Page 1

S P R I N G

E d i t i o n

Trades

2 0 1 4

Today Volume 1 Edition 1

Career of Choice Promoting the skilled trades in Ontario

Enforcement What to expect

Ready, Set, Build

25th Annual Ontario Technological Skills Competition

NEW - benefits for members

+

Q&A

with Brenda Smith

Perspectives on women in the trades and tips for success for young people


Message from the Chair

I

am pleased to introduce our new and improved newsletter — Trades Today.

As we approach our one year anniversary of welcoming members to the Ontario College of Trades, I think it is fair to say we have accomplished a lot. There is no doubt, however, that we have many opportunities to build on our progress. Together, with my hard working Board of Governors, our divisional and trade boards, we have been active in reaching out to members to discuss the role of the College and the important contribution that trades professionals will make to its success. We have heard that you’d like more information from the College

Along with consumer protection, the College is also mandated to promote skilled trades as a career of choice. You will also read a report from the Conference Board of Canada that predicts a possible shortage of more than 300,000 skilled tradespeople in Ontario. That’s a big number but with your help, I’m confident we can reach many of the talented young people in high school classrooms and workshops across this province, and show them that working in the skilled trades is a rewarding and worthwhile career path. The College is working with many groups like Skills Canada-Ontario and school boards to encourage youth to consider a career in the skilled trades.

“I can tell you that a primary goal of the College is to weed out the underground economy to not only protect consumers from unqualified workers but to also create a level playing field for all businesses and trades professionals. ” and we hope this newsletter will serve as another communications tool. Your feedback and content suggestions for future editions are welcomed. Many of you have also expressed a strong desire to hear about the College’s enforcement activities. I can tell you that a primary goal of the College is to weed out the underground economy to not only protect consumers from unqualified workers but to also create a level playing field for all businesses and trades professionals. Your Certificate of Qualification and membership with the College are a seal of approval, and we’re working hard every day to ensure its integrity is respected. In this edition you will find articles on stats related to our enforcement activities as well as information about what to expect if visited by a College enforcement officer.

2

I was honored at our last board meeting to be reelected as Chair of the Board of Governors for another term and congratulate Pat Blackwood on his re-election as Vice Chair. I’d like to thank my other colleagues on the Board for their commitment and dedication as well as recognize the divisional and trade boards for their contributions. And finally, a special thanks to CEO and Registrar David Tsubouchi who has shown great passion and leadership in his new position and— with the support of College staff — continues to build a College that adds value to its members and the people of Ontario. Sincerely, Ron Johnson Chair, Board of Governors


College members eligible for discounts on insurance, pharmacy and optical fees Worried about the cost of your home or car insurance?

Please contact Breckles Insurance for more information!

The College has negotiated a member discount program with Breckles Insurance to offer a wide range of services at reduced rates. Through Breckles Insurance, College members can now receive: •

additional discount on car insurance when combined with home insurance

customers who are claims-free, mortgage-free or nonsmokers will be recognized

no interest or service charges on some payment plans

reduced pharmacy fees

reduced optical service and supply costs, up to 40 per cent on retail cost

access to commercial lines and insurance products (liability, vehicle, equipment, and tool floater)

Toll-free dedicated line: 1-855-840-6268 www.breckles.com And stay tuned as the College looks to bringing on more partners in the near future who will provide you with discounts on a wide variety of products and services.

Save the Date

Have your say

T

Get Involved!

he membership of the Ontario College of Trades is invited to attend our first Annual Meeting of Members on Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Please bring your membership card to the registration table. Location: 655 Bay Street Suite 600, Room 602 Toronto, Ontario M6K 2K4 Time: 9 a.m. All members are asked to RSVP to: rsvp@collegeoftrades.ca

I

n accordance with the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 (the Act), the College of Trades Appointments Council seeks candidates to be members of Trade Boards. Each Trade Board is composed of equal numbers of members selected as employee and employer representatives, all selected from the relevant trade or group of trades. If you would like to be part of one of the College’s boards or would like more information about the appointments process, roles and responsibilities of members, please visit the Appointments Council’s website at: www.cot-appointments.ca or call 1-800-387-5656.

Contact Your Board! You may contact your designated Trade Board by sector using the following emails: Service - Servicetradeboards@collegeoftrades.ca Industrial - Industrialtradeboards@collegeoftrades.ca Construction - Constructiontradeboards@collegeoftrades.ca Motive Power - MotivePowertradeboards@collegeoftrades.ca

3


Trades as Career of Choice

3

60,000. That’s the magic number, according to the Conference Board of Canada. The Ottawa-based non-profit organization estimates there could be a shortage of 360,000 skilled tradespeople in Ontario by 2025. The CBOC also predicts that the shortage could grow to more than half a million by 2030. That’s a big deficit. But it’s also a big opportunity for younger Ontarians. That’s because the primary reason behind the potential shortage is a significant imbalance between the number of young people with a skilled trade background and older Canadians with similar qualifications. Of the three post-secondary credentials (trades certificates, college diploma and university degree), the trades certificate is the only one held by a lower proportion of younger adults as compared to older adults, according to Statistics Canada. Figures from StatsCan also show that 10.7 per cent of adults ages 25 to 34 had a trades certificate in 2011, compared with 12.8 per cent among adults aged 55 to 64.

Certificate in ‘Mechanic & Repair The disparity is most stark for mechanics; there Technologies/Technicians’

15

were 104,200 older adults with a certificate in

67,680 Mechanics Adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 ‘mechanic and repair technologies/technicians,’ 104,200 Mechanics Adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011

as opposed to only 67,680 younger Canadians.

12

The future of Ontario’s economy, of course, depends on the province’s tradespeople. 9

Certificate in ‘Mechanic & Repair

Certificate in ‘MechanicTechnologies/Technicians’ & Repair in ‘Mechanic & Repair Certificate 67,680 Mechanics Adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 15 Technologies/Technicians’ Technologies/Technicians’

15 6

15

104,200 Mechanics Adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011

12 3

67,680 67,680 Mechanics Adults ages 25 to 34Mechanics in 2011 Adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 104,200 Mechanics Adults ages 104,200 55 to 64Mechanics in 2011 Adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011

12

12

9 0 9

9

6 Trades Certificate 6 10.7%

of adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 12.8% of adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011

6 3 3

3

0 0

Trades Certificate 10.7% of adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 Trades Certificate

0

4Trades Certificate

12.8% of adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011 10.7% of adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 12.8% of adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011

10.7% of adults ages 25 to 34 in 2011 12.8% of adults ages 55 to 64 in 2011


Thus, the College is doing everything it can to actively promote the trades to young people, and show them the opportunities available to those willing to take the plunge. The College already participates in programs like the Skilled Canada Trades Competition, a yearly event that brings together young people studying a skilled trade or technology to compete in a national competition. And the College will soon be partnering with parenting and career expert Dr. Karyn Gordon to reach out to youth and parents to better educate them on the value of a career in the skilled trades. The College is always seeking out fresh ideas from its members.

“So naturally we’re looking at social media to reach young people – things like YouTube and having a micro site to communicate directly.” During a recent dialogue session with Motive Power stakeholders, members peppered the College administration with ideas as to how to attract more young people to the skilled trades. The suggestions were thoughtful and varied- everything from reaching out to students earlier, to highlighting the salaries one can earn in the trades, to increasing the trades’ social media presence were offered by participants. And Ontario College of Trades CEO David Tsubouchi is listening. “We already have young people in community colleges who have made up their minds, or people who are looking for a career change, but how do we get into the high schools and primary schools? That’s our challenge today,” said Tsubouchi. “So naturally we’re looking at social media to reach young people- things like YouTube and having a micro site to communicate directly.” The message is clear: in order to thrive in the 21st century, the province needs more young people to learn a trade. And the College is determined to build an effective framework that will lure young Ontarians to a successful, rewarding career as skilled tradespersons. And if we build it, they will come.

5


Meet our staff Brenda Smith, Enforcement Officer Along with being a well-known advocate and champion for women in the trades, Smith has many years’ experience in the electrician trade as a 309A Construction and Maintenance electrician, which is a Red Seal trade.

Q A Q A

How long have you been with the College? In 2013 I started my position as an Enforcement Officer with the Compliance and Enforcement Division of the College. I have worked as an electrician from the time I began as an apprentice in 1999 until early 2013 when I joined the College. What attracted you to the position of Enforcement Officer with the College? I know exactly how complex trades and apprenticeship can be.  Prior to my position with the College, I worked voluntarily as an advocate for apprentices and trades promotion. I was attracted to this the position because I am a journeyperson and have a good understanding of current apprenticeship and training and believe I can introduce the concept of compliance and the benefits of enforcement in a positive manner. 

“Trades today are a wonderful outlet to do something meaningful. No two days are the same.”

Q A Q A 6

Q A

How did you get into the trades? With determination, persistence and a genuine desire to build something lasting. I knocked on doors and made phone calls, learned everything I could. I did it all on my own merit. I did not have the comfort of working with my father, uncles or relatives because they are not in the trades.

Trades today are a wonderful outlet to do something meaningful. No two days are the same. You have a chance to meet so many people from all over the world and make lasting friendships. Experiencing different cultures and continuous learning are just the tip of the iceberg. As far as compensation goes, it’s fair and sustainable. Working hours will vary from employer to employer. There are definitely jobs where you work eight hours a day and can still have a family life. There are so many grants and bursaries available for employees and employers now that weren’t available when I started. Getting paid to learn is a great way to start a career.

Q

Do you think it’s difficult for women to fit into some of the more male-dominated fields and sectors or has that changed?

A

Yes it is hard to fit in, especially if you don’t know anyone there. It is difficult to be new in any workplace, but when you are different from anyone else, it can be somewhat isolating. The culture of the trades is slowly changing. Some trades are slower to change than others. I found out the hard way that written workplace policies do not always reflect the culture of the workplace. In an ideal world the workplace would be welcoming to everyone. One way to achieve this is with small gestures such as proper fitting uniforms, suitable, properly sized personal protective equipment and a seat at the crew lunch table.

Q

What is the best piece of advice you would give to women and youth who are thinking about entering the skilled trades in Ontario?

A

Keep a daily journal. This is the most important thing any apprentice or journeyperson can do. It will keep you organized; it will help you to remember and stay on task. Besides, it is a record of everything you have done, learned and achieved. It is an accurate account of your hours of progression and career achievements. Believe in yourself and keep your standards high.  

Which sector(s) or regions are you mainly involved with? I perform inspections and promote the College to the following sectors: Motive Power, Construction, and Service.

In your opinion, what are some of the benefits of working in the skilled trades today?


Trades by Numbers Did you know that there are nearly 300,000 certificates registered with the Ontario College of Trades? Apprentices

JP Candidates

Journeypersons

Tradespersons

Total

Construction

33,277

3,199

81,812

4

1118,292

Industrial

13,302

283

1,028

12

14,625

Motive Power

15,441

455

77,132

1

93,029

Service

33,171

888

33,101

5

67,165

Total

95,191

4,825

193,073

22

293,111

Source: Ontario College of Trades - January, 2014 *Note: Data represents the number of trade qualifications across classes, not the number of members, as one member can hold several qualifications.

Which trades have the most journeyperson certification? 400

Top three compulsory trades: (310S) Automotive Service Technician – 42,591 (309A) Electrician Construction and Maintenance – 41,618 Top three compulsory trades: (332A) Hairstylist – 32,845 (310S) Automotive Service Technician – 42,591 (309A) Electrician Construction and Maintenance – 41,618 (332A) Hairstylist – 32,845

Which trades have the most journeyperson certification?

350 400 300 350 250 300 200 250 150 200 100 150 50 100 0 50

0

Top three voluntary trades with the most journeypersons: (442A) Industrial Electrician – 377 (433A) Industrial Mechanic Millwright – 364 (403A) General Carpenter – 268 Top three voluntary trades with the most journeypersons: (442A) Industrial Electrician – 377 (433A) Industrial Mechanic Millwright – 364 (403A) General Carpenter – 268

What about members in the Apprentices Class? 10000

The top three apprenticeships in compulsory trades: (310S) Automotive Service Technician – 8,629 (309A) Electrician Construction and Maintenance – 8,254 The top three apprenticeships in compulsory trades: (332A) Hairstylist – 5,620 (310S) Automotive Service Technician – 8,629 (309A) Electrician Construction and Maintenance – 8,254 (332A) Hairstylist – 5,620

What about members in the Apprentices Class? 8000 10000

6000 8000

4000 6000

2000 4000

0 2000

0

Top three apprenticeships in voluntary trades: (634E) Information Technology Contact Centre Customer Service Agent – 8,876 (403A) General Carpenter – 5,541 (620C) Child Development Practitioner – 4,980 Top three apprenticeships in voluntary trades: (634E) Information Technology Contact Centre Customer Service Agent – 8,876 (403A) General Carpenter – 5,541 (620C) Child Development Practitioner – 4,980

7


Protecting you and the public The Facts

T

What’s the College’s role when it comes to enforcement? •

The College currently has 41 enforcement officers throughout Ontario to maintain high industry standards while protecting the public.

Work towards establishing a level playing field—where the effect of the underground economy is diminished.

Investigate any complaints of professional misconduct, incompetence or incapacity that are made against the College’s members.

Conduct inspections and ensure fair and impartial treatment for its members while protecting the public.

Respond to concerns and incidents reported by the public.

Ensure that anyone engaging in the practice of a compulsory trade is a member in good standing with the College.

he Ontario College of Trades (the College) is responsible for protecting the public interest by ensuring that individuals working in a compulsory trade have the required qualifications to do so.

What is the College enforcing? There are two categories of enforcement: incidents and formal complaints. Incidents involve allegations of violations of the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 (OCTAA) and are dealt with by way of the Provincial Offences Act, that commonly results in ticketing or a summons to attend provincial court. Formal Complaints involve allegations of violations that relate to members of the College whose behaviour in the workplace may be alleged as professional misconduct, incompetence or incapacity. Formal complaints are dealt with by way of hearings before a committee at the College.

What to expect when you’re inspected: •

REMEMBER: The Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 requires that members carry proof of membership on their person at all times while working.

OFFENDER

OFFENCE

Individual

Engaging in compulsory trade – no membership in good standing in the College

Upon arrival at a workplace, enforcement officers will identify themselves. The officers carry identification indicating their number and status with the College. They also carry a permit that includes their picture and information about their powers to enforce.

The College’s official logo will be visible on clothing worn by the enforcement officer or equipment in their possession, including warrant cards, business cards and College vehicle.

If you work in a compulsory trade, legally you must carry your active (i.e. not expired) College membership card on you.

Employers are not required to produce proof of membership (as membership is voluntary for employers) but they may be required to produce records to confirm compliance with journeyperson to apprenticeship ratio requirements.

Holding self out as able to engage in compulsory trade – no Certificate of Qualification

Apprentice

Engaging in compulsory trade – no Registered Training Agreement/statement of membership in good standing in the College. Holding self out as an apprentice who is able to engage in compulsory trade – no Registered Training Agreement/statement of membership in good standing in the College.

Employer

Employing or otherwise engaging individual to work in compulsory trade – that does not have membership in good standing at the College Employing or otherwise engaging apprentice to work in compulsory trade – no Registered Training Agreement /statement of membership in good standing in the College.

8


What can happen after an inspection: •

Members as well as non-members may be subject to penalties/ tickets/charges for offences.

Members have the right to hear and respond to all written complaints of professional misconduct, incompetence or incapacity formally made against them throughout the complaints and investigation process.

Did you know? There is a wealth of information on our website about the College, its activities and services to help you. •

Applications for registration and renewal

There are three committees composed of tradespersons, employers of tradespersons, and members of the public that will consider complaints and evidence against the member and rule on their findings.

Public register of members

Code of Ethics

Strategic Plan

Budget

Members have a right under law to appeal decisions to the Divisional Court of Ontario.

Record of Board Decisions

Exam Preparation Guide

Anyone can be held accountable for offences under the Act.

Much more!

Provincial Offences Notice (more commonly known as ticketing) carry a fine of $195 for an individual and $295 for an employer.

Still can’t find what you’re looking for?

Repeated offences and other sections of the legislation may result in charges being laid. The result of these charges could lead to fines of up to $5,000 for the first offence and up to $10,000 for the second offence.

You can contact our Client Services Department at 1-855-299-0028 (toll-free). One of our client service agents will be pleased to assist you.

Enforcement stats: •

3,854 field visits were made throughout Ontario in order to educate and raise awareness about the College and the Act.

Source: Compliance and Enforcement Statistical Report: Cumulative to January 31, 2014

The College’s enforcement officers checked and verified over 7,000 trade credentials (C of Qs and statements of membership).

Got a complaint?

Over 200 complaints/incidents were submitted to the College from the public.

69 Provincial Offences Notices (tickets) issued and 6 prosecutions.

Anyone can report an incident or file a complaint against a member or a non-member of the Ontario College of Trades by calling our Client Services Call Centre at: 1-855-299-0028 (toll-free) or 647-847-3000 (in Toronto) or emailing complaints@collegeoftrades.ca.

9


Preparing to write Quick Facts your exam

330/595

Helpful tips available through the Exam Guide

330 industry stakeholders actively involved in the governance of the trades in Ontario, including an even mix of employees and employers.

595 industry stakeholders will eventually be engaged in the governance of the trades (once the Appointments Council completes its work and appoints people to all vacant positions).

Active Trade Boards comprised of industry stakeholders representing their trade in the College’s governance structure, including an even mix of employees and employers.

199 trade board meetings have been conducted since 2012, including 29 for the motive power sector, 105 for the construction sector, 28 for the service sector, and 27 for the industrial sector.

journeyperson-apprentice ratio reviews completed by independent review panels based on submissions from industry stakeholders and experts.

What is the Exam Guide?

T

he College now has a helpful Exam Preparation Guide for those who are preparing to write the Certificate of Qualification (C of Q) exam either for the first time or upgrading after a failed examination. The Guide includes study tips, information on training standards, sample questions and tests, pre-exam checklists, next steps and much more.

Where can you get a copy? The Exam Preparation Guide is now available on the College’s website under the resources, guides and forms tab.

Why is it important? Other than being a valuable tool to help you prepare to write the C of Q exam, beginning on April 8, 2014, the first wave of people in the Journeyperson Candidates Class working in a compulsory trade will need to have passed the C of Q exam in order to continue to work legally in Ontario after their 12 months of membership in that class expires.

10

15 journeyperson-apprentice ratios will change as a result of completed reviews: 14 will decrease, 1 will increase, while 18 will remain the same. 2007 was the last time in Ontario that a ratio was reviewed and amended prior to the ratio review process undertaken by the College. 2016 all ratios will be reviewed again. The College has committed to ratio reviews every four years.

1,049

submissions received from the public as part of a number of consultations on various proposed regulatory changes.

new regulations

passed to protect the public interest since 2011.

Source: Policy and Research, Ontario College of Trades: April – October, 2013


Essential Skills Provincial competition promotes skilled trades

T Photo courtesy of Skills Canada

he 25th Annual Ontario Technological Skills Competition (OTSC), the largest skilled trades competition in Canada, kicks off May 5-7, 2014 in Waterloo. This Olympic-style skilled trades competition gives students the chance to show off their skills provincially and nationally. Through competitions in trades ranging from welding to baking, students contend for the top spot by demonstrating their skill application, accuracy and professionalism.

“Changing perceptions and inspiring youth to consider careers in the skilled trades sector gives them greater options and opportunities for success,” says Ontario College of Trades Chair Ron Johnson. The College is a sponsor of the competition.

none of them are better than the other; they are simply different paths leading to different outcomes and careers. Simply put, if you’re interested in the skilled trades, apprenticeship and college are the way to go,” said Gail Smyth, Executive Director of Skills Canada – Ontario. When it comes to wages, job security and employment satisfaction, research from the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum (CAF) demonstrates that those who have completed apprenticeships fare better than individuals who haven’t completed trade or technical programs. For instance, trained apprentices have: •

Better employment outcomes, both immediately and several years after being certified

Better earning potential – in the short and longer term

Higher levels of job satisfaction and job security

Changing the perception of the skilled trades with those that influence career choices can have a huge impact. By promoting the skilled trades as a desirable, first choice career option for Ontario youth, a wider career net is cast—

“Changing perceptions and inspiring youth to consider careers in the skilled trades sector gives them greater options and opportunities for success.” - Ron Johnson Many skilled trades require advanced math, science, digital and problem solving skills. Because these skills are so important, a high school education is crucial for success in the trades; the classroom is where the foundation of success is built. Also, the myth that university is the only path to a good career needs to be cast aside. “People often forget that there are four career pathways after high school: straight to work, apprenticeship, college and university. There’s no right or wrong way, and

students are introduced to more than 150 different skilled trades and potential career paths. Skills Canada-Ontario’s 25th Ontario Technological Skills Competition, which showcases nearly 2,000 competitors from elementary, secondary and post-secondary students, takes place May 5 to 7 in RIM Park, Waterloo, followed by the Skills Canada National Competition June 4 to 7 in Toronto and the WorldSkills Competition in São Paulo, Brazil August 11 to 16.

For more information about these competitions, visit the Skills CanadaOntario website at: www.skillsontario.com

Sources: CAF-FCA article Skills Canada National Post article Careersintrades.ca

11


What April 28 means to us

T

he Day of Mourning — an occasion designed to commemorate all of those workers injured, disabled or killed at their place of work or from causes inherent to their occupation — is once again upon us. Every April 28, we honour the tradespeople all over the province who have lost their lives, and give tribute to the enormous contributions they have made to our communities. The Day of Mourning, recognized as World Day for Safety and Health at Work by more than 100 countries all over the world, is a Canadian initiative started in 1984 by the Canadian Union of Public Employees. Flags at Queen’s

Park and other government buildings are expected to fly at half-mast, and many workplaces including the College of Trades will observe a moment of silence. The College recognizes the importance of the Day of Mourning to our province and to the lives of the men and women working in the trades. We pay tribute to all tradespersons’ dedication and work by continuing to promote the trades and protecting the interests of certified skilled workers in Ontario. For a comprehensive list of events, visit Workers Health and Safety Centre - www.whsc.on.ca.

Skilled Trades Summit 2014

E

very other year, the non-profit organization, Canadian Apprenticeship Forum (Forum canadien sur l’apprentissage), which is a leader in Canadian apprenticeship research, hosts its national conference on the skilled trades and apprenticeship in a different Canadian city. The CAF – FCA Conference, rebranded this year as the Skilled Trades Summit, will take place at the Westin Ottawa Hotel from June 1 to 3. The conference offers more than 500 stakeholders from across the country the opportunity to meet and discuss the current issues and strategies to address them in the skilled trades and the apprenticeship community. Previous events have featured distinguished speakers involved in the Ontarian skilled trades community such as Dr. Rick Miner, President Emeritus of Seneca College and author of the speaking series “People Without Jobs, Jobs Without People”.

This year’s conference will feature over 20 presentations and interactive workshops on topics such as engaging youth and integrating traditionally under-represented groups in the trades community, the development of online courses for apprentices, which would enable more flexibility to mix theory and practice, and the most recent legislation regarding local and foreign workers in Canada and their impact on industry. The 2014 edition of the conference will also address skills and labour shortage in Ontario and Canada by focusing on targeted gaps within several industries today. The summit’s line-up will be finalized in the coming weeks as more speakers are announced, along with the recipient of the Darryl Cruickshank Memorial Award presented by the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship. More information is available at www.skilledtradessummit.ca.

Do you have any comments or inquiries about Trades Today? Please send them to: editor@collegeoftrades.ca.

Ontario College of Trades 655 Bay St., Suite 600 Toronto, ON M5G 2K4 Telephone: (647) 847-3000 Toll free number: 1 (855) 299-0028 Fax: 1 (866) 398-0368 E-mail: info@collegeoftrades.ca

Disclaimer: While Ontario College of Trades makes every effort to ensure that the information in this publication is current and accurate, Ontario College of Trades does not warrant or guarantee that it will be free of errors. The information contained in this publication is not intended to cover all situations. It is general information only and users/readers are encouraged to seek their own independent advice for particular fact situations.

12

Trades Today Spring 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you