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50

IMPACT:

Years

of the CFDA

J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 3

HERB RITTS:

L. A.Style AT R I N G L I N G MUSEUM OF ART, S A R A S O TA

AT B O C A R AT O N MUSEUM OF ART PLUS

RECYCLED DREAMS:

Pablo Cano’s Marionettes AT V E R O B E A C H MUSEUM OF ART

AND

CHAPUNGU:

Custom & Legend, a Culture in Stone AT FA I R C H L D

T R O P I C A L B O TA N I C GARDEN, CORAL GABLES


CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

V

2013

Vo l . 3 , N o . 5

56 Boca Raton

IMPACT: 50 YEARS OF THE CFDA

on iew FLORIDA

J A N U A R Y/ M A R C H 2 0 1 3

50

IMPACT:

Years

HERB RITTS:

L. A.Style AT R I N G L I N G MUSEUM OF ART,

of the CFDA

S A R A S O TA

AT B O C A R AT O N AND

MUSEUM OF ART

CHAPUNGU:

PLUS

Custom & Legend, a Culture in Stone

RECYCLED DREAMS:

Pablo Cano’s Marionettes

IMPACT, the season spotlight exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, is an ode to the illustrious designs created by members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

AT FA I R C H L D T R O P I C A L B O TA N I C

AT V E R O B E A C H

GARDEN,

MUSEUM OF ART

CORAL GABLES

ON THE COVER : NORMA KAMALI, BLACK PARACHUTE CLOTH AND FEATHER JACKET, SKIRT AND TURBAN, 2011, USA; PHOTOGRAPH: MFIT / CFDA

LEFT: OSCAR DE LA RENTA, SPRING 2012, USA; PHOTOGRAPH: MFIT / CFD

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

64 Coral Gables

74 Sarasota

84 West Palm Beach 92 Vero Beach

CUSTOM AND

L. A. STYLE

LEIBOVITZ

CHAPUNGU: LEGEND, A

CULTURE IN STONE

Set amidst the lush lowlands of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Chapungu presents 82 stone sculptures that portray the unique culture and life of the Shona people of Zimbabwe.

HERB RITTS:

Hosted by The Ringling Museum of Art, Herb Ritts: L. A. Style traces the life and career of the iconic photographer through a stunning selection of photographs.

ANNIE

RECYCLED

This exhibit, featured at the Norton Museum of Art, includes a selection of well-known and lesser-known works by Annie Leibovitz that emphasize the broad scope of her portraiture.

PABLO CANO’S

DREAMS:

102 Tampa

CHUCK CLOSE: A COUPLE OF

TAPFUMA GUTSA, NZUZU (WATER SPIRIT); HERB RITTS, STEPHANIE, CINDY,

SOMETHING

CHUCK CLOSE, SELF PORTRAIT, DAGUERREOTYPE

The Florida Museum of Photographic Arts presents a collection of exquisitely detailed daguerreotype portraits by Chuck Close. Each image offers an intimate and immensely revealing study of the subject, extending the hyperrealist tradition of portraiture for which Close is renowned. OnV

Parents and children alike will marvel at this delightful new show at the Vero Beach Museum of Art, starring Pablo Cano’s beloved puppet masterpieces. TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

WAYS OF DOING

RIGHT:

MARIONETTES

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CHRISTY, TATJANA, NAOMI, HOLLYWOOD, 1989, ©HERB RITTS FOUNDATION; ANNIE LEIBOVITZ, THE REVEREND AL SHARPTON, PRIMADONNA BEAUTY CARE CENTER, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, 1988, ©ANNIE LEIBOVITZ; pablo cano, Chorus Line of Ants (detail), 2007, Photo: Cesar Barroso

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CONTENTS Ja nu a r y/ M a rc h

2013

Vo l u m e

3,

No. 5

5 6

MUSE

Patrick Dougherty’s dreamlike architectural sculpture will be the featured in Sarasota Museum of Art’s 2013 ARTmuse.

116

LAWN JOBS

Don Lambert’s show at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood explores the American lawn as both a physical and psychic phenomena.

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

52

GALLERY

Fo r m

A selection of gallery artists and exhibitions

O n Vi e w D e s t i n a t i o n

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2012

120

Love Stream #2, 2012, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

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I AM NATURE: PAINTINGS BY LESLIE WAYNE

Spotlight

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PICTURED:

114

Foosaner Art Museum in Melbourne presents a selection of works by Leslie Wayne, inspired by landscape and geology.

COMMENTARY

Randy Polumbo,

Profile

On View presents highlights from the 11th edition of Art Basel Miami Beach—a four day art extravaganza which took place in December. In case you missed it, check this out!

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CONTEMPORARY GLASS SCULPTURE

The Orlando Museum of Art joins in a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the development of studio art glass in America.


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Happy New Year!

M A G A Z I N E

H e r e ’ s t o a h e a l t h y a n d p r o s p e r o u s 2013! Our New Year’s celebration begins with a dazzling tribute to the illustrious designs created by members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA, on pg. 56). Fashion is also a prominent theme for a stunning display of photographs by Herb Ritts, whose innovative approach to fashion, nude and celebrity portraiture was ground-breaking (Herb Ritts: L. A. Style, on pg. 74). Continuing in the genre of portraiture is a distinguished body of work by Annie Leibovitz, one of the most celebrated portrait photographers of our time (Annie Leibovitz, on pg. 84), as well as a compelling series of exquisitely detailed daguerreotype portraits by the master of the close-up, Chuck Close (Chuck Close: A Couple of Ways of Doing Something, on pg. 102). Also included in this edition is an awe-inspiring exhibit of beautifully hand-carved stone sculptures that provide a glimpse into the world of the Shona people of Zimbabwe (Chapungu: Custom and Legend, a Culture in Stone, on pg. 64), and a delightful showcase of Pablo Cano’s whimsical, hand-crafted puppet masterpieces (Recycled Dreams: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes, on pg. 92), an inspired commentary on the human condition. We anticipate a year filled with exciting new shows to keep you engaged...so please stay tuned!

Editorial Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, four times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

Publisher & Creative Director OnV

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MUSE

SMOA’s 2013 ARTmuse: Patrick Dougherty

R J A N U A RY 7 – 2 6 , 2 0 1 3

ENOWNED

sculptor, Patrick Dougherty, is the featured artist in Sarasota Museum of Art’s 2013 ARTmuse, which takes place January 7-26, 2013.

Known for his large-scale architectural forms woven from trees, twigs, vines and other natural materials, Dougherty will spend three weeks in Sarasota creating one of his unique sculptures on the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School and future home of the Sarasota Museum of Art. 6

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MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y Ringling College’s Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA, Sarasota’s first museum of modern and contemporary art, is poised to become a dynamic destination for exhibiting innovative and compelling visual art. A vital part of Sarasota’s rich cultural legacy, the museum will interweave exhibitions, educational programs and community outreach initiatives to engage a diverse audience and serve as a destination for creative discovery and discourse.  SMOA has made incredible strides toward achieving its $22 million fundraising goal and is increasing in momentum. To date, the project has raised $15.2 million.

Patrick Do Photograph: J

Dougherty’s dreamlike architectural forms invite pe

Previous page: Hocus Pocus, 2008, Bittersweet Farms, Ennice, NC; Photograph: Robin Dreyer. Above (left to righ

Close Ties, 2006, Scottish Basketmakers Cir

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ougherty James Fraher

MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y Together, Ringling College and SMOA will transform the former Sarasota High School, a landmark building listed on the National Register of Historic Places, into nearly 60,000 square feet of exhibition space, a 110-seat, multipurpose auditorium, sculpture court, indoor/outdoor café, classrooms and studios, and educational resource and meeting spaces. “The building will regain its stature as one of the area’s most significant and recognizable structures,” says Wendy G. Surkis, president of Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA, a division of Ringling College of Art and Design. “The reinvention of this building, which includes a glass structure, iconic in

eople to wander through his amazing environments.

ht): Simple Pleasures, 2001, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME. Photograph: Bowdoin College;

rcle, Dingwall, Scotland. Photograph: Fin Macrae

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MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y

its modernity, invokes the past, the present and the future. The rebirth of the high school is exhilarating.” SMOA’s ARTmuse programs bring renowned artists and museum professionals to the region. According to Surkis, “They share their creative journey and impart a deep understanding of who they are, what they do and how they do it.” These distinguished visitors give the public, “unique and meaningful learning experiences in an up-close-and-personal setting. Our enlightening programs provide Sarasota art enthusiasts a sense of what’s to come once SMOA is up and running.” Previous visiting artists have included Lesley Dill, Janet Echelman, Judy Pfaff and Seth Randal.  “This is a remarkable opportunity for our community,” says Surkis. “Pat-

Uff Da Palace, 2010, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska, MN. Photograph: Todd Mulvihill

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MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y

rick Dougherty has exhibited his work around the world; we’re thrilled that he is coming here for SMOA. It’s an example of the fresh ideas SMOA will be bringing to Sarasota.” Surkis adds that it’s “pure joy to watch his creations come alive as he bends, twists and cajoles tree branches into large, dreamlike architectural forms that invite people to explore, wonder and wander through his amazing environments.” Born in Oklahoma in 1945, Patrick Dougherty was raised in North Carolina and studied art history and sculpture at the University of North Carolina. Combining his carpentry skills with his love of nature, Dougherty began to learn more about primitive techniques of building and to experiment with tree saplings as construction material. 

Easy Rider, 2010, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC. Photograph: Andy Lynch

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MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y

In 1982, his first work, Maple Body Wrap, was included in the North Carolina Biennial Artists’ Exhibition, sponsored by the North Carolina Museum of Art. His work quickly evolved from single pieces on conventional pedestals to environmental works on a monumental scale, which required saplings by the truckloads. Over the last 30 years, he has built over 230 of these works—and has become internationally acclaimed. Dougherty has received numerous awards, including the 2011 Factor Prize for Southern Art, North Carolina Artist Fellowship Award, Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, Henry Moore Foundation Fellowship, Japan-US Creative Arts Fellowship, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Princeton Architectural Press published a major book, “Stickwork,” about the artist and Running in Circles, 1996, TICKON Sculpture Park, Langeland, Denmark. Photograph: Hatten

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MUSE S M O A’s 2 0 1 3 A R T m u s e : P a t r i c k D o u g h e r t y

his work in 2009. To view more works by Patrick Dougherty, visit his website: www.stickwork.net. A celebratory first event, the “SMOA Inaugural Bash,” is Sunday, January 20, 2013, 6-10 pm, on the grounds of the historic Sarasota High School. The public is invited to meet the artist, enjoy libations and cuisine from The Sarasota-Manatee Originals, and enjoy the stirring sounds of Tampa’s premier dance band, Ace Factor. Tickets start at $125. For tickets and more information about this event, call 941.309.0118 and specify SMOA Inaugural Bash. For information about sponsorship and benefactor opportunities, contact Mary Lee Richey at 941.309.4732. For more information about Sarasota Museum of Art/SMOA visit: www.sarasotamuseumofart.org. O n V iew Call of the Wild, 2002, Museum of Glass: International Center for Contemporary Art, Tacoma, WA; maple and willow saplings, 18’ high. Photograph: Duncan Price

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{S P E C I A L

E X H I B I T I O N S*

C O M P I L E D

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CALENDAR *Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.

BOCA RATON 01.29.13–04.21.13

Draw and Shoot: Fashion Illustrations and Photographs from the Collection Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Draw and Shoot offers a sampling of 20th century fashion drawings and photographs showcasing the evolving aesthetics of fashion design and its documentation by pencil and camera. Over 50 works will be on display from art-

ists such as Rudolf Bauer, Carl Erickson, Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon and John Rawlings. 01.29.13–04.21.13

IMPACT: 50 Years of the Council of Fashion Designers of America

Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA is the first museum exhibition to celebrate the quintessentially American artistry of the leading fashion trade organization in the US. The exhibition includes gar-

ments and accessories by the most impactful creators of the last fifty years. Among the designers included in the exhibition are Geoffrey Beene, Michael Kors, Coach, Donna Karan, Norma Kamali, Francisco Costa / Calvin Klein, Vera Wang, Kenneth Cole, Diane von Furstenberg and Thakoon. (See story on pg. 56.) Thru 01.13.13

Michael Zansky: Dance of the Cuckoos Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Image from IMPACT: 50 Years of the Council of Fashion Designers of America at Boca Raton Museum of Art: Patricia Underwood, courtesy of Patricia Underwood

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Boca Raton continued...

Michael Zansky’s exhibition, which includes paintings as well as sculptures in motion magnified by optical lenses, is named after the loopy theme song of comic duo, Laurel and Hardy, and reflects the artist’s darkly funny view of the predicaments of life. Thru 01.13.13

Politics Not as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say Boca Raton Museum of Art

stones of the Folk Art Museum’s comprehensive quilt holdings. The exhibition also marks the first opportunity for viewers to see the 9/11 National Tribute Quilt outside of the American Folk Art Museum.

40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, focusing on striking graphics, creative storytelling and player interactivity.

Thru 01.13.13

Thru 05.31.13

The Art of Video Games Boca Raton Museum of Art

Chapungu: Custom and Legend, a Culture in Stone Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

www.bocamuseum.org

The Art of Video Games explores the

CORAL GABLES

www.bocamuseum.org

Highlighting textile masterpieces from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum in NYC, this exhibition includes bedcovers that have rarely been on view, and important corner-

www.fairchildgarden.org

Explore the unique culture, way of life and daily experiences of the Shona people of Zimbabwe. Eightytwo stone sculptures are on display, ranging in size from three to 11 feet, each covering important subject matter ranging from environmental issues to social commentary. (See story on pg. 64.) Thru 4.21.13

Artlab @ The Lowe: Adapting and Adopting— Waves of Change as East Encounters West, Modern & Contemporary Japanese Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

Image from Chapungu: Custom and Legend, a Culture in Stone at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables: Tapfuma Gutsa, Nzuzu (Water Spirit)

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Coral Gables continued...

Joseph and Janet Shein Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

www.lowemuseum.org

The integration of foreign influence and its contribution to the development of modern and contemporary Japanese art is highlighted through 32 paintings, works on paper and sculpture from the Lowe’s Permanent Collection. Thru 01.13.13

Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

Varied in content and technique, this collection represents more than 40 years of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s versatile artistic career, dating from 1962

www.lowemuseum.org

through 2004, including preparatory works for and documentation photographs of Surrounded Islands, Project for Biscayne Bay, Greater Miami, Florida; lithograph/ collages of Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped and sculptural objects such as Wrapped New York Times and Wrapped Payphone.

Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

01.26.13–03.24.13

Thru 02.10.13

Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity

Saintly Blessings: A Gift of Mexican Retablos from

www.lowemuseum.org

American artists of African, Arab European, Asian, Latino and Native American descent explore their heritage in this vivid and diverse exhibition using a wide variety of media.

On view for the first time at the Lowe is a splendid collection of 28 retablos painted on tin, which have been graciously donated to the Museum by prominent Philadelphia and Miami art collectors, Joseph and Janet Shein. 01.26.13–03.24.13

Stephen Knapp: New Light Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www.lowemuseum.org

For over thirty years, Stephen Knapp has been creating art that

Image from Stephen Knapp: New Light at Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables: Stephen Knapp, Into Morning, 2007-2011, © Stephen Knapp

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Coral Gables continued...

interacts with and is transformed by light. Dispensing with traditional media and narrative content, Knapp’s “lightpaintings,” a word he coined to describe his light-based installations, are both innovative and invigorating, transposing artistic tradition into the hyper-stimulated world of the 21st century.

realistic forms and intensely colorful, thickly painted surfaces.

and an emotional experience of the scene he has chosen to commit to canvas.

02.16.13–06.01.13

Ramon Vilanova: Instantes de Vida Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Ramon Vilanova works exclusively plein-air, at that time and place, giving his compositions a special sensitivity

on metal armatures and assembled on the wall, humorously convey his social observations to the viewer.

Thru 02.02.13

Ricky Bernstein: Kitchen Dreams Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Ricky Bernstein’s visual collages, each composed of sections of vividly painted glass planes mounted

CORAL SPRINGS Thru 02.02.13

Ethel Grodsky: Abstracts in Acrylic Coral Springs Museum of Art

Thru 02.02.13

Robert Mars: Captivated Coral Springs Museum of Art www.csmart.org

Robert Mars’ artwork chronicles an evolving fascination with the Golden Age of American popular culture and celebrates the icons of the 1950s and ’60s by taking inspiration from this era long past. DAYTONA BEACH 01.19.13–04.28.13

www.csmart.org

In her abstract works, Ethel Grodsky’s canvases touch on both

Boarders of Paradise: The New World

Image from Ramon Vilanova: Instantes de Vida at Coral Springs Museum of Art: Image courtesy of the artist and Coral Springs Museum of Art

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Daytona Beach continued...

in the Eyes of the Explorers Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Works that are featured in this exhibition include maps, etchings, engravings and lithographs from the 17th through 19th centuries. 01.19.13–04.28.13

Florida Celebrates Space Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

An unprecedented collaboration between the United States of America, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Museum of Arts & Sciences includes 40 paintings exem-

plifying the history of American spaceflight from the Mercury program (1958) through the recent conclusion of the Space Shuttle era. 02.23.13–05.19.13

Greek and Russian Icons from the MOAS Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

stories of the saints themselves, are beautifully and strikingly represented in this lovely grouping depicting both miraculous stories of the past and the rich heritage of both nations.

Examples of the importance and beauty of Old Master drawings are included in this show featuring works by Benjamin West, Fragonard, Vermeyen, Leoni, van de Velde, Angelica Kauffmann and their contemporaries. Thru 02.03.13

Anthology 2012: A Biennial of Contemporary Photography Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Thru 02.10.13

Old Master Drawings from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Museum of Arts & Sciences

The iconic visions of Russian and Greek saints, and the historic www.moas.org

The photographers exhibited in Anthology 2012 are producing significant new work that is starting to have an impact in the field of serious photography. All of these artists are enter-

Image from Anthology 2012: Contemporary Photography at Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach: Judith Fox, Untitled (detail) from the series Sea of Dreams, pigment inkjet print

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Daytona Beach continued...

ing the solid core of their careers as their style and subject matter matures to reflect the concerns of a new generation of artists. D e LAND Thru 04.07.13

Duane Hanson Sculptures Museum of Florida Art www.museumoffloridaart.org

Around 1966, Duane Hanson began making figural casts using fiberglass and vinyl. Cast from actual people and painted to make the revealed skin look realistic with veins and blemishes, Hanson clothed the figures with garments from second-hand clothing stores and theatrically arranged the action. (See story in

the October/December 2012 issue on pg. 94.)

precious collectable, but in Japan, ningyō are doll-like forms that serve many DELRAY BEACH different purposes, Thru 01.27.13 from talismanic and Entertaining the ritual functions to Gods and Man: starring in theatrical Japanese Dolls dioramas and public and the Theater performances. This Morikami exhibition presents Museum over 60 visually stunand Japanese ning and powerfully Gardens engaging ningyō, www.morikami.org exemplifying this For most of us, the little-explored world word doll connotes a of Japanese art. (See child’s plaything or story in the October/

December 2012 issue on pg. 116.) Thru 01.27.13

Itsuo Kiritani: 23 Views of Tokyo Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens www.morikami.org

Itsuo Kiritani’s pen drawings—all drawn on site—depict scenes of traditional Tokyo, which have been rapidly vanishing. 02.12.13–05.19.13

The Curator’s Farewell Exhibition: Cool Stuff from the Morikami Museum’s Collection Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Image from Duane Hanson Sculptures at the Museum of Florida Art, DeLand: Duane Hanson, Self Portrait with Model, 1979, painted polyvinyl with accessories

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Delray Beach continued...

www.morikami.org

www.moafl.org

Morikami Museum Senior Curator, Tom Gregersen, will soon be retiring after a 35-year career of service to the museumgoing public of South Florida. Before he says “sayonara,” he will be sharing some favorite objects from the Museum’s treasure vault. DUNEDIN

Julie Mehretu, Clarence spective of his life’s Morgan and Todd work and passion— Norsten, among others. printmaking.

01.18.13–03.03.13

Highpoint PRINTS Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Thru 02.24.13 01.18.13–03.03.13

Highpoint PRINTS features contemporary artist editions from Highpoint Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis. Featured artists include: Carlos Amorales, Mary Esch,

Stephen Littlefield: The Ecstasy of Tedium Dunedin Fine Art Center www.dfac.org

Artist, Stephen Littlefield, shares a retro-

FORT LAUDERDALE Thru 03.2013

Foto Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

Image from Highpoint PRINTS at Dunedin Fine Art Center: Rob Fischer, Dodgeball

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Foto Fort Lauderdale is an exciting new series of highcaliber photographic exhibitions that give photography a permanent, year-round home at the Museum of Art/Fort Lauderdale, complemented by a wide array of related workshops, lectures and in-gallery activities. Featured artists include Diane Arbus, Elliott Erwitt and Vic Muniz.

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Return to the Ashcan Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

The Ashcan painters of early 20th century America painted the


C A L E N D A R

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

full reality of urban living—blemishes included. George Luks, William Glackens, John Sloan, Everett Shinn, Guy Pène du Bois and George Bellows were leaders of the group, and their works are included in this stunning exhibition of paintings and works on paper. Thru 02.10.13

Warhol and Cars: American Icons Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University

exhibition traces the development of Warhol’s work with cars throughout his career. 02.10.13–05.19.13

Wari: Pre-Inca Lords of Peru Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Wari’s capital is one of the largest archaeological sites in South America. This exhibition showcases textiles that are among the

most complex ever made in the Andes— fine ceramics; delicate ornaments of precious metal, shell or bone; and small, masterful sculptures of stone or wood. GAINESVILLE Thru 03.17.13

Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth Harn Museum of Art

This installation displays a selection of photographs by Anne Noggle, who became a professional photographer at age 40, after serving as one of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and as a captain in the US Air Force during WWII. Noggle’s work explores female vitality, aging and beauty with an honest, respectful and sometimes humorous view. 02.05.13–04.28.13

www.harn.ufl.edu

Printmaking in the Age of Rembrandt Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

Featuring more than 40 drawings, paintings, prints, photographs and related archival material spanning the years 1946 to 1986, this

www.harn.ufl.edu

Printmaking in the Age of Rembrandt features prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and

Image from Anne Noggle: Reality and the Blind Eye of Truth at Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Anne Noggle, Reminiscence: Portrait with My Sister, 1980, gift of Anne Noggle Foundation

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his contemporaries, including Hendrick Goltzius (1558-1617), Esias van de Velde (c. 1591-1630) and Jan Dirkszoon (16181652). These extraordinary—and at the time, groundbreaking­— prints depict landscape, genre and maritime subjects, and a refashioning of portraiture and biblical and mythological narratives. Thru 02.03.13

Thru 03.15.13

Things That Go Bump in the Night Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

(1896-1960), who lived and worked in Japan most of his life.

Souvenirs of Modern Asia: The Prints of Paul Jacoulet Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

German metropolis after WWI.

01.15.13–04.28.13

Souvenirs of Modern Asia features a remarkable set of 55 masterfully printed woodcuts by French artist, Paul Jacoulet

Surreal, Sexy, Sinister: The Photographs of Marta Astfalck-Vietz Harn Museum of Art www.harn.ufl.edu

Surreal, Sexy, Sinister is the first solo exhibition of Berlin photographer, Marta Astfalck-Vietz (1901-1993), outside Germany. The 18 reproduction photographs showcase her personal responses to the social, sexual and political transformations that shaped the

Things That Go Bump in the Night explores the sometimes fearful anxieties experienced after the sun goes down. The exhibition features 18th-20th century Japanese paintings and sculptures from the Harn’s Asian Collection. HOLLYWOOD 01.26.13–02.21.13

Abracadabra Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Image from Souvenirs of Modern Asia: The Prints of Paul Jacoulet at the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville: Paul Jacoulet, Nuit de Neige. Corée (Snowy Night. Korea), 1939, color woodcut print, collection of Dorothy Finkin, courtesy of Eugene Finkin, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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www.artandculturecenter.org

Now in its sixth year, this exhibition and fundraiser is comprised of approximately 100 donated works in all media by artists who have been invited to participate. Thru 01.13.13

Antonia Wright and Ruben Millares: Love on an Escalator Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

03.09.13–04.14.13

Brandon Opalka: Janigan’s Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Brandon Opalka’s sitespecific installation is inspired by the wellknown South Florida pub chain, Flanigan’s, renamed after his mother, Jan. Born in Virginia and raised in South Florida, Opalka asserts that art can provide a place in which viewers are invited to

experience a shared moment. 01.26.13–02.24.13

David Leroi: Amusez La Galerie Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

The work of David Leroi is often described as Lichtensteinesque—a form of distorted Pop Art—yet Leroi leans more towards an edgier form of Agitprop Art. He

www.artandculturecenter.org

In this on-going project, the simple repeated gesture of a kiss tests the rules of social conduct. In the video work, one sees the audience encounter the artists, Antonia Wright and Ruben Millares, as they kiss in public.

does this through his use of political comments, which turn the capitalist system against itself. 03.09.13–04.14.13

Don Lambert: Lawn Jobs Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

This exhibit continues Don Lambert’s investigation of visual phenomena, employed as a comment on both cultural and social perceptions. His domestic chores eventually led to an investigation into the origins of the American lawn, its aesthetics and the effects this formal landscape has on our social and environmental interactions. (See story on pg. 116.)

Image from Don Lambert: Lawn Jobs at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Don Lambert, Cubic Yard and Deere John, 2009, artificial turf on maple plywood, dimensions variable, image courtesy of the Nerman MOCA

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Boyd McLean: Lummox Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Thru 01.13.13

Elisabeth Condon: The Seven Seas Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

In her new painting and drawing exhibition, Elisabeth Condon introduces the 1980s Los Angeles nightclub scene as a metaphor for personal and social transformation. The Tampa and Brooklynbased artist approaches this landscape as a repository for individual and shared memories, associations and cultural experiences.

Brillhart focuses on medium and material, using architecture as a jumping-off point for her paintings and sculptural collages. Common urban motifs provide Brillhart with initial inspiration and abstract forms. 01.26.13–02.24.13

Jenny Brillhart: Accumulation Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

Matu Croney: Bravelion & the Class of 2000 Art and Culture Center of Hollywood

www.artandculturecenter.org

www.artandculturecenter.org

03.09.13–04.14.13

This exhibition presents a selection of drawings by artist, Millree Hughes, and a related film by Peter Informed by ancient Boyd McLean. The history, counterculture drawings are of the movements, metaphys- Lummoxes, glam rockics, personal mytholo- loving hooligans that gies, cultural approcame on holiday to the priation and internet little resort village of proliferation, Matu Towyn, North Wales, Croney’s work preswhere Hughes grew ents interplay between up. The band eventudrawing, photography, ally became a reality, collage, sculpture and playing during Art performance in the Basel Miami Beach in form of esoteric as2005, and McLean’s semblages and audio/ film is a mocumentary visual installations. of the show. Thru 01.13.13

01.26.13–02.24.13

Millree Hughes and Peter

Perry Pandrea: If I’ve said it once,

Image from Jenny Brillhart: Accumulation at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood: Jenny Brillhart, image courtesy of the artist

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I’ve said it a thousand times... Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

Pandrea investigates mundane and utilitarian platitudes by mining phrases that are colorful, and even insightful, in mirroring a feeling or reinforcing a mood.

for authenticity through a variety of formats combining photography, poetry and book art.

Ian Bogost is a noted video game designer. His research and writing consider video games as an expressive medium. His creative practice JACKSONVILLE focuses on games Thru 03.10.13 about social and Project Atrium: political issues, Ian Bogost including airport Museum of security, consumer Contemporary Art debt, disaffected Jacksonville workers, the petrowww.mocajacksonville.org leum industry,

Thru 01.13.13

Rosemarie Chiarlone and Susan Weiner: Obstruction Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

This collaborative effort of visual artist, Rosemarie Chiarlone, and poet, Susan Weiner, investigates women’s struggle

suburban errands, pandemic flu and tort reform. 03.23.13–07.07.13

Project Atrium: Sarah Emerson Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Sarah Emerson’s paintings present viewers with highly stylized versions of nature by taking patterns already visible in the natural world and painting them in pastel hues and pop, paint-by-number repetition. Inspired by themes ranging from battlefields, war propaganda, literature, and idyllic gardens, she uses the landscape for impression, abstraction, symbolism, and sentiment.

Image from Project Atrium: Sarah Emerson at the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville : Sarah Emerson, Sea of Trees

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

01.26.13–04.07.13

01.26.13–04.27.13

SLOW: Marking Time in Photography and Film Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

The Tsar’s Cabinet: Two Hundred Years of Russian Decorative Arts Under the Romanovs The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.mocajacksonville.org

“SLOW” challenges viewers to pause, engage with the art around them, and reassess the importance of time in daily life. Participating in the exhibition are internationally renowned artists, Eve Sussman, Kota Ezawa, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Chris McCaw, Idris Khan, James Nares and David Claerbout. Thru 04.07.13

Jim Draper: Feast of Flowers The Cummer Museum of Art

& Gardens

01.15.13–10.06.13

www.cummer.org

La Florida The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

The Tsars’ Cabinet Feast of Flowers serves features extraordinary as a contemporary objects that have been investigation of and drawn from the finest response to the essen- www.cummer.org private collection of tial ecosystems that The Cummer presents Imperial Russian porhave existed in Florida an exhibition that celain and decorative for thousands of years. showcases this beau- arts in the US. As a collaborative ef- tiful state through the fort, ecologists, bicenturies. Included LAKELAND ologists, philosophers, as part of this instalhistorians, taxonolation are Florida Thru 01.12.13 mists and writers landscapes by WinAbout Face have provided essenslow Homer, HerPolk Museum tial material as anman Herzog, Martin of Art chors for the pictorial Johnson Heade and www.polkmuseumofart.org narratives created for Frederick Frieseke, From mugshots of unthis show. among others. familiar criminals to

Image from Jim Draper: Feast of Flowers at The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, Jacksonville: Jim Draper, Nana (unfinished), 48 x 60”, ©Jim Draper

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celebrity portraits and paparazzi snapshots, About Face features portraits of all mediums from PMoA’s Permanent Collection. 01.19.13–04.20.13

Coincidence: Works by Louviere & Vanessa Polk Museum of Art

includes pieces from nine different series of works.

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Polk Museum of Art presents the National Portrait Gallery’s new Thru 01.12.13 exhibition, In Vibrant In Vibrant Color: Vintage CeColor: Vintage lebrity Portraits from Celebrity the Harry Warnecke Portraits from Studio, a collection of the Harry color photographs of Warnecke Studio celebrities who rose to Polk Museum fame at a time when of Art color photography

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Artists, Vanessa Brown and Jeff Louviere, constantly strive to push the bounds of image making and reinterpret traditional ideas of photography. Their surreal subjects emerge from a sense of literary romanticism and tragedy, and often include satirical undertones. This exhibition is a survey of their work and

was in its infancy. This exhibition of color photographs from the 1930s and ’40s includes actors, Lucille Ball and Roy Rogers; trumpeter, Louis Armstrong; baseball star, Ted Williams; Olympian, Babe Didrikson Zaharias; and General George S. Patton. (See story in the October/ December 2012 issue on pg. 66.) 01.19.13–04.20.13

No Ordinary Days: Works by Maggie Taylor Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Maggie Taylor’s digital creations include familiar imagery taken from found objects and 19th century daguerreotypes, which she scans and

Image from In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio at the Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland: Harry Warnecke and Robert F. Cranston, Gene Autry, 1942, color carbro print, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Elsie M. Warnecke

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manipulates, converting their historical and mysterious significances into something of sophisticated fantasy. This exhibition is a survey of Taylor’s work and coincides with the release of her new book, No Ordinary Days. MAITLAND 02.08.13–03.10.13

Anna Tomczak: Animalia Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Lake Helen artist, Anna Tomczak, creates one-of-a-kind photographic images utilizing a large Polaroid camera. Widely exhibited and collected, Tomczak’s unique format dye-in-

www.artandhistory.org

This exhibit highlights a broad spectrum of work from artists involved in the past two Participation exhibitions. 01.11.13–02.03.13

fusion transfer images explore a rich variety of found objects, botanicals and related ephemera. 01.11.13–03.10.13

James Casey: Equine Sculpture Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

Memories of growing up in Central Florida and working on his grandmother’s

cattle ranch laid the foundation for James Casey’s iconic sculptures. Casey’s current body of work employs rugged materials that capture the unexpected beauty and grace of his equine subjects. 03.21.13–05.19.13

Participation: Class of 2011 and 2012 Art & History Museums, Maitland

Selections from the Permanent Collection: Sculpture Art & History Museums, Maitland www.artandhistory.org

The A&H’s Maitland Art Center is home to a diverse collection of sculptural works by distinguished national and local artists. Acquired through purchases and donations, the collection unites a variety of media and subject matter.

Image from James Casey: Equine Sculpture at the Art & History Museums, Maitland: James Casey, Strangely Young, courtesy of the artist

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MELBOURNE 01.12.13–03.17.13

I Am Nature: Paintings by Leslie Wayne Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Inspired by landscape and geology, Leslie Wayne shapes paint much in the way that geological forces work in nature. Alluding to compression and the shifting of tectonic plates, the intervening spaces between her many layers of paint act as the narrative. (See story on pg. 114.)

year body of photography is a study of our humanity. From his early career as a freelance reporter to now, he captures the zeitgeist of his era through his choice of political, social and human subjects. The theme of this exhibition is Paris from the 1960s. MIAMI Thru 02.17.13

Smoke Signals: Istwa, Paisajes

and Allegories ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Smoke Signals challenges what may be familiar perceptions of our surroundings through unconventional materials. Many of the materials the artists incorporate into their work are sourced from traditional building materials, found objects and textiles.

Thru 01.27.13

The Gift of the Present Moment ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

The Gift of the Present Moment uses text and visual representations to convey a poem as conceptual art and mimics the madness of the world, creating a sort of “Turrets Art” that demands you to inhale, slow down, listen close, and appreciate the art as though you were the eye within the storm. 12.06.12–03.17.13

The Endless Renaissance Bass Museum of Art

03.23.13–05.12.13

Léon Herschtritt: Photography Foosaner Art Museum

www.bassmuseum.org

Presented in this exhibition are solo artist projects by

www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Léon Herschtritt’s 50-

Image from I Am Nature: Paintings by Leslie Wayne at Foosaner Art Museum, Melbourne: Leslie Wayne, One Big Love #36, 2009, oil on panel, 10 x 13”

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Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Barry X Ball, Walead Beshty, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ged Quinn and Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook.

of newly commissioned projects and special programs. Thru 03.03.13

Thru 03.03.13

EMOTICON: Selections from the Permanent Collection Miami Art Museum

03.15.13–06.02.13

and Joaquín TorresGarcia, among numerous others.

Bill Viola: Liber Insularum Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

Part of MOCA’s Knight Exhibition Series, Liber Insulawww.miamiartmuseum.org Thru 06.02.13 rum presents a major Living in an age New Work exhibition of 11 screen and culture in Miami 2013 works and projecwhich psychological Miami Art tions by one of today’s yearnings are Museum leading pioneers in generally repressed, www.miamiartmuseum.org www.miamiartmuseum.org the art of video. Bill artists continue Selections from Miami Art Museum Viola’s video installato examine the the Pérez Collection presents the second tions—total environability of art objects includes 40 major iteration of the highly ments that envelop the to awaken the works such as sigsuccessful New Work viewer in image and viewer’s emotions, nificant paintings Miami 2010. Like the sound—employ stateboth vicariously and works on inaugural edition, this of-the-art technologies and physically. paper by Roberto exhibition is conceived and explore the pheEMOTICON explores Matta, Diego Rivera, as a salute to Miami’s nomena of sense perthe role of emotion Wifredo Lam, community of artists, ception as an avenue in art. Fernando Botero and includes a number to self-knowledge. Frames of Reference: Latin American Art from the Jorge M. Pérez Collection Miami Art Museum

Image from Bill Viola: Liber Insularum at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami: Bill Viola, The Quintet of The Astonished, 2000, color video rear projection on screen mounted on wall in dark room, projected image size: 1.4 x 2.4 metres, room dimensions variable

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The Frost Art Museum MOCA’s 15th and FIU’s Sculpture Anniversary Park welcomes the Collection addition of 10 monuMuseum of mental sculptures for Contemporary an unprecedented Art, North Miami outdoor exhibition. www.mocanomi.org Made of a variety of This exhibition inmaterials, each work cludes major works in represents the best of the Museum’s Perma- contemporary sculpnent Collection that ture through its most are being unveiled recognized artists and together for the first the diversity of styles, time. Among the themes and technical featured artists are Uta Barth, Bhakti Baxter, Tom Burr, Gabriel Orozco, Yinka Shonibare, Xaviera Simmons, and others. Thru 03.03.13

approaches that characterize our times. 02.27.13–05.19.13

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

In 1935, Eugene Francis Savage made the first of many journeys into the Florida Ev-

erglades to study the Seminoles. Inspired by his observations, he created the most extensive painted record of the Florida Seminoles from the early 20th century. 01.12.13–02.17.13

Form’s Transgressions: The Drawings of Augstín Fernández The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Graphite drawings from the late 1960s to the ’90s provide a comprehensive overview of Augstín Fernández’s most recognizable imagery— a visual language instilled with the erotics of desire and vulnerability.

Thru 05.20.13

American Sculpture in the Tropics The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Image from Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Eugene Savage, Orchid Trail, 1935, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 13”

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Thru 01.27.13

Iván Navarro: Fluorescent Light Sculptures The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Iván Navarro’s light sculptures glow and buzz with color and electrical current, transforming utilitarian objects into radiant yet foreboding forms with double meanings. 02.27.13–06.16.13

Jose Manuel Ballester: Concealed Spaces The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Spanish photographer, Jose Manuel Ballester, is known for his largescale works that are

connected by key concepts such as space, light and time—many use historical images associated with the old masters that are deconstructed to become current comments on the world of art.

Over 150 years of portraits of Seminole leaders and tribal members by George Catlin, Edward Curtis and other noted 19th and 20th century artists are featured in this historic exhibition.

Thru 01.13.13

Reflections Across Time: Seminole Portraits The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Thru 02.24.13

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

To beauty: A Tribute to Mike Kelley The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Mike Kelley created highly symbolic, representational and ritualism pieces that transcended all mediums. His works frequently dealt with class, youthful rebellion and popular culture, and attacked the sanctity of cultural attitudes toward religion, history, education and family. Thru 04.07.13

Esther ShalevGerz: Describing Labor The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Once the heroic image of class-consciousness and national character—pictured widely in the period of the Great Depression, the

Image from Iván Navarro: Fluorescent Light Sculptures at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami: Iván Navarro, Nowhere Man I, 2009, cool white fluorescent lights and electric energy, 65 x 77”

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Soviet Revolution and the two World Wars— the worker has since disappeared from the contemporary visual landscape. Through video, audio, photography and text, ShalevGerz’s installation gives voice to these otherwise silent figures so that we might achieve a new awareness of the human endeavor that shapes our daily realities.

From luxury tea services to propaganda porcelains, and ornate vases to unadorned, salt-glazed stoneware, Material and Meaning explores the remarkable range of objects created from different kinds of clay. Thru 03.31.13

Postcards of the Wiener Werkstätte: Selections from the Leon-

ard A. Lauder Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

This exhibition explores a selection of artists’ postcards produced from 1907 to 1919 by the Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna Workshop). Designers such as Hoffmann, Oskar Kokoschka,

Dagobert Peche and Egon Schiele produced a variety of thematic cards that bring to life the rich social fabric of turn-of-the-century Vienna cafés, architecture, fashion, urban types and humor. Thru 03.18.13

The Light Club of Vizcaya: A Women’s Picture Vizcaya Museum & Gardens www.wolfsonian.org

New-York based artist and MacArthur Fellow, Josiah McElheny, has created a thirty-minute film for this commissioned project. The film references a littleknown short-story, The Light Club of Batavia, written in 1912 by Paul Scheerbart. The characters in Scheerbart’s story become

Thru 01.13.13

Material and Meaning: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Porcelain from The Wolfsonian— FIU Collection The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

Image from Material and Meaning: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Porcelain from The Wolfsonian–FIU Collection at The Wolfsonian–Florida International University, Miami: Image courtesy of The Wolfsonian–Florida International University

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obsessed with the fantasy of constructing an underground light spa, built entirely out of Tiffany glass. McElheny substitutes characters drawn from Vizcaya’s history for Scheerbart’s and uses the estate as the ingenious setting for this narrative about the promise of modernity and utopia. NAPLES 02.09.13–04.13.13

Following Footsteps: Three Generations of Plein Air Painters Naples Art Association at The von Liebig Art Center www.naplesart.org

Rarely do we see three generations of suc-

includes several outdoor sculptures. Thru 01.20.13 and 05.04–07.07.13

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

cessful artists working in the same genre— Charles, Emile and Robert Gruppé are one such example. Following Footsteps reveals three generations of the Gruppé family through their plein air paintings. Thru 01.20.13

Fletcher Benton: The Artist’s Studio Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

This experiential and interactive exhibition explores the unique attitudes and methods that Benton, a world-renowned kinetic and constructivist sculptor, applies to his work. The exhibition recreates Benton’s studio with the images, textures and inspirations that constitute his working environment. The exhibition also

An exciting new selection of works from the Museum’s American Modernism Collection is on display representing all of the important movements in American art during the first half of the 20th century. 01.12.13–04.21.13

Painting Women Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

More than 80 works from the Permanent Collection of the

Image from Fletcher Benton: The Artist’s Studio at Naples Museum of Art: Fletcher Benton, Folded Square Alphabet Y, 2004, painted steel, 12 x 12 x 12”, ©Fletcher Benton

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, explore the role of women in art. These paintings, by and about women, include works by Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe, Lilla Cabot Perry, Helen Torr, Edgar Degas, Gretchen Woodman Rogers, and many others. 02.02.13–07.07.13

Revelation: Major Paintings by Jules Olitski Naples Museum of Art

by Revelation. This exhibition draws together more than 20 monumental canvases spanning Olitski’s career. Thru 03.24.13

Sight Unseen: International Photography by Blind Artists Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

The first major exhibition of work by the world’s most accom-

plished blind photographers, Sight Unseen examines our definitions of blindness and encourages us to reevaluate what it means to see. Each of the artists employ diverse strategies in their work to capture the outside world and bring it into their realm. OCALA 01.19.13–02.24.13

Chick Schwartz: Cedar Key Artist

www.thephil.org

Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

View 34 works of whimsical sculpture, ceramics and oil on canvas by renowned Cedar Key artist, Chick Schwartz. 02.02.13–03.31.13

Rebels with a Cause: American Impressionist Women from the Huntsville Museum Of Art Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Jules Olitski (19222007) has received international acclaim for his maverick Color Field paintings of the 1960s, however, the larger arc of his career remains to be fully appreciated—an opportunity addressed

On exhibition are 54 paintings, drawings and sculptures by many of the most prominent female artists between the mid-19th and mid20th centuries. Works presented exemplify the effects of French

Image from Revelation: Major Paintings by Jules Olitski at Naples Museum of Art: Jules Olitski, With Love and Disregard: Splendor, 2002, acrylic on canvas, 68 x 92”, collection of Audrey and David Mirvish, Toronto. Image ©Jules Olitski Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York; photo: Michael Cullen

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Impressionism and the Barbizon style that influenced American art at that time and what became known as the American Impressionist style.

features approximately 65 works by internationally renowned artists as well as younger artists who are taking the medium in new directions. (See story on pg. 118.)

ents works by masters of 20th century photography who created iconic images that established photography as a major medium for modern art. Today, a new generation of artists use digital technology to create images that were not possible to make in previous generations. Darkroom to Digital explores the shared ideas, practices and aesthetics of these artists and the new directions of photography today.

Thru 06.2013

Thru 02.08.13

Darkroom to Digital: Photography from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art

Going Places: Adventures in Art from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 01.20.13

Sendak & Co.: Children’s Book Illustrations Since “Where The Wild Things Are.” Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

Featured are 34 of some of the best known names in children’s book illustration, including Chris Van Allsburg, Chris Raschka, Leo and Diane Dillon, Brian Selznick and Mo Willems. The Exhibition features drawings from the artists’ own collec-

tions as well as other sources. ORLANDO Thru 03.31.13

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass

www.omart.org

This exhibition pres-

www.omart.org

Going Places takes visitors on a journey

Image from Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass at Orlando Museum of Art: Dale Chihuly, Macchia (Purple with Yellow Lip), n.d., blown glass, 24 x 40 x 40”

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through four thematic sections: In the Garden, In the Snow, At the Beach and At Home. In each section, a variety of outstanding paintings, sculptures and photographs interpret how artists use their imagination to explore the world around them. Thru 02.10.13

Judy Rushin: The Secret Social Life of Painting Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 06.2013

Tricks of the Trade: Trends and Techniques in Contemporary Art Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

This exhibition considers the creative practice of a number of important artists represented in the OMA’s Permanent Collection. The exhibition includes sculptures by John Chamberlain and Ursula Von Rydings-

vard, paintings by Robert Rauschenberg and Pat Steir, and prints by Chuck Close and Jennifer Bartlett. 02.01.13–04.28.13

African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

Artworks in this exhibition are drawn from the Smithsonian

American Art Museum’s rich collection of African American art. Featured are paintings by Benny Andrews, Jacob Lawrence and Loïs Mailou Jones, and photographs by Roy DeCarava, Gordon Parks, Roland Freeman and Marilyn Nance. Thru 03.17.13

The Big Dog Show The Mennello Museum of American Art www.mennellomuseum.com

The Mennello Museum of American Art welcomes back sculptor, Dale Rogers, and his fresh pack of twenty 8-foot-tall, 10-footlong sculptures of dogs made of Corten steel.

www.omart.org

The Secret Social Life of Painting presents site-specific works that hang on and lean against the walls, and stand freely in open spaces, creating an experiential environment.

Image from Judy Rushin: The Secret Social Life of Painting at Orlando Museum of Art: Judy Rushin, Carapace: Twins, 2010-12, 72 x 96”, collection of the artist

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sumptuous interiors of wealthy collectors and society figures in late 19th and early 20th century America and Europe.

Thru 01.13.13

With a Little Help from Our Friends The Mennello Museum of American Art

02.02.13–03.30.13

www.mennellomuseum.com

Acquisitions that were purchased through the generosity of the museum’s support organization, The Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art, include works by Dale Chihuly, Alexander Calder, Leroy Person, Ralph Fasanella, Bessie Harvey, Tim Lewis, Jean Wagner Troemel, Albert Paley and others. ORMOND BEACH 01.26.13–03.03.13

X-treme Speed: Daredevils,

Thrill Seekers and Innovators Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens www.ormondartmuseum.org

Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens’ annual “Speed” exhibition goes extreme in 2013! Enjoy original artwork, photography and interactive displays featuring the quest for extreme speed.

PALM BEACH 01.29.13–04.21.13

Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum www.flaglermuseum.us

The Flagler Museum presents a major exhibition of work by American artist, Walter Gay (1856– 1937), who specialized in painting the

Copley, Delacroix, Dalí and Others: Masterworks from the Beaverbrook Art Gallery The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

This exhibition includes the 75 most prestigious holdings of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery of New Brunswick, Canada. Featuring five centuries of painting masterpieces, the collection is particularly strong in British works from the Georgian, Victorian and Modern periods, and

Image from Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay at The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, Palm Beach: Walter Gay (American, 1856–1937), The Fragonard Room, 1926, oil on canvas, 19-1/2 x 25-1/2”, Frick Art & Historical Center, Pittsburgh

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is also rich in Canadian artists’ work. Thru 01.20.13

Painting the Beautiful: The Pennsylvania Impressionists Landscape Tradition The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

Take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see masterpieces of American landscape painting from the James A. Michener Art Museum.

Herb Ritts (American, 1952–2002) established an international reputation for his distinctive photographs of fashion models, nudes and celebrities. This exhibition features a selection of Ritts’s vintage prints, magazine covers, Polaroids, and commercial video projects. (See story on pg. 74.)

Thru 01.14.13

Now Appearing in the Howard Bros. Circus The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

The remarkable lithographs that inspired Howard Tibbals as he created The Howard Bros. Circus Model are featured in the Poster

Gallery of the Circus Museum’s Tibbals Learning Center. The historic accuracy of the amazing model came from years of careful study of a variety of documents, including photographs, programs and posters. Unlike any show before, the Howard Bros. Circus features the greatest acts of all time, performing for one appearance only! Thru 04.14.13

Paolo Veronese: A Master and His Workshop in Renaissance Venice The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

SARASOTA 02.23.13–05.19.13

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.ringling.org

Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) created art that was religious

www.ringling.org

Image from Herb Ritts: L.A. Style at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Herb Ritts, Djimon with Octopus, Hollywood, 1989, gelatin silver print, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, © Herb Ritts Foundation

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and secular, public and private, grand and intimate in scale. Drawing upon North American collections, the exhibition illustrates this extraordinary versatility and closely examines Veronese’s artistic practice.

representative sampling of images spanning the 20th and 21st centuries and includes work by renowned photographers, Henri Cartier-Bresson, André Kertész, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Berenice Abbott and Robert Capa.

02.28.13–03.03.13

ST. AUGUSTINE

Ringling in Bloom The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

01.11.13–02.22.13

sin are expected to parThe third annual Ring- ticipate. The four-day ling in Bloom springs celebration combines to life with more floral fine art and flowers arrangements than ever and includes lectures, before—all inspired by demonstrations and the Museum’s Colworkshops by Parties lection. Thirty floral to Die For, Atlanta’s designers from a wide premier event planners variety of garden clubs and floral designers, as close as Sarasota as well as tours of the and as far away as Museum’s grounds and Michigan and Wiscon- gardens. www.ringling.org

Thru 02.03.13

The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Celebrating the gift of over 700 photographs to the Collection, this exhibition features a

Planning and Painting in Paradise: The Art and Architecture of the Hotel Ponce de Leon Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, Flagler College www.flagler.edu/crispellert

This exhibition focuses on the contributions of architects, John Merven Carrère and Thomas Hast-

Image from Ringling in Bloom at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota: Ringling in Bloom, 2011, Designers Preview; photo by Peter Acker

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ings, and McDonald and McGuire, as well as a selection of artists who worked in the Hotel Ponce de Leon’s artist studios during the early years, through historically and culturally significant ephemera and original artworks. ST. PETERSBURG Thru 02.02.13

Contemporary Prints by American Women: A Selection from the Gift of Martha and Jim Sweeny Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

ists, made after 1950, have recently joined the Museum’s Collection. This new installation features works by Vija Celmins, Yvonne Jacquette, Lois Lane, Georgia Marsh, Elizabeth Murray, Howardena Pindell, Betye Saar, Pat Steir and Joan Snyder. 03.02.13–06.16.13

Philip Pearlstein’s People, Places, Things

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Philip Pearlstein’s People, Places, Things is the most comprehensive retrospective ever organized of this revered American artist. The exhibition brings together all aspects of his art, including figure painting, portraits, landscapes and major historic monuments.

Thru 02.17.13

The Art of Golf Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The Art of Golf spans four centuries of golf and features approximately 90 works by artists such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Hendrick Avercamp, Sir Henry Raeburn, Childe Hassam, George Bellows, Norman Rockwell, Andy Warhol and the celebrated photographer, Harold Edgerton. 01.11.13–04.28.13

Much Ado About Shakespeare The Dalí Museum www.thedali.org

The Dalí Museum presents two suites of Shakespearean Com-

www.fine-arts.org

More than 60 prints by American women art-

Image from The Art of Golf at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg: Charles Lees, The Golfers (detail), 1847, oil on canvas, 51-1/2 x 84-1/4”, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, purchased with the assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund, The Art Fund and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, 2002; photo: A. Reeve

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edies and Tragedies, consisting of 31 sepia etchings in Much ado about Shakespeare and Shakespeare II. On display are two illustrated books—the 1946 Doubleday edition of Macbeth and the London, Folio Press 1953 edition of As You Like It containing illustrations of Dalí’s set and costume designs for a 1949 stage production.

www.fine-arts.org

This presentation includes selected prints by Peter Paul Rubens, one of the most influential artists of all time, on loan from the Ringling Museum of Art. TAMPA 01.31.13–03.31.13

Chuck Close: A Couple of Ways of Doing Something Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

TALLAHASSEE 02.08.13–03.31.13

02.02.13–03.31.13

02.02.13–03.31.13

Heads, Shoulders, Genes & Toes Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

I Am Me: Artists and Autism Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

www.fine-arts.org

www.fine-arts.org

Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Museum of Fine Arts, Florida State University

Heads, Shoulders, Genes & Toes explores the intersection of art and human biology.

I Am Me features a selection of works by talented autistic artists.

www.fmopa.org

A Couple of Ways of Doing Something features 15 of Chuck Close’s delicately intimate daguerreotypes (including striking enlargements) of leading contemporary artists, paired with Bob Holman’s witty and beau-

Image from Chuck Close: A Couple of Ways of Doing Something at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Chuck Close, Self Portrait, daguerreotype

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tifully typeset poems. As individual portraits, each daguerreotype offers an intimate and immensely revealing study of the subject, extending the hyperrealist tradition of portraiture for which Close is renowned. (See story on pg. 102.)

with resilience, often with despondence. Thru 01.13.13

The Man, the Image & the World: Henri Cartier-Bresson, a Retrospective Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th century. His images of world events and the people (famous and otherwise) who made these events happen, have shaped our understanding of the last century. The Man, the Image & the

World includes over 330 photographs, films and important publications. Cartier-Bresson chose the works for this exhibition before his death in 2004. (See story in the October/ December 2012 issue on pg. 112.) 02.02.13–04.28.13

To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection Tampa Museum of Art

Thru 01.27.13

Dorothea Lange’s America Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

During the crash of 1929, Dorothea Lange found her true calling as a peripatetic chronicler of the many faces of America—old and young, urban and rural, native-born and immigrant—as they dealt with unprecedented hardship, sometimes

www.tampamuseum.org

The Tampa Museum of Art is one of only three US museums to host this landmark exhibition which traces American art from the birth of the modernist spirit at the end of the 19th century through postwar American

Image from Dorothea Lange’s America at Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Tampa: Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936, from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg, courtesy of Art2Art

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painting in the mid20th century. To See as Artists See showcases more than 100 works by 75 artists, including Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Winslow Homer, George Inness, Robert Motherwell, Georgia O’Keeffe and many others.

Thru 02.10.13

Songs from the Sea: Bronze Sculptures by David Smalley Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

With its emphasis 01.18.13–03.09.12 on the technological Open Score aspects of new media, University of Open Score examines South Florida the possibilities that Contemporary these technologies Art Museum offer as tools for the www.ira.usf.edu poetic transformaOpen Score pays tion of reality and the homage to artist, Rob- approach to forms of ert Rauschenberg, and expression in art and the first in the series daily life. of groundbreaking performance art TARPON presentations he titled SPRINGS 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering, held 01.20.13–02.10.13 in 1966 at the Armory 38th Annual in New York City. International

Using its outdoor Terrace as an exhibition space, the Leepa-RatMiniature tner Museum of Art Art Society of presents seven bronze Florida works by sculptor, Exhibition David Smalley. Each Leepa-Rattner work symbolizes a Museum of Art reliquary for the sunkwww.spcollege.edu/museum en ships that descend The Museum is hostinto the sea. ing the 38th annual exhibition of the Min- 02.24.13–04.21.13 iature Art Society Tableaux, of Florida (MASF) Metaphors and with over 800 entries. Passages: Also on view are Environments by the MASF Permanent Maria Albornoz, Collection and the Jack King and Miniature Artists Randall Smith of America (MAA) Leepa-Rattner traveling exhibition. Museum of Art

Image from Open Score at University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa: Bill Vorn, Hysterical Machine, 2006

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www.spcollege.edu/museum

This exhibition brings together three contemporary artists—each with highly individualistic styles whose statements create personal environments. The artists include Tampa ceramist and installation artist, Maria Albornoz; University of Tampa art professor and sculptor, Jack King; and Winter Park photographer, Randall Smith. VERO BEACH

distinctive films and plays are featured in this exhibition created from the collection of the Kent State University Museum. Costumes from the 20th century’s best designers, including Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Cecil Beaton and Coco Chanel, will be on display. Thru 01.13.13

Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera

The multi-talented artist, Pablo Cano, perwww.verobeachmuseum.org forms productions with Norman Rockwell: Be- sculptural marionettes hind the Camera rehe has created using veals the role of phofound objects and retography in Rockwell’s cycled materials in decreative process. (See lightful combinations. story in the October/ (See story on pg. 92.) December 2012 issue on pg. 76.) 02.02.13–06.09.13 Vero Beach Museum of Art

Recycled Dreams: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes Vero Beach Museum of Art

The Golden Age of European Painting from the Speed Art Museum Vero Beach Museum of Art

www.verobeachmuseum.org

www.verobeachmuseum.org

02.16.13–05.26.13

02.16.13–05.19.13

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Costumes from some of Hepburn’s most

The Golden Age of European Painting illustrates both the people and the objects that made the two centuries between 1600 and 1800 such a rich cultural age. Highlights include Portrait of a Forty-Year-Old Woman by Rembrandt and The

Image from Recycled Dreams: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes at Vero Beach Museum of Art: Pablo Cano, Chorus Line of Ants, 2007, guitars, air dry clay, dolls’ eyes, 3’ x 7” x 4” (wallpiece), collection of the artist; photograph: Cesar Barroso

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ated a call for prints. Seventy-one artists were asked to take part. The artists include Roy Lichtenstein, Enrico Baj, Robert Motherwell, Niki de Saint Phalle, Andy Warhol, Louise Nevelson, Wifredo Lam, Robert Indiana, Joan Miro, and many others.

Princes of the Church Adoring the Eucharist by Rubens. Together, these works illustrate the major genres of painting that were popular in the Baroque era—portraits, religious paintings, landscapes, scenes of everyday life, still lifes and interpretations of classical antiquity.

02.13.13–03.24.13 WEST PALM BEACH 01.02.13–02.10.13

Ben Aronson Exhibition Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

03.27.13–04.28.13

Noted American painter, Ben Aronson, exhibits works from his private collections and up to 13 new pieces.

Homage to Picasso Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

The Homage to Picasso portfolio represents a unique event in the history of printmak-

ing. In the early 1970s, with the intent of honoring the fertile genius of Picasso and his role as a catalyst for many different styles of 20th century art, German critic, Wieland Schmied, and German publishing house, The PropyläenVerlag, initi-

The Collector Series: Exhibition No. 1 Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

This exhibition features an interesting group of works from the walls of collectors from New York to Palm Beach. Picasso, Matisse, Milton Avery and Malvina Hoffman are just a few of

Image from Ben Aronson Exhibition, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, West Palm Beach: Ben Aronson, Low Sun, Rising Shadow, 2007, oil on linen, 67-1/4 x 48”

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the artists that will be represented. 01.19.13–02.09.13

Leo Yeni Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

Works by ItalianJewish artist, Leo Yeni, include watercolors and pen and ink drawings, created over a span of 40 years and across two continents.

cluding painting and video. Programming highlights the music, poetry and cuisine of this vibrant culture. Thru 04.26.13

Jane Manus: Geometry of Space Armory Art Center

www.armoryart.org

Though concrete and heavy in themselves, Manus’s sculptures are artfully connected planes of line and geometric shape, joined so as to invoke a complex, shifting array of transparent spaces and paradoxically unsubstantial solid forms.

01.18.13–03.15.13

Cuban Connection: Contemporary Cuban-American Art from Florida Armory Art Center

02.09.13–03.16.13

ECLECTIC—A NAWA Multimedia Exhibition Armory Art Center www.armoryart.org

The National Association of Women Artists was founded in 1889. It is the oldest professional women’s fine art organization in the US and provides a forum for women artists to share ideas and exhibit their work. 01.17.13–06.09.13

Annie Leibovitz Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This striking selection of 39 iconic photographs the Museum acquired from the internationally renowned photographer,

www.armoryart.org

This exhibition features and celebrates Cuban artists currently working in diverse media, in-

Image from Annie Leibovitz at Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Annie Leibovitz, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Morris, New York City, 1988, ©Annie Leibovitz

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Annie Leibovitz, focuses on work that is direct, straightforward and relies on an essential element of all great portraits–a vital connection between artist and subject. (See story on pg. 84.)

Thru 01.20.13

Keep Calm and Carry On: World War II and the British Home Front, 1938-1951 Norton Museum of Art

Thru 01.27.13

www.norton.org

Clear Water and Blue Hills: Stories in Chinese Art Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Presented in this exhibit are works of art depicting tales from Chinese history and literature. 03.21.13–07.14.13

Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art

Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Doris Duke’s Shangri La is the first comprehensive traveling exhibition of objects from Duke’s remarkable collections within the context of Shangri La, her extraordinary Hawaii residence, and her personal role in collecting and commissioning works. This

exhibit brings together furnishings and objects from Shangri La, newly commissioned photographs by Tim StreetPorter, vintage photographs and films, including documentation of the estate’s construction, original architectural drawings and ephemera to explore the history and experience of this remarkable place.

Keep Calm and Carry On explores the impressive gamut of England’s home-front efforts just before, during and after the war years. While millions of British men and women served in the military overseas, England’s entire creative class mobilized to win the war on the home front. Drawings, posters, photographs, film, furniture, fashion, and more, illustrates how they did so.

Image from Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Mosaic tile panel in the form of a gateway, Iran, probably 19th century, stonepaste monochrome-glazed, assembled as mosaic, on Shangri La’s dining room lanai, ©Tim Street Porter

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Thru 03.03.13

Say it Loud: Art by African and AfricanAmerican Artists in the Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Paintings, sculpture, photographs and works on paper by African artists and artists of African descent comprise this exhibition which celebrates a renewed emphasis on diversity in the Museum Collection. More than 20 artists whose practices span the 20th century represent ideas and issues inspired by personal and artistic concerns.

Landscape and Trees Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

Sylvia Plimack Mangold is the second artist to be celebrated in the Norton’s RAW (Recognition of Art by Women) program. For the last three decades, she has concentrated not only on the landscape sur-

rounding her Hudson River-area studio, but also the individual trees comprising it, considering these subjects in paintings, drawings and prints.

Norton Museum of Art

02.02.13–08.04.13

03.14.13–06.16.13

The Middle East and the Middle Kingdom: Islamic and Chinese Artistic Exchange

The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951 Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

This installation highlights Chinese works with ties to the Islamic world.

www.norton.org

The Radical Camera presents the development of the documentary photograph during a tumultuous period that spanned the New Deal reforms of the Depression, World War II and the Cold War, and features the most important photographers of their day, including Ber-

Thru 03.03.13

Sylvia Plimack Mangold:

Image from The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951 at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach: Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print, The Jewish Museum, New York; purchase: Mimi and Barry J. Alperin Fund, © Estate of Jerome Liebling

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enice Abbot, Aaron Siskind, Barbara Morgan, Sid Grossman, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), and Lisette Model, among others. WINTER PARK 01.19.13–05.12.13

Collecting for the Cornell Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Collecting for the Cornell is an overview of the many gifts and acquisitions, large and small, that have contributed over time to making the Cornell’s Collection the gem that it is today.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

in the universality of aesthetic expression.

cfam.rollins.edu

01.19.13–04.14.13

This project traces the development of African-American artist, Felrath Hines. In a sustained analysis of specially selected 01.19.13–05.12.13 works, the exhibition Felrath Hines investigates the artand the Question ist’s chromatic experiof Color ments and his belief

This exhibition specifically highlights the Florida component of the Index of American Design. Combining documentary photographs, handsome watercolor renderings and existing material objects, the project serves as the cornerstone for a year’s worth of programming at Rollins College, under the overarching rubric of “The Useable Past.” 01.19.13–05.12.13

Florida’s “Useable Past”: The Sunshine State and the Index of American Design Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Jeffrey Gibson: Trade Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

Acclaimed Native American artist, Jeffrey Gibson, debuts four new assemblages that he

Image from Collecting for the Cornell at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, Winter Park : William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825–1905), Tendres Propos (detail), 1901, oil on canvas, 75 x 48”; gift of the Myers Family, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Myers, Jr., R’42, and June Reinhold Myers, R’42; Cornell Fine Arts Museum 1966.15

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has created specifically for the niches in CFAM’s Orientation Gallery. His work encompasses themes of appropriation and empowerment as well as the speed of modern life, and utilizes traditional Indian motifs in surprisingly contemporary ways. Thru 04.14.13

Life in the Fast Lane: The Art of David Delong The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens

ity. An avid motorcycle racer, DeLong considered these machines to be the perfect metaphor for life and art, explaining that each requires a high level of control and discipline. The original works on display focus on the culture of motorcycle racing and include paintings, pen and ink drawings and etchings from the late 1950s to 2001.

www.polasek.org

Over the course of five decades, American Realist, David DeLong, produced a body of work remarkable for its breadth, variety and dexter-

Thru 01.13.13

The Virtues of Simplicity— American Arts and Crafts from the Morse Collection The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art www.morsemuseum.org

the Arts and Crafts movement manifested itself in the US, especially in the Northeast and Midwest. Thru 09.29.13

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art

The Museum’s exhibition of American Arts and Crafts furnishings and decorawww.morsemuseum.org tive art illustrates how A selection of watercolors by Otto Heinigke (1850– 1915), a principal in the prominent Brooklyn stainedglass firm, Heinigke and Bowen, includes scenes ranging from Middle Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. On View

Image from Life in the Fast Lane: The Art of David Delong at The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, Winter Park: David Delong, Infield, 2001

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gallery

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

Gallery Artists & Exhibits

Artist: RON ENGLISH RON ENGLISH COINED

the term “POPaganda” to describe his signature mash-up of high and low cultural touchstones, from superhero mythology to totems of art history, populated with his vast and constantly growing arsenal of original characters.

MIAMI

Gallery: Diana Lowenstein Gallery www.dlfinearts.com

Artist: Irene Clouthier

“MY WORK IS ABOUT RECREATING STORIES IN ARTIFICIAL

places. I use plastic to simulate stories as a reflection of my childhood, to enact fantasies, as a statement about the bubble wrap society I live in, the disposable culture, the loss of sensibility and the embrace of plastics as the cool material of our emptiness.” —Irene Clouthier From left: Ron English, Double Elvis, 2012, silkscreen on Coventry rag, 39 x 29-1/2”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary; Irene Clouthier, Cordon de Plastico (detail), 2008, C-print on plexi, 118-1/8 x 47-1/4”, Ed: 2/3, courtesy of the artist and Diana Lowenstein Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

BOCA RATON

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Karen Lynne Gallery

GARDENS

Gallery: Studio E Gallery

www.karenlynnegallery.com

www.studioegallery.com

Artist: Allegra Spaulding ALLEGRA SPAULDING’S OIL

paintings combine her love for exotic images, human adornment and sumptuous textile design as well as an enduring fascination with crystals. Her work is a culmination of remarkable life experiences and an unusual blend of talents.

Artist: MICHAEL KESSLER INSPIRED BY THE

powerful light that surrounds him in the vast landscapes of New Mexico,

ORLANDO

Gallery: Jai Gallery www.jaigallery.net

Artist: Gregorii GREGORII CREATES

vivid, fluid art with emotional and visionary themes. The convergence of art and technology is a passion for Gregorii, feeling both are developed through similar conceptual and connective processes.

Michael Kessler’s nature-based abstractions depict the invisible dynamics of time and space.

Clockwise from top left: Allegra Spaulding, The Queen, mixed media, 81 x 70”, courtesy of the artist and Karen Lynne Gallery; Michael Kessler, Grill IX, mixed media, 48 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Studio E Gallery; Gregorii, Molten Brass, from Light Reflections Jazz series, courtesy of the artist and Jai Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

NEW SMYRNA BEACH

Gallery: Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles www.artsondouglas.net

Artist: LEE DUNKEL 
 LAUDED BY CRITICS

for its uncompromising consistency and startling beauty, Lee Dunkel’s photography references nature through a shimmering blackand-white palette.

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery www.holdenluntz.com

Artist: Jamie Baldridge JAMIE BALDRIDGE DECIDED TO BECOME AN ARTIST WHEN

he was a child, after finding an old fairytale book in his grandmother’s attic. He takes his photographs and manipulates them digitally in order to express his own interpretation of these aged stories. His pictures are visual puzzles that visualize metaphors and existential situations. He is a photographer who plumbs the earth for answers about its basic construction and how things work. From left: Lee Dunkel, image from Fifteen Preludes to Lyonia series, 2009-2010, courtesy of the artist and Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles; Jamie Baldridge, A Ten-Penny Prophet, archival pigment photograph, 2008, 42 x 56”, courtesy of the artist and Holden Luntz Gallery

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G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

MIAMI

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Zadok Gallery

Gallery: ArtSpace Virginia Miller Galleries

www.zadokgallery.com

www.virginiamiller.com

Exhibition: SeonGhi Bahk: Strung Out Relationships

Artist: MELQUIADES ROSARIO SASTRE

ON VIEW THROUGH 02.18.13

SeonGhi Bahk’s charcoal suspended sculptural works deal with 3 dimensional and 2 dimensional properties at the same time, collapsing the border between sculpture and painting.

INSPIRED BY THE

MIAMI

Gallery: Art Fusion Galleries www.artfusiongalleries.com

Artist: D. H. Guire

wild vegetation growing around his studio as well as the artist’s relationship with nature, Melquíades Rosario Sastre’s sculptures are made of local woods such as cedar, teak, mahogany, and oak.

“I SEE THE WORLD AS PHOTO-

graphs. It is whatever captures my eye or inspires a reaction in me, as though the photograph is simply asking for a photographer. Very simply put, I try to capture the art around us.” —D. H. Guire

Clockwise from top: SeonGhi Bahk, courtesy of the artist and Zadok Gallery; Melquiades Rosario Sastre, Untitled, 2006, mahogany, oak, cedar, 21 x 28 x 17”, courtesy of the artist and ArtSpace Virginia Miller Galleries; D. H. Guire, courtesy of the artist and Art Fusion Galleries

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IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA is the first museum exhibition to celebrate the quintessentially American artistry of the leading fashion trade organization in the United States. Spearheaded by CFDA President, Diane von Furstenberg, the exhibition includes garments and accessories by the most impactful creators of the last fifty years.

I MP 50

YEARS of

THE COUNCIL OF FASHION

DESIGNERS OF AMERICA

ON VIEW 56

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2013

BOCA RAT


PACT ON M U S EUM OF ART

• WWW.BOCAMUSEUM.ORG


I IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA

I M PA C T , T H E S E A S O N

Previous page:

Norma Kamali;

Photograph: Mark Seliger

spotlight exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, is an ode to the illustrious designs created by members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). Featured in the presentation are interactive touchscreen displays that illustrate a timeline of American fashion and recognize the nearly 600 designers who have been members of the CFDA over the last five decades. Each living designer selected to participate in the show has chosen a single object or ensemble that best represents his or her impact on the fashion world. Work by historical CFDA members have been selected

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Opposite: Norma Kamali, black parachute cloth and feather jacket, skirt and turban, 2011, USA; Photograph: MFIT / CFDA Below: Thom Browne, pheasant feather/wool suit and grey felted fur bowler hat, fall/winter 2008-2009, USA; Photograph: MFIT / CFDA


IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA

by exhibition curators, Patricia Mears, Deputy Director of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York, and Fred Dennis, the FIT museum’s Senior Curator. “American designers have always had impact on how people dress,” said CFDA president, Diane von Furstenberg. “In honor of that creativity and in celebration of the CFDA’s 50th anniversary, we are proud to present, in partnership with the Boca Raton Museum of Art, an exhibit that represents the tremendous work of our members for the last five decades. ‘Impact’ was the one word that came to mind immediately— it is so strong and defining of our individual and collective influence that we knew right away that our exhibit would Oscar De La Renta, spring 2012, USA; Photograph: MFIT / CFDA

“American desig

Judith Leiber; Photograph: ©John Bigelow Taylor

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Halston, Fashion Institute of Technology / SUNY,

Michael Kors, cashmere sweatshirt, hemp

FIT Library Dept. of Special Collections and FIT Archives

crystal beaded pajama pant, leather belt and platform sandal, spring 2011, USA; Photograph: MFIT / CFDA

gners have always had impact on how people dress.” —D iane von F urstenberg , CFDA P resident OnV

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IMPACT: 50 Years of the CFDA

Opposite page: Vera Wang, courtesy of Vera Wang; Photograph: Carter Smith Right: Geoffrey Beene; Photograph: Jack Deutsch Below: Judith Leiber; Photograph: ©John Bigelow Taylor

be called Impact: 50 Years of the CFDA.” Among the designers included in the exhibition are Michael Kors, Donna Karan, Carolina Herrera, Oscar de la Renta, Zac Posen, Alexander Wang, Norma Kamali, Diane von Furstenberg, Vera Wang and Thom Browne.

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To coincide with IMPACT, the Boca Raton Museum of Art is hosting a black-tie gala on January 26, 2013. Art and fashion devotees will have the opportunity to experience an elegant cocktail of food, fashion and entertainment.Visit www.bocamuseum.org/gala for details. O n V iew


CHAPU CUSTOM and LEGEND,

On view through 05.31.13 at FAIRCHILD TR 64

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UNGU a CULTURE in STONE

ROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Coral Gables


F

FA I R C H I L D T R O P I C A L B O TA N I C G A R D E N

in Coral Gables presents Chapungu: Custom and Legend, A Culture in Stone during Art at Fairchild 2012-2013, a continuing annual tradition that began at Fairchild in 2003. Chapungu (pronounced Chä-poon-goo) explores the unique culture, way of life and daily experiences of the Shona people of Zimbabwe. The exhibition depicts 82 beautiful stone carvings that range in height from three to 11 feet, weighing between 600 and 6,000 pounds. Carved from opal stone, cobalt and springstone, these alluring works of art are grouped by 66

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CHAPUNGU: Custom and Legend, A Culture in Stone

Set amidst the lush lowlands of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, “Chapungu� is a profound, deeply human expression of the African people, celebrating the connection all humanity shares with nature, culture and art. Images courtesy of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden


CHAPUNGU: Custom and Legend, A Culture in Stone

Opposite page: Agnes Nyanhongo, Grandmother Fetches Water

“Now too old for heavy work, she contributes through her wisdom and counsel.” Below and previous page: Tapfuma Gutsa, Nzuzu (Water Spirit)

“I take a child from the riverbank. If the parents do not cry out, I will teach the child many things and then return it to the family. It will become important in the community.”

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theme in Fairchild’s lowlands. The sculptures address important subject matter ranging from custom and legend, family, nature and the environment, to the role of elders, the role of women, social commentary, the spirit world and village life. “Each of these sculptures is a unique, one-of-a-kind creation that the artists have produced based on their own ideas and passions,” says Roy Guthrie, Chapungu Curator. Many of the 35 artists represented are from Zimbabwe’s native tribe, the Shona people. The Shona tribe believes that

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the “Chapungu Bird” is a good omen, bringing them protection and good fortune. Chapungu is a metaphor for the Bateleur Eagle, Terathopius ecaudatus, a powerful bird of prey that can fly up to 300 miles a day at 30 to 50 miles an hour and lives in the savannahs, open forests and semi-deserts of central and southern Africa. Relatively new to sculptural arts, Zimbabwe was a land once considered by many to be “culturally barren.” Over the past 40 years, the tradition of stone sculpture has developed, leading both critics and fans to revel in this regional-


CHAPUNGU: Custom and Legend, A Culture in Stone

Opposite page: Eddie Masaya, Agony Woman

“My husband is gone, my child is gone. I will soon follow. ‘Mukondembera’– the scourge of AIDS.” Below: Boira Mteki, Woman of Authority

“She admonishes, warns, counsels and comforts. Her opinion is sought after and respected.”

Above: Gift Muchenje, Beer for the Wedding

“Before the festivities start, the Muroora (daughters in law) must bring specially brewed beer to the Elders.” ly new form of artistic expression. As John Wilkinson wrote in Newsweek, “Shona Sculpture is perhaps the most important art form to emerge from Africa in this century.” Zimbabwe stone sculpture is a profound, deeply human expression of the African people that transcends time and space. Sculptors say their ancestors’ spirits come in dreams and visions to reveal themselves in images that dwell within the stone. These “voices in stone” can almost be heard through

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the awe-inspiring sculptures, which tell tales of life in traditional and contemporary works of art. In this way, sculptors release life within the stone and their spirits soar within the collective reality of the African people. Viewers may find themselves leaving with a sense that they have been blessed by the stones’ varied and emotional messages. The process begins with stones quarried from mines in different parts of the country. Sculptors use non-mechanical


CHAPUNGU: Custom and Legend, A Culture in Stone

Opposite page: Joe Mutasa, Chief’s Advisor

“The advisor presents a balanced picture so that the chief can make a fair assessment.” Below: Rachel Ndandarkia, Aunt Admonishing Child

Above: Square Chikwanda, The Bira

“It is the role of Vatete (the aunt) to guide the children.”

“The elders are gathered for this special ceremony to pay tribute to our ancestral spirits. We must always respect our spirits.” tools to craft the stone. Due to the stone’s hardness, chisels, hammers, punchers, tile cutters and metal combs are essential, as is 60 to 800 grit emery paper. When the design phase is complete, the artists polish their creations with clear wax to bring out the stones’ textures and natural colors. In addition to enjoying the exhibition, visitors and the community can create their own original sculpture with

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the help of a Chapungu artist in residence during one of several five-day workshops held Tuesday through Saturday in a pavilion near the lowland’s palm collection. No experience is required. The $500 fee includes a sculpting stone from Zimbabwe, a set of tools to keep, and instruction by prominent Zimbabwean artists. For reservations and details, call 305.667.1651 ext. 3322. O n V iew


HERB RITTS L.A. STYLE 02.23.13– 05.19.13 AT THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART, SARASOTA WWW.RINGLING.ORG •

Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage, 1990, gelatin silver print, 24 x 20”, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, ©Herb Ritts Foundation

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HERB RITTS: L. A. Style

HERB RITTS: L. A. STYLE, hosted by The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, traces the life and career of the iconic photographer through a compelling selection of renowned as well as previously unpublished photographs. Herb Ritts’s intimate portraiture, his modern yet classical treatment of the nude and his innovative approach to fashion brought him international acclaim and placed him securely within an American tradition of portrait and magazine photography that includes Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe and Irving Penn. His aesthetic incorporated facets of life in and around Los Angeles. He often made use of the bright California sunlight to produce bold contrasts, and his preference for outdoor locations such as the des-

ert and the beach, helped to separate his work from that of his New Yorkbased peers. From the late 1970s until Ritts’s untimely death from AIDS-related complications in 2002, his ability to create images that successfully bridged the gap between art and commerce was not only a testament to the power of his imagination and technical skill but also marked the synergistic union between art, popular culture and business that followed in the wake of the Pop Art movement of the 1960s and ’70s.

Djimon with Octopus, Hollywood, 1989, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16”, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, ©Herb Ritts Foundation

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HERB RITTS: L. A. Style

Herb Ritts revolutionized fashion photography, modernized the nude, and transformed celebrities into icons. Herb Ritts: L. A. Style explores the artist’s work, his inspiration and process through a series of carefully selected images illustrating three distinct areas of focus: Fashion, The Nude and Celebrity Portraits.

FASHION

For his fashion photographs, Ritts drew inspiration from painting, sculpture, film and the work of such leading fashion and portrait photographers as George Hurrell, Horst P. Horst, Louise Dahl Wolfe, Irving Penn and Richard Ave-

THE NUDE

don. Ritts’s ability to synthesize and incorporate these influences into a new style that was easily recognizable was nothing less than extraordinary. As hundreds of magazine spreads demonstrate, Ritts kept top fashion editors happy by providing a dazzling mix of pictures designed to sell clothes with others that simply celebrated beauty. Ritts cherished his creative freedom and pushed picture editors to use the photographs that he knew would capture people’s attention. Once seen, his best fashion pictures are almost impossible to forget.

In the 1980s, Ritts, along with his contemporaries, Robert Mapplethorpe and Bruce Weber, provoked a radical change in how the nude was depicted—Mapplethorpe reinterpreted the nude in classical terms or in explicit ways calculated to shock while Weber’s work for such clients as Calvin Klein, radiated warmth and broke new ground in making male sexuality commercially appealing. Ritts’s forte was his ability to analyze the body from a variety of angles and create compositions that abstracted it in

Cincy Crawford, Ferré 3, Malibu, 1993, gelatin silver print, 14 x 11”, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, ©Herb Ritts Foundation

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HERB RITTS: L. A. Style

ways that communicate strength and poise. It was the atmosphere of trust that Ritts created in his studio that enabled him to convince his sitters to disrobe. “You knew you were going to look gorgeous,” Cindy Crawford, once said. “The way Herb Ritts photographed you was the way you wanted the world to see you.” Mostly working outdoors, Ritts enjoyed relating the body to the natural world. He rendered his nudes with verve and an overriding elegance that became hallmarks of his pictures.

CELEBRITY PORTRAITS

During the early 1980s, Ritts became part of a coterie of Los Angeles artists who photographed celebrities for Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine. Ritts’s antiglamour Stephanie, Cindy, Christy, Tatjana, Naomi, Hollywood, 1989, gelatin silver print, 18-7/16 x 19-13/16 “, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, ©Herb Ritts Foundation

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HERB RITTS: L. A. Style

Ritts knew how to make celebrities feel comfortable and how to cajole them into doing what he wanted them to do. style of portraiture made celebrities look more natural and allowed them to reveal inner qualities, making them more accessible to their fans. Ritts, who was raised in Brentwood, CA, next door to actor Steve McQueen, had a particular ease with celebrities. He knew how to make them feel comfortable and how to cajole them into doing what he wanted them to do. By the late 1980s, Ritts’s reputation as a shaper of fame made him a celebrity in his own right, and the iconic status of such pictures as Richard Gere, San Bernardino (1977) and Madon-

na, Hollywood (1986) made a photograph by Ritts a rite of passage among Hollywood insiders. Ritts’s big break as a photographer came in 1979 when the portraits he made of the emerging actor, Richard Gere, two years earlier, were published by Mademoiselle, Vogue, and Esquire—all in the same month. The strength of the pictures were instantly recognized and led to other important job offers—model, Brooke Shields, for Elle; actor, Burt Reynolds, for After Dark; and singer, Olivia Newton-John, for her album, Physical.

“I think you will find many images that will bring sense memories flooding back to you,” says Dr. Matthew McLendon, Ringling Museum’s Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. “Herb Ritts provided the backdrop to so much of our lives during his career, that even if you were not aware of the authorship of the image, you will certainly remember the look and feel of it. As Herb Ritts: L. A. Style proves, this singular photographer defined his era and continues to exert a powerful influence on our aesthetics today.” O n V iew

Naomi Campbell, Face in Hand, Hollywood, 1990, gelatin silver print, 19-5/16 x 16”, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, gift of Herb Ritts Foundation, ©Herb Ritts Foundation

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A

The NORTON MUSEUM OF ART, West Palm Beach, presents...

ANNIE JANUARY 17th through JUNE 9th, 2013 www.norton.org 84

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A L

LEIBOVITZ


T Annie Leibovitz

THE NORTON MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS

Annie Leibovitz, an exhibition of 39 works by the renowned photographer. Leibovitz’s large and distinguished body of work encompasses some of the most well-known portraits of the last four decades. Since the late ’60s, her pictures have appeared regularly on magazine covers and in numerous publications. “The Norton’s photography collection of more than 3,000 works spans the entire history of the medium. Annie Leibovitz is one of the most important portrait photographers of our time and as such deserves a prominent place in our encyclopedic Permanent Collection,” said Charles Stainback, Assistant Director of OnV

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Annie Leibovitz, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Morris, New York City, 1988 All images ©Annie Leibovitz

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Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz, Cindy Sherman, New York City, 1992

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the Norton Museum of Art. “The photographs we’ve chosen demonstrate the quiet power of the photograph and the vital connection between the artist and the subject—the essential element of all great portraits.” Stainback worked closely with Leibovitz to narrow the selection to the final 39 photographs, which include a mixture of well-

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known and lesser-known works that range from the late ’60s to the present. Both Stainback and Leibovitz felt it was important to select a grouping that emphasized the scope of her portraiture— from her images of celebrated figures to less familiar subjects. The black-and-white and color images on view will include: American Soldiers and Mary, Queen


of the Negritos, Clark Air Base, The Philippines (1968); Cindy Sherman, New York City (1992); R2-D2, Pinewood Studios, London (2000), and The Reverend Al Sharpton, Prima Donna Beauty Care Center, Brooklyn, New York (1988). There are also iconic portraits of actors, musicians and artists, from Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt to Allen Ginsberg and

Andy Warhol. “The Norton has made a sophisticated selection,” Leibovitz said. “While there are several portraits of very famous people, they are not my most famous portraits. There are some surprises.” “We are fortunate to have generous donors that provide us with the means to continually enhance our collection,” said OnV

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Norton Executive Director, Hope Alswang. “We were able to acquire the Leibovitz portraits with the support of individual contributions as well as the Norton’s special endowment funds.” Widely considered one of America’s best portrait photographers, Annie Leibovitz has been documenting American popular culture since the J

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Annie Leibovitz early 1970s, when her work began appearing in Rolling Stone. For nearly 30 years, her photos have appeared regularly in Vanity Fair and Vogue. A retrospective of her work from 1970 to 1990 was presented by the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, and the International Center of Photography in New York. A Photographer’s Life, 1990-2005, opened at the Brooklyn Museum and toured widely, including the National Portrait Gallery in London and the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Leibovitz’s most recent exhibition, Pilgrimage, opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, in January, 2012. Leibovitz is the recipient of many honors, including the rank of Commandeur in the French government’s Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, and the International Center of Photography’s Lifetime Achievement Award. She was named a Living Legend by the Library of Congress in 2000, and received the 2012 Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art Award to Distinguished Women in the Arts. O n V iew

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Annie Leibovitz, The Reverend Al Sharpton, PrimaDonna Beauty Care Center, Brooklyn, New York, 1988


ReCYCLeD DReAMS: PaB

02.16.13–05.26.13 a t Ve R O B E a C H M U S e Chorus Line of Ants, 2007, guitars, air dry clay, dolls’ eyes, 3’ x 7” x 4” (wallpiece), collection of the artist. Photograph: Cesar Barroso


Lo CaNo’S MaRIoNETTeS

UM of ArT

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RECYCLED DREAMS: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes

PeRFoRMaNCE

artist and master puppeteer, Pablo Cano, has been entertaining audiences for decades with his beloved marionettes, which he features in imaginative performance pieces of his own composition. His latest exhibition, Recycled Dreams, at Vero Beach Museum of Art, showcases a selection of works spanning the artist’s career. Opposite page: Plump Ballerina, 2012, from the Musical Marionette series, mixed media, collection of the artist. Photograph: José Rodriguez

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RECYCLED DREAMS: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes Originally a painter, Pablo Cano was delighted to find a place for his sculptural work in the world of theatre and puppetry. “Recycled Dreams, surveys a very personal breakthrough moment when I decided to work with marionettes while earning my master’s degree in painting,” says the artist. “Very few of my professors and fellow students understood my work with marionettes had anything to

do with painting, but I did.” Cano employs numerous art forms in his work, including oil and watercolor painting, drawing and ceramic sculpture. He uses carefully selected, discarded debris from the urban streets he frequents, as well as miscellany brought to his studio by friends from all over the world, to fashion his whimsical cast of characters. From Boring Boris (a pig in a tuxedo) to Countess Ukulele

Cano employs numerous art forms in his work, including oil and watercolor painting, drawing and ceramic sculpture. (whose body is formed from a real instrument), his wonderfully expressive marionettes engage viewers. “I create a dream world where inanimate objects come to life, springing from my imagination...,” Cano explains. His theatre pieces include Seven Wonders of the Modern World, Cavaletti’s Dream, Viva Vaudeville and City Beneath the Sea. His productions have included collabo-

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Left: Toy Soldier, 2012, from the Toy Box series, mixed media, 3’ x 6” x 4”, collection of the artist; Photograph: José Rodriguez Opposite page: Pablo Cano; Photograph: Liam Crotty, www.liamcrotty.com


RECYCLED DREAMS: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes rations with writers, William Billowit, Christopher King and Carmen Pelaez; pianist, Karen Schwartz; and Miamibased choreographer, Katherine Kramer. “For me, the most anticipated element of

commissioned Cano’s annual marionette performances at the Museum. Highlights from Recycled Dreams include The Florabel Marionette Theater (1984’85), dedicated to the artist’s

“I create a dream world where inanimate objects come to life, springing from my imagination...” —Pablo Cano the process of creation is the final step—when the contributors (choreographers, dancers, actors, musicians and producers) sprinkle magic stardust over the tenderly assembled detritus and bring the cast of remarkably unique marionettes to life,” says Cano. “I am sure the stardust has worked when I see in the faces of the audience, young and old, the unfolding of their connection with the characters in the production.” Many of the marionettes in Recycled Dreams were originally commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami. Since 1997, MOCA, North Miami, has

Left: Dr. Death, AKA Fidel Castro, 1999, wood, wire, plastic and balloon, 3’ x 4’ x 2’, collection of the artist; Photograph: Cesar Barroso Opposite page: Duke and Duchess of Urbino, 2008, lamp, plastic, metal, 4’ x 4’ x 1’, collection of the artist; Photograph: José Rodriguez

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RECYCLED DREAMS: Pablo Cano’s Marionettes dear friend, the late Florabel Webster. The theater is collaged with hundreds of cigarette silver foil papers that Florabel collected and mailed to Cano. Also on display are the artist’s first life-sized rod puppets, Queen Marie Antoinette, Prince Miami and Señior Cavaletti. Three of his newest marionettes, Slender Ballerina, Plump Ballerina and Toy Soldier, created for his recent revival of The Toy Box, are

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE: Pablo Cano and his Musical Marionettes are scheduled for a performance at the Vero Beach Museum of Art on Sunday, April 7, at 2 pm in it’s Leonhardt Auditorium. Parents and children alike will be delighted and enthralled by these puppet masterpieces. (Event admission rate applies.)

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also included. Born in Havana in 1961, Cano was carried out of Cuba as an infant on the last flight before the Cuban Missile Crisis. Since then, he has resided in the Little Havana area of Miami. His fascination with marionettes began in his early childhood. At the age of ten, Cano was already mounting puppet productions for his family. The artist recently converted his 1903 home in Little Havana into a marionette and dance space called The Red Velvet Theater. Since April 7, 2012, thirty-two performances have been featured. Professional dancers such as Katherine Kramer, Joanne Barret, Priscilla Marrero and renowned musicians, Matthew Evan Taylor, Dan Dickenson and Herman Leghorn, have performed at The Red Velvet. Cano’s work can be found in numerous public and private collections, including MOCA, North Miami; Museum of Art/ Fort Lauderdale; Lowe Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables; and the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, among many others. O n V iew


Left: Face Booka, 2011, from The Seven Wonders of the Modern World series, ukulele, air dry clay, dolls’ eyes, plastic mirror, 3’ x 7” x 5”, collection of the artist Opposite page: Cell Phone Frog, 2011, from The Seven Wonders of the Modern World series, Nokia cell phone, silver cigarette foil and glue, 6” x 3” x 3”, collection of the artist Photography by José Rodriguez


CHU CLO

A COUPLE OF WAYS OF

01.31.13–03.31.13 at the FLORIDA MUSE www.fm


UCK OSE

F DOING SOMETHING

EUM

of

opa.org

PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS, OnV

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CHUCK CLOSE: A Couple of

Ways of Doing Something

Left: American artist, Chuck Close (born Monroe, Wisconsin, 1940), has been a leading figure in contemporary art since the early 1970s. Best known for the monumental heads he has painted in thousands of airbrush bursts, thumbprints, or looping multi-color brushstrokes, Close has developed a formal analysis and methodological reconfiguration of the human face that has radically changed the definition of modern portraiture. Chuck Close, Self Portrait, daguerreotype

A

A COUPLE OF WAYS OF DOING SOMETHING,

hosted by the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in

Tampa, presents a stunning collection of portraits by Chuck Close of his influential circle of artist colleagues

who have made regular appearances in his paintings over the years. The cast of characters includes Laurie Anderson, Lyle Ashton Harris, Cecily Brown, Gregory Crewd-

son, Carroll Dunham, Ellen Gallagher, Philip Glass, Bob Holman, Elizabeth Murray, Elizabeth Peyton, Andres Serrano, Cindy Sherman, James Siena, Lorna Simpson,

Kiki Smith, James Turrell, Robert Wilson, Terry Winters, Lisa Yuskavage—and Chuck Close himself.

The exhibit features 15 exquisitely detailed daguerre-

otypes, which Close uses as the base to create the other works in the show—20 digital pigment prints, six tapesOnV

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CHUCK CLOSE: A Couple of

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Below: Gregory Crewdson is best known for his eerily beautiful and elaborately staged scenes of American homes and neighborhoods. Chuck Close, Gregory Crewdson, daguerreotype

Left: Each image in this exhibition is complemented by a poem on its subject by Bob Holman, the widely published New York School poet and founder of the Bowery Poetry Club. Holman’s praise poems celebrate each of the artists, their work and their contributions to the art community. Along with the Close photos, they form composite portraits of their subjects and are the inspiration for the title of the exhibit and related publications.

tries and two photogravures. Each of the 20 artist-subjects is accompanied by a lyrical praise poem by New York School poet, Bob Holman. As individual portraits, each image offers an intimate and immensely revealing study of the subject,

extending the hyperrealist tradition of portraiture for which Close is renowned. Holman’s accompanying poems are concise, witty and beautifully typeset to reflect the personality and style of each person portrayed. With

Chuck Close, Bob Holman, daguerreotype

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CHUCK CLOSE: A Couple of

Ways of Doing Something

the counterpoint of Holman’s engaging poetry, the exhibition becomes a transfixing group portrait that explores the idea of the “art circle” and its importance to an artist’s work and life. The exhibition is accompanied by a lush, oversized catalog published by Aperture (November 2006) and includes a lively interview with Close and Holman, conducted by art

critic and author, Lyle Rexer. “...Throughout a career of more than four decades, Chuck Close has consistently sought to test the limits of the media in which he has chosen to work, from painting and Polaroid photography to holograms and Japanese woodblock prints. ‘I have always been fascinated by how one way of doing something can kick open a door to another

Left: By turning the camera on herself, Cindy Sherman has built a name as one of the most respected photographers of the late 20th century. Although the majority of her photographs are pictures of her, these photographs are most definitely not selfportraits. Rather, Sherman

All those other portraits of me All those other portraits of me Are just portraits Not of me, no Not of me, no

uses herself as a vehicle for commentary on a variety of issues of the modern world: the role of the woman, the role of the artist, and many more. It is through these ambiguous and eclectic photographs that Sherman has developed a distinct signature style.

All that artifice inside the frame Hold it right there, hold my hand Walk into the camera Hold my hand Hold it right there

Chuck Close, Cindy Sherman,

—B ob H olman

daguerreotype Right: Cindy Sherman praise poem by Bob Holman

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CHUCK CLOSE: A Couple of

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Chuck Close, A Couple of Ways of Doing Something, 2006, installation view, image courtesy of Aperture Gallery, New York

Left: Through his operas, his symphonies, his compositions for his own ensemble, and his wide-ranging collaborations with artists ranging from Twyla Tharp to Allen Ginsberg, and Woody Allen to David Bowie, Philip Glass has had an extraordinary and unprecedented impact upon the musical and intellectual life of his times. Chuck Close, Philip Glass, daguerreotype

way,’ he has remarked. ‘For me, the original image serves as a matrix, from which I can explore issues of scale, information, and perception.’ In the 1960s, Close was one of the earliest artists to use photography as the foundation of his painting, and one of the most influential. He developed a gridded painting system based at first on gelatin-silver prints and dye transfers, then on 20-by-24-inch Polaroid images, which enabled him to scale up his portraits to colossal size. The innovation overthrew traditional expressive hierarchies of portrait painting and substituted an ‘all over’ delivery of information. O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

Since the late 1990s, Close has expanded his interests to include daguerreotypes, an early form of photography, and these, in turn, have been the basis for a series of digital pigment prints, tapestries and photogravures. Examples of all four of these interests are displayed in this exhibition. To achieve the effects he desires, Close works directly with master craftsmen, artists, printers and technicians, collaborating on the development of techniques that often expand the capabilities of the particular medium. His interest in artistic methods that are sometimes centuries-old is never merely antiquarian or arcane. •

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Proces CHUCK CLOSE: A Couple of

Ways of Doing Something

DAGUERREOTYPES

DIGITAL PIGMENT PRINTS

JACQUARD TAPESTRIES

Invented in 1839, the da-

Like Polaroid photographs,

Chuck Close first became in-

guerreotype is among the oldest

daguerreotypes are one-of-a-

terested in tapestries as a me-

photographic processes and

kind images, and reproduc-

dium for portraiture when the

perhaps the most arresting. It

ing them in photographs is

artist, Sol Lewitt, and his wife,

captures a direct positive im-

inevitably unsatisfactory. The

Carol, brought back contem-

age on a metal plate, usually

problem of accuracy is com-

porary examples from China in

copper coated with silver. It

pounded when the photographs

the 1970s. Intrigued by how

is renowned for the detail and

are translated to print. Chuck

the individual strands could be

depth of its rendering. Because

Close and David Adamson, of

woven together to comprise an

of the way it refracts light, it

Adamson Editions, were con-

image, Close began working with

must be viewed at the proper

sidering the problem of how to

Chinese tapestry manufacturers

angle in order for the image to

reproduce the daguerreotype

in the 1990s. The advent of the

be visible. Chuck Close was at-

when they hit upon the idea of

digital Jacquard loom opened

tracted to the uncanny presence

scanning the pieces directly on

the possibility of more precise

and intimacy of daguerreotypes,

a flatbed scanner. The result

translation of images into threads

and in1999 began working with

was a high-resolution digital

and, in 2006, Close began a col-

master daguerreotypist, Jerry

copy with great tonal fidelity

laboration with Magnolia Editions

Spagnoli, to produce a series of

that could be enlarged to many

of Oakland, California, and their

portraits. The medium tradi-

times the size of the original

weavers in Belgium. A daguerreo-

tionally required long exposure

daguerreotype and outputted in

type serves as the basis of an

times—a delay that caused

ink without significant loss of

8-by-6-foot portrait tapestry. A

portraits to look stiff and formal

visual information. The exhibi-

digital scan of the original is ren-

and, because the subjects in-

tion’s 26-1/2 by 20-inch inkjet

dered into a computer program

evitably moved, blurry. To over-

pigment prints, made on an

for the warp and weft threads,

come this limitation, Close used

Epson 9600 printer, have a

which the loom then processes

high-intensity strobe lights. The

tactile richness daguerreotypes

into a tapestry. Each black-and-

result is images of great tonal

cannot achieve and a precision

white tapestry is actually com-

range that capture their sub-

that eludes most photographic

posed of up to 17,800 colored

jects with a rare spontaneity.

reproductions.

warp threads.

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ss PHOTOGRAVURES

The photogravure process

was invented in 1869 and was the earliest method used to widely distribute photographic imagery. It consists of etching a photographic image onto a metal plate, which is then inked and printed. Chuck Close first engaged the gravure process through a project at the University of South Florida Printstudio in which he made prints directly from images of fingerprints on Mylar. Although he was intrigued by the idea of translating his photographs into prints, he found most photogravures tonally flat or extreme in their contrasts. These problems were overcome in his recent collaboration with the USF Printstudio. The photogravures were created by a meticulous process of etching and reetching to bring out the full depth and tonal range of the original images.

And although his experiments in each process are dependent on precise control of the output, Close is in constant pursuit of surprise and the unexpected. Close regularly exhibits work in different media together so that viewers can experience the radical differences inherent among them and the various ways of seeing they engender. ‘People think that if you have a photographic image, there is pretty much only one thing you can do with it, that because of its iconography, it is fixed,’ he has remarked. ‘But changing the medium, the method of mark-making and the scale, transforms the experience of that image into something new.’”—Lyle Rexer

fingerprint, a pointillist dot, or a brushstroke—here, every square inch of the tapestry is comprised of different combinations of the same warp and weft threads and is equally rich in tone and texture. Close selects images for the tapestries from his daguerreotype portraits. The gilded, silver-coated daguerreotype plates are scanned and then translated into digital “weave files.” The files are woven in Belgium with a seven-foot wide, double-head electronic Jacquard on a customized Dornier loom. Close’s tapestries incorporate a fusion of methods separated by over two hundred years: on one hand, the lyricism and nearly infinite detail of a 19th century photographic technique; on the other, the Magnolia Tapestry Project’s innovative, digitally-driven approach to weaving, a result of experiments conducted only within the last decade.

T he M agnolia T apestry P roject

Experimental innovations in portraiture have been Chuck Close’s trademark for nearly half a century. In 2006, Close teamed with the Magnolia Tapestry Project to create limitededition woven textiles. As with previous Close projects, where portraits were generated by filling each interstitial square of a grid with tonal variations on a single mark—whether a O n V i e w M a g a z i n e . c om

A Couple of Ways Of Doing Something is a challenging exploration of photographic techniques and processes that transcends any one medium.­ O n V iew

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PROFILE { L E S L I E

INSPIRED BY LANDSCAPE

WAY N E }

Exhibition

I Am Nature: Paintings by Leslie Wayne On view January 12th through March 17th at Foosaner Art Museum, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne www.foosanerartmuseum.org

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and geology, Leslie Wayne shapes paint much in the way that geological forces work in nature. She manipulates the medium to resemble the natural phenomena of flowing lava and stratified rock formations, transforming the paint itself into a sculptural medium. Wayne’s vibrant oil paintings range in size from 14 feet long to as intimate as 10 x 13 inches. She states that her large works are inspired by landscape and geology and are a secular contemporary and abstract response to 19th century Romantic Landscape painting. “Rather than paint pictures of landscapes, Wayne chooses to capture the corporeal essence of nature by offering an analogous experience to being in the natural world. Alluding to compression, subduction and the shifting of tectonic plates, she packs the narrative passages into the interstices of each successive layer of paint, testing the range of Richard Serra’s famous ‘Verb List’ by pulling, scraping, folding, cut-


P R O F I L E

ting and collaging her materi- tional oil painting. Her underal like clay,” says Mark Sloan, graduate studies began at the Director/Senior Curator at the University of California, Santa Halsey Institute. Barbara, in painting, and finIn addition to taking cues ished with a BFA in sculpture from landscape, Wayne draws from Parsons School of Deinspiration from fashion and sign. After her move to New fabric to fractals and chaos York City in 1982, she abantheory—but rarely in antici- doned observational painting pation of a specifand developed her ic work. “I don’t set signature style of out to make a paintintuitive painting. ing about a particWayne has exular subject,” says hibited in numerthe artist. “I allow ous solo and group phenomenology shows, including and the nature of the Corcoran Galthe material to lead lery of Art, Washthe way.” ington, DC; WhitWayne’s smaller ney Biennial, WhitLeslie Wayne paintings in the exney Museum of transforms paint hibition are part of American Art, NY; into a sculptural her One Big Love Bildmuseet, Umea, medium. series. She began Sweden; Museum these works while simultane- of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg; and ously working on her larger MOCA, North Miami. She repaintings, in an effort to chal- ceived a 2006 New York Founlenge herself with new pa- dation for the Arts Fellowship rameters. in Painting and is a past grant Wayne was born in 1953 recipient from both the Polin Germany, but grew up in lock-Krasner Foundation and Southern California, where the Adolph and Esther Gottlishe originally studied tradi- eb Foundation. O n V iew

opposite (clockwise from top left): 1. One Big Love #32, 2009, oil on wood, 9-1/2 x 12-3/4” 2. One Big Love #36, 2009, oil on panel, 10 x 13” 3. One Big Love #39, 2010, oil on wood, 9 x 12-1/2” 4. One Big Love #43, 2010, oil on wood, 12 x 10” above: heaven to me, 2007, oil on panel, 21 x 14” left: Exquisite corpse (detail), 2005, oil on wood, 26 x 43-1/2” images courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery


SPOTLIGHT { D O N

LAWN JOBS CONTINUES

Don Lambert’s investigation of visual phenomena, employed as comment on both cultural and social perceptions. The title of this ongoing series is a reference to yard work as well as to the slang term for driving a car through someone’s lawn. The former is most often done as an exercise in maintenance, beautification or improvement, while the latter is typically done with the intent to deface property or as an act of defiance. Lambert creates the patterns he uses by alternating the grain direction of the artificial turf. “I began playing with striping patterns in my own yard as a way of combating the boredom of my weekly house chores,” he says. “This eventually led to an investigation into the origins of the American lawn, its aesthetics, and the effects this landscape has on our social and environmental interactions. For one year, I charted each mowing, including a map of the pattern used along with notes chronicling pests encountered, weeds combated and moles killed.

L A M B E RT }

Exhibition

Don Lambert: Lawn Jobs On view March 9th through April 14th at Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org

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S P O T L I G H T

The project eventually spread the question of identity, while into the studio where it devel- situated within the continuum oped into a more focused ex- of South Florida’s own unique ploration of decoration and history. patterning as it related to both Lambert received his BFA domesticity and the ideals of from The University of Cincinmiddle America. The designs nati, Cincinnati, OH, in 1997 are derived from my own ex- and his MFA from The School periences with yardwork as of the Art Institute of Chicawell as from other areas of in- go, Chicago, IL, in 2004. He terest. All are used to draw at- is the recipient of the Commutention to the tensions manifest nity Arts Assistance Program in the lawn as both Grant from the City a physical and psyof Chicago Departchic place, and to ment of Cultural question the culturAffairs and the Ilal norms symbollinois Arts Council ized therein.” (2005) and winner Since moving to of the Inaugural 4th Miami in late 2009, Floor Regional BiLambert has con- “Lawn Jobs” draws ennial Competition tinued to focus on from The Cincinattention to our culture’s often nati Art Museum cultural and social idealized, and ro(2009). perceptions. manticized, ideas Among numerof nature, and how these affect ous other exhibitions throughus both individually and as a out the US, in 2009 Lambert had society. Employing a practice a solo exhibition, Super Nova grounded in landscaping and Terra Firma, at The Cincinnati maintenance, and building nar- Art Museum and in 2010, was ratives based in regional histo- included in Miami Art Museries of exploration and conquest, um’s exhibition, New Work Mihis work continues to speak to ami 2010. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. installation view, left to right: Heaven looking down, Cubic Yard, Deere John; 2009, ARTIFICIAL TURF ON MAPLE PLYWOOD, DIMENSIONS VARIABLE; image courtesy of the nerman moca 2. Radiant Dream (diptych), 2010, ARTIFICIAL TURF ON MAPLE PLYWOOD, 103 x 49 x 4.5” above: Amber Waves, 2011, ARTIFICIAL TURF ON MAPLE PLYWOOD left: image courtesy of the artist


FORM { G L A S S

IN A VISUALLY STUNNING

S C U L P T U R E }

Exhibition

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass On view through March 31st at Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

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presentation of contemporary glass sculpture, the Orlando Museum of Art joins in a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the development of studio art glass in America that includes more than 160 events at museums, galleries and universities nationwide. The 50th anniversary of studio glass marks the first glass workshops held at the Toledo Museum of Art in 1962. The workshops were taught by Harvey K. Littleton, who, along with scientist, Dominick Labino, introduced a small furnace built for glassworking. For the first time, individual artists had the ability to work in independent studios, to make glass alone and unaided, without the necessity of a factory environment. The sustained efforts of artists, educators and collectors over the following 50 years have established glass as a major medium of contemporary art with an enthusiastic public following. Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th


F O R M

Anniversary of Studio Glass that look surprisingly like glass. features works by internationally renowned artists such as January 20th... Dale Chihuly, Laura de San- Special Lecture with tillana, Harvey K. Littleton, William Warmus Dante Marioni, William Mor- Prominent contemporary glass ris, Christopher Ries, Ther- scholar, William Warmus, will man Statom, Lino Tagliapi- speak about the treasures in the etra, and many othexhibition. ers. Also included are exciting works Jan. 23rd, Feb. 27th by younger artists and Mar. 27th... who are taking the Chihuly Video medium in new diSeries rections. The exhibition explores the February 9th... concepts and techFused Glass The OMA joins niques of these artJewelry Workshop ists and how each Participants will a nationwide uses the intrinsic celebration of the create their own characteristics of pendant with glass 50th anniversary glass, its mass, fluartist, Duncan Mcof contemporary idity, color and Clellan, and instrucglass. transmission of tor, Irene Winn. light for expressive purposes. A host of events accompany- February 24th... ing the exhibition include: Glass Collectors Forum The OMA will host a round January 11th... table discussion with noted Art Adventures: Florida glass collectors. Looks Like Glass In this workshop, participants For event details, please visit will create art with materials www.omart.org. O n V iew

opposite (top to bottom): 1. Dale Chihuly, Macchia (Purple with Yellow Lip), n.d., blown glass, 24 x 40 x 40” 2. Dale Chihuly, Seaforms (Orange), n.d., blown glass, 20 x 24 x 36” Above and below: 1. Christopher Ries, Desert Flower, 2000, optic lead crystal, cut, ground, polished, 39-11/16 x 16 x 8-3/8” 2. Therman Statom, Crow Portal, 2012, painted plate glass, 12-1/2 x 10 x 7-1/2’ left: DALE CHIHULY, RED FLOAT, CA. 2004, BLOWN GLASS, 24 x 24 x 24”


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Art Basel 2012 Mi a m i B e a c h . . .

I N E A R LY D E C E M B E R , T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L A RT

world descended upon Miami Beach for the mother of annual art fairs, Art Basel Miami Beach 2012. The event once again dazzled spectators with a virtual explosion of creativity during the four day art extravaganza, which took place December 6th-9th at the Miami Beach Convention Center. As Art Basel marked its second decade in Miami Beach, more than 250 leading galleries from 31 countries from North America, Latin America, Europe and Asia presented the highest quality of work. This year, the show attracted 50,000 visitors. Art collectors, art lovers, museum directors, curators and cultural journalists from all over the world enjoyed a program of special exhibitions, panel discussions, private collection tours and satellite events. On the following pages, On View presents highlights from several of the main fair’s special exhibition sectors. Enjoy the show! O n V iew

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Art Galleries Sector

A

ART GALLERIES INCLUDED

20th and 21st century artworks from more than 250 of the world’s leading art galleries for modern and contemporary art in North America, Latin America, Europe, South Africa and Asia. Painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, print, photography, film, performance, video and digital art by more than 2,000 artists were featured in works ranging from editioned pieces by young artists to multi-million-dollar museum-calibre masterpieces.

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PREVIOUS SPREAD: RANDY POLUMBO, LOVE STREAM #2, 2012, PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, NEW YORK LEFT: GALLERI NICOLAI WALLNER, COPENHAGEN: Jonathan Monk, Andy Warhol’s Chairman Mao Hand Made in The Peoples Republic of China (Large), 2010, Oil on canvas images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: 1. BQ , BERLIN 2. Marian Goodman Gallery, New York 3. D’Amelio, New York 4. Casa Triângulo, São Paulo images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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THIS PAGE (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): 1. GALERIE ALMINE RECH, PARIS 2. Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin 3. Galerie Almine Rech, Paris OPPOSITE: MAI 36 GALERIE, ZURICH: MICHEL PÉREZ EL POLLO, ARBOL DEL OCHO (THE TREE OF EIGHT), 2012, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS

Art Galleries Sector continued...

images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: 1. NEUGERRIEMSCHNEIDER, BERLIN 2. INSTALLATION VIEW, MAI 36 GALERIE, ZURICH 3. GALERIE HANS MAYER, DÜSSELDORF 4. & 5. BARBARA MATHES GALLERY, NEW YORK

Art Galleries Sector continued...

images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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LEFT (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1.Metro Pictures, New York 2. Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin RIGHT: SKARSTEDT GALLERY, NEW YORK images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

ABOVE: GALERIA LUISA STRINA, Sテグ PAULO LEFT: Galerie Karsten Greve, St. Moritz

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Art Nova Sector

W WITH 40 GALLERIES ON

display, this year’s edition of Art Nova featured work by more than 100 artists from across the world. Designed for galleries representing two to three of their artists with new works created during the last three years, Art Nova again became a space of discovery for works fresh from the studio, providing viewers the chance to spot the newest artistic tendencies.

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LEFT: LOMBARD FREID GALLERY, NEW YORK image Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Positions Sector

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ART POSITIONS CREATED

a platform for a single major project from one artist, allowing visitors to the exhibition an opportunity to discover ambitious new talents from around the globe. The Art Positions sector presented 16 young galleries from 9 different countries, showcasing cutting-edge single projects by each of the artists.


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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: 1. Galeria Laura Marsiaj, Rio de Janeiro: Paulo Vivacqua, Deserto, 2008 2. La Central, Bogotรก: Felipe Arturo, Primero estaba el mar, 2012, Concrete casting 3. installation view 4. Arratia Beer, Berlin: Pablo Rasgado, Unfolded architecture (Monochromatic muralism No. 20) images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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Art Kabinett Sector

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ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH

introduced Art Kabinett in 2005 as a platform for the show’s gallerists to display the curatorial aspect of their work, with special exhibitions drawn from the gallery’s program. This year, Art Kabinett presented viewers with a mix of 20 carefully curated exhibitions in a separately delineated space within the booths of the galleries. Exhibition concepts included thematic group exhibitions, art-historical solo shows and showcases for rising stars. The projects featured a wide array of artists, ranging from emerging artists to historical figures.

ABOVE: ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, NEW YORK: JOAN SEMMEL RIGHT: VALERIE CARBERRY, CHICAGO: JOSE DE RIVERA images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

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LEFT: ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, NEW YORK BELOW: Two Palms, New York images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.


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LEFT: JULIANA CERQUEIRA LEITE, CLIMB, 2012, CASA TRIÂNGULO, SÃO PAULO RIGHT: Iván Navarro and Courtney Smith, Street Lamp, 2012, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

Art Public Sector

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images Courtesy MCH Swiss Exhibition (Basel) Ltd.

A R T P U B L I C PRESENTED

outdoor sculptures, interactive performances, site-specific installations and public artworks within an open and public exhibition format. For the second year running, Art Public, produced in collaboration with the Bass Museum of Art, transformed the recently redesigned Collins Park with unique artworks and performances by renowned artists and emerging talents, whose works directly engaged viewers and interrupted the daily routine of passersby in poetic and surprising ways.

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ABOVE: Lourival Cuquinha, Varal, 2012, A Gentil Carioca, Rio de Janeiro LEFT: Mark Hagen, To be Titled (Additive Sculpture, Miami Screen), 2012, Galerie Almine Rech, Paris

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On View 01-03.2013  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

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