, Pequi wood; Right: Hugo França, Machacos sculpture, 2007, Pequi wood; Photo: Morgan Brooks

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FA I R C H I L D T R O P I C A L

Botanic Garden in Coral Gables presents a new exhibition of sculptural works in wood by artist, Hugo França, during the 2013-2014 season of Design at Fairchild, part of Fairchild’s highly acclaimed annual visual art program, Art at Fairchild—a celebration of art and culture. The exhibition is curated by Cristina Grajales of the Cristina Grajales Gallery in New York, and will be on display through May 31, 2014. One of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens, Fairchild features extensive collections of rare tropical plants, including palms, cycads, flowering trees, tropical fruit trees, vines, and succulents. The 83acre garden is among the Miami area’s most popular visitor attractions, offering tours along with a variety of programs in environmental education, conservation and horticulture. Design at Fairchild has supported cultural enrichment and a connection between the arts and sciences since its inception in 2012. The program sets beautiful design pieces against

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the lush tropical landscape of the Garden to link art, design and nature together in harmony. Based in Brazil, Hugo França uses all natural materials to create functional and sustainable design pieces, often tables and seating. Each piece uses reclaimed wood from felled, burned or dead trees found in Brazil. By working them into functional designs, França gives new life and purpose to the salvaged material. The stunning scale of França’s pieces helps draw attention to his message of sustainability. Giving viewers the opportunity to experience the raw power of a tree as a functional object in a home or public space can inspire the creative spirit and instill a newfound respect for the natural world. After studying industrial engineering at the university in his hometown in Brazil, França yearned for a more rural existence and moved to the jungle in northeastern Brazil. He lived with the indigenous people of Bahia, where he learned unique woodworking techniques. His extremely labor-


Art in the Garden

intensive works are primarily carved from the Pequi tree, a gigantic oleaginous tree, which averages 148 feet in height and 10 feet in diameter. França hand-carves each piece he designs, sometimes opening grooves in the wood, other times refining it to rediscover curves that highlight the tree’s organic forms. Viewers can experience all the details of the wood used, from the texture to the color to the shape. The process for making Hugo Franca’s work aligns itself with the central concept of his work—his preoccupation with not wasting wood and the belief that there are infinite possibilities in reclaiming this material. Finding wood left behind by deforestation requires constant scouting in the Tron-

Hugo França, Guaraci Chaise, 2007, Pequi wood, woven leather

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coso, Bahia, area. Finding his way on foot, by donkey or canoe, he relies on the Pataxo Indians, local loggers, and on his own knowledge of coastal southern Bahia, which he acquired during the fifteen years he lived there.

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As long as the wood has not suffered irreversible damage, all parts of the tree may be utilized. Unearthed roots, trunks and branches are transformed by the artist into one-of-a-kind objects. Due to the tremendous weight and difficulty in trans-


“Hugo is able to reveal the trees’ next-life beauty. He takes a felled tree and reveals the beauty that still remains.”—Nannette Zapata, F airchild ’ s C hief O perating O fficer and A rt C urator OnV

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Art in the Garden

Below: Hugo França; Photo: André Godoy

porting the raw material, the first cuts are made where the trees are found. And so begins the first signs of tables, benches, chairs and consoles. After that, the design is defined and its finish is executed. Throughout the process, the forms and natural textures are highlighted so that the furniture always refers back to where it came from—the tree.

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Given its harmony with the environment, França’s work fits seamlessly into the natural landscape of Fairchild. Both the artist and the Garden are committed to fostering sustainability and promoting conservational awareness. Hugo França’s design pieces are interactive, inspirational works of art that breathe new life into dead trees and wood


Left: Hugo França, Guaraci chaise (back), 2007; and Mene lounge chair, 2007, Pequi wood; Below: Hugo França, Apekoy Casulo, 2010, Castanheira wood

that are often times hundreds of years old. “Hugo is able to reveal the trees’ next-life beauty,” said Nannette Zapata, Fairchild’s Chief Operating Officer and Art Curator. “He takes a felled tree and reveals the beauty that still remains.” These unique sculptures, set amongst Fairchild’s tropical plant collections are sure to enchant visitors of all ages. O n V iew OnV

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DAVID Society’

O n v i e w 01 . 1 6 . 1 4 – 0 4 .1 3.14 a t t h e N O R T O N M U S


WEBB ’s Jeweler

S E U M o f A R T, W e s t P a l m B e a c h

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THE NORTON MUSEUM OF ART

Coral Seahorse Brooch.

presents the first retrospective of famed American jewelry designer, David Webb, whose creations are inextricably linked to the heady and free-wheeling spirit of the 1960s and early 1970s. David Webb: Society’s Jeweler brings together 80 extraordinary examples of Webb jewelry from necklaces and rings to pieces made in hammered gold, jade, coral, enamel, and precious stones. The exhibition also features preparatory drawings and special displays that offer behind-thescenes insights into the making of Webb’s jewelry, as well as 1 02

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Designed in 1966, this brooch is made out of carved coral, circular-cut diamonds, Cabochon emeralds, platinum, and gold. Photography by Ilan Rubin.

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DAVID WEBB:

Society’s Jeweler


DAVID WEBB:

Society’s Jeweler

Emerald and Diamond Shell Brooch. Using an actual seashell as his model, Webb complemented this brooch with Cabochon emeralds and diamonds. Photography by Ilan Rubin.

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Jacqueline Kennedy dubbed Webb a “modern-day Cellini” and the Duchess of Windsor called him “Fabergé reborn.” photographs, magazine spreads, and advertisements that demonstrate the tastemaking position Webb held in American high society. The show opens on January 16, 2014 and runs through April 13, 2014. “The exhibition puts Webb’s designs in the context of his era and demonstrates how Webb perfectly met the needs and desires of that zeitgeist to create memorable and dazzling objects d’art,” said exhibition curator, Donald Albrecht. “At the height of his fame in the 60s and early 70s, he created official gifts of state for the White House. Jacqueline Kennedy dubbed him a ‘modern-day Cellini’ and the Duchess of Windsor called him ‘Fabergé reborn’.” The retrospective traces the evolution of Webb’s style from his elegant variations on flowers in the 1950s, to the muscular aesthetic of his Vogue-named “fantastic besOnV

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tiary” that characterized his work in the 1960s and continued throughout the early 1970s. Inspired by travel and almost weekly visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Webb created distinctly modern, Pop-art-spins on historical forms and techniques from across the globe. Webb also worked closely with celebrity clients, like Doris Duke and Elizabeth Taylor, to create unique, bespoke pieces. “The Norton Museum of Art is thrilled to present the first retrospective of David Webb’s work,” said Hope Alswang, Executive Director of the Norton Museum of Art. “His story is truly an American one of self-invention, and his groundbreaking designs not only captured the spirit of his time, but continue to influence jewelry design today.” David Webb: Society’s Jeweler is organized into three themes: Aesthetics, which explores g a z i n e

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Fantasy Object. Designed in 1975, this creature is made out of carved lapis lazuli with carved and cabochon rubies for the eyes and tail. The creature sits on a pedestal made out of circular-cut diamonds, cabochon emeralds, jade-bi disks, scored rock crystal, white enamel, platinum and gold. Photography by Ilan Rubin.

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Webb’s signature design styles, including work inspired by animals and other natural forms; the ways in which he updated historical motifs from sources ranging from China to Mexico, Greece, and India; and his fascination with bold, geometric forms, including the Art Deco. This section also includes a selection of original design drawings, which show the pieces of jewelry in the conception phase. Commissions and Reception,

Craft, which focuses on the remarkable workmanship of Webb’s jewelry through a “deconstruction” of one his most famous pieces, the 1963 zebra bracelet. The display reveals its 36 different components and how they fit together. There is also a newly commissioned video of contemporary workers in the Webb studio demonstrating different techniques like the enameling, jewel-setting, and casting that set Webb’s pieces apart.

David Webb jewelry has been closely associated with socialites and movie stars virtually since its inception.

Heraldic Maltese Cross Coral Brooch. Designed by Webb in 1964, this exquisite cross is made out of Cabochon green onyx, a circular-cut diamond and a sapphire center. The extending four coral arms also contains circular-cut diamonds and gold. Photography by Ilan Rubin.

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which examines the social and critical acclaim given to Webb and his work. The section profiles the women who bought and commissioned Webb jewelry. Editorial layouts of Webb’s jewelry in publications like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Town and Country underscore how his bracelets, rings, brooches, and necklaces complemented the era’s fashions, from severely simple sheaths to exotic animal-print garments. g a z i n e

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Born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina, David Webb began designing jewelry as a young boy. He apprenticed in his uncle’s silversmith shop and learned metal smithing techniques. Webb arrived in New York at the young age of seventeen and got a job repairing jewelry in Greenwich Village. Blond, handsome, and positively brimming with Southern charm, Webb navigated his way through New York society r c h

2014


DAVID WEBB:

Society’s Jeweler


Above (left to right): Elephant Brooch. Designed in the 1960s, the elephant’s face is made out of pearl, accentuated by small emerald eyes. The headpiece consists of a large carved emerald and diamonds. Photography by Ilan Rubin. The Webb Zebra Bracelet. Since its debut in 1963, the zebra has been among the most popular of the David Webb animal bracelets. The piece is made out of blackand-white enamel, circular-cut diamonds, cabochon rubies, platinum, and gold.

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and met Antoinette Quilleret, a wealthy socialite who immediately recognized his design talents and helped Webb found an eponymous atelier that soon gained the devoted following of a stylish, socially prominent clientele. The jewelry designs immediately caught the attention of department stores such as Bergdorf Goodman. Before long, David Webb jewelry was sought after by the most fashionable and demanding design c om

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connoisseurs. David Webb jewelry has been closely associated with socialites and movie stars virtually since its inception. Movie sirens, Ava Gardner and Lana Turner, wore their David Webb jewelry both on and off the big screen. Style mavens like Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duchess of Windsor, Merle Oberon, and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis were loyal customers. Elizabeth Taylor featured


DAVID WEBB:

Society’s Jeweler

Left to right: Necklace Sketch, April 27, 1973; Necklace Sketch. Detailed with carved coral, emeralds, diamonds and black enamel. Courtesy of the David Webb Archive.

four pages of David Webb jewelry in My Love Affair with Jewelry, the photo book of her legendary collection. Diana Vreeland, the legendary editor of Harper’s Bazaar, was rarely seen without her beloved David Webb black and white enamel zebra bangle with tiny diamonds interspersed on its mane and cabochon ruby eyes. In the seventies, the image of a young Diane von Furstenberg wearing a big, bold David

Webb necklace on the cover of Vogue epitomized the best of that glamorous style period. At the height of production Webb’s two full-time workshops employed 200 jewelers and 37 setters. In 1963, he opened a retail salon at 6 East 57th Street, where he remained until his untimely death at age 50 in 1975. The store, now at 942 Madison Avenue, continues to carry on Webb’s legacy of fine craftsmanship. O n V iew OnV

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David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler by Ruth Peltason is the first monograph on this important designer who redefined mid-20th century American jewelry.

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G RA P H I C S T U D I O :

COMMON PRACTICE AT USF On view 02.01.14– 05.18.14 at TA M P A M U S E U M o f A R T • www.tampamuseum.org Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstroke Chair and Ottoman, 1986–88, cast bronze chair: 70-1/2 x 17 x 22-3/4”, ottoman: 20-1/2 x 18 x 23-1/2”;

hed by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection; © 1986-88 Roy Lichtenstein, Graphicstudio, USF; Courtesy of a Private Collection

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O GRAPHICSTUDIO: Uncommon Practice at USF

OVER ONE HUNDRED LEADING INTER-

national contemporary artists have created limited edition fine art works at Graphicstudio, the internationally recognized print atelier at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF, hosted by the Tampa Museum of Art from February 1 through May 18, 2014, will explore the incredible body of work produced by the studio.

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait/Photogravure, 2005, photogravure, 54-1/4 x 40-5/8”; Published by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection; © 2005 Chuck Close, Graphicstudio, USF; Photo: Will Lytch, courtesy of the Institute for Research in Art/Graphicstudio, University of South Florida

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The exhibition is co-organized by USF Contemporary Art Museum and the Tampa Museum of Art and will present over 110 artworks by 45 artists, including Louise Bourgeois, Chuck Close, Jim Dine, Roy Lichtenstein, Christian Marclay, Philip Pearlstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Rus-

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cha, and Kiki Smith. The range of artworks includes etchings, photo- and direct gravures, inkjet prints, cyanotypes, lithographs, woodcuts and screen prints, as well as sculpture in bronze, concrete, basalt, and cast epoxy resin. Graphicstudio’s philosophy of providing artists with the c om

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freedom to experiment and pursue new directions to advance their practice, matched with an exceptionally talented staff, has attracted world-class contemporary artists to the USF campus. Their collaborative projects have produced print editions and multiples at the forefront of contemporary art.


GRAPHICSTUDIO: Uncommon Practice at USF

USF Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Donald J. Saff, founded Graphicstudio in 1968. Other Directors have included David Yager, Alan Eaker and Hank Hine. In 2001, Graphicstudio merged with the Contemporary Art Museum and Public Art Program to form the Institute for Research in Art, and Professor Margaret A. Miller was appointed Director. Through the years, Graphicstudio has received popular and critical acclaim for its innovative approach to artistic collaboration and technical advancements. Fueled by the renaissance in American printmaking in the 1960s, Saff led his team to develop new processes and treatments of traditional printmaking. Jim Dine, Philip PearlAbove: Allan McCollum, Each and Every One of You, 2004, 1,200 digital inkjet prints, 4 x 6” each; Published by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection; © 2004 Allan McCollum, Graphicstudio, USF; Courtesy of Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston, MA; Right: Graphicstudio printers with Chuck Close photogravure; Photo: Will Lytch

stein, Robert Rauschenberg and James Rosenquist produced large-scale lithographs and mixed-media works. A new process for printing encaustic waxes, called “waxtype,” was developed specifically for Roy Lichtenstein. Relief, the oldest printmaking process, was transformed by using photographically generated stencils which allowed for fine detail, resulting in a technique known as “heliorelief.” Deli Sacilotto, retired Director of Research, expanded the 19th century photogravure process to allow for the hand printing of unusually large images, as well as four-color photogravures. Chuck Close, Robert Mapplethorpe, Vik Muniz, Ed Ruscha, William Wegman,


and others, have used the photogravure process to advance new concepts and approaches to their work. The studio has invited artists to use the 19th century cameraless cyanotype process in new ways, producing astounding,

GRAPHICSTUDIO: Uncommon Practice at USF

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large-scale unique prints with Alex Katz, Guillermo Kuitca, Arturo Herrera and Christian Marclay. Cyanotypes are photographic prints created by placing objects or film (contact printing) on a photosensitive surface, and are commonly known as “blue-


prints” because of their distinctive Prussian blue color. Research and collaborations are not limited to works on paper; the production of sculpture editions and artist’s books has been a significant part of Graphicstudio’s mis-

sion. Innovative sculpture multiples produced include Robert Rauschenberg’s mixed-media editions for his R.O.C.I. project (Rauschenberg Overseas Cultural Interchange) and cast bronze sculptures by Roy Lichtenstein. Hank Hine produced OnV

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Christian Marclay, Allover (Rush, Barbra Streisand, Tina Turner, and Others), 2008, cyanotype, 51-1/2 x 100”; Published by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection; © 2008 Christian Marclay, Graphicstudio, USF; Photo: Will Lytch, courtesy of the Institute for Research in Art/ Graphicstudio, University of South Florida

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Right: Louise Bourgeois Spider Home, 2002, cast bronze spiders and fly, welded bronze wire web, wood base, 48 × 16 × 16”; Published by Graphicstudio, University of South Florida Collection; © 2002 Louise Bourgeois, Graphicstudio, USF; Photo: Will Lytch Acknowledgements: Graphicstudio: Uncommon Practice at USF is curated by Jade Dellinger and co-organized by USF Contemporary Art Museum and the Tampa Museum of Art. The project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.


GRAPHICSTUDIO: Uncommon Practice at USF

unique book projects with George Baselitz, Ed Ruscha and Kiki Smith among others. In recent years, Miller has reemphasized sculpture production, and the studio fabricators have researched and developed innovative techniques in bronze casting for Louise Bourgeois, Diana Al-Hadid and Esterio Segura; wood constructions for Los Carpinteros and Allan McCollum; cast resin projects for Roxy Paine and Trenton Doyle Hancock; poured basalt forms for Keith Edmier; and water-jet cut, polished stainless steel sculptures for Teresita Fernández. Digital technologies have also been utilized for research and the production of both traditional print and sculpture editions. Use of digital output of films for print processes and rapid prototyping for 3D multiples provide artists with technically advanced tools to expand their research and practice. Graphicstudio has served a variety of constituencies from its inception. Students and faculty have benefited from educational and professional interac-

tion with visiting artists. Participants in the Research Partners Program collect significant art while supporting research and educational commitments. In 1990, an archive of Graphicstudio’s publications was established at the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, DC, which presented a comprehensive exhibition. Graphicstudio’s editions continue to be acquired by leading museums and collectors, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the New York Public Library and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. O n V iew

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Below: Christian Marclay working on cyanotypes at Graphicstudio. Photo: Will Lytch Images courtesy of the Institute for Research in Art/Graphicstudio, University of South Florida.

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ON

VIEW

JANUARY 25

THE ART OF

WARNER BRO

AT THE ORANGE COUNTY REGION

w w w.thehisto


th–MARCH 23rd, 2014

S. CARTOONS AL H I S T O R Y

C E N T E R ,

O R L A N D O

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The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

Discover the secrets of how

America’s favorite cartoons pioneered a new kind of animated humor in The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons, created by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, opening January 25 and running through March 23, 2014, at the Orange County Regional History Center in Orlando. Learn about the creative process that gave birth to Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Wile E. Coyote, and their comrades, and turned these entertaining animated short films into a cultural phenomenon. Since 1930, “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” have delighted audiences of all ages with their wit and surprising sophistication. Such Warner Bros. phrases as “What’s up, Doc?,” “That’s All Folks!,” “I Taut I Taw a Putty-Tat,” “Suf-

ferin’ Succotash!,” and “You’re Dethpicable!” have become part of the national vocabulary. Consisting of over 160 drawings, paintings, “cels,” and related objects used in the making of Warner’s classic cartoons from the 1930s through 1960, The

Porky Pig, © Warner Bros. Inc.

Porky Pig premiered on the silver screen in 1935, which started the phenomenal rise of Warner Bros. animation production. The stuttering pudgy pig developed in a few years into an amiable and eager, if a little naive, everyman, who often ends up being taken for a ride by others. Porky Pig gained his reputation in the sometimes surrealistic worlds created by the writers and animators of Warner Bros. Porky’s antagonist was often Daffy Duck. Their joint appearances started in 1937 (Porky’s Duck Hunt). OnV

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Tweety and Sylvester, Š Warner Bros. Inc.


The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons celebrates the familiar cartoon characters who have captured the hearts of millions and have become part of our shared folklore and heritage, spanning generations. “This collection of art and memorabilia is outstanding,” says Michael Perkins, Curator of Exhibits at the History Center. “So many of us grew up with these cartoons, and for those who did, Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote will always

Tweety and Sylvester had their separate careers independent of each other, but the very first joint appearance in 1947 (Tweetie Pie, in which Sylvester still goes under the name Thomas), won an Oscar for best short animation. This marked the beginning of the success story of these two eternal enemies. The basic plot is clearcut: a large black-and-white cat chasing a tiny yellow canary. Tweety, baby-like with those large eyes and baby talk, always beats the large, slightly simple cat hands down with her savvy and often quite excessive physical violence. OnV

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bring a smile to our faces. The exhibition brings these memories flooding back with a rich collection of animated cels interspersed with information about the artists, and of course, cartoons.” Since the studio introduced

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Porky Pig as its first character in 1935, the cartoons have never been less than enormously popular. Warner Bros. perfected the antic, irreverent, street smart humor that has characterized much of short-subject animation ever since. Originally proc om

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duced for screening in theaters, the studio’s cartoons are now broadcast on television several times a day around the world. The impact of these characters, the styles of humor, notions of pacing, and narrative devices introduced by Warner Bros.


The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

Cartoons is felt in many corners of popular culture. Under the early influence of the Disney studio, animation had been soft, sentimental, and storybookish—aimed exclusively at a children’s audience. Warner Bros. did the complete opposite and modernized animation, creating cartoons that were brash and reckless. With striking frequency, the Warner Bros. writers devised stories

of brilliant invention, while the studio’s directors masterfully executed them. But the Warner Bros. cartoons did not come alive without the talents of gifted animators, painters, and designers. The Washington Post described them as “men who well may qualify as among the century’s great humorists, (who) made an invaluable contribution to the culture that only in recent years has begun to receive the

Vivacious, colorful, and highly enjoyable, the exhibition traces the development of all of Warner’s cartoon stars, and gives a step-by-step breakdown of how animated films are made. Above: Wile E. Coyote Right: Speedy Gonzales Images: © Warner Bros. Inc.


The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

outpourings of appreciation it deserves.” Warner Bros. Cartoons would eventually win six Academy Awards and create more cartoon stars than any other studio. Vivacious, colorful, and highly enjoyable, the exhibition traces the development of all of Warner Bros.’ cartoon stars, and gives a step-by-step breakdown of how animated films are made. Cel animation was developed in the early 1900s in the United States and Europe. At Warner Bros., typical six- or seven-minute cartoons were in production for periods ranging Right and below: Bugs Bunny, © Warner Bros. Inc.


from several months to over one year, with a few dozen artists working on different stages of the highly collaborative process. Several distinct units worked separately on cartoons at Warner Bros. studio, with an entire workforce of 200 people during the years of the heaviest production. Warner Bros. Cartoons involved a substantial amount of work because they were made in “full animation� using many thousands of drawings for each short. As a

Like many comic and cartoon heroes, Bugs Bunny started off as a sidekick. Very soon, however, in the early 1940s, the streetwise bunny became one of the most popular cartoon characters of all time. Bugs Bunny usually appears alongside, that is to say, competes with, Daffy Duck, Sylvester, and Elmer Fudd, the persistent but hapless hunter. Constantly chewing on his carrots, Bugs is the one who, in the end, always carries the day. Whatever happens, this clever, self-assured bunny has the situation under control. Bugs Bunny has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and he has been crowned the greatest cartoon character on several occasions. OnV

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result, the characters moved with subtle grace and flowing expressiveness. From camera movements and musical cues, to witty dialogue and expressive drawings, each step of the process was perfected to convey the attitudes and

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charm of the characters. For 16 consecutive years, Warner Bros. Cartoons were voted America’s most popular shorts. Even today, Bugs Bunny continues to win major national popularity polls for America’s favorite cartoon character. A recent TV c om

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Guide survey named the iconic rabbit the “Greatest Cartoon Character of All Time.” “Our visitors will enjoy these wacky characters as much today as they did when they first saw them, and our younger guests will have the treat of


The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

receiving a full introduction to the gang. These iconic figures hold an important place in our social and cultural history, and we are truly excited to host this world-famous exhibition,” Perkins said. Visitors will be able to watch exclusive clips that are no longer aired on television, see Warner Bros. artifacts from the collections of central Florida Warner Bros. enthusiasts, and partici-

pate in family-friendly, handson activities that help bring the animation process to life. Special programming in conjunction with The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons includes Saturday Morning Cartoons on Saturday, February 1st, and Saturday, March 1st, 2014, when visitors can come down to the museum for pancakes and screenings of Warner Bros. cartoons, and a visit to the exhibition from

“Our visitors will enjoy these wacky characters as much today as they did when they first saw them, and our younger guests will have the treat of receiving a full introduction to the gang.” —Michael Perkins, Curator of Exhibits at the History Center

Above: Elmer Fudd Right: Witch Hazel Images: © Warner Bros. Inc.


Daffy Duck, © Warner Bros. Inc.


The ART of WARNER BROS. Cartoons

9-11 am. Call 407-836-7010 for admission prices and to register. Both an educational presentation about the elaborate creative process that supported the making of many classic films, and a one-of-a-kind celebration of the studio that created acknowledged masterpieces of humor and satire, The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons is sure to give delight to young and old— “That’s All Folks!” O n V iew

Daffy Duck is one of the first ever screwball heroes in cartoons. He is reckless, feisty, and with seemingly endless energy. These qualities were made use of in wartime shorts to drum up fighting spirit against the enemy. In the 1950s, Daffy Duck turned into an anti-hero, a rebellious outsider, loud and cocky, and always up for a new venture—no holds barred. Daffy Duck was Bugs Bunny’s best friend but also his eternal nemesis. One of Bugs Bunny’s creators, Chuck Jones, a legendary Warner Bros. director and animator, said he made Bugs Bunny represent his aspirations—what he would like to be—but he feared he was more like Daffy. OnV

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SPOTLIGHT { A N DY

THE

WA R H O L }

Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. On view 01.18. 14–04. 27. 14 at The Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg www.thedali.org OnV

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MUSEUM

presents Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality., the first major nonDalí exhibit at the Museum since it opened its new building along St. Petersburg’s waterfront in 2011. The exhibition explores how Andy Warhol learned from Dalí’s public visibility and was equally attuned to the images derived from mass culture. Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality. considers Warhol’s little commented on engagement with other artists through his own painting; how he constructed an approach to the image in terms of celebrity and fame; and finally, his treatment of painting and image in terms of human mortality. The show includes approximately 35 paintings, 20 drawings, 50 photographs, and a selection of Warhol films, including screen tests. The featured works are on loan from The Warhol Museum, which opened in 1994 in Pittsburgh, PA—Warhol’s birthplace. Seven floors house his paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs,

Exhibition

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S P O T L I G H T

films, screen tests, and other artists and celebrities that Wararchives. hol worked with,” explained “Our new exhibit will fea- The Dalí’s Special Exhibitions ture an important selection of Curator, Dr. William Jeffett. works from Andy Warhol, one “Visitors will find nine acrylof the world’s most well-known ic and silk screen paintings of artists,” said The Dalí Muse- Jacqueline Lee ‘Jackie’ Bouvium’s Executive Director, Dr. er Kennedy Onassis, amongst Hank Hine. “It’s important for many other works.” The Dalí to present In addition, a works from othspecial film instaler artists, especiallation will provides ly those that relate visitors their “15 to Salvador Dalí, to minutes of fame.” highlight different A simulated Warhol perspectives while screen test is set to showing their film visitors as they unique connec- The Dalí Museum’s sit in front of the tions. Working dicamera for about new Warhol show rectly with The explores the mean- a minute. The inWarhol Museum stallation harkens ing and limits of in Pittsburgh alback to the film fame and mortality. lowed us to collabstyle Andy Warhol orate and select specific works experimented with in his days that will show Warhol’s impact at The Factory. Visitors will be on the art scene through his syn- able to capture, save, and share thesizing of different media.” their “movie” online. “What is unusual is the mix During the Warhol exhibit, a of materials, including archi- myriad of educational programs val photographs depicting War- and special events will allow hol in the 1950s. You will see the community to learn, explore, both photos of and by Warhol. and be entertained by Warhol’s There are portraits of dozens of works and inspirations. O n V iew

opposite : Andy Warhol, Jackie, 1964, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 20 x 16”, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 1998.1.92 above: Andy Warhol, Skull, 1976, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 72 x 80”, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts, 2002.4.25 left: Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1986, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 40 x 4o”, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 1998.1.821 all images © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.


FOCUS

C A P T U R E T H E M O M E N T:

{ P H O T O JOU R NA L I S M }

Exhibition:

Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs On view 02.12. 14–04. 20. 14 at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami www.thefrost.fiu.edu

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The Pulitzer Prize Photographs presents the most comprehensive exhibition of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs ever assembled. More than 150 photographs, organized chronologically, depict a tumultuous history of the world. They bear stark witness to war and brutality. They honor heroism, compassion, and the strivings of ordinary people for better lives. And behind each indelible image is a second, moving tale—the story of how each photographer made the picture that won the prize. The collection has traveled the world since its inception in 2000 in association with NEWSEUM, located in Washington, DC, and includes every Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph since the Pulitzer board began awarding the photography prize in 1942. This presentation, hosted by The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum in Miami, marks its first visit to Florida. The exhibition, curated by


F O C U S

producer, director and writer, exhibition styles, there are no Cyma Rubin, has been seen by interactive elements and no more than three million people flashy graphics. The viewer is and is updated annually to in- simply hit with raw emotion clude the most recent award- captured on film. Each phowinning photos. tograph is accompanied by As The Washington Post its title, the photographer and wrote, the images are “as dif- news outlet, and a brief story ficult to look at as of each image. they are to look In addition to away from.” In a the photos, visgripping tribute to itors can take in the boundless powthe accompanying er of a compelling Emmy-winning photograph, the exdocumentary, Mohibit includes such ment of Impact: iconic images as an Stories of the Puailing Babe Ruth litzer Prize Photo“Capture the watching his numgraphs. This film Moment” exposber being retired at es visitors to signif- reveals, in a gripYankee Stadium, icant global events ping first-hand US Marines raising account, how the as well as very an American flag photographers personal moments. atop Mount Suritook their prizebachi on Iwo Jima, and Jack winning photographs. Ruby’s assassination of Lee A companion book to the Harvey Oswald, among many exhibit, Capture the Moment: more. The Pulitzer Prize Photographs, Beginning with the most re- features the story behind each cent award winners, the dis- photograph, biographies of the play moves chronologically photographers and new interfrom 1942 through 2013. A views with many of the surdeparture from contemporary viving prize winners. O n V iew

opposite : a policeman leans down to speak to a young boy at a parade in washington, dc, sept. 10, 1957, by william c. beall, washington daily news; © scripps howard news service above (top to bottom): US marines raise American flag atop mount suribachi on iwo jima in the south pacific, feb. 23. 1945, by joe rosenthal, the associated press; © the associated press The world trade center is attacked on sept. 11, 2001 in New York City, by Steve ludlum, The New York Times; © The New York Times/Steve Ludlum left: companion book to the exhibit, Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs by Cyma Rubin


PROFILE { S T E P H E N

STEPHEN LAWSON’S IMAGES

allow viewers to time travel with the artist through a variety of urban and rural locales. Using film (not digital) cameras that he has mechanically modified, Lawson has created fascinating sectioned panoramas shot over varying periods of time, that simulate for the viewer the sensation of actually being on location, while experiencing the “fourth dimension.” The photographs are composed of dozens, even hundreds, of separate “slices” of visual reality, each captured at a specific moment in time. In Lawson’s work, science and art come together in perfect harmony. One of his cameras may be timed to make exposures over the course of a morning, and an-

L AW S O N }

Exhibition:

Stephen Lawson: Images of Time On view 01.25. 14–05. 14. 14 at Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

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P R O F I L E

other over the course of an entire year. To create one circular composition, Circle of the Seasons, Lawson’s camera rig shot a 3° wide “slice” of the West Virginia landscape, shooting one exposure at 3 o’clock every third afternoon across the seasons. Other Lawson photos are rectangular, with varying angles of view over different periods. His photograph Callanish Stone Circle (a Scottish version of Stonehenge) was made on August 30, 1991 by exposing strips of film one degree wide at two-minute intervals. In this eerie photograph the ancient stones seem to come alive under the growing light of the rising sun. Born in Glasgow Scotland, Lawson studied figurative

sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art. He received an undergraduate degree in 1967, and an MFA from the University of Colorado in 1970. He taught sculpture at Ohio State University for six years, prior to his relocation to West Virginia to become involved in “Earthart,” that is, art that uses the Earth itself as the physical medium of expression. Lawson’s award-winning work has been exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the US and abroad and is held in the collections of the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY; Library of Congress, Washington, DC; and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; to name a few. O n V iew

opposite : Circle of the Seasons, 2009, chromogenic collage, 30 x 35”, Collection of the Artist above: Stephen Lawson, 2012; photo by stephen lawson below: Callanish Stone Circle from the N.W., Chromogenic Print, 12.5 x 30” Images courtesy of the artist


SHOWCASE { F U N D - R A I S I N G

L U C K Y AT T E N D E E S O F

the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood’s Abracadabra fund-raising event could walk away with a contemporary piece of art worth thousands of dollars. Now in its seventh year, this extraordinary event is comprised of approximately 100 donated works of art in all media by artists who have been invited to participate by the Center’s Curator, Jane Hart, and the Event Committee. Abracadabra culminates with a live drawing of these outstanding works in the Center’s main gallery on Friday, March 14, from 6-9 pm. All pieces are exhibited prior to the evening of the drawing, affording ticket buyers an opportunity to preview the art before the main event. The exhibition runs from January 25 through March 14, 2014, with an opening reception on Friday, January 24, from 6-9 pm. “This annual, electrifying event brings art lovers and artists together for a good cause,” says Art and Culture Center’s Executive Director, Joy Satterlee. “Abracadabra has

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Exhibition:

Abracadabra On view 01.25. 14–03. 14. 14 at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

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evolved over the past six years valued at greater than the tickinto a highly anticipated night et price—so everyone’s a winthat raises crucial funds for the ner! At 8 pm on the evening Center.” of the drawing, all participatAmong the featured artists ing ticket holders’ names will are Jose Alvarez, Francie Bish- be randomly drawn. When an op Good, Samantha Brooks, individual’s name is called, he Elisabeth Condon, Phillip Es- or she can choose any work of tlund, Sinisa Kukec, Douglas art that has not yet been selectHoekzema, Francesco LoCas- ed. Proxy bidding will be availtro, Johnny Laderable for any particer, Don Lambert, ipants who are unand Alex Trimino, able to attend. to name just a few. Tickets are availParticipating galable in advance and leries include: Daat the door, if still vid Castillo Galremaining. Prices lery, Miami; Dot are $375 for one “This annual, Fifty One, Miami; drawing ticket and electrifying event Emerson Dorsch admission for two brings art lovers Gallery, Miami; to the event; $700 and artists together Gallery Diet, Mibuys two tickets for a good cause.” ami; Gavlak Galand admission for lery, Palm Beach; Carol Jazzar four; $1,000 buys three tickets Contemporary Art, Miami; Di- and admission for six. The cost ana Lowenstein Fine Art, Mi- is $30 for those who wish to atami; Primary Projects, Miami; tend the event but not particiFredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami; pate in the drawing. Guests can Spinello Projects, Miami; and enjoy a complimentary full bar, Swampspace, Miami. hors d’oeuvres, and live magEach ticket purchased for the ic. To purchase tickets, visit: drawing guarantees the bearer www.artandculturecenter.org will go home with a work of art or call 954.921.3274. O n V iew

opposite : Francesco Lo Castro, Grace Jones 2011, Unique C-print on paper, 17-1/2 x 14-1/2” above: Jose Alvarez, Solaris 2013, Unique digital print, 30 x 20” below: Nellie Appleby, Wild Love Rituals, 2013, Color photograph, 19 x 25” left: Douglas Hoekzema, Untitled, 2013, Acrylic, enamel on canvas, 40” diameter *all images courtesy of the artists


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On View 01-03.2014  

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