Page 1

V

on iew FLORIDA

PRE

MI

ERE

E

ISSU

ART IN THE GARDEN

T H E ART OF YAYOI KU SAMA AT FA IR CHILD TRO PI C A L BOTANIC GARD E N

APRIL / MAY 2010


CONTENTS

A p r i l / M a y

2010

Vo l . 1 , N o . 1

THIS PAGE : yayoi kusama, flowers that bloom at midnight (detail), 2009 ON THE COVER: yayoi kusama, guidepost to the new space, 2009 images courtesy of fairchild tropical botanic garden, coral gables

Fe a t u r e s

38

ART IN THE GARDEN

The 2010 art season at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, in Coral Gables, features an exuberant new sculptural ensemble by the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, a living legend of the international art avant-garde.

2

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/May 2010


Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

30 Interview MICHAEL CULVER

As the Naples Museum of Art celebrates its 10th anniversary, On View catches up with Museum Director and Chief Curator, Michael Culver.

44 Exhibition

HEYDAY: PHOTOGRAPHS OF FREDERICK W. GLASIER

52 Education

58

Educating children in fine art is a great idea. Museums make it fun!

Tampa has a reason to smile, and art lovers have an exciting new destination for world-class art— the new Tampa Museum of Art.

A PROPER INTRODUCTION

Circus life at the turn of the 20th century at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota

URBAN TREASURE

FROM TOP LEFT: michael culver, courtesy of the nma; frederick w. glasier, pete mardo, 1923, collection of the john and mable ringling museum of art; mike shaw, the critic, © micheal shaw; richard barnes, the new tampa museum of art, © richard barnes

On View Destination:

BOSTON, MA

74 The Museums: An overview of Boston’s outstanding art venues

84 A Gallery Tour: A fine art gallery listing OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

3


CONTENTS 2010

April/May

Vo l u m e

1,

No.

1

Retrospective

66

STANLEY BOXER

8

Often called a “sculptor of paint,” Stanley is best known for his large-scale abstract paintings.

A narrative

Profile

Departments

68

6

COMMENTARY

MUSE

MAGGIE TAYLOR

10

Maggie’s playful, provocative and surreal imagery delights and challenges viewers.

CALENDAR

Museum exhibitions

26

GALLERY

Spotlight

A selection of gallery artists

70 Fo c u s

72

CLYDE BUTCHER

PICTURED: Clyde Butcher, Indian Key 5, 1997, silver gelatin fiber print, 84 x 60”, Collection of the Artist

4

OnV

i e w

Ma

The exquisite beauty and depth of Clyde’s photography draws the viewer into a relationship with nature.

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

CARLOS CRUZ-DÍEZ

Carlos creates sensory chromatic environments which invite viewers to become participants in his work.


Baterbys ART AUCTION GALLERY


V

C O M M E N T A R Y

on iew

Welcome...

M A G A Z I N E

Editorial

W e l c o m e t o o u r p r e m i e r e i s s u e ! On View magazine is about bringing world-class art exhibitions from across Florida directly to you. Of course, we also hope our pages will inspire you to venture out and explore the state’s wonderful museums in person. What better way to spend a weekend than to visit a different city for a fresh sampling of art, culture and cuisine? To help with your plans, we have compiled an impressive selection of exhibitions in our Calendar section, beginning on page 10. For those looking further afield, On View’s Destination section, which begins on page 74, highlights a different city outside of Florida in every issue. This issue’s features include: an interview with Michael Culver, Director and Chief Curator of the Naples Museum of Art, on page 30; Art in the Garden, a magical visit to the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables, featuring the delightful sculptures of Yayoi Kusama, on page 38; a rare view of circus life at the turn of the 20th century in HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier, at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, on page 44; a peek at the fun things museums are doing to teach kids about fine art in A Proper Introduction, on page 52; and a tour of the new Tampa Museum of Art in Urban Treasure, on page 58. Enjoy!

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney

Contributing writer

Paul Atwood

Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Pho tography Contributing photographers

Richard Barnes J a m e s O s t r a n d , M i k e S h aw Adver tising

Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com A special note of thanks to Lyn Boyer and Jason Karaian for all their support. On View is published on-line six times per year by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

Publisher & Creative Director

www.onviewmagazine.com

6

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


h

H A R N

U N I V E R S I T Y

M U S E U M O F

O F

A R T

D A A F L O R I D

Imagining the (Im)Possible Through May 9, 2010 www.harn.ufl.edu/projecteuropaexhibition.html The exhibition is made possible by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; the C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation; Étant donnés, the French-American Fund for Contemporary Art, a program of the French-American Cultural Exchange; University of Florida Student Government; the John Early Publication Endowment; the Sidney Knight Endowment; and the Harn Program Endowment. Additional support is provided by the University of Florida’s Harn Eminent Scholar Chair in Art History; Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere; Center for European Studies; France Florida Research Institute; International Center; and Paris Research Institute. Additional funding provided by the Exhibition Circle of the Harn Museum.

image: Tacita Dean, British, b. 1965, Palast, 2004, Six color photogravures, 19 5/8 x 27 1/2 in. each, Courtesy of Baker Botts L.L.P., Dallas, Texas

SW 34th Street and Hull Road, Gainesville, Florida | 352.392.9826 | www.harn.ufl.edu


MUSE

Oasis B Y PA U L AT W O O D

T

HERE WAS STILL

some light in the sky as I swerved through the throng rushing toward the commuter rail. The frigid, threeblock walk to the museum seemed like ten. It had been a very long week. The museum, like a tranquil oasis, was warm and inviting. I meandered through the galleries, at one with the company around me yet not feeling compelled to engage them nor obliged to be amused by them.


MUSE

...and the words intensely smoky with chocolate overtones came to mind as I sipped my coffee. About half an hour had passed when I found myself alone in one of the galleries, standing before Monet’s Water Lilies. All was still. Time stopped. I was not considering the skill of the artist’s strokes. I was, instead, immersed in a rich landscape, with fragrant air and the incredible light of Giverny. It was probably just five minutes, but it may as well have been five hours. My mind felt nourished, alive. Invigorated, the night air felt crisp and refreshing on my walk home. The stars above were wondrous. The baguette with prosciutto and Brie tasted so much better than before, and the words intensely smoky with chocolate overtones came to mind as I sipped my coffee. After dinner, I sat on the couch and took in the cityscape. The long, hard week was a distant memory. The world was no longer a daunting, complex place. It was simple and filled with hope, as it should be. I woke the next morning, rested and renewed. It was as if spring had arrived after a long hard winter.

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

” PICTURED: claude monet (1840-1926), Water lilies, 1916, oil on canvas, the museum of fine arts, boston, 1907

/May 2010

9


CALENDAR Current

04-05.10 Boca Raton Thru 04.11

Marc Bell Presents: The Magical World of M.C. Escher Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

The unforgettable vis-

Exhibitions

Cornelis Escher (18981972), have earned him worldwide acclaim. This is one of the most comprehensive and important exhibitions of Escher’s work ever shown in the US. Famous works, including Reptiles, Drawing Hands, Ringsnakes, Waterfall, House of Stairs, Metamorphosis as well as hundreds of rare original artworks are featured. Thru 04.11

ual puzzles and impossible structures of the Dutch artist, Maurits

Mary Cassatt: Works on Paper Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

C O M P I L E D

B Y

O N

V I E W

reveal the range of the artist’s creative process. 04.20-06.13

One of the greatest and most popular of the Impressionists, American artist, Mary Cassatt (1844-1926), created some of her most inventive and appealing images in the print medium. This exhibition presents 41 major prints and drawings that have rarely been shown—etchings, color aquatints, counterproofs and drawings

Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

In 1956, a twenty-oneyear-old Elvis Presley was at the beginning of his remarkable career. This exhibition features 40 large-

1. M.C. Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972), Reptiles, 1943, lithograph, 13 1/8 x 15 1/8”, courtesy of The Walker Collection 2. Mary Cassatt, The Lamp (La Lampe), 1890, drypoint, soft-ground and aquatint, 12 3/4 x 10”, courtesy of Adelson Gallery 3. Alfred Wertheimer (American, 1929- ), Elvis at 21, courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution and Govinda Gallery

10

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 2 o f 1 3 }

Boca Raton continued...

format photographs of Presley, taken by Alfred Wertheimer, capturing the unguarded moments in Elvis’s life during a year that took him from Tupelo, Mississippi to the silver screen, and to the verge of international stardom. 04.20-06.13

Remembering Stanley Boxer: Retrospective (1946-2000) Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

Stanley Boxer (19262000) is best known for his large scale abstract paintings which have a rich sculptural quality. This retrospective exhibition features 50 paintings and 13 sculptures dating from 1946 through 2000.

Hunt Slonem (born June 18, 1951) is an artist who combines abstract expressionism and representational imagery. He is best known for his paintings of tropical birds,

www.fairchildgarden.org

Boxer became one of America’s most eminent mid-century abstract painters, with works now held by major museums throughout the US. (See story on pg. 66.) Coral Gables Thru 2010

Art at Fairchild Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Fairchild presents the 2010 art season featuring the fantastic art of Yayoi Kusama. Her work is on view through May of 2010. This extraordinary pairing of art and nature continues a proud tradition of art that began in 2003. Other artists featured include Cameron Gainer, Leyden RodriguezCasanova, Mark di Suvero, Kris Martin, Dale Chihuly, and Daisy Youngblood. (See story on pg. 38.)

based on a personal aviary he keeps. Since 1977, Slonem has had over 150 solo Coral Springs exhibitions. Over 75 Thru 04.24 museums internationHunt Slonem: ally include his work Birds, Butterflies in their collections, & Bunnies including the MetroCoral Springs politan Museum of Art Museum of Art and the Guggenheim www.csmart.org Museum, both in NY.

1. Stanley Boxer (1926-2000), Lacedplumeinabam (detail), circa 1985, oil on canvas, Joel and Lila Harnet Museum of Art, University of Richmond Museums, The Alcoa-Reynolds Art Collection 2. Yayoi Kusama, Three Pumpkins (detail), 12/11/09, Kusama at Fairchild, on loan from Gagosian Gallery 3. Hunt Slonem, Old Yellow, oil on wood, courtesy of Hunt Slonem Studio

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

11


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 3 o f 1 4 }

Coral Springs continued...

Thru 05.24

Shelley Parriott: Color Fields Coral Springs Museum of Art

Her Color Field Installation at The Coral Springs Museum of Art is inspired by the luminous Florida sky.

www.csmart.org

From miniature interior wall pieces to largescale sculptural installations, Shelley Parriott’s fabric, steel, and mixed media pieces speak of the dichotomy between our physical and spiritual aspects and the transitory nature of form. Exhibited in NYC, the US and Europe, her work has received numerous honors and awards.

Daytona Beach 05.28-08.01

The Paintings of Tom Reis Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

Tom Reis is a nationally known illustrator whose art has appeared in Time magazine, Rolling Stone, the Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Sports Illustrated, BusinessWeek, Smart Money, and other prestigious publications. Reis has also worked as a fine artist, producing work with all the refinement of a classically trained painter.

its ground-breaking use of the bikers own stories and accounts, The Bikeriders was a landmark collection that documented the abandon and risk of His paintings are repre- motorcycle gangs, and sented in numerous propelled motorcycle permanent and private counterculture into the collections throughout mainstream American the US. consciousness. The Thru 05.07

Bikeriders— Danny Lyon Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

In 1968, after four years with the Chicago Outlaws Motorcycle Gang, Danny Lyon created one of the defining photography projects of the 1960s: The Bikeriders. With its mix of grit, realism and romanticism, and

images and interviews are as raw and alive as they were nearly four decades ago. DeLand Thru 05.02

Almost Alice: New Illustrations

1. Shelley Parriott, Color Field Sculpture, courtesy of Shelley Parriott 2. Tom Reis, Autumn Nap, © Tom Reis 3. Danny Lyon, Crossing the Ohio, 1966, silver gelatin print, 11 x14”, © Danny Lyon

12

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 4 o f 1 4

DeLand continued...

of Wonderland by Maggie Taylor Florida Museum for Women Artists

that perfectly complements the verbal wit and irony of Carroll’s writing. (See story on pg. 68.)

Possible considers the relationship of art to democracy in Europe. In 1989, the expansion and unification of Europe was conceived as a vital and urgent social project to promote democracy. Now, in the 20th anniversary year of the fall of the Berlin Wall, artists in

www.floridamuseum forwomenartists.org

This exhibition features 45 digital inkjet prints illustrating Lewis Carroll’s famous work, “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” The prints on display are innovative in both content and technique. Taylor’s radical manipulation of her source images, but retention of photographic realism, results in an ironic visual surrealism

Ft. Lauderdale

brilliance, dramatizing Edward Steichen: and glamorizing conIn High Fashion temporary culture and Museum of Art, its achievers in poliNova Southeastern tics, literature, film, University dance, theater, and the www.moaflnsu.org world of high fashion. Edward Steichen was The essence of the already a famous exhibition is 200 plus painter and photogframed vintage prints. rapher when, in early 1923, he was offered Gainesville the most prestigious position in photogThru 05.09 raphy’s commercial Project Europa: domain: that of chief Imagining the photographer for (Im)Possible Vogue and Vanity Fair. Harn Museum Over the next fifteen of Art years, Steichen would www.harn.ufl.edu produce a body of Project Europa: work of unequaled Imagining the (Im) Thru 04.11

the exhibition question the promise and potential of Europe’s democratic dream. The works featured in the exhibition, which include large-scale wall paintings, photography and video by 20 artists from

1. Maggie Taylor, Birds of a feather, 2007, archival pigment inkjet print, © Maggie Taylor, Almost Alice: New Illustrations of Wonderland by Maggie Taylor is organized by Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and toured by Curatorial Assistance, Pasadena, California 2. Edward Steichen, Black: Model Margaret Horan in a black dress by Jay-Thorpe, 1935, courtesy Condé Nast Archive © 1935 Condé Nast Publications 3. Tacita Dean, British (b. 1965), Palast, 2004, six color photogravures, 19 5/8 x 27 1/2” each, courtesy of Baker Botts LLP, Dallas, Texas

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

13


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 5 o f 1 4 }

Gainesville continued...

Turkey to the British Isles, explore the complex and subtle relationship between art and politics. Hollywood Thru 05.23

Balbone Martinez: Speaking in Parables Will Get You Nowhere With This Crowd Art and Culture Center of Hollywood http://artandculturecenter.org

Balbone Martinez is a collaborative project by Michael Balbone and Emily Martinez.

For the most part, they like working somewhere between the world of fine arts and contemporary culture and between the world of handmade craft and consumerism. Their latest installations consist of two-dimensional found objects, decorative items, and recontextualized information portrayed in a schizophrenic carnival aesthetic. Some of the themes the artists keep in rotation are: fine art versus product marketing, socio/economic/political mythologies, and the concept of salvation in art. Jacksonville Thru 08.08

Jazz ABZ: An A to Z Collection

of Jazz Portraits by Paul Rogers The Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens

the time, including artistic references to well-known artists who were particularly inspired by jazz music.

www.cummer.org

Artist Paul Rogers teamed with jazz musician Wynton Marsalis to create the book Jazz ABZ, which highlights jazz greats from A

Thru 04.04

Life as a Legend: Marilyn Monroe Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

(Louis Armstrong) to Z (Dizzy Gillespie) through art and poetry. Each portrait and poem is evocative of the particular musician’s sound, and each work of art alludes to song titles, artifacts, and other markers of

Life as a Legend: Marilyn Monroe captures the spark, sex appeal and sensation that was Marilyn Monroe through the art of more than

1. Balbone Martinez, Speaking in Parables Will Get You Nowhere With This Crowd, 2010, Google image search, Photoshop, and incantations, courtesy of the artist 2. Paul Rogers, Charlie Parker, 2005, acrylic and ink on Strathmore illustration board, 12 ½ x 12 ½”, on loan from the artist, © Paul Rogers 3. Milton H. Greene, Marilyn Monroe, NYC, “Ballerina” sitting, 1954, fine art inkjet, Artoma Collection, Hamburg, © 1994, Milton H. Greene Archives, Inc.

14

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


with Poems by wynton mArsAlis

t h r o uG h A uG u s t 8 , 2 0 1 0 Ongoing Exhibition Programs and Events • Gallery tours • Art-making classes • Jazz concerts • Poetry events For more information, please call 904.355.0630 or visit www.cummer.org.

Paul Rogers, Billie Holiday, 2005, acrylic and ink on Strathmore illustration board, 12 ½ x 12 ½ in., On loan from the Artist. © Paul Rogers.

829 Riverside Avenue Jacksonville, FL 32204 (904) 356-6857 www.cummer.org


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 6 o f 1 4 }

Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

80 artists, including Andy Warhol, Allen Jones, Peter Blake, Richard Avedon, Bert Stern, Henri CartierBresson and many others. Melbourne

photographs of nature, 04.24-08.01 the human figure, exteJust Suppose: rior and interior enviMaggie ronments, and human Taylor & Jerry relationships evoke Uelsmann myth and magic, and Brevard Art are considered to be Museum masterpieces of 20th www.brevardartmuseum.org century photography. This is a whimsical exhibition of the otherMiami worldly art of Maggie Taylor that reflects her Thru 04.18 imaginative ventures 48 Jews: into digital technology. What it means Jerry Uelsmann’s pho- to be Jewish tographs are produced Jewish Museum using more convenof Florida tional darkroom techwww.jewishmuseum.com niques. Uelsmann’s This is a series of 48 composite, surreal Warhol-esque portrait

paintings, by Abshalom Jac Lahav, of famous Jews that celebrates and questions our notions of what it means to be Jewish. With varying degrees of abstraction, the portraits reveal mystery, emotion, shadow, form, essence and masked reality. Lahav gathers

images from contemporary media sources and selects them for their iconic quality.

Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

Carlos Cruz-Díez’ oeuvre is well known throughout Europe and Latin America, but not as well recognized in the US. This exhibition seeks to increase the understanding and appreciation of his work in this country. Cruz-Díez creates interactive environments that invite visitors to become participants in his work, experiencing color through their own movement. Initially conceived in 1965 and presented for the first time in 1968, in

Thru 06.20

Carlos Cruz-Díez: The Embodied Experience of Color

1. Jerry Uelsmann, Untitled (hands holding water), 2003, silver gelatin print, 16 x 20”, © Jerry Uelsmann 2. Abshalom Jac Lahav, Bob Dylan, 2009, oil on canvas, courtesy Jewish Museum of Florida, © Abshalom Jac Lahav, 2009 3. Carlos Cruz Díez, Cromosaturación (Chromosaturation), 1965-2008, three chromo-cubicles site-specific environment (fluorescent lights with blue, red and green filters), courtesy of Americas Society Gallery, NY, photo by Arturo Sanchez

16

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 7 o f 1 4 }

Miami continued...

the Ostwald Museum in Dortmund, Germany, Cromosaturación (Chromosaturation) consists of three separate color chambers infused with red, green and blue light. By way of experiencing color’s intense immediacy as light rather than pigment, the viewer’s eye is freed from the burden of interpreting representational forms. (See story on pg. 70.)

translations of verbal expressions. The exhibition includes multimedia works from the late 1990s to the present and premieres a new site specific work. Thru 05.06

Ceal Floyer Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

Cory Arcangel: The Sharper Image Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.mocanomi.org

www.mocanomi.org

Thru 05.06

Ceal Floyer uses ordinary objects to create tableaux that challenge the viewer’s perception and assumptions. Her minimal constructions are precise, visual

Cory Arcangel, a pioneer in the use of digital technologies in contemporary art, often combines music, humor, and computer & video game software to create works that examine the aesthetics and uses of technology. This exhibition includes collaborations with other artists and musicians. Arcangel has also produced new multimedia works for the exhibition. Naples

anniversary season and features beautiful and unique new pieces selected by the artist. For four decades, Chihuly has produced a body of work unlike any other, helping to redefine the medium and revolutionize the American studio glass movement.

Thru 04.25

Thru 04.30

Chihuly: Recent Work Naples Museum of Art

Woman: The Art of Gaston Lachaise Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

This spectacular show by renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly is part of the Museum’s 10th-

www.thephil.org

French-born sculptor, Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935), was

1. Ceal Floyer, Untitled, 2008, metal suggestion box and closed sign, ed. 3 of 3, 11 3/4 x 12 1/4 x 6”, courtesy of the artist, Esther Schipper, Berlin, Lisson Gallery, London and 303 Gallery, NY 2. Cory Arcangel, Super Mario Clouds, 2002, homemade hacked Nintendo game, single-channel video, courtesy of the artist and Team Gallery, NY 3. Dale Chihuly, Flavus Black Vessel with Maroon Leaf, 1993, Blown glass, 17 x 34 x 17”, photo by Chuck Taylor, Chihuly: Recent Work is organized by the NMA in cooperation with Chihuly Studio

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

17


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 8 o f 1 4 }

Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

famous for his amply proportioned female nudes. Lachaise left Paris for Boston in 1905 in pursuit of his love, Isabel, and became one of the most important sculptors in modernist art. This exhibition features ap-

Diner, ca.1941, Masters of Art Nouveau Shop, Miniature: The Chinese Laundry and Kupjack Rooms Artists’ Garret. Many & Kaye Collection of these miniature Naples environments were Museum of Art created by the late www.thephil.org Eugene Kupjack, This groundbreaking Some of the world’s widely regarded as the exhibition features most remarkable pioneer in the field, 90 rare vintage prints miniatures will be on and his son Henry. from the golden age of display this season as French photography, part of the Museum’s Orlando 1900-1940. From the Masters of Miniature lyrical architectural exhibition. Featured views of Eugène Atget in this collection of to the Surrealist inminiature rooms are: ventions of Man Ray the majestic Roman and Dora Maar, from Triclinium, the Napoleproximately 75 sculp- the boyish wonder of onic Anteroom and the tures and 20 drawings. Jacques-Henri Lartigue Louis XV Petit Salon. to the twilight-inspired Other rooms include Thru 05.16 Thru 06.30 moodiness of Brasa delightful American Out of this world: French Twist: saï, all major facets Extraordinary Masterworks of of French photogracostumes from photography from phy are surveyed and film & television Atget to Man Ray celebrated. This is a Orange County Naples rare opportunity to see Regional Museum of Art these masterworks in History Center www.thephil.org one exhibition. www.thehistorycenter.org Thru-06.30

1. Installation view, Woman: The Art of Gaston Lachaise at the NMA, photo: Christine Elzinga, exhibition organized by The Lachaise Foundation, Boston, MA, exhibition tour organization & management by Landau Traveling Exhibitions, Los Angeles, CA 2. Man Ray, Erotique Voilée (Meret Oppenheim in Louis Marcoussis’ studio), 1933, silver gelatin print, 9 7/8 x 8 1/8”, French Twist: Masterworks of photography from Atget to Man Ray organized by art2art Circulating 3. Henry Kupjack, Roman Triclinium (detail), 1984, mixed media, 31 x 30 x 40”, collection of the NMA, 2002.10.007, gift of Carole & Barry Kaye 4. George Clooney’s costume from Batman and Robin, image courtesy of the Paul G. Allen Family Collection

18

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 9 o f 1 4 }

Orlando continued...

More than 40 costumes and props spanning 60 years of entertainment history reveal a new way of looking at characters from some of the most popular films and television shows. Thru 05.16

Lights! Camera! Action! Filming in Paradise Orange County Regional History Center

from the Black Lagoon.” Follow the Florida Walk of Fame and go on “set”. Thru 12.31

The American Collection Orlando Museum of Art

Thru 07.25

Clyde Butcher: Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

fragility of the Western Everglades. (See story on pg. 72.) 05.22-08.29

Knuffle Funny: The Art and Whimsy of Mo Willems Orlando Museum of Art

www.omart.org

www.thehistorycenter.org

Discover Florida’s surprising history in filmmaking, featuring artifacts from local shoots such as “Apollo 13” and “Creature

are: Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, George Inness, Herman Herzog, Robert Henri and Charles Sheeler.

This exhibition includes more than 40 paintings and sculptures from the nation’s early years through the 20th century. These works reflect many important trends in American art. Among the artists represented

Recognizing the critical and formative role of landscape and the environment in the American experience, the OMA presents Changing Landscapes, which includes this Clyde Butcher exhibit. Big Cypress Swamp features 40 stunning large-format black and white photographs depicting the beauty and

www.omart.org

Author and illustrator, Mo Willems,

1. Ricou Browning is helped with his Creature from the Black Lagoon costume, courtesy of the State Archives of Florida 2. Herman Herzog,The St. Johns River Entering the Atlantic Ocean, ca. 1888-1890, oil on canvas, 62 1/2 x 52 1/2”, on long-term loan from the Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc. 3. Clyde Butcher, Moonrise, 1986, silver gelatin fiber print, 46 x 60”, collection of the artist 4. ©2004 Mo Willems, illustration for Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, 2003, published by Hyperion Books for Children, exhibition organized by the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, Abilene, Texas

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

19


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 0 o f 1 4 }

Orlando continued...

has been hailed by The New York Times Book Review as “the biggest new talent to emerge thus far in the ’00s.” Winner of several prestigious Caldecott Honor awards, Willems began his career as a writer and animator for television. He garnered six Emmy awards for his writing on Sesame Street, and created Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City. In 2003, Willems launched his picture book career with the bestselling Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! Thru 05.23

Auspicious Vision: Edward Wales Root and American Modernism

The Mennello Museum of American Art

Palm Beach Thru 04.18

www.mennellomuseum.org

Art collector, Edward Wales Root, acquired more than 227 paintings and works on paper, which provide a valuable record of the artists who

emerged during the “American Century.” The works were created from 1896-97 to circa 1955. Drawn from this collection, the exhibit will feature paintings created by Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove and Jackson Pollock.

Paintings from the Reign of Victoria: The Royal Holloway Collection The Society of the Four Arts www.fourarts.org

This exhibition showcases 60 extraordinary paintings which not only exemplify the astute taste of a late Victorian collector, but also illustrate some of the highest achievements in the figurative and landscape art of the nineteenth century. The collection includes

many of the most visible and praised “modern canvases” in London in the 1880s. Included are seminal works by such revered artists as Sir Edwin Landseer, William Powell Frith, Sir John Everett Millais, and David Roberts. Ponte Vedra Beach Thru 04.24

Jean Blackburn The Cultural Center www.ccpvb.org

Jean Blackburn’s paintings portray intricate, fluid and reflective patterns inspired by rivers, lakes and oceans. Her images explore the surface and depth of the water, creating a multi-dimensional effect. Each work is a

1. Jackson Pollock, Number 34, 1948 © 2009 The Pollock Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society, New York 2. Erskine Nicol, The Missing Boat, 1876, oil on canvas, Royal Holloway Collection, University of London

20

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 1 o f 1 4 }

P o n t e Ve d r a B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

unique interpretation of the subject. Swirling and undulating movements create a hypnotic effect sure to delight and fascinate.

through the rarely seen photographs of Frederick W. Glasier (1866-1950). The exhibition features more than 60 photographs and approximately a dozen lithographic posters that depict the circus coming to town, performances of spectacular feats, and the behind-the-scenes

05.15-09.06

life of circus members. (See story on pg. 44.)

www.ringling.org

HEYDAY offers a glimpse into the most dynamic period of the American circus

St. Petersburg Thru 04.04

The Baroque World of Fernando Botero Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition represents the first retrospective of the artist’s work in North America since 1974. Included are 100 paintings,

www.ringling.org

Sarasota

HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

side Rockwell originals: paintings, drawings and limited artist’s prints.

Thru 04.25

In Search of Norman Rockwell’s America

In Search of Norman Rockwell’s America is a groundbreaking exhibition that pairs the work of American icon Norman Rockwell with images by award-winning photojournalist Kevin Rivoli. Unprecedented in concept, this exhibition features 35 black and white photographs along-

1. Jean Blackburn, Myakka River #113, oil on canvas, 48” x 48” 2. Barnum & Bailey, The Four Sisters Deike, Strobridge Lithographing Company, 1909, 40 ½ x 30 1/8” 3. Norman Rockwell, Boys Fishing, Conte Crayon, Connecticut Valley Historical Museum, Gift of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 4. Kevin Rivoli, Frog Pond, Giclee Print, courtesy of the Artist 5. Fernando Botero, The First Lady, 1989, courtesy of Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

21


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 2 o f 1 4 }

S t . Pe t e r s b u r g c o n t i n u e d . . .

sculptures and drawings culled from the artist’s private collection. Many works have never been exhibited in public. Thru 04.18

Dalí: Gems Salvador Dalí Museum
 www.salvadordalimuseum.org

Dalí: Gems features selections of the artist’s work by celebrated friends of the Dalí. The ex-

paintings, drawings, glassware, and objets d’art. The jewelry, designed by Dalí in the 1940s and 1950s, is a highlight of the exhibition as well as Dalí’s Alchemy of the Philosophers, published in 1976.

This comprehensive exhibition on the career of the great French artist, Henri Matisse (1869-1954), showcases over 170 works of art spanning 50 years of Matisse’s career, with

Thru 05.02

Dean Mitchell: Visions with Heart and Soul Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art central/museum

Thru 04-18

Celebration of Henri Matisse: Master of Light and Line Tampa Museum of Art

Tarpon Springs

www.spcollege.edu/

Tampa

www.tampamuseum.org

hibit includes over 80 exquisite and rarely viewed pieces from the museum’s vault, including: jewelry,

particular emphasis placed on the role that printmaking played in the development of the artist’s career. Examples of every printmaking technique

used by Matisse are included. Almost all of the prints involve serial imagery, showing the development of a reclining or seated pose, the study of facial expressions, and the transformation of a subject from a straight representation to something more abstract or developed.

This retrospective exhibition spans 38 years of Dean Mitchell’s career and includes 66 drawings, watercolors, acrylic and oil paintings selected from private collections throughout the US. Mitchell is recognized as one of America’s finest realist artists.

1. Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory, brooch (La persistencia de la memoria, broche), 1949,
gold, diamonds
 2. Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Marie-Jose in a Yellow Dress (III), 1950, color lift-ground aquatint (black with four colors), image: 21 1/8 x 16 7/16”, sheet: 29 15/16 x 22 1/4”, Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation (1454 –104051),© 2009 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, courtesy of America Federation of Arts 3. Dean Mitchell, Rowena, 1990

22

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 3 o f 1 4 }

Vero Beach Thru 05.16

Food for Thought: Sculpture by Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

ated scale. Each piece is meticulously crafted with intense attention to detail, rich color and a final humorous touch.

dialogue between natural forms and industrial materials.

Thru 06.27

Thru 04.11

secular themes in the Habsburg Trea16th-century repertoire sures
Renaisof Flemish tapestrysance Tapestries making: the legendary from the Kunfounding of ancient sthistorisches Rome by Romulus and Museum, Vienna Remus.

A Secret Language: Sculpture by John Bisbee Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz work as partners to create large scale bronze sculptures of fruits and vegetables. The works offer luscious reproductions of food such as tomatoes, citrus, watermelons, and asparagus, conceived in an exagger-

W. Palm Beach

John Bisbee creates large scale sculptures by welding and forging everyday metal objects, such as nails and spikes, into organic forms. His sculptures are both minimal and complex—and evoke a

Norton Museum of Art

Thru 05.09

Avedon Fashion 1944–2000 Norton Museum of Art

www.norton.org

The tapestry collection of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, is one of the greatest www.norton.org in existence. Richly Richard Avedon revowoven with silk, wool, lutionized fashion and gold thread, these 8 gigantic wall hangings were made for the Hapsburg emperors at the famous Brussels atelier of Frans Geubels. They depict one of the most beloved

1. Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz, The Arc, 2004, bronze, 75 x 215 x 50” 2. John Bisbee, Helio, 2006, 12-inch spikes, 84 x 84 x 9”, collection of the artist 3. Renaissance tapestry, The Founding of Rome, circa 1565-70, Brussels, workshop of Frans Geubels, wool, silk, silver, and gold, 11’ 10” x 10’ 5”, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, T VIII/6 4. Richard Avedon (American, 1923–2004), Veruschka, New York, January 1967, © 2009 The Richard Avedon Foundation

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

23


C A L E N D A R

{ P g. 1 4 o f 1 4 }

W. P a l m B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

photography in the post-World War II era with his spirited, imaginative images of the modern woman. This spectacular exhibition will feature more than 160 works—including edition and vintage prints, contact sheets, and original magazines.

Harry Bertoia’s Sunburst III (1968), and Sir Anthony Caro’s Topper (1978-79).

the 1930s are shown along with a group of American and British propaganda posters from World War I. Each group represents the power of the image—and the artist—

Winter Park

Thru 05.02

Here Comes the Sun: Warhol and Art after 1960 in the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

This exhibition features a diverse selection of artworks made after 1960, all of which belong to the Norton, including Andy Warhol’s flower painting of 1964,

Thru 08.01

Man and the Machine Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

CFAM is proud to premiere this exhibition of rare, Stalinist-era propaganda posters. Following an extensive conservation process, this selection of Russian posters from

in social and political history.

In 19th century America, women who wanted to study art had few avenues open to them. Those belonging to an artistic family could learn from male family members. Those with means could attend the first art academies in the United States, or travel to Europe. This exhibition examines the work of women who chose each of these avenues including Mary Cassatt and members of the Peale family, among notable others. O n V iew

Thru 04.23, 05.12-08.01

Out of the Shadow Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College cfam.rollins.edu

1. Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987), Flowers, 1964, acrylic, silkscreen on canvas, 24 x 24”, exchange with Jules Brassner, 86.33, © 2009 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2. USSR Strengthen Civil Aviation, 1933, lithograph, collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum 3. Martha Bare, Still Life with Roses and Vase, 1981, oil on canvas, 29 x 20 1/2”, private collection

24

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


SEE FEEL LIVE

Visit www.norton.org to see the exhibitions and collections on view now.

Become a member today!

Collections | Exhibitions | Events | Programs | Tours | Shop | Dine 1451 S . O l i v e Av e n u e | We s t P a l m B e a c h , F l o r i d a 3 3 4 0 1 | 5 6 1 . 8 3 2 . 5 1 9 6 | w w w. n o r t o n . o rg


gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaum contemporary.com

Artist: GLORIA KISCH Gloria Kisch has had over 200 shows on four continents. Her work has been exhibited in dozens of museums, collected and reviewed internationally, and exhibited beside such art world luminaries as Dale Chihuly, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, and Andy Warhol. SCULPTOR

PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gavlak Gallery www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: Jose Alvarez ALVAREZ creates collages that incorporate the exuberance of color, texture and scale to describe an experience. Employing his trademark materials—porcupine quills, feathers, mica and mineral crystals—combined with scientific notions of the universe, Alvarez creates intense images that invite us to look more closely at the perfection and beauty within the world.

From left: Gloria Kisch, Immortal Flower III, 2007, stainless steel, 34 x 34 x 13”, courtesy of the artist; Jose Alvarez, After the Eclipse (detail), 2008, feathers, crystals, porcupine quills, collage, mica, enamel, resin, ink, sequences and beads on inkjet print, 44 x 72”, courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach

26

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 2 o f 4 }

NAPLES

Gallery: Trudy Labell Fine Art www.trudylabellfineart.com

Artist: Melody Postma “MY WORK is a multi-layered evolution of vivid color, playful shapes, textural fragments and long forgotten photographic images of nonchalant figures. Each layer is a moment, a thought, sometimes revealing what came before and at other times hidden as the momentum continues.”

TAMPA

Gallery: Clayton Galleries www.claytongalleries.net

Artist: BENJAMIN DIMMITT DIMMITT , a former

ST. AUGUSTINE

Clearwater resident, lives in NYC. He returns to Florida regularly to photograph the lush tropical and wooded landscape that is abundant throughout the state. His work is part of many private and public collections and he has been in numerous exhibitions.

Gallery: Butterfield Garage Art Gallery www.butterfieldgarage.com

Artist: Mark Moran

ST. AUGUSTINE resident and

artist/designer Mark Moran creates digital collages that combine bold graphics and vintage elements to create surreal, and playful, environments.

Clockwise from top left: Melody Postma, Bathing Beauty, oil on panel, 36 x 36”, courtesy of the artist; Benjamin Dimmitt, Palm Hammock, Titusville, FL, courtesy of the artist; Mark Moran, Flagler Station, digital collage, 6 x 8 1/2”, courtesy of the artist

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010

27


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 3 o f 4 }

ST. AUGUSTINE

Gallery: Cutter and Cutter Fine Art/ Loves Art Emporium www.lovesemporium.com

Artist: ROBERT COOK A SELF TAUGHT

art-

ist, Cook paints “moods”... late evening, early morning, impressions of melancholy or lonesomeness. “The feeling you get when fall comes and the shadows change.”

CORAL GABLES

Gallery: The Americas Collection www.americascollection.com

Artist: Jorge Cavelier

THROUGHOUT HIS ARTISTIC CAREER, Cavelier has purposely

drawn inspiration from the heart of one of the most striking forests in the world, which happens to be located in his native country, Colombia. By first observing, then experiencing and ultimately becoming part of that nature, the artist dares to leave behind his comfort zone, and any point of reference to his familiar world, in order to fully understand what it means to lose oneself to then emerge spiritually renewed and forever changed. From left: Robert Cook, Moody Blues, courtesy of the artist; Jorge Cavelier, Oro Verde, Serigraph, 32 x 42 1/2”, courtesy of the artist

28

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


G A L L E R Y

{ P g. 4 o f 4 }

PALM BEACH

NAPLES

Gallery: Holden Luntz Gallery

Gallery: Longstreth Goldberg Art

www.holdenluntz.com

www.plgart.com

Artist: BRIAN OGLESBEE

Artist: Robert Creamer “ P H O T O G R A P H Y has been very good to me. Photography, most of all, has given me the opportunity to explore, be curious, and allowed me an avenue to interpret the world around me as an artist, a teacher and as a professional architectural photographer.”

has exhibited his photographs in group and one-man shows in the US, Canada and Japan.

His work hangs in public and private collections includOGLESBEE

PALM BEACH GARDENS

Gallery: Onessimo Fine Art www.gavlakgallery.com

Artist: Gary Borse

BORSE’S IMAGES depict the color

and vibrancy of the Florida landscape in a dimension that takes you into your own feelings while you are drawn into the work. The series of glazes reveal other colors that have come before, to create movement and vitality at the surface of the piece. The work comes alive with passages that take you on a color journey into space and light.

ing: The George Eastman House, Rochester, NY; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; Museum of Fine Arts, St Petersburg, FL.

Clockwise from top: Robert Creamer, Abstraction Of Petals, courtesy of the artist; Brian Oglesbee, Untitled, courtesy of Holden Luntz Gallery; Gary Borse, Cypress Hearts, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 36”, courtesy of the artist

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010

29


Interview

MUSEU MICHAEL CULVER: SHARING A PA S S I O N

of

As the NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

celebrates its 10th ANNIVERSARY,

we thought we would catch up with MICHAEL CULVER,

a very

busy man since taking on the role of DIRECTOR AND CHIEF CURATOR

in January of 2009.

30

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


NAPLES

UM

f

ART


T

THE 2010 SEASON at the Naples Museum of Art (NMA) is in full swing with a diverse lineup including glass artist Dale Chihuly, sculptor Gaston Lachaise, early modern French photographers, works from the American Associated Artists organization, a compelling array of photography, painting and sculpture by Florida artists, as well as an extensive selection of American Modernism and Modern Mexican Masters from the museum’s permanent collection. As the Naples institution celebrates its tenth anniversary, Michael Culver, Director and Chief Curator since January last year, has been busy meeting the day-to-day challenges of running a world-class museum. In addition to all the necessary curatorial skills, he is not afraid to roll up his sleeves when it comes to work around the museum, a quality that endears him to the institution’s small staff. Prior to his arrival in Naples, Culver was Executive Director and Curator at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art in Ogunquit, Maine. The museum, serving a

1. Dale Chihuly: Flavus Black Vessel with Maroon Leaf, 1993, blown glass, 17 x 34 x 17”, photo: Chuck Taylor; Saturn Red Black Macchia with Orange Chrome Lip Wrap, 2006, blown glass, 26 x 41 x 28”, photo: Terry Rishel; Shell and Sealife Resting on Gilded Base, 1999, blown glass, 22 x 16 x 16”, photo: Scott M. Leen. 2. Gaston Lachaise, Floating Figure, 1927, Bronze, 47 x 91 x 35”, courtesy of the Lachaise Foundation.

OV: Given the extraordinary challenges facing museums, the NMA’s tenth anniversary is a significant achievement. What has contributed to the success of the museum?

MC: The primary reason for the NMA’s success is

32

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

its commitment to offer quality exhibitions of great diversity. When I arrived here one year ago, the museum was showing both Fernando Botero and Norman Rockwell. That sort of variety is instrumental in attracting an audience. Over the past decade, the NMA has shown Chinese, Cuban and

/May 2010


Interview

seasonal resort community along the Atlantic Coast, is home to an impressive collection of 20th-century artists such as Thomas Hart Benton, Charles Burchfield, Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Mark Tobey, and Louise Nevelson. Culver’s museum career began somewhat by chance. In the early 1980s, he was teaching at the University of Louisville when he met Henry Strater, a painter, philanthropist and founder of the Ogunquit museum. The two shared an interest in American art and Ernest Hemingway, whom Strater had known personally. One year later, when the curator at Ogunquit fell ill, Strater offered Culver an opportunity to fill in during the summer. He ended up staying for 25 years. A Kentucky native, Culver holds a master’s degree in painting and a doctorate in art history and humanities from the University of Louisville. An accomplished abstract painter in his own right, Culver’s work is included in numerous private and public collections, including the Rhode Island School of Design Art Museum, Humana Corporation, and the Owensboro (KY) Museum of Fine Art.

3. Installation view of Modern Mexican Masters organized by the Naples Museum of Art, photo: Christine Elzinga. 4. Brassaï, Fille de Montmartre Playing Russian Billiards, Blvd. Rochechouart, 1932-33, gelatin silver print, 11 ¼ x 8 ¼ ”, from the collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg.

Mexican art, as well as works by Ansel Adams, Andy Warhol, Picasso, Matisse, the Wyeth family, and Monet. And this is not to mention noteworthy exhibits on baseball, the St. John’s Bible, studio art furniture and glass, and architecture. Every day, we receive comments from visiOnV

i e w

tors about what a wonderfully eclectic exhibition schedule we have. It is this variety that encourages visitors to return again and again.

OV: What attracted you to the museum?

MC: Having previously been a director and curator Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

33


Interview

of a museum dedicated exclusively to American art, the opportunity to delve into the wider world of art initially attracted me to the NMA. Also, during the job interview process, I was able to meet briefly with the museum staff and see their accomplishments. It was impressive, and then I knew that it would be a pleasure to work with this group of skilled and dedicated professionals. I also felt that, after more than 20 years in the business, I had something to offer and could make a useful contribution here. I love my work as a painter, teacher, director and curator, but I also want what I do to make a difference.

OV: A museum director’s role is often a delicate balancing act. What has been the most challenging aspect of the job so far?

MC: My position as director and curator is what makes my role such a balancing act—the distribution of time between the two positions can be challenging. Like everyone else, there are times when it seems that there aren’t enough hours in the day. On those days, I leave my office and walk through the museum. It sounds corny, but I almost always return thinking how lucky I am to be paid to be surrounded by great art. How bad can it be?

OV: Has your background as an artist helped you as a museum director?

MC: My career as a painter has had an extremely

positive impact on my role as a curator and director. When I approach artists, I am perceived differently than a curator who is exclusively an art historian. If I had one wish for curators and directors, it would be that they have a solid background in at least one art-making medium. Tom Hoving, the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, once told me that he learned how to recognize fakes by “apprenticing” with a great art forger. Likewise, I think anyone who takes museum studies courses at college with the intent of becoming a curator or director should also be required to take studio art classes. I don’t expect a curator or director to necessarily be an exhibiting artist as I am, but to have made a painting, sculpture, print, or photograph seems essential in order to speak about art, and art history, with any real authority.

OV: What is the most rewarding part of your role at the NMA?

MC: People might think it is curating “blockbuster” exhibitions. However, I find it more satisfying to introduce audiences to young or lesser-known mature artists. To use an analogy from my native Kentucky, I think that, like picking a long-shot in a horse race, you can reap the largest rewards from exhibiting an “undiscovered” artist. The NMA audience is sophisticated and has seen the “big names”. New artists are more exciting and chal-

“SHOWING EDWARD HOPPER IS A ‘NO-BRAINER’. HIS ART HAS ALREADY BEEN VALIDATED. THE RUSH COMES FROM INTRODUCING THAT NEXT GREAT ARTIST.”

34

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art with entrance gates: Albert Paley, Untitled, 1999, steel, bronze & stainless steel, 240 x 120”, collection of the Naples Museum of Art, Museum Purchase

lenging because they challenge viewers to decide for themselves the artists’ worth. Such personal discovery of a new talent is a very heady experience. Also, showcasing an unknown artist means that the NMA may acquire a work from that artist before he or she becomes better known and the price of their work goes up. Finally, good curators like to take chances. This is a large part of what we are hired to do. Showing Edward Hopper is a “nobrainer”. His art has already been validated. The rush comes from introducing that next great artist.

OV: What do you think about when planning exhibits? How will you help to attract audiences to the NMA in the future?

MC: Words that come to mind when planning exhibits are: diversity, quality, accessibility, education, creative, affecting, challenging, and entertaining. If an exhibition contains all of these aspects, there will be an audience for that show. That said, all planning starts with great art. It’s hard to explain exactly why curators make certain OnV

i e w

decisions—probably some combination of the heart, head and gut.

OV: What changes, if any, can we expect at the NMA in the near future?

MC: If you are asking what changes I will bring to the NMA, I am not sure that you will notice many changes in the immediate future. Many exhibits are planned two or three years in the future, and I’ve only been here a year or so. If I didn’t believe what the NMA has been doing for the past decade is fundamentally sound, I wouldn’t have accepted a position here. The artist Man Ray said, “There is no progress in art any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it.” I feel the same way about my role as director and curator. In terms of new developments, we have created an annual Collier County student exhibition and an annual Florida Contemporary exhibit. I think by bringing these two groups into the NMA, we make them feel invested in “their” museum. Too Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

35


Interview

often, museums are seen as elitist institutions that cater only to a narrow segment of the population. That perspective has to be eliminated.

point me toward the Mona Lisa”. I’m sorry to say that I have seen similar scenarios in person.

OV: In terms of your role at the NMA, what—eventually—would you like to be remembered for?

OV: What advice do you have for readers when they come to visit the museum?

MC: Whatever special exhibit may be showing, don’t ignore the second floor where selections from our permanent collection of American Modernists and Modern Mexican Masters are hung. It is an exceptional collection that would be the pride of any museum in the country. Second, if you like what you see at the NMA, please return often and bring people that have never visited us. Many people in and around Naples do not know what a jewel they have in their midst. We need everyone’s support to maintain the quality that has been the hallmark of the NMA since it opened a decade ago. And, if you really like what you see, please join as a NMA member. Third, give yourself enough time to really look at the art. I don’t expect everyone to like everything in the museum, or to devote an equal amount of time to each object. But, seek out what attracts, moves, or challenges you, and then spend some time understanding why. I remember a great New Yorker cartoon where a limousine pulls up in front of the Louvre, and a well-dressed man jumps out and tells the security guard, “I only have five minutes,

MC: I can’t think of anything better than to be remembered as someone whose passion for art created a passion in others. Along with that, I’d also like to be remembered as an educator and art historian who made art accessible and understandable to everyone. Passion is inadequate if one cannot articulate the reason for that passion.

OV: How often do you get to paint these days? Has Florida been an inspiration in that regard?

MC: The first six months after I started at the NMA, I didn’t paint at all. Because I came in the middle of the exhibition season, I needed to devote a lot of time not only to catching on, but to catching up. Since then, I’ve set up a studio and tried to paint every day, but some days I have only time to sketch out ideas for paintings. In Florida, I am still getting used to the flatness, the change in vegetation, and the greenness. I very much like the morning and evening light here, which makes my reaction to colors quite different from that caused by the northern light I was previously used to. O n V iew

“TOO OFTEN, MUSEUMS HAVE BEEN SEEN AS ELITIST INSTITUTIONS THAT CATER TO A SEGMENT OF THE POPULATION. THAT PERSPECTIVE HAS TO BE ELIMINATED.”

36

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010


Dale Chihuly, Saturn Red Black Macchia with Orange Chrome Lip Wrap, 2006, 26 x 41 x 28 inches. Photo by Terry Rishel.

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

CHIHULY: RECENT WORK THROUGH APRIL 25, 2010 In 2000, an unforgettable Dale Chihuly exhibition christened the Naples Museum of Art as it first opened its doors. In 2010, a spectacular new show by the renowned artist is part of the museum’s 10th-anniversary season. For four decades, Chihuly has produced a body of work unlike any other, helping to redefine the medium and revolutionize the American studio glass movement. Additionally, there will be a special store selling Studio Editions and prints by Dale Chihuly and books and DVDs about his work. Generously underwritten by Harris Private Bank and Friends of Art at the Naples Museum of Art. Exhibition organized by the Naples Museum of Art in cooperation with Chihuly Studio.

ALSO THIS SEASON: Woman: The Art of Gaston Lachaise through April 30, 2010 People, Places & Things: The Art of Ben Aronson, Joel Babb and Alec Soth through April 18, 2010 French Twist: Masterworks of Photography from Atget to Man Ray May 1 through June 30, 2010

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART CELEBRATES

PATTY & JAY BAKER

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

®

Southwest Florida’s premier art museum. Three floors. 30,000 square feet. Y E A R S

5833 Pelican Bay Boulevard, Naples, FL 34108 For tickets and information, call (800) 597-1900 or visit www.thephil.org Member of the American Association of Museums


G ON VIEW:

The art of

YAYOI KUSAMA

at Fairchild Tropical


ARTin the GARDEN

Botanic Garden OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

•

A

p r i l

/May 2010

39


ART in

the GARDEN

C C U RRENTLY ON VIEW AT

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden in Coral Gables, are the distinctive sculptures of several world-renowned artists featured as part of Fairchild’s annual art exhibition. This extraordinary pairing of art and nature continues a proud tradition that began in 2003 with Patricia Van Dalen’s Luminous Gardens, followed by Dale Chihuly in 2005. Since then, Fairchild’s art program has gone on to exhibit such influential

40

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

artists as Fernando Botero, Roy Lichtenstein, Franz West, Ursula von Rydingsvard, Michele Oka Doner, Mark Dion, Joshua Levin and FrancoisXavier Lalanne. The 2010 art season boasts an exuberant new sculptural ensemble by the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, a living legend of the international art avant-garde. Flamboyant yet profound, her oeuvre encompasses unique masterpieces in painting, sculpture, and installation, as well as mass production and popular culture. Kusama also produces playful sculpture on a monumental scale. Her first large-scale sculpture appeared in 1994, a huge, vivid yellow pumpkin covered with an optical spot pattern, which was installed at the end of a jetty on the island of Naoshima in the Seto Sea, Japan. Her work is in the collections of leading museums throughout the world in-

pgs. 38-39: yayoi kusama, guidepost to

cluding the Museum of Modern Art, New York; LACMA, Los Angeles; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Tate Modern, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.

KUSAMA’S ARTIFICIAL GARDEN UNFOLDS IN ALL ITS PSYCHEDELIC GLORY, AGAINST THE EXOTIC BACKDROP OF FAIRCHILD’S GARDENS.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


the new space, 2009; above: yayoi kusama, three pumpkins, 2009. all kusama art is on loan from gagosian gallery.

“Fairchild is absolutely thrilled to bring Yayoi Kusama’s enchanting art works to South Florida,” said Bruce Greer, Fairchild’s board of trustees’ President. “Her surreal, botanically inspired monumental sculptures, brought together with Fairchild’s world-famous tropical garden landscape, are sure to provide a magical experience for visitors of all ages.” Included in the exhibit are Kusama’s Flowers that Bloom at Midnight, a group of her

classic Pumpkins, as well as Guidepost to a New Space, a multi-part floating work specifically conceived for one of Fairchild’s large garden ponds. This will be the first time anywhere in the world that all these sculptures have been shown together in an outdoor setting. Flowers that Bloom at Midnight consists of vividly painted, giant cast flowers measuring between five and sixteen feet in height. These sinuous baroque forms provide a liveOnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

ly contrast with the monolithic Pumpkins. The multi-part floating work Guidepost to the New Space, a series of rounded “humps” in fire-engine red with white polka dots, protrudes enigmatically from the water in a pond on the 83-acre garden. Thus Kusama’s artificial garden unfolds in all its psychedelic glory, against the exotic backdrop of Fairchild’s gardens with their equally rare and wondrous tropical vegetation. Yayoi Kusama at Fairchild c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

41


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 1. yayoi kusama, flowers that bloom at midnight (detail), 2009 2. mark di suvero, gnarly, 2008 3. dale chihuly, cobalt herons, 2005

42

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

is part of an annual exhibition series in support of the Garden’s conservation work, educational outreach programs and commitment to cultural enhancement in South Florida. Fairchild houses internationally important collections of rare tropical fruit and cycads, as well as the largest palm collection in the U.S. The Garden maintains an international conservation program, which works with more than 20 countries to preserve some of the worlds’ rarest

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

species and tropical habitats. Rounding out the Fairchild exhibition is a collection of masterpieces from artists including Cameron Gainer, Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova, Mark di Suvero, Kris Martin, Dale Chihuly, and Daisy Youngblood. Gainer’s mythically inspired sculptures, di Suvero’s massive steel structures and Chihuly’s organic installations add to a truly magical encounter with art and nature. (See Calendar pg. 11.) O n V iew


ART AT FAIRCHILD

The extraordinary pairing of art and nature

Featuring works by:

CHIHULY • DI SUVERO • GAINER • KUSAMA RODRIGUEZ- CASANOVA • YOUNGBLOOD through May

30, 2010

ADMISSION is free for Fairchild members and children 5 and under, $20 for adults, $15 senior citizens 65 and older, $10 for children 6-17. Group rates available. For information, please call 305.663.8088. Present this ad for $5 off adult admission and $2 off children’s admission.

10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, Florida 33156 | 305.667.1651 | www.fairchildgarden.org Photos by Benjamin F. Thacker and Gaby Orihuela/FTBG.


05.15-09.06

Photographs of FREDERICK W. GLASIER

at the John and Mable RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART

44

OnV

i e w

HEY

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


DAY


A

AT THE TURN OF THE 20 th CENTURY in America,

the circus was an unmatched social spectacle. Large circus companies were like mobile cities, requiring an enormous staff to install and break down operations every few days. At their peak, circus companies toured more than 150 cities and towns each year, playing to more than two million people over a seven month season. HEYDAY: Photographs of Frederick W. Glasier, at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, will feature more than 60 photographs of Frederick Whitman Glasier, who photographed the circus and served as the official photographer for the Barnum & Bailey Circus. Glasier’s unrestricted access to both grand performances and backstage life allowed him to explore the public and private personalities of some of the greatest entertainers of the era.

ABOVE: FREDERICK W. GLASIER, (1866-1950), CIRCA 1927 OPPOSITE: PETE MARDO, 1923 PREVIOUS PAGES: MAUDE BANVARD, THE CATCH, BROCKTON FAIR, MASSACHUSETTS, 1907

46

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

“He was travelling a lot with the artists and thus could build this wonderful relationship. He had this intimate look that not everyone was able to capture,” says Deborah W. Walk, Tibbals curator at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and co-curator of the exhibition. HEYDAY is arranged to chronologically illustrate the event of the circus coming to town. Lithographic promotional posters would vividly announce upcoming performances, with hyperbolic claims about the spectacular events soon to unfold. Examples of these posters

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

are juxtaposed with Glasier’s photographs that document the arrival of the circus, from the excitement of parades that take over small towns, to the setup of the massive big top tent, which could hold more than 12,000 people. Highlights include photographs of circus performers captured in the midst of their acts, such as the Deike Sisters, a gymnastic family with the Barnum & Bailey circus. The exhibition features both a photograph (ca. 1910) and a 1909 promotional poster that illustrate the Deike Sisters’ “contortional

I M A G E S A R E F R O M T H E C O L L E C T I O N OF THE J O H N A N D M A B L E R I N G L I N G M U S E U M OF ART


OnV

i e w •

M

ay

2010

00


ABOVE: CHIEF IRON TAIL, CIRCA 1914 TOP: THE DEIKE SISTERS, CIRCA 1910 OPPOSITE: MADEMOISELLE OCTAVIA, SNAKE CHARMER, CIRCA 1901

48

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

cleverness and muscular control in artistic bending.” Glasier also captured a split-second moment in a trapeze aerial act by the Flying Banvards in the photograph Maude Banvard, The Catch, Brockton Fair (1907). Glasier’s great strength was as a portraitist, and his photographs reveal an intimate connection with the circus and sideshow performers. 
“Glasier had the ability to unveil the humanity behind the façade, and the circus, of course, is most of all about façade. He transcends the portrait of a person. His photography is not only a unique historical document, it’s about the people,”
says Peter Kayafas, co-curator of the exhibition and director of the Eakins Press Foundation. “Glasier had the

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

capacity as a portrait photographer that allowed his camera to disappear. Even 100 years later we feel like looking at these people.” A 1914 portrait of Chief Iron Tail, a star of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, captured the strength and dignity of the last survivor of the Battles of Little Big Horn and Wounded Knee. His photograph of Mademoiselle Octavia (ca. 1901), known as the “Yankee Snake Charmer,” has a sensual aspect as snakes writhe over Octavia’s form-fitting, sleeveless outfit. Charmion, Strong Woman (1904), is a bold image of a partially disrobed circus star whose muscular poses challenge ideas of feminine beauty and physical strength. Pete


ABOVE: ONE OF GLASIER’S CAMERAS OPPOSITE: MADEMOISELLE SCHEEL WITH LIONS, CIRCA 1905

50

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

Mardo (1923), is a portrait of Peter Guckeyson, who ran away from home and joined the circus to become a traditional white-faced clown under the name Pete Mardo. Frederick W. Glasier was born on March 5, 1866, in Adams, Massachusetts, to parents Henry and Lucy Ann Glasier.

Prior to starting his career in photography, Glasier worked as a town clerk and textile designer in his hometown. By 1890, Glasier moved to Brockton, Massachusetts, and later opened the Glasier Art Studio and Museum. From his residence, Glasier worked, exhibited his photographs, and sold copies of his prints. By 1900, Glasier took publicity photographs for major circuses and Wild West shows. He had traveled out West and was greatly influenced by William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody. Performers had their photographs taken by Glasier, which they later sold to their fans. While Glasier took scenic shots of the circus and portraits of circus performers for commercial sale, he also documented the daily life of the traveling circus and Wild West show. Glasier also gave public

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010

lectures on his photographs to increase his income. These lectures were designed around his photographs of Native Americans, the circus, and the history of the Pilgrims. Glasier used three 8 x 10 inch King view cameras to which he added a Thornton-Pickard focal plane shutter with a speed up to 1/3,000th of a second (just a little longer than today’s camera flash speed and quicker than it takes to blink your eyes!). Glasier also used a Coerz Celor lens on a 5 x 7 inch Graflex with an accordion-line pleated focusing hood, as well as a postcard Kodak camera. With all this equipment, Glasier is said to be a master of the “action shot,” capturing an image of an object or person in motion. After over fifty years as a professional photographer, Glasier retired and spent his time wood carving, or “whittling” as he called it. He died on July 28, 1950, in Brockton, and was buried in his hometown of Adams, MA. According to Kayafas, Glasier should be regarded not only as a gifted circus photographer, but also among the greats of American photography. (See Calendar pg. 21.) O n V iew


A Proper In EDUCATING CHILDREN

52

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

in fine art is


ntroduction a GREAT IDEA. Museums make it FUN!

MIKE SHAW, THE CRITIC, © MIKE SHAW


A

Boca Raton Museum of Art Boca Raton

have become quite masterful at developing fun and clever ways to introduce kids to fine art—gallery hunts, hands-on workshops, art camps, family tours and interactive exhibits foster interest in classic masterpieces. Art teaches children to think beyond boundaries, explore possibilities, ask questions, and better understand the world. These skills can be applied to learning in science, history, math and beyond. On View has invited several of Florida’s fine art museums to list their most popular kids’ programs and offerings—just make sure to call ahead for dates, times and fees. O n V iew ART MUSEUM S

54

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p

Once a month,

MEET A MASTER,

CREATE A MASTERPIECE gives children,

grades 3 to 5, an opportunity to learn about a master artist on exhibit at the Museum and create a masterpiece in the style of the selected artist.

p ARTFUL ADVENTURE SUNDAY, a fun family program led by seasoned art educators, draws inspiration from the Museum’s permanent collection into a studio class designed for everyone.

p

MORNING MOVIES: FILMS FOR

The Museum offers free screenings of family films during school break times. These G-rated films enchant viewers with rich storytelling and inspiring tales.Viewers are exposed to famous works by creative geniuses and learn about their lives. THE FAMILY.

www.bocamuseum.org

p r i l

/May 2010

A L L I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F T H E M USEUMS


The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Jacksonville

Dunedin Fine Art Center Dunedin

p Hosts DROP-IN ART every Tuesday. Chil-

dren, ages 4-10, have the opportunity to explore the galleries or gardens and experiment with a different art process.

p Offers WEEKEND CLASSES such as:

Art For Two where tots, ages 3-5, and their favorite adult, enjoy gallery visits and art making. Art Adventures where children, ages 6-12 take classes in painting, printmaking, collage and construction with changing themes.

p ART CONNECTIONS, a hands-on, mul-

tidisciplinary experience for all ages, combines art, music, literature, history, dance and poetry through a series of learning stations ranging from a collage table to a state-of-the-art virtual canvas.

p EDUCATIONAL TOURS examine original

works of art from Ancient Egyptian sculpture to American 20th-century painting. Trained docents engage students in discussions of the works of art. Tours include time in the museum’s gardens and hands-on exploration with studio art projects.

p The DAVID L. MASON CHILDREN’S

is an interpretive/ interactive gallery space for children and their families that provides hands-on activities assisting with an understanding and appreciation of the work of artists exhibited in the galleries. ART MUSEUM (DLM)

p Visual summer camps, such as MINI MAS-

for kids, ages 4.5 to 5, and SIZZLIN’ SUMMER for children, ages 6 to 10, incorporate a variety of media, techniques, art history, and multicultural appreciation in a fun and educational environment. Working with themes, students rotate through drawing and painting, 3-dimensional art, clay, and various hands-on projects. TERS

p ART SQUAD features art camp
classes for

students, ages 11-14, which are divided into groups that rotate through classes in photography/black & white darkroom, computers, throwing on the wheel, drawing and painting.

www.cummer.org

www.dfac.org OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

55


MAM Miami Art Museum Miami

MOCA Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville

p MAM & SCHOOLS offers multiple pro-

p Offers ART EXPLORIUM LOFT where

grams in collaboration with local schools to help children develop an understanding for modern and contemporary art while complementing school curriculum and promoting critical thinking skills. Programs include curator led and self-guided tours for student groups and preparatory classroom pre-visits by MAM staff.

p SECOND SATURDAYS are free for families, from 1 to 4pm. These monthly programs offer fun hands-on activities, live music, storytelling, guided tours, gallery games, and dance performances. provide free interactive space in MAM’s Plaza and Upper level galleries, featuring reading materials, videos, writing stations and hands-on activities.

p VISITORS

GALLERIES

held each April, fills the Miami-Dade Cultural Plaza with a variety of games and activities for children and their families.

p

THE FAMILY FESTIVAL,

children and adults enjoy exploring 16 fun and interactive stations that link basic visual art principles with works in the MOCA collection. This lively educational environment is great fun for kids of all ages, and parents or accompanying adults can learn about art right along with them.

p Features SUNDAY ARTFUSION, a free

Sunday afternoon program for families, providing a creative and inspiring environment for children to work with their parents or adult caregivers. Hands-on projects are related to the permanent collection and featured exhibitions.

p ARTCAMP@MOCA provides nine week-

long sessions of creative art making for ages 4-5, 6-11, and 12-15. Museum educators and certified local art educators provide quality instruction in a wide variety of subjects and media. The program includes a variety of art-making activities, exploration of art history, tours of the Museum’s collection, and more.

www.miamiartmuseum.org

56

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

www.mocajacksonville.org /May 2010

A L L I M A G E S C O U R T E S Y O F T H E M USEUMS


Orlando Museum of Art Orlando

Museum of Fine Arts St. Petersburg The third Saturday of the month is SUPER SATURDAY at the Museum of Fine Arts. The day varies in theme each month and features the following programs:

p DISCOVERY HOUR encourages kids to start exploring the Museum with their parents by handling contemporary objects in the Interactive Education Gallery, using a scavenger hunt, Museum Masterpiece worksheet, and joining the docent-led family tour.

p WORLD OF IMAGINATION STORYinvites audience members to join our storyteller-in-residence as they act out and become a part of the stories that relate to the artwork in the galleries. TELLING

gives families an opportunity to work together with Museum educators to create their own take-home masterpiece.

p

MFA: HANDS-ON!

p For older kids, the Museum’s performing art-

p Hosts ART ADVENTURES the second

Tuesday of the month with specially designed gallery hunts, games, and stories that make art come alive. Children learn looking skills and art vocabulary and create special works of art related to gallery lessons.

p ART CAMPS encourage children to participate in projects that place value on self-expression and the process of creating art in a relaxed atmosphere. They also provide an opportunity to explore the museum’s collections with seasoned teachers.

p The ART OF THE PICTURE BOOK art

series encourages children to feel comfortable in a museum setting by offering exhibitions of art that they can easily relate to and often recognize from favorite books. After viewing the picture book art exhibition, we hope that our young visitors and their families will explore other areas of the OMA and its collections..

ist-in-residence brings a historical figure such as Georgia O’Keeffe to life in an informative and entertaining one-woman show called ENCORE.

p FAMILY DAYS & PROGRAMS: Themed

www.fine-arts.org

www.omart.org OnV

i e w

events are scheduled on special dates offering family-friendly interactive activities.

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

57


UR B A N T R E A S Tampa has a reason to smile, and ART LOVERS

have an exciting NEW DESTINATION for world-class art— the new TAMPA MUSEUM OF ART.

58

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010


“ URE

T

“ T H I S M U S E U M is a frame

for the display of art, an empty canvas, an apparatus to experience appearances. In its setting in the downtown park, the building is a jewel box, an urban treasure chest.” —S tanley S aitowitz , museum architect

ON FEBRUARY 6, 2010 the

shimmering new Tampa >>

LEFT: The museum’s façade features perforated aluminum panels that create a moiré-like pattern in the sunlight. by night, the museum façade is illuminated with an abstract led light show, sky (tampa). PHOTO: © richard barnes, richard@ richardbarnes.net


OPPOSITE: the soaring three-story atrium lobby is minimalist and serene. PHOTO: © richard barnes, richard@ richardbarnes.net BELOW: Museum director, todd smith PHOTO: © james ostrand, www.jamesostrand.com

Museum of Art opened its doors to an enthusiastic crowd. The highly anticipated event drew in approximately 2,000 visitors. City supporters hope the museum will become a nationally recognized major art destination and premier venue— injecting new life into a quiet downtown. “We hope it will be a place to encourage dialogue and creativity, serve as a catalyst to community interaction and, most importantly, become a center for the rebirth of downtown Tampa,” says Todd Smith, the museum’s director. The 66,000-square-foot, $32.8 million facility, designed by San Francisco based architect Stanley Saitowitz, is situated in the newly redesigned City of Tampa park, overlooking the picturesque Hillsborough River. From a distance, the building appears to float above the water. ELEGANCE INSIDE & OUT The soaring three-story atrium lobby is minimalist and serene, featuring large glass panes, white benches and filtered daylight. An Alexander

60

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010


Calder mobile hovers above a prominently appointed staircase which leads guests to the second-floor galleries. The first floor offers a museum store, Sono Café, lecture rooms, catering facilities, and back-of-house storage spaces. Architecture and landscape converge by way of the lobby, which opens to 18,000 square feet of outdoor space under a

cantilevered overhang that connects visitors to the park and provides space for congregating and dining. The museum’s second floor accommodates eight expansive galleries that provide 26,000square-feet of exhibition space. The dramatic increase in size over the museum’s former home will have a significant impact on museum operations. OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

With nearly 150 percent more gallery space, the museum can now attract larger and prominent exhibitions. The galleries feature innovative translucent ceilings, high-polish concrete and stoneimpregnated floors, and surround the atrium lobby that extends to the second floor, creating expansive open-air views for museum visitors. c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

61


RIGHT: Sono Café features panoramic river views. PHOTO: © richard barnes, richard@ richardbarnes.net

The second floor also features back-of-house space, carefully designed to accommodate the future growth (phase two) of the museum. The third floor of the museum is designated for an open-office layout, as well as additional meeting rooms and back-of-house mechanical operations. The museum’s façade features perforated aluminum panels that

62

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

create a moiré-like pattern in the sunlight. Three thousand perforated panels wrap the museum’s exterior and interior, creating a unique design and appearance that optimizes natural lighting, enhances energy management, and supports the contemporary design of the facility. In honor of its opening and new home, the museum commissioned an exterior installation

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

titled Sky (Tampa), an abstract light show, by digital light artist Leo Villareal. Sky (Tampa) is one of a series of works Villareal has done based on clouds and sunsets, however the colors and configuration of this installation were created specifically for Tampa. The work features programmable light emitting diodes (LEDs), 45 feet high and 300 feet long, embedded within two


burdens associated with the arrival of a major storm. In addition, the building employs water conservation methods and uses energyefficient systems and renewable resources. It incorporates materials that have less of an impact on the environment and reduce waste. Minimal windows and shading screens create stable interior thermal conditions to reduce energy consumption and the interiors are designed to be bright and reflective to optimize wattage of artificial lighting and reduce energy loads. “It is important that the structure itself make a statement not only about the art it houses, but also about its commitment to the environment,” says Smith. layers of perforated aluminum panels. In darkness, Villareal’s LED installation illuminates downtown Tampa. Sky (Tampa) will be on display every evening (beginning at dusk) as part of the museum’s permanent collection. ENVIRONMENTALLY SPEAKING... Saitowitz’s clean, modern design takes into account

Florida’s potential inclement weather conditions. The facility is just as aesthetically pleasing as it is hurricane ready. The museum has vaults nestled on the second floor, high above the river and potential floods, and exhibition spaces are virtual “strong boxes” where art and sculpture can remain undisturbed. The new facility alleviates the worry and the OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

INAUGURAL EXHIBITS “A Celebration of Henri Matisse: Master of Line and Light,” (thru 04.18.10) is the signature exhibition and main draw. It also provides a theme for the other exhibits and hints at the future direction of the museum. “Matisse provides a great starting point for understanding 20th century art,” says Smith, who plans to bring in c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

63


Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954) Marie-Jose in a Yellow Dress (III), 1950, Color lift-ground aquatint (black with four colors), Image: 21 1/8 x 16 7/16” Sheet: 29 15/16 x 22 1/4”, Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation (1454–104051). © 2009 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

64

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

more contemporary and modern art. “If you look across the board of what we’re showing, you’ll see we’ve honed our strengths, and we’re showing our strengths and pushing forward. Our past has been very much about celebrating 20th century art, so we’ll continue to do that and highlight our collection of ancient Greek and Roman art.” The exhibition, which showcases over 170 works of art spanning 50 years of Matisse’s career, offers compelling evidence of the important role printmaking played in the evolution of Matisse’s visual ideas. Examples of every printmaking technique used by Matisse—etchings, monotypes, lithographs, linocuts, aquatints, drypoints, woodcuts and color prints— are included. Almost all of the prints involve serial imagery, with the artist showing the development of a reclining or seated pose, the integration of models within interiors, the study of facial expressions, and the transformation of a subject from a straight representation to something more abstract or developed. Many of the later prints in the exhi-

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

bition will be shown for the first time. The majority of these works are rarely on view to the public due to their sensitivity to light. Other opening exhibits include: “Life Captured: Garry Winogrand’s Women are Beautiful,” (thru 07.18.10) features 85 photographs themed around candid shots of women in everyday life. “Taking Shape: Works from the Bank of America Collection” (thru 08.31.10) presents mid-20th century artists who pushed the boundaries of the painted canvas into new forms. “The Hidden City,” (thru 12.05.10) is a special exhibit featuring international artists with multi-media installations that focus on the theme of urbanism over a three-decade period. “From Life to Death in the Ancient World,” (thru 01.30.11) highlights the museum’s extensive antiquities selection. “Jesper Just: Romantic Delusions,”(05.08.10-09.05.10) presents four films by this critically acclaimed Danish artist that explore the complexities and contradictions of human emotion. O n V iew


RETROSPECTIVE { S T A N L E Y

B O X E R }

Exhibition

Remembering Stanley Boxer: Retrospective (1946-2000) On view April 20th-June 16th at the Boca Raton Museum of Art www.bocamuseum.org

66

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

S TA N L E Y B O X E R enjoyed a

highly successful and productive artistic career which continued until his death in 2000. This exhibition features 50 paintings and 13 sculptures dating from 1946 through 2000. Often called a “sculptor of paint” Stanley is best known for his large-scale abstract paintings which have a rich sculptural quality produced by thick, impasto brushwork. In his later works, he often combined such diverse materials as seeds, pebbles, gravel, string, glitter and roofing shingles with generous quantities of paint to create striking mixtures of texture and color. His exuberant surfaces animate the paintings. He once wrote: “In the manufacture of my art, I use anything and everything which gets the job done without any sentiment or sanctity as to medium. Then, too, I have deliberately made a practice of being ‘visionless’... this is, I go where my preceding art takes me, and never try to redirect the future as to what my art should look like. This is a general credo and founda-


R E T R O S P E C T I V E

tion for everything I have ever self. When I’m doing it, I feel done and stands firm in its so- wholesome.”

 lidity as this is written.” Stanley’s first solo exhibiBorn in New York City in tion of paintings took place 1926, Stanley drew obsessively in New York in 1953. Later, as a child, often sketching the he showed regularly with Ticowboys and Indians he saw bor de Nagy, the Andre Emmin movies. He began his for- erich Gallery and the Salandmal education after World War er-O’Reilly Galleries. II, when he left the Navy and Awarded a Guggenheim Felstudied at the Art lowship in 1975, Students League and elected to the of New York at the National Acadeurging of his oldmy of Design in er brother. Stanley 1993, Stanley bewas immediately came one of Amerdrawn to painting ica’s most emiand worked tirenent mid-century “I have lessly in the studio DELIBERATELY abstract painters. seven days a week. He enjoyed workmade a practice He preferred to be ing in different meof being known as a ‘practidiums and always ‘VISIONLESS.’” tioner’ because he thought that one believed that constant practice nourished and influenced the was the only way to excel at art. other. His works are now held “To become artist, to remain by every major museum in artist, is both idea and goal. All America including the Museconduct is congruent to that um of Modern Art and the Whitpurpose. The development of ney Museum of American Art conscience to art is the prin- in New York, the Boston Muciple of the whole.” “Art is seum of Fine Art and the San all, everything: it’s an obliga- Francisco Museum of Art. (See tion to something other than Calendar pg. 11.) O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. lacedplumeinabam (detail), circa 1985, oil on canvas, Joel and Lila Harnet Museum of Art, University of Richmond Museums, The AlcoaReynolds Art Collection 2. Dourspreadofweavingnightglances, 1980, oil on linen, Museum Permanent Collection, Gift of Dr. Marvin and Mrs. Elayne Mordes LEFT: stanley boxer (1926-2000), Courtesy of the Estate of the Artist OPPOSITE: Roilypeersamongbloomednights, 1991, oil and mixed media on canvas, Courtesy of the estate of the artist


PROFILE { M A G G I E

T AY L O R }

Exhibition

Almost Alice: New Illustrations of Wonderland by Maggie Taylor On view through May 2nd at the Florida Museum for Women Artists in DeLand www.floridamuseumforwomenartists.org

68

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

A L M O S T A L I C E is a unique-

ly compelling twist on Lewis Carroll’s famous classic: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Maggie Taylor’s interpretation of the tale is sure to delight and challenge viewers who thought they knew Carroll’s classic story. “Although quite a few people had mentioned to me over the past 10 years that my digital images had a strange ‘Alice in Wonderland’ quality to them, it never occurred to me to re-read the story or investigate further,” she says. After months of research, the works began taking shape: “I’m particularly interested in daguerreotypes of people from the Victorian era. Each of my Alices is a different Victorian girl.” The original portrait images that Maggie uses are recycled 19th-century unclaimed photographs of unknown people she finds at flea markets and on eBay. Almost Alice features 45 digital inkjet prints which are composite images derived from daguerreotypes or tintypes. Maggie then uses 21st century digital processes and Photoshop mon-


P R O F I L E

tage techniques to layer multiple Maggie’s photographic prints images to create the final prints. have the potential to engage She works spontaneously and in- imaginative minds of all ages. tuitively, trying to come up with Additionally, her inventive comimages that have a resonance and bination of digital processes and a somewhat mysterious narrative older sources provides inspicontent. “There is no one mean- ration to contemporary artists ing for any of the images, rather and photographers pushing the they exist as a kind of visual rid- boundaries of new media. dle or open-ended poem, meant Maggie received an MFA in to be both playful photography from and provocative,” the University of she explains. ComFlorida in 1987. pleting the imagSince then, her stilles is a slow process life photographs that can take weeks have been exhibited or even months. Fiin one-person exhinal prints are made Maggie’s IMAGES bitions throughout on an Epson inkjet the US and abroad. are meant printer on a paper to be both PLAY- In 1996 and 2001 that gives the texture she received State FUL and and look of a print or of Florida IndividPROVOCATIVE. watercolor. ual Artist’s FellowAlthough richly colored and ships and won the Santa Fe Cendream-like in appearance, her use ter for Photography’s Project of photographic sources and dig- Competition in 2004. Maggie ital manipulation retains a sense lives in Gainesville, FL with her of the original photographic ve- husband, Jerry Uelsmann, a reracity, thus adding to the images’ nowned photographer. The two surreal power. Her digital trans- will be featured in a joint show at formations bring out the fantasy the Brevard Art Museum in Meland fantastic that is at the heart of bourne, April 24-August 1. (See Carroll’s playfully ironic writing. Calendar pgs. 12 & 16.) O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. I’m grown up now*, 2006, digital pigment inkjet 2. It’s always tea-time*, 2006, digital pigment inkjet LEFT: maggie taylor, courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE: A very difficult game indeed*, 2006, digital pigment inkjet *© maggie taylor exhibition organized by Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and toured by Curatorial Assistance, Pasadena, California


SPOTLIGHT { C A R L O S

C R U Z - D Í E Z }

Exhibition

Carlos Cruz-Díez: The embodied experience of color On view through June 20th at the Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

70

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

C A R L O S C R U Z - D Í E Z : The

Embodied Experience of Color is an exhibition of sensory chromatic environments which invites visitors to become participants in the artwork, experiencing color through their own movement. Initially conceived in 1965, Cromosaturación (Chromosaturation) consists of three separate color chambers infused with red, green and blue light. Three other works are also included: Duchas de inducción cromática (Showers of Chromatic Induction), 1968, where color is experienced via a series of booths in the shape of showers made with strips of transparent colored plastic; Ambiente cromointerferente (Chromo-interferent Environment), 1974, a changing, three-dimensional chromatic projection environment activated by the physical movement of the spectator/participant; and Experiencia cromática aleatoria interactiva (Aleatory Interactive Chromatic Experience), 1995, an interactive computer installation that allows the spectator to create his own visual interpretation of Carlos’s work.


S P O T L I G H T

Carlos Cruz-Díez was born in that color is a sensory agent, like Venezuela in 1923. He studied cold or heat, and that art is inat the Escuela de Artes Plásticas complete without viewer pary Aplicadas in Caracas and be- ticipation. gan his career as an art director In 1959 Carlos started workfor the McCann Erickson adver- ing in radiation of color, essentising agency in Caracas. While tially colored light, and abantraveling in Europe, he visited doned paint as a medium. By Paris and Barcelona where he way of experiencing color’s inwas exposed to art movements tense immediacy as light, rather such as geometric than pigment, the abstraction and the viewer’s eye is freed Bauhaus’ ideas on from the burden of combining art and interpreting repreindustry. His expesentational forms. rience in advertisSince 1960, Caring, combined with los has lived in the new artistic ideas Paris, though he reART is acquired abroad, in- incomplete without turns often to Venspired him to explore ezuela. He is conVIEWER color concepts. PARTICIPATION. sidered one of LatThroughout his in America’s most career, Carlos has consistently important living masters and his focused solely on color, line and work is in the permanent collec(viewer) perception. He is often tions of The Museum of Modassociated with the Kinetic Art ern Art, NY; Tate Modern, LonMovement, which relies on don; Musée d’Art Contempomovement, particularly of an art rain, Montreal; Centre Georges object. However, as an Opera- Pompidou, Paris; Musée d’Art tional Artist, Carlos relies on the Moderne de la Ville de Paris; movement of the viewer rather Victoria and Albert Museum, than that of the art object itself. London, among others. (See He bases his work on the idea Calendar pg. 16.) O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Duchas de inducción cromática*, 1968, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, 2001 2. Ambiente cromointerferente*, 1974, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, 2003 LEFT: carlos cruz-díez* OPPOSITE: Cromosaturación, 1965-2008, Three chromo-cubicles Site-specific environment, Courtesy of Americas Society Gallery, New York, Photo by Arturo Sanchez *Courtesy of Atelier Cruz-Díez, Paris


FOCUS { C L Y D E

C LY D E B U T C H E R has often

B U T C H E R }

Exhibition

Clyde Butcher: Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades On view through July 25th at the Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

72

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010

been compared to Ansel Adams. Both have a few things in common: large format cameras, a love of nature, an abundance of talent...and whiskers. This award winning, Florida wetlands-based, landscape photographer explores his personal relationship with the environment through black and white photography. The exquisite beauty and depth of his work draws the viewer into a relationship with nature. Clyde describes his preference for black-and-white images by stating, “Color is a duplication of nature, black-andwhite is an interpretation.” The exclusion of people in his images is deliberate. He believes the presence of a person in an image disengages the viewer from the scene, assigning the viewer’s space to that person. Clyde wants his viewers to be fully engaged in the images he has created. In 1986, a personal tragedy changed Clyde’s life forever. “When my son was killed by a drunk driver it was to the wilderness that I fled in hopes of re-


F O C U S

gaining my serenity and equi- mat camera allows him to express librium. The mysterious spiri- the elaborate detail and textures tual experience of being close that distinguish the intricacy of to nature helped restore my the landscape. soul. It was during that time, He photographs his images in I discovered the intimate such a way as to evoke a three beauty of the environment.
 dimensional quality, a technique My experience reinforced my he developed during his early sense of dedication to use my art years photographing architecform of photography as an in- tural models. His photographs spiration for others range in sizes from to work together to 8”x 10” to 5’x 8’. save nature’s places Among his many of spiritual sanctuawards, Clyde has ary for future genbeen honored by the erations.” Creating state of Florida with something positive the highest award out of something that can be given a negative was a way “WILDERNESS, private citizen: the of making someArtist Hall of Fame to me, thing meaningful is a SPIRITUAL Award. The Sierra out of his son’s life. Club has given him NECESSITY.” For more than the Ansel Adams forty years, he has been preserv- Conservation Award, presented ing on film the untouched areas to a photographer who shows of the landscape. Undaunted by excellence in photography and mosquitos, gators and water moc- has contributed to the public cassins, Clyde carries his equip- awareness of the environment. ment around the swamps on his Clyde and his wife, Niki, live back, wading waist high in water. in Big Cypress National Preserve His images are captured with surrounded by more than a milan 8”x 10”, 11”x 14”, and 12”x lion acres of wilderness. (See 20” view camera. The large for- Calendar pg. 19.) O n V iew

ABOVE (TOP TO BOTTOM): 1. Tamiami Trail 2*, 1990, silver gelatin fiber print, 36 x 46” 2. Cape Romano 10*, 2006, silver gelatin fiber print, 26 x 30” 3. Gaskin Bay 5*, 1998, silver gelatin fiber print, 60 x 108” LEFT: clyde butcher, courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE: Moonrise*, 1986, silver gelatin fiber print, 46 x 60” *Collection of the Artist


V

on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Boston

The museums. . .

WELCOME TO BOSTO N ! The City of Boston hosts over

12 million annual visitors from across the country and around the globe. This vibrant, thriving metropolis is renowned for its cultural facilities, educational institutions, champion sports franchises, as well as its place at the very forefront of American history. But Boston is also a trendy urban enclave, home to world-class art museums including the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Harvard Art Museum, the MIT Museum and the Peabody Essex Museum—all within city limits or a short ride away via the subway (T) line or commuter rail. Tourism is one of New England’s largest industries. As the region’s social and commercial hub, Boston will accommodate and entertain as few other cities can. On View is pleased to present some of the best art venues the city has to offer—pack your bags! O n V iew

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

75


Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston

A

A W A R D - W I N N I N G archi-

tects Diller Scofidio + Renfro designed the ICA, conceiving the building both “from the sky down,” as a contemplative space for experiencing contemporary art, and “from the ground up,” providing dynamic areas for public enjoyment. The design weaves together interior and exterior space, producing shifting perspectives of the waterfront throughout the museum’s galleries and public spaces. INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART www.icaboston.org

Info

ostonBostonBosto 76

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

100 Northern Avenue Boston, MA 02210 617.478.3100

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

Since its 2006 move to the architecturally stunning new harbor front digs, the museum has continued its path on the cutting edge of contemporary art in Boston. The facility houses an amazing permanent collection, as well as traveling exhibitions showcasing the hottest talents from around the world. ICA is also home to a year-round program of dance, theater and film. The cafe overlooks the water and offers outdoor seating in fine weather, and the gift shop is spectacular. O n V iew p r i l

/May 2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: 1. Cornelia Parker, Hanging Fire (Suspected Arson), 1999, Wire mesh, charcoal, wire, pins, nails, Gift of Barbara Lee, photo: Charles Mayer 2. the ICA, photo: Iwan Baan 3. Kader Attia, Oil and Sugar #2, 2007, Video on DVD 4:30 minutes, color, with sound, Promised gift of James and Audrey Foster ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Perched atop Beacon Hill, in the heart of Boston, XV Beacon Hotel offers distinguished & elegant personalized service. Our sleek, earth-toned dĂŠcor compliments the works of fine art. With versatile and cutting edge accommodations, amenities at XV Beacon positively define luxury. Your perfect summer escape...

15 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 617.670.1500 | XVBeacon.com


Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

I

I S A B E L L A Stewart Gardner

first welcomed visitors to her museum on New Year’s Day, 1903. Since then, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum has remained essentially unchanged, but certainly not stagnant­, since its founder’s death in 1924. The Museum is modeled after a 15th-century Venetian palazzo surrounding an interior courtyard garden that blooms with life in all seasons. The Collection is housed on three

Info

ostonBostonBosto 78

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

floors of galleries filled with paintings, sculpture, tapestries, furniture, and decorative arts from cultures spanning thirty centuries, including works by Rembrandt, Titian, Raphael, Botticelli, Degas, and Sargent. Special contemporary and historic exhibitions, a museum music program, and an artistin-residence program enrich the permanent collection and provide ongoing inspiration for visitors. In celebration of the museum’s founder, all named “Isabella” are admitted free. O n V iew

ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM www.gardnermuseum.org 280 Fenway Boston, MA 02115 (617) 566-1401

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/M

ay

2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM COURTYARD 2. Titian (1560-62), Europa, circa 1485, Oil on canvas, Purchased in 1896 from Colnaghi, London, through Berenson 3. JOHN S. SARGENT, (18561925), PORTRAIT OF ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER (DETAIL), 1888, OIL ON CANVAS, COMMISSIONED IN 1888 FROM THE ARTIST ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM


Museum of Fine Art, Boston

T

THE MFA IS one of the most

comprehensive art museums in the world. The museum welcomes more than one million visitors each year to experience art from ancient Egyptian to contemporary, special exhibitions, and innovative educational programs. With a collection of 450,000 objects, the MFA owns some of the most rare and important artistic treasures in existence. At every turn, you’ll find breathtaking works of art, from mas-

Info

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS www.mfa.org Avenue of the Arts 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617.267.9300

ters of American painting to the icons of Impressionism, from exquisite Asian scrolls to Egyptian mummies—you never know what you might find! The MFA’s ambitious Campaign and Building Project, Building the New MFA, comprises a new wing for American art that is scheduled to open in late fall of 2010; renovated art of Europe galleries; improved conservation and education facilities; a West Wing devoted entirely to contemporary art; and a new, larger public space: the Glass Courtyard. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. the mfa 2. artist rendering: Glass-enclosed Ruth and carl J. Shapiro Family Courtyard, designed by Foster + Partners (London) 3. Antonio López García, The Night, 2008, Bronze Sculpture, Museum purchase with funds donated by Gail and Ernst von Metzsch, © Antonio López García (One of two sculptures) ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM

A

p r i l

/May 2010

BostonBostonBoston

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

79


Harvard Art Museum, Cambridge

O

ONE OF THE WORLD’S

leading arts institutions, the Harvard Art Museum is comprised of three constituent museums: the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. The Museum is distinguished by the range and depth of its collections, its groundbreaking exhibitions, and the original research of its staff. Its collection includes more than 250,000 objects, rang-

Info

ostonBostonBosto 80

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

ing in date from ancient times to the present, from Europe, North America, North Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. While the museum is currently undergoing a major renovation, the Sackler Museum remains open and has been reinstalled with a unique exhibition called Re-View, which features some of the finest works representing the collections of all three museums. When the renovation is complete, the three museums will be housed in a single stateof-the-art facility. O n V iew

HARVARD ART MUSEUM www.harvardartmuseum.org 485 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02138 617.495.9400

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. MAX BECKMANN, SELFPORTRAIT IN TUXEDO, 1927, HARVARD ART MUSEUM/ BUSCH-REISINGER MUSEUM, ASSOCIATION FUND 2. WINSLOW HOMER, PITCHING QUOITS, 1865, HARVARD ART MUSEUM/FOGG MUSEUM, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. FREDERIC HAINES CURTISS 3. RITUAL WINE-POURING VESSEL WITH TIGER AND OWL DECOR, CHINESE, 13TH CENTURY BC. HARVARD ART MUSEUM/ARTHUR M. SACKLER MUSEUM, BEQUEST OF GRENVILLE L. WINTHROP, ALL PHOTOS: PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES © PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF HARVARD COLLEGE


MIT Museum, Cambridge

T

T H E M I T M U S E U M invites

you to explore invention, ideas, and innovation. Through interactive exhibitions and its renown collections, the MIT Museum showcases the fascinating world of science, technology and art. Ongoing exhibitions such as Holography: The Light Fantastic, and Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson, demonstrate how technology can translate into wonderful artistic creations. MIT MUSEUM www.mit.edu/museum

Info

ostonBostonBosto 82

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

265 Massachusetts Ave. Building N51 Cambridge, MA 02139 617.253.5927

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

The holography exhibit presents an awe-inspiring sampling of twenty-three historic holograms from the MIT Museum holography collection, the world’s largest, including scientific and artistic applications of holography in diverse fields such as medicine, engineering, and retailing as well as architecture, portraiture and abstract art. Ganson’s sculptures feature ingenious, philosophical, and witty kinetic works composed of a range of materials from delicate wire to welded steel and concrete. O n V iew p r i l

/May 2010

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. ARTHUR GANSON, ANOTHER DREAM (DETAIL), PHOTO: ERIC ROTH 2. MIT MUSEUM 3. SALLY WEBER, LACOLITH ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF MIT MUSEUM


Peabody Essex Museum, Salem

T

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. THE MUSEUM’S GRAND ATRIUM CEILING 2. PEM’S EXTERIOR 3. YIN YU TANG, A 200-YEAR-OLD CHINESE HOUSE THAT WAS BROUGHT TO AMERICA AND REASSEMBLED AT THE MUSEUM

TO ENGAGE THE MIND and

Info

spirit, the PEM collection offers outstanding works primarily from the 1700s to today: paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, textiles, architecture and decorative objects. African, American, Asian, maritime, Native American and Oceanic art emphasizes the lively conversation that occurs through creativity across time, place and culture. Approximately 1 million works—many of them the PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM www.pem.org 161 Essex Street Salem, MA 0197o 978.45.9500

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE PEM

first to be collected in this country—offer experiences unique among American art museums. Deep and far ranging, the collection opens windows onto how people live, work and celebrate. Explore art and the world in which it is made—revealing and comparing concepts of creativity, individuality, community, tradition, spirituality and even emotion. See special exhibitions and tour historic houses, including Yin Yu Tang, the 200-year-old ancestral home of the Huang family. O n V iew OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

BostonBostonBoston

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : BOSTON

83


V

on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

Boston

A gallery tour. . .

HERE’S TO THE GA L L E R I E S ! Boston offers a world of

choice when it comes to seeking out fine art. From antiquarian to historical, representational to abstract, modern to contemporary—Boston’s galleries have it all. These artistic venues boast an eclectic and compelling mélange of work including paintings, sculpture, prints, photography, decorative arts, furnishings, mixed media, video and performing arts. If you take a stroll down Newbury Street or wander through the South End, you are bound to be drawn in by at least several of these amazing gems. Galleries provide a more intimate setting for the display of art and afford viewers the opportunity to experience established as well as emerging talents—often showcasing the works of local artists and celebrities. Whether you are interested in purchasing art or simply viewing a current exhibit, galleries are a wonderful resource for art lovers. On the following pages, On View presents a listing of Boston’s most distinctive galleries. O n V iew

OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010 2010

85


ostonBostonBosto 86

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • B O S T O N : A gallery tour

Newbury Street galleries

130 Newbury St

NEWBURY

617.437.1518

FINE ART

Contemporary art

www.newburyfinearts.com

29 Newbury St

ALPHA GALLERY

LANOUE FINE ART

www.alphagallery.com

www.lanouefineart.com

125 Newbury St 617.262.4400 Contemporary art

38 Newbury St 617.536.4465

Contemporary art

617.536.0210

Contemporary art PUCKER GALLERY www.puckergallery.com

GALERIE

MARTHA

171 Newbury St

D’ORSAY

RICHARDSON

617.267-9473

www.galerie-dorsay.com

FINE ART

33 Newbury St

www.martharichardsonfineart.com

617.266.8001

38 Newbury St

QUIDLEY

617.266.3321

& COMPANY

Master works and contemporary artists

American and European 19th & 20th century art

GALLERY NAGA

Contemporary art

www.quidleyandco.com

118 Newbury St 617.450-4300

Contemporary paintings

www.gallerynaga.com

MARTIN

67 Newbury St

LAWRENCE

ROBERT

617.267.9060

GALLERIES

KLEIN GALLERY

www.martinlawrence.com

www.robertkleingallery.com

77 Newbury St

38 Newbury St

617.369.4800

617.267.7997

Contemporary art INTERNATIONAL

Modern & contemporary art

POSTER GALLERY www.internationalposter.com

205 Newbury St 617.375.0076

19th & 20th century and contemporary photography

MILLER BLOCK

Original vintage posters

GALLERY

THE IRIS

www.millerblockgallery.com

GALLERY OF

JUDI ROTENBERG

38 Newbury St

FINE ART

GALLERY

617.536.4650

PHOTOGRAPHY

Contemporary art

www.judirotenberg.com OnV

i e w

Ma

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

www.irisgallery.net


129 Newbury St 617.895-8951

Contemporary photography

617.482.2477

HOWARD

Contemporary art

YEZERSKI GALLERY www.howardyezerskigallery.com

CHASE GALLERY

460 Harrison Ave, A16

www.chasegallery.com

617.262.0550

VICTORIA

450 Harrison Ave, #57

MUNROE FINE ART

617.859.7222

www.victoriamunroefineart.com

Contemporary art

Contemporary art

KHAKI

161 Newbury St 617.523-0661

Historical European and contemporary American art

GALLERY DIAMOND–NEWMAN

www.khakigallery.net

FINE ARTS

460 Harrison Ave

www.diamond-newman.com

617.423.0105

450 Harrison Ave, #65

Contemporary art

617.350.3040 VOSE

Contemporary art

KINGSTON

GALLERIES

GALLERY

www.vosegalleries.com

GALERIA CUBANA

www.kingstongallery.com

238 Newbury St

www.lagaleriacubana.com

450 Harrison Ave, #43

617.536.6176

460 Harrison Ave

617.423.4113

18th, 19th and early 20th century art

617.292.2822

Contemporary Cuban art

Contemporary art LACONIA

South End galleries

GALLERY KAYAFAS

GALLERY

www.gallerykayafas.com

www.laconiagallery.org

450 Harrison Ave, #37

433 Harrison Ave

617.482.0411

617.670.1568

450 Harrison Ave

GURARI

SOPRAFINA

617.451.3605

COLLECTIONS

GALLERY

www.gurari.com

www.soprafina.com

460 Harrison Ave, B16

55 Thayer St

617.367.9800

617.728.0770

BROMFIELD GALLERY

Contemporary photography

Contemporary art

www.bromfieldgallery.com

Contemporary art CARROLL AND SONS www.carrollandsons.net

450 Harrison Ave

Antiquarian and contemporary artwork OnV

i e w

Ma

Contemporary art O n V iew

g a z i n e

.

c om

A

p r i l

/May 2010

BostonBostonBoston

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N • B O S T O N : A gallery tour

87

On View 04-05.2010  

Fine art magazine featuring exciting art museum exhibitions, artist profiles and more...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you