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Volume 17, No. 2w

Singer

Gillian Margot Reinvents page 18

Time to Treat Yourself & Others

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John Lennon Educational Tour Bus Comes to Town

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Rental Car Center Opens

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Mission Hills 5K Scheduled

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PresidioSentinel.com•

A Publication by Presidio Communications• ©MMXVI

February 2016 Web Edition


Serving the Heart of San Diego

Presidio Sentinel is a commentary-driven newspaper that provides coverage on local,regional and national issues that impact the lives of its readers and the community it serves.  The serious issues are politics, government, redevelopment, the environment, conservation and safety. The quality of life issues include health, community activities, fundraisers, social events, religious issues and activities, theatre, arts, science and educational programs and services. We have over 35,000 monthly readers! Highly-educated, community-and arts-oriented. Both young and mature members of society. Most enjoy entertainment and travel, fine dining, local coffee houses, book and garden clubs, and participate in church, school and neighborhood activities. Our Mission: Making a difference, providing the facts, the truth, and a variety of opinions so that its readers are provided up-to-date researched information. The Presidio Sentinel strives to create dialogue, bringing topics to the forefront that need and deserve attention. Its writers, who share a variety of experiences and business backgrounds, write on topics that impact readers on a daily basis. Contact:

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Allowing Your Heart to Heal

Front Porch Brand Change

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11

Kenya Sojourn

The Treksters

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16

Valentine Fundraiser

“The Realish Housewives of San Diego...”

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Romeo & Juliet

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Music at the Maritime

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Featured Stories

Featured Events

The State of Our Union

George Mitrovich is a San Diego civic leader. He may be contacted at: gmitro35@gmail.com.

by George Mitrovich

How can we know how life unfolds When we cannot see the road

Mine Eyes Have Seen George Mitrovich

Through the mist of time the path unwinds To the end of the road we go. • To The End of the Road by John McDermott While watching President Obama’s last State of the Union address, I felt my emotions welling up and tears running down my cheeks, knowing the presidential road he has traveled is coming to an end. With an Irish mother and Serbian father, emotions are a part of my DNA, but I have been around politics and government a long time and have heard thousands of political speeches and 55 State of the Union addresses without tearing up. But even in that emotional moment, I understood my emotions. As I watched our president deliver his final State of the Union, I was quite overwhelmed thinking about everything he’s gone through in his presidency. Knowing, among his 43 predecessors, not one had traveled his road, because they were white and he is black–and that difference goes infinitely beyond his skin color and theirs. I think it will be extremely challenging for historians who chooses to chronicle the presidency of Barack Hussein Obama (and many will), because how does any historian judge his eight years as president without being influenced by his being the first black man in the Oval Office? My question may strike you as ridiculous. Of course, he’s black. You know it. I know it. Historians know it, and that is the challenge they face–and that’s why my question is relevant, not ridiculous. In my mind, while there’s no question Barack Obama, as a black man, has been judged unfairly, neither is there any question that others have been restrained in their criticism, also because he’s black. But for everyone who has tempered their criticism of Mr. Obama during his presidential tenure because of his skin color, a great many more have reviled him for that very same reason. Following Senator Obama’s election as president in 2008, I was at a reception in downtown San Diego, when the wife of a high-ranking Republican county official, came up to me, knowing I was a Democrat, because she wanted me to know Obama had not been born in America, and therefore had failed the Constitution’s requirement to be president.

I think it was the first time the president-elect’s being unborn in the USA had come to my attention; somehow I had missed that. Of course, I thought the woman was slightly wacky. Little did I know her wackiness would metastasize and become a cancer on the body politic. I must say here a harsh thing: Anyone, anyone, who believes Barack Obama was not born in America qualifies for idiot status. My philosophical side tugs at me constantly. It tells me either/or are few. But the question of the president’s place of birth is profoundly either/or. Either you accept that he was American born, or you do not, and if you do not then your idiot “status” is no longer in doubt; it is manifestly confirmed– and you need help. The Birther Movement is race based, but because overt racism in polite circles is thought socially déclassé, a covert means was sought to remove its racist stigma, and thus was born the Birther True Believers. I emphasize the Birther Movement because it was from the beginning a relentless campaign to smear Barack Obama; to call into question his legitimacy as president, from his first inauguration to his final State of the Union–and though twisted and deceitful, mean in spirit and immoral in conduct, the Birther crusade continues. But perhaps my harsh judgment, calling you out as an ”idiot”, will be mollified knowing Donald Trump, among other prominent Republicans, also believes President Obama was not born in the USA; and it was Trump, of course, who hired “investigators” to travel to Honolulu, Obama’s “alleged” birthplace, to uncover the cover-up. (Does Donald Trump know Hawaii is a U.S. State?) Now that Trump’s a serious candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, he has sought to downplay his role in the Birther Movement, but he can’t because he was its leader.

Continued on page 7 PresidioSentinel.com •


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Local News

Valentine’s Day is a

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

©

Time to Treat Yourself & Others

This isn’t the time to bring more stress to your life, it’s the time to embrace that fact that you can show kindness and gift those who deserve your special attention. It may also be the perfect time to gift yourself with something special. With that in mind, here are some gift options.

Valentine’s Day at the Museum

Embrace romance with an after-hours, lovethemed art tour, available exclusively on February 14. Following the tour, visit the May S. Marcy Sculpture Court and Garden at Panama 66 and enjoy a picnic basket for two filled with gourmet sandwiches, a cheese or vegan plate, chocolate truffles and a bottle of champagne, wine or craft beer. Museum tours are offered every half hour from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The San Diego Museum of Art is located at 1450 El Prado in Balboa Park. For information, call 619.232.7931, or visit www.sdmart.org.

Bonnie and Clyde Outdoor Movie Night at the Headquarters at Seaport

San Diegans looking for a twist on the traditional Valentine’s Day date can ditch the expensive dinner and flowers and head to the Headquarters at Seaport for a free outdoor movie screening of “Bonnie and Clyde” from 6 to 9 p.m., Friday, February 12. With fully-restored 1939 jail cells and mug shot photo-ops, the former San Diego Police Headquarters is the perfect venue to celebrate the most lawless couple in history. The event is completely free; guests are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets for the screening. Come early and enjoy a cocktail from Puesto or Season’s 52 and enjoy sweet bites from specialty food shops like Dallmann’s and Venissimo Cheese. The Headquarters at Seaport is located at 789 W Harbor Drive in downtown San Diego. For information, call 619.235.4013 or visit www.theheadquarters.com.

Valentine Fundraiser for Pug Rescue of San Diego County If you’re seeking a more “canine approach” to the Valentine season, Pug Rescue of San Diego County, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the rescue and placement of homeless pugs, is hosting their annual Valentine’s Wine and Cheese fundraiser event at Fido & Co., located at 1228 University Avenue. You can bring a pug (or not) and join a fun-filled event that includes four glasses of wine or soda and all the cheese, crackers and desserts you can eat. There will be a pug fashion show, a pug kissing booth, pug boutique and Valentine-themed raffle baskets. You must be 21 or older to drink alcohol at this event. ID will be required. All ages are welcome. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For information, call 619.295.9663.•

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Local News

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Transparency & Government Is Change on the Horizon? by Patty Ducey-Brooks My friend, George Mitrovich, who is a passionate writer, shares in this issue his impression of our current president. Though I respect George’s political experience and outlook, he and I don’t share the same observation and feelings about the current president and his accomplishments and contributions. The reason I make this statement is that I am disappointed and believe that President Obama didn’t fully appreciate the significance of his presidency and the honor he was given. Being that he is the first president of color, he could have made a significant difference for the country. It didn’t happen. In case you wonder what I know about people of color, I do have a perspective different than most people. I grew up in a predominately Hispanic community. And, I attended a predominately black junior high and high school in Denver, Colorado. And, I wasn’t a student who was bussed in. The community we lived in was originally a melting pot for immigrants, primarily Polish,

The NAMM Foundation

Germans and Italians. Over time the neighborhood changed. Ironically, I remember when other white neighbors ran away to “whiter communities.” As a family, we chose to stay in our home and “integrate.” Along with my three sisters, we learned what it was like to attend a predominately black school and be the minority. We definitely have a perspective of life that few can relate to, because we chose to stay in our neighborhood and assimilate. The outcome of our decision came with a hard reality. Whites shunned us; blacks were cautious and questioned why we didn’t leave. We had to prove that we belonged. So, my disappointment with President Obama is that he didn’t do enough to truly make a difference as a black president. Having seen and heard from Martin Luther King… which I did… I grew up believing that change was necessary and that some are chosen, and some elect to make the world a better place for all us. I idolized Martin Luther King, and still do, because he chose to make a difference, even if it meant his life. He was a man who had a dream and a vision. He wanted humankind to embrace each other. He wanted all of us to work together to create a better world, a kinder world, one world.

President Obama had eight years to “really make a positive impact.” I am disappointed because he failed on so many fronts. Most importantly, race relations have declined, not improved. How could that happen on his watch? As I look back at his presidency, I see the same reoccurring problems with our government, not solutions. Which brings us to where we are today, Americans are extremely disenchanted with our government. If you look at the current presidential election, it’s pretty obvious that a huge segment of the American population feels that the government is out of control and is no longer representing the people it was created to protect and serve. I hear it daily from small and medium sized business owners that government is eating away at their profits and creating more layers of bureaucracy. It’s hard to make a living, to succeed, to stay in business, to manage all the layers of red tape. The recent and serious issue in Flint, Michigan is also a reminder that “we are at the hands of those who choose what’s best for the public at large.” Dangerously, harmful water was allowed to be in the homes of these residents. Water they drank and bathed in. The real harm and full results of this “lack of

concern for the public at large” is on the horizon. Unfortunately, what happened in Flint, Michigan is not the exception, this has become the norm with governmental agencies. Fact is, our government, at all levels, is quickly becoming more bureaucratic and disconnected from the public it was created to serve. What I am hopeful for, and plan to contribute to, is working toward a government that pays more attention to the public it serves, and less to lobbyists and special interest groups. If we don’t turn the tide of where government is headed, we face a very dismal future. Let’s start by not electing “career politicians” who have lobbyists and special interest groups at their beck and call. And, let’s start to really do our homework through the election process. Get involved by paying attention to who is running for office and challenge their interests, goals and objectives. Don’t elect just because they are Republican or Democrat. Start acting responsibly for all of us…or we all suffer the consequences of bad decisions and bad politicians. We can’t sit by idly “hoping that government will change on its own,” we must help it change.•

Awards San Diego Students

John Lennon Educational Tour Bus Comes to Town

The National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) presented Crown Point Jr. Music Academy the Foundation’s SupportMusic Merit Award. Awardees were invited to submit a video that answered the question, “What Makes Music Education Great in My District?” Video contest winners were awarded a two-day residency with The NAMM Foundation and the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus to write, record, and produce an original song and music video in the mobile recording studio. Crown Point Jr. Music Academy will host a SupportMusic Community Forum where the school will be presented with a surprise instruments and gear donation worth $3,500 from Audio-Technica, Epiphone, Genelec, Mackie, Other World Computing (OWC), Neutrik, Yamaha and ZVEX Effects.

The NAMM Foundation SupportMusic Community Forum brings together school officials and administration, community leaders and NAMM Members to share strategies for incorporating music education as part of the curriculum. This event will be webcast live and will include performances by ensembles from Crown Point Jr. Music Academy, Pacific Beach Middle School, and Mission Bay High School. The NAMM Foundation invited 2015 Best Communities for Music Education districts and SupportMusic Merit Award winning schools to submit a video to illustrate what makes their music education programs special. Crown Point Jr. Music Academy was one of six schools to win a two-day residency with the NAMM Foundation and the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus by submitting this creative video.•

Studio Equipment and musical instruments are included on the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus.

PresidioSentinel.com •


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Local News

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Let There Be Light By Ilene Hubbs It all started with a dream. He was a music lover and a talented composer, whose Masters degree was in music composition. But sometimes life gets in the way. First a marriage, then children and the dream of a music career turns into the practicality of staying with a small business that is growing and growing, enabling him to provide a good life for his family. And so he stayed with it and became very successful. Fast forward many, many years and he finds himself and his wife retired to the good life in San Diego. He now has a beautiful home in Rancho Santa Fe, a happy healthy family, all grown now, and all the trappings success can bring. But he needs mental stimulation and the company of other vital and interesting seniors. He enrolls in the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UCSD and is drawn toward the Theater group, who put on staged readings of plays and one musical a year. It’s fun, it’s rewarding, but one day in a group of fellow thespians, he mentions his dream. He has always wanted to write an original musical production. I take the bait! That sounds like fun, let’s do it, I proclaim. And so it began.

Patty Ducey-Brooks We put the call out to anyone interested in working on an original musical. We set a meeting date and to our surprise, many Osher students showed up. After a few meetings, we saw that more and more interested parties lost interest. The early meetings were a bit hectic. It was brainstorming on steroids. The thought of what they were tackling was daunting and so, one by one they dropped out leaving just a core of five of us diehards, but this core was dedicated to making it happen. Here we were, a businessman, a Navy officer, a music librarian, a non-profit CEO and a psychology professor, all retired, and all working as a collaborative entity. The first thing we needed to agree on was what the play would be about. Then the appropriate music could be composed. One song was already written by our leader, a song about what was needed to produce a play. The song was titled “Let There Be Light” and it was beautiful. Everyone agreed we need to fit this song in. But how? One day a light bulb went off on all of us at the same time. How about a play about a bunch of seniors putting on a show. A play within a play. A play that would end with the new play about to begin. After that the ideas began to flow. There could be a love angle too, a

spark of interest between a widow and a widower both working on the play. He’s all for the relationship, she feels she’s not ready, conflict, drama, resolution, a reason for more songs to be written. Our brainstorming sessions became more productive. Each participant in the writing process took ownership. Soon we had the first scene written, the second, then a third. Each scene begged an appropriate song. It was magic. I wrote lyrics, someone else put it to music. It was working. We were all seemingly amazed, but secretly confident that we knew deep down that it could work. We knew it all along. Confidence builds with success and with each meeting we became more and more convinced we can do this. Then one of the group created a storyboard to keep us visually on track. Now we could see where each scene was going, who the characters are, what music was needed and whether the sequence made sense. Now, after many months, we are well into the process. We have no idea how long this will take to complete or how good the finished product will be. The joy is in the creating. Once the musical is written, we are done, and that will be “the end”…or not.•

Publisher

Ilene Hubbs Associate Editor

Michal A. Tuzinkiewicz Creative Director

Phyllis E. Zawacki Graphic Designer

Contributing Writers Blake Beckcom Rick Brooks Melody Brown Ian Campbell Richard Cone Cath DeStefano Violet Green Barry Hager Ilene Hubbs David Kamatoy Philip C. Lee Alice Lowe Aubree Lynn George Mitrovich David Rottenberg Anne Sack

Love Yourself First

Sabine Starr Barbara Strona

By Violet Green Ah February, the month that makes everyone, at least in American culture, think of hearts—paper hearts, candy hearts, hand-drawn hearts and flower hearts. They can be seen in all manner of shops trying to cash in on the retail holiday of Valentine’s Day. I’d rather think of it as a month to celebrate love, the pure love of friendship, sometimes family, and your chosen beloved. With all of this talk about love, it seems we rarely about our body’s organ attributed to that symbolic love… the heart. This amazing muscle is easy to forget about since it automatically beats non-stop, each muscle contraction pumping oxygen-rich blood to our cells and carrying away waste. By keeping the walls of our blood vessels free of buildup they remain flexible and can expand and contract easily to ensure proper blood flow and more balanced blood pressure. As a believer of preventive health, and someone who has familial heart disease, I try to think of new ways to continue my good heart health. I’ve found that one simple and delicious solution to protecting my ticker is to eat heart-healthy foods such as garlic, onions, ginger, and cayenne–coconut oil stir-fry anyone? I know that drinking green tea is another way to support my heart, but I sometimes have a tough time including it in my day. Instead, my new favorite tea is a yummy blend of hawthorn and red clover, two known heart-protective herbs that make my tongue and heart happy! Remember, the best way to show your love for those around you is to love yourself first! I just had to share this tidbit from my week… I recently watched a mama hummingbird building her nest outside of my kitchen window. What better way to display love than Motherly love for a hummingbird means building a nest making a warm cozy spot for a new baby?• for the expected arrival.

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Charlotte Tenney Laura Walcher The Presidio Sentinel is a monthly publication that is distributed by the first of each month to households in Mission Hills, Bankers Hill and Point Loma, with additional drop off points in Mission Hills, Bankers Hill, Point Loma, Old Town, Little Italy, Downtown, Hillcrest, Kensington, University Heights, Mission Valley and Linda Vista. The publisher assumes no responsibility for any unsolicited materials. All manuscripts, photographs and artwork become the possession of The Presidio Sentinel. All rights are reserved. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part without express written consent of the publisher is prohibited. Subscription rate is $25 per year. Send checks, all letters, editorial, press releases and calendar of events to the following.

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A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Allowing

Animal News

5

Your Heart to Heal

By Dove Braunstein

Canine Friends are Special Mates

In March of 2014, I wrote an article about my 11-year-old boxer, Bella, who had just been diagnosed with a mass near her heart. In the article I spoke of old dogs, the remarkable connection we have with them, and the inevitable loss, which at the time was a feeling I had yet to experience and was trying not to think about too much. This past July, Bella went to heaven after holding on longer than anyone expected, as the mass grew, slowly beginning to impede on the ventricles of her heart. She began receiving holistic care as well as taking several supplements to slow its growth. Once she could no longer walk or stand, I told her, sobbing, that she could go, and I’d be okay. When she did finally leave us, I had been bracing myself for so long that I was as prepared as I could be, but I was still heartbroken and bereft, as anyone who’s said goodbye to a dog knows. After six months of healing, six months of expecting Bella’s face to appear when I came in the door, six months of feeling a hole where her comforting presence had once been, I finally decided I was ready— it was time to look for a puppy. I had dipped my toe into the idea sooner, but it was still too raw, too painful. Until three weeks ago, that’s when Zephyr came home. Zephyr is now 12-weeks old, and I had entirely forgotten what having a new puppy is like, how intense, how much like having a human baby, how exhausting, how frustrating. This puppy has been astonishingly rewarding. My mother says that Zephyr is a gift from Bella, and I love that idea. I was afraid I’d never love another dog as much as I loved Bella, afraid that I might resent the new dog for not being Bella. Her first night with us, my husband asked, “Aren’t you excited?” because he could sense my reservation. She wasn’t Bella. But the next morning, my heart began to open. Though she was timid, out in the big world for the first time in her life, she would walk by my side and even run a little bit after me. After she’d been home a week, she was following me everywhere, her personality began to emerge, and I started to fall for her. December has been, as it is for many of us, an exhausting month. There were several quick trips for out-of-state holiday parties, then a rambunctious four days in Miami for Christmas with my husband. (Thank goodness for my mother, who stays with her granddog when we travel, and boy, are they in love.) Today I was bone-weary and it was an effort to leave the house. But I had made plans to exchange gifts with one of my best girlfriends. She and her husband’s beloved 12-year-old Rottweiler-shepherd mix, Henri, went to

heaven about a year before Bella did. I was with them the day they adopted him at eight-weeks old. Of course, any dog is always welcome in her home, so Zephyr came with me. We all laughed about how much work a puppy is. After an hour, they both agreed that maybe they weren’t quite ready for one of their own just yet. All of us had forgotten the magnitude of it all. When we said our goodbyes, Zephyr was full of energy. All I could think about was going home and getting into bed. But she needed to move, so we stopped at Heritage Park and we ran together until my lungs and legs were burning, Zephyr is just twelve-weeks old and she loved every second and full of energy. of it. She’s almost faster than me already. As I ran, I became aware that it was a beautiful, clear night. In the park’s darkness, I could see an astounding number of stars. The air was crisp and smelled of eucalyptus. And I realized that this… this is what dogs (as well as children, for that matter) do for us. They get us out moving when we might otherwise crawl into bed. They get us outside; they get us to the park; they get us to run under a sky full of stars on an exhilaratingly brisk December night. Tears ran down my face as I gasped for air, Zephyr waiting expectantly. I never would have been there had it not been for her. I would have missed the entire experience, the beauty of nature, the magic of the night sky. I felt enormous gratitude in that park tonight, to Zephyr for getting me there, and to Bella, for teaching me how to love a dog, and allowing me to do it again.•

help us find a hom e Clover is a 4½ year-old, American Staffordshire terrier mix. She is beautiful, sweet, and playful and a volunteer and staff favorite at the Escondido Campus. Clover is known for her remarkable Frisbee skills, her beautiful brindle coat, and her incredibly friendly nature. Clover will do best as the only pet in the home, as she loves her humans and would rather not have to share them with any other animals.

Not to be combined with any other offer. Not good for boarding, bathing, grooming, pet food and prescription and non-prescription drugs.Expires 2.29.2016

Clover’s adoption fee has been waived, and includes her spay, current vaccinations, permanent microchip identification, 30 days of complimentary medical insurance from Trupanion Insurance, a certificate for a free veterinary exam, and a license if residing in Oceanside, Vista, Escondido, San Marcos or Poway. Clover is currently located at the San Diego Humane Society, Escondido Campus, located at 3450 E. Valley Parkway. To learn more about making Clover a part of your family, call 760.888.2275 or visit the Escondido Campus at 3450 E. Valley Parkway. Ellie is a three-year old, German shepherd mix. She has come such a long way. Initially terrified when she first came into our care, she would cower at the back of her kennel and even treats could not compel her to come forward. With time and a lot of love and patience, we saw her tail start to wag, and then the sweet girl started to solicit play and affection. Ellie will benefit from ongoing training to continue with her confidence-building, and also to help with some of her puppy-like energy. She has already learned to sit, lay down, army crawl, and shake. Ellie has also done well in several doggie playgroups, though she can be a bit selective with her friends, so we would recommend a doggie intro for anyone who has another dog in the home. Ellie’s pet adoption fee has been waived. She is spayed and has current vaccinations, permanent microchip identification, 30 days of worry-free medical insurance from Trupanion Insurance, a certificate for a free veterinary exam, and a license if residing in Oceanside, Vista, Escondido, San Marcos or Poway. To learn more about making Ellie a part of your family, call 619.299.7012 or visit the San Diego Campus at 5500 Gaines Street.

SPCA PresidioSentinel.com •


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Lifestyle

Be Smart

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

©

About Your Resolutions

by Blake Beckcom SMART goals—commonly defined as specific, measureable, achievable, relevant and time-bound—have been used in the corporate world since the early 1980s. The concept has stood the test of time because it works. Anyone can set goals without these criteria, but if goals aren’t clearly defined and geared toward your real objective, you’ll likely lose interest. Also, if you’re not sure they’re achievable and you have no way to measure progress, you’re setting yourself up for disappointment and confusion along the way. We are now one month into 2016. How are you faring thus far on your goals? SMART goals give you the tools to make sure you’re setting the right goals, making steady progress and reaching the desired outcome. While SMART goals are typically used in personal development, project management and employee performance scenarios, this concept may be useful outside the corporate world. Now that we’ve entered a new year, why not set SMART goals to help you follow through with your resolutions? Resolution to meet your resolutions If you typically make New Year’s resolutions but seldom follow through, you’re not alone. It is now February, and already, many are falling by the wayside. It’s easy to start out enthusiastically, especially with common goals like getting in shape. Unfortunately, it’s also easy to get off track and lose your motivation. That’s where SMART goals come in. Be specific Specific goals outline the details of what you’re trying to accomplish. To do this, you need to state your overall objective (e.g., get in shape in 2016) and answer a few key questions like who’s involved (e.g., you and your family), what you want to accomplish (e.g., lose 15 pounds by April 30), why it’s important (e.g., feel better, look better), and where, how and when you’ll take action (e.g., work out at the gym and at home six days per week). Make it measurable Measuring progress is the only way to make sure you’re on track to meet your goal. For example, if your goal is to lose 15 pounds by April, how will

you know if you’re on the right track if you don’t step on a scale? While it’s best to weigh yourself first thing in the morning, you can decide how many times per week you’ll weigh in, but make sure you stick to it and write it down. Be sure it’s achievable and relevant Goals geared toward your main objective must be achievable and relevant. For example, if your objective is to get in shape in 2016, setting a goal to become a worldclass body builder in six months probably wouldn’t be achievable or relevant. However, the goal of losing 15 pounds by April fits both criteria. Add a time frame Committing to a deadline with Blake & Gwen Beckcom. milestones along the way will help keep you accountable for staying on track. If you start out thinking you have the whole year to accomplish your goal, you’ll be much more likely to procrastinate.• Fitness Together Mission Hills offers personal training with qualified professionals by regular appointment in private suites. Exercise and nutritional programs are custom designed to fit your needs and abilities. Call 619.794.0014 for more information or to schedule a free fitness diagnostic and private training session. See what others are saying about us on Yelp.

Love in Unusual Places by Sabine Starr Every year around Valentine´s Day we get inspired by love stories and then seek to show the special people in our lives how much we love them. It inspires me to think of love as the glue of society. It is the ingredient that makes a bonding, human relationship possible; it even extends to other living beings, like animals and plants. Any gardener will be able to confirm that without love for this world´s flora there is no possibility of a good gardener. The same is true of animals. Even the love a rancher has for his livestock will ensure better quality meat, since it will help determine all his actions and decisions along the way. But back to love among humans. Is there a greater love than that of a mother for her child? I think it is unmatched and without equal.

Then there is love among siblings. If it exists, it is a special bond that continues beyond the life of the parents. Parents can sigh in relief knowing that their adult children demonstrate loving actions towards each other and stay in touch in a busy and transient world. However, the obvious kind of love that we celebrate on Valentine`s Day is the romantic one. Yet, I’d like us to consider the impact of having love in our lives to enhance all other aspects of our life encounters? That is where love truly permeates. A person who has a strong and steady love relationship in his or her life (be it a parent, child, partner, sibling and friend) will see the world with a different set of eyes and make decisions based on the experience of love. To emphasize this point, studies have shown that people are more generous to strangers after minutes before having been the recipient of generosity and kindness from random strangers. These kinds of

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actions are in response to a general feeling of love (we tend to think of love as only the romantic kind, but there are many forms of love). It is difficult to be cold hearted with loving people in one’s life (sociopaths and narcissists excepted). These insights mean that we can make our love grow by sharing it with others, as they will in return share it again with more people. Ultimately, this is a great way of contributing to the world. This can almost be known as a secret amore weapon as in “loving greed and hatred to death” (which can also explain that wretched expression of loving someone or something to death). This Valentine´s Day, why not

consciously extend our love to the people around us and visualize it, extending it further and further… from neighbor to neighbor and around the world. So where do we start with this newfound kind of love? First, we must find love for ourselves; that’s where it starts. It is not possible to find a kind, loving partner, if we despise ourselves. We would not be able to accept and embrace kind treatment and instead look for someone who treats us poorly. This Valentine´s Day, take the extra effort to show appreciation for your self. Pamper yourself and enjoy the feeling of love. Then, go share the love.•

Author Sabine Starr is a psychologist licensed in Vienna, Austria, currently living and working in Mission Hills. She has written numerous articles for professional psychology journals. For further information, visit www. starrcoaching.com and follow her blog at www.HealthwithTaste.blogspot. com; and a new social media offering is www.facebook.com/StarrCoaching.


A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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A

Business News

7

Very Rough Start By Rick Brooks

Over the past few weeks, we have received a stark reminder that investing in the stock market involves risk. From March 2009 through 2015, the S&P 500 has gained over 200 percent, with only a couple of significant hiccups along the way. So what has investors so spooked, and what can those of us with a long-term investment perspective do? Investors have been rattled with something of a perfect storm of bad news and soft economic readings. A strong dollar has been putting a dent in exports and manufacturing. Falling oil prices have wreaked havoc on energy sector companies and workers. At the same time, cheaper oil typically leads to lower gasoline prices, which has historically allowed consumers to increase spending on other things, but that impact hasn’t been obvious in spending data yet. And increasing doubts about the health of the Chinese economy has led to volatility and unease in other stock markets around the world. Compounding all of this is the societal tension brought on by Europe’s migrant crisis, and the relatively unpredictable economic and political impacts on those countries. In short, investors have had a lot on their minds. In a market environment where stocks are not cheap (but not ridiculously overvalued, either), it doesn’t take much to cause something of a stampede as traders rush to place sell orders. The fundamental questions for investors, though, are these: What’s really happening in the economy? Underlying every investment decision is the health or weakness of the economy. And the U.S. economy is fundamentally sound, if not exciting. Manufacturing may be struggling, but the service economy (which is about 70 percent of the economy) is still quite strong, especially the construction sector. Unemployment (admittedly a lagging indicator) is near all-time lows and interest rates are not indicating trouble ahead. Finally, government spending is on track to increase, adding a significant tailwind. So while we can’t rule it out completely, we don’t appear to be heading into a recession. Will these overseas events affect us here at home? China purchases relatively little from the U.S., so if their economy is soft, it doesn’t affect us much. A strong dollar makes life hard for companies that have operations overseas, since their earnings in other currencies are reduced as the dollar

rises. But it also makes imported goods cheaper for U.S. consumers keeping a lid on inflation. Events in Europe are disruptive, and could impact our trade relationships and alliances in the long-run, but they are also fundamentally unpredictable and those are fairly low probability worst-case outcomes. So on balance, we’re mostly insulated from overseas angst. So what’s happening to corporate profits? In the end, the price of a company’s stock reflects the value today of all of its future earnings. So if profits are in trouble, then the price of a stock will usually come down. This does seem to be our first hint of an explanation. Corporate profits have been setting records since 2008, and that can’t go on forever. Workers are pushing hard for higher wages (which really haven’t grown in the past decade) and interest rates are rising, both of which affect profits. And the strong dollar isn’t helping. What does this mean for the future? The stock market will adjust company stock prices very quickly for new expectations about future profits, and at its core, that seems to be what’s going on recently. It’s not fun to participate in, but it also isn’t a bad thing for long-term investors. If you are investing with funds you don’t need for several years (which should be true if you own stocks), then this most recent downturn will probably represent a temporary correction that will recover in time. What does that mean for my portfolio? Hang in there. I know it’s not easy advice to hear when the markets are roiled and some pundits are talking collapse and recession. But a recession doesn’t seem likely yet, so this recent downturn (like most) should work itself out eventually. It may take a while and shave a few more points off of the indexes, but for patient investors with long-term goals and a well-thought investment strategy, the recent volatility is just part of investing. What’s more, it may be an opportunity to rebalance a portfolio to pick up some bargains.• This column is prepared by Rick Brooks, CFA®, CFP®. Brooks is director and chief investment officer with Blankinship & Foster, LLC, a wealth advisory firm specializing in comprehensive financial planning and investment management. Brooks can be reached at 858.755.5166, or by email at brooks@bfadvisors.com. Brooks and his family live in Mission Hills.

Our Union Continued from page 1 The Birther Movement is race based, but because overt racism in polite circles is thought socially déclassé, a covert means was sought to remove its racist stigma, and thus was born the Birther True Believers. I emphasize the Birther Movement because it was from the beginning a relentless campaign to smear Barack Obama, to call into question his legitimacy as president, from his inauguration to his final State of the Union– and though twisted and deceitful, mean in spirit and immoral in conduct, the Birther crusade continues. It was this effort to discredit Mr. Obama because of his skin color that so upset me. How was that possible in America? How could

any decent human being, knowing the uncertainty that marked the president’s childhood, of growing up the son of a single white Kansas mother and an absent black Kenyan father, of having to overcome the stigma our racist society assigns, not alone to black children, but also to children of biracial parents, and yet somehow, despite all, rising to the highest elective office in the world–President of the United States and Leader of the Free World–how could anyone deem that anything but heroic? It is a road no one else has ever traveled and he traveled it with the utmost dignity and poise and integrity despite the unyielding enmity of men and women unworthy to stand in his presence. They said he was not born in America. They said he’s a Socialist. They said he’s a Communist. They said he’s a Muslim, that he worships Allah. Never mind that no president in our history has publicly confessed Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior as many times as has Barack Hussein Obama. In his long journey from St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School in Indonesia to Punahou School in Honolulu, from Columbia University to Harvard Law School, from the Illinois State Senate to the United States Senate, to his election as President of the United States, no greater or more heroic chapter has ever been written in the annals of American history; nor is it likely that should the United States of America last a 1,000 years, his story will stand unique among all the stories ever written about presidents. I have issues with President Obama. At times he has disappointed me, especially his failure to adequately confront our ever growing wealth divide, but measured against the whole of his presidency, of his story, I have nothing but the greatest regard for him and his remarkable wife and their two impressive and beautiful daughters. Please know, Mr. President, that among decent and fair minded Americans, you have done us proud–and then some. Mr. President, I love you, and I thank you for your service to America. You’re better than we deserve.• George Mitrovich is a San Diego civic leader, serving as president of The City Club, a public forum of 40-year standing. In addition, he’s president of The Denver Forum, and chairs for the Boston Red Sox The Great Fenway Park Writers Series, the only literary series ever sponsored by a professional sports team. Mitrovich can be reached at gmitro35@gmail.com .

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Local News

Mission Hills:

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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A Treasure Trove for Valentine’s Day & Everyday

by Troy Curnett, President, Mission Hills Business Improvement District

Realtor & Broker/Owner of the boutique real estate office, One Mission Realty Whether your celebration of Valentine’s Day takes place with a friend, spouse, parent or child, there are many wonderful ways to celebrate. And, when I think of Mission Hills “wonderful” is one of the first descriptions that come to mind. From West Lewis to Fort Stockton, along Goldfinch and West Washington, India Street and Reynard Way, there is a treasure trove of wonderful gift buying options. If you need a Valentine’s gift for an infant or the person who seemingly has everything, or simply want to treat yourself to a little extra pampering, you will find Mission Hills offers abundant opportunity! The BID directory at www.missionhillsbid.com/places/ will help guide you. Plan ahead if you want flowers and dinner reservations. Call your favorite Mission Hills florist and Mission Hills restaurant. Since Valentine’s Day falls on a Sunday,

you will have the entire weekend to honor those you care about. If you are more of an impromptu person, or have not decided which special someone you wish to spend time with on Valentine’s Day, you may want to consider a last-minute purchase of a bottle of something sparkling and a couple of flutes from one of our Mission Hills stores. Finding it difficult to decide between flowers, chocolates, jewelry, pampering, and/or a delicious dinner? If it is just too hard to choose one, choose them all. As I am writing this column, I am also fresh out of a half-daylong Strategic Planning Session. A special “thank you” to the Mission Hills United Methodist Church for donating their parlor, to the BID board of directors for their time and dedication, and to The Patio on Goldfinch for donating a delicious and energy inspiring lunch. To El Indio, Farm Fresh to You, Farmer’s Bottega, Harley Gray, Lefty’s, Luxury Farms, Meshuggah Shack, Rubicon Deli, and The Wellington, thank you

very much for your generous gift certificate donations to express your appreciation to the BID board. The Mission Hills BID board has a lot in store for 2016. The Mission Hills BID is already hard at work promoting Mission Hills as a premier shopping, dining, personal well-being destination and so much more; working on and reviewing design options which maintain the heritage of our thriving neighborhood; seeking sound economic development opportunities, and seeking and promoting bike, motorcycle, and automobile parking opportunities in our BID neighborhood. We will again be hosting the 5th Annual Taste of Mission Hills in October and partnering with our BID businesses and Mission Hills residents, through the Presidio Sentinel and Mission Hills Town Council, to celebrate Small Business Saturday in November. We are also partnering with the San Diego County Fair again this year to showcase our Mission Hills

businesses on banners throughout the Mission Hills BID and at the San Diego County Fair. A professional photographer will be in Mission Hills on Thursday, February 25 from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. The banners will sail from May through mid-July. To find out more, please contact Susan McNeil Schreyer, executive director, Mission Hills BID at MissionHillsBID@gmail.com. If you have ideas for a fun promotion and have time to help implement it, please attend a Mission Hills BID committee meeting on the first Wednesday of the month beginning at 3:30 p.m. We need volunteers. We need you! Please visit our website at MissionHillsBID.com for news on what’s happening in Mission Hills and for the most up-to-date information about our meetings.•

Mark Your Calendars!

Garden Walk Mission Hills Garden Walk!

th Sa tu rd ay, Ma y 7 , 20 16

YA R D S A L E Mission Hills Community Garage Sale is coming! Satu rday, May 21 st , 2016

• PresidioSentinel.com


A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Part One:

Lifestyle

9

Kenya Sojourn

by Barb Strona Travel broadens the mind. I disagree. Being in a location with people who have had different experiences, whose way of life is unlike yours, whose physical environment is different from yours is enlightening. Traveling coach by air, to go from point A to point B, is exhausting and annoying. However, the destination can make the misery of being folded into a tiny space amid coughing and sneezing adults and screaming babies worthwhile. My husband and I spent the first of this year in the bush in Kenya. It was our second visit, and it is a place we Elephants, zebra, giraffe, Cape buffalo, and antelope of all varieties from dik diks to elands both love. Although a third world dot the landscape in various combinations. country, Kenya has laws to protect At four we meet for tea, al fresco, its biggest asset: the environment. much; flowers are great; stagnant my symbol of Kenya, occasionally with an animal resting or guarding followed by our afternoon game drive. Being in the bush, conservancies or water holes maybe not. I love bumping over the rough its prey. On a previous trip we While watching the magnificent just wild life preserves, is a spiritual, mystical experience like returning to roads in a vehicle. I sink into its watched a leopard guarding her prey Kenya sunset, we have cocktails. The the beginning of time. Four-wheeled motion as if I were riding a horse. from the ground. In an acacia was drive ends after dark with time for a vehicles, rutted dirt and mud roads, The sun warms those of us who are a Thompson’s gazelle. The leopard shower before more drinks around people herding cattle in modern not fair-skinned, and the sights may climbed the tree, grabbed her meal a campfire or in the lounge. Before dinner is a good time to shower. In dress or Maasai garb do not mitigate have been present before the birth of dragging it up a few branches. man. Elephants, zebra, giraffe, Cape Spellbound in our vehicle we the camps without running hot water, this feeling. and antelope Kenya country-side with buffalo, HAPPYteams GROUND HOG DAY of all varieties watched her devour one leg with great hot water comes from tanks filled by bird-calls. The smells are heavenly Februaryfrom 2 dik diks to elands dot the crunching sounds. The leg disposed buckets. Temperature control is from to me. After a rain, the plains are landscape in various combinations. of she carried the rest of her dinner the shower. You learn efficiency in verdant with red oat grass on which Wart hogs dart across the plains while headfirst down the tree wrapping showering; turn the water off while her tail around the tree’s trunk for you lather; turn it on again to rinse. hooved animals feast, in which cheetahs sit atop termite mounds. The vegetation is fascinating. Many balance. She dragged the meal across The staff always accompanies guests predators hide, and which emit the odor of springtime. Occasionally varieties of acacia abound including the plain, its body between her four at night for safety from tripping, one passes other areas which may a very thorny one which will attack legs. The entire trip took over thirty finding one’s tent in the very dark not appeal to all; vegan manure an arm too close to the outer side of minutes. This trip we didn’t see any night, and to dissuade animals from smells fine to me; urine not so the car. The flat-topped large trees are leopards, but we did learn that some joining the camp. of her sons, now quite mature, are still Despite having only charcoal fuel alive and thriving. with no thermostat, a tasty threeHAPPY GROUND HOG DAYDAY This trip we stayed at two of the course dinner is beautifully served, HAPPY VALENTINE’S February 2 four Kicheche camps. Both camps including cakes and soufflés! February 14 consisted of six tents. All the camps The spacious, beautifully are informal. Meals are served appointed tents have every amenity: family style. Whenever possible, comfortable king sized or single one dines al fresco. Each camp has beds, a seating area, a veranda a lounge, dining room, and a small overlooking the view, a hammock, shop for forgotten essentials. Hearty and an enormous bath and dressing HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY and spectacularly good breakfasts room with plush towels and terry February 14 are served during the morning game robes, laundry soap, shampoo, drive. The Scotch eggs at our second lotion, cotton swabs, fresh water camp (Bush) were so good that I in reusable carafes and a large requested them three days in a row! water dispenser. Laundry service Each camp has guides for game is included. Since the help is all HAPPY PRESIDENTS’ DAY drives. Our drives often consisted male, the service does not include February 15 of the two of us and our guide. ladies’ “unmentionables.” Occasionally we were joined by The camps make every effort HAPPY PRESIDENTS’ DAY another couple. The drives are in to be self-sustaining, using solar February 15 four-wheel drive vehicles with heavy powered electricity and charcoal bars supporting the removable stoves and ovens. China, glass and canvas rooves. We kept ours open metal cutlery are always used on so we could jump up for photo ops. picnics in all the camps. The camps With two rows of seating behind conserve water and waste nothing. the front seat, each person has easy Wine bottles are cut to become viewing and a window seat. Very water glasses or vases. Organic For all your real estate needs, please call: For all your real estate needs, please call: knowledgeable guides carry ponchos matter is buried; paper is burned if it Barbara Strona in case of rain or cold, bean bags for cannot be reused while plastic and CRS, GRI, SRES, RMS (619) 203-1200 steadying cameras, and an umbrella. metal are taken to recycling centers CRS, GRI, SRES, RMS All guides go through a year’s rigorous in Nairobi. Stay tuned for Africa’s (619) 203-1200 training; they are encouraged to fauna and flora. advance their knowledge by earning This month’s Garden Club barbstrona@aol.com www.strona.com DRE # 00872337 a bronze, then silver, then gold level meeting will take place from 6 to of competency. 8 p.m., Wednesday, February 24 at After a morning drive, we return the church at 4070 Jackdaw Street barbstrona@aol.com to camp for lunch, usually served at West Lewis. with Nan Sternum on www.strona.com DRE # 00872337 outdoors. Growing Edibles in a Drought.•

Barbara Strona

PresidioSentinel.com •


10

School News

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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MADCAPS San Diego Announces th

56 Annual Benefit Show Mothers and Daughters Club Assisting Philanthropies (MADCAPS) celebrates 56 years of community service with its annual benefit show Thursday, March 10 through Saturday, March 12, 2016 at Brown Chapel on the campus of Point Loma Nazarene University. The theme for the 56th anniversary show is MADCAPS, In Harmony with San Diego and will feature several different styles of dance. Tickets for this year’s show go on sale February 9, 2016 with prices ranging between $5 and $25. Tickets can be purchased at www.sdmadcaps.org. “We are particularly excited about this year’s theme “MADCAPS, In Harmony with San Diego,” says Kate McKenzie, 2016 Benefit communications chair. “It focuses on our local community, where our boots are on the ground making a difference. An exciting new feature of our show is spotlight appearances by representatives of the philanthropies we support. This year, we are very pleased to welcome to the stage San Diego Habitat for Humanity, St. Vincent de Paul, and San Diego Therapeutic Recreational Services to say a few words to our patrons. In addition, we are supporting an outreach to the homeless led by Point Loma Nazarene University/San Diego First Church by collecting items for homeless kits. Patrons are asked to bring an item such as new tube socks and small shampoos, which will be distributed to those in need. All of this would not be possible without the support of sponsors from our community. And so we sincerely thank our Erin & Jim Schabarum, Brick Youth Group of Point Loma Community Presbyterian Church, and the MADCAPSs Class of 2016.”

This annual musical extravaganza has become MADCAPS signature fundraising event to provide financial support to dozens of local charities. The underwriting of major production costs, proceeds from ticket and advertising sales, and the donated time and expertise of the girls, their families and friends make it possible to give to these community organizations. MADCAPS is very excited to return to the campus of Point Loma Nazarene University. The additional capacity and comfort of the theater at Brown Chapel, state of the art audio and visual technology, and ease and accessibility of parking will again make this year’s show a fantastic experience for all who attend. MADCAPS is a group of approximately 180 mothers and their seventh to 12th grade daughters from the Point Loma, Ocean Beach, Mission Hills and Hillcrest areas who provide direct service and donations to many charitable organizations in San Diego. In addition to the thousands of hours of community service served by the girls each year, MADCAPS presents a high-energy music and dance benefit show annually to raise additional funds for these local charities. The group’s history of fundraising has grown tremendously over the past 55 years to become an integral part of philanthropy in San Diego. Since its inception in 1960, MADCAPS has raised more than $828,000 for the community and contributed tens of thousands of hours volunteering for philanthropic organizations. For more information about MADCAPS, visit www.sdmadcaps.org. For information about this year’s benefit show, contact Kate McKenzie, 619.399.9839, kate.mckenzie@cox.net.•

High kicking dance routines are part of the benefit show.

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Missionhillsacademics.com • missionhillsacademics@gmail.com

“Making Life’s Little Problems Disappear”

Celebrate Mardi Gras a little early. San Diego’s finest Zydeco and Cajun Music! Bring the whole family. Wednesday, February 3, 2016, at 6:30 PM

Mission Hills Branch Library 925 W Washington St. San Diego, CA 92103 619-692-4910 Facebook: www.facebook.com/mhlibrary This information will be made available in alternative formats upon request.

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Use QR Reader App to View Product Video For more information, visit www.liftoffinc.com or Call 1-800-346-1633.


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The Front Porch is

Local News

11

Now Luxury Farms

New Name Reflects Brand Enhancements The Front Porch in Mission Hills and Coronado, California recently went 2016. For the kitchen, Emile Henry has come out with some exciting new through a name change to reflect enhancements to the business. According colors in bakeware which will be unveiled as well as some new copper/ to Melissa Scott Clark, one of the owners, this is in response to a growing stainless blend cookware pieces by Mauviel. The kitchen gadgets for 2016 product range and expanding brand; The Front Porch is now Luxury Farms. are innovative and out of the world in design. Luxury Farms features a variety of unique gifts and baskets from kitchen Scott Clark also complimented the team of people behind the operation, and gourmet pantry to home goods. The name change is in direct correlation “Add to all of this excitement, we are fortunate to have attracted and kept with brand identity as a release of their highly anticipated ecommerce a motivated and dedicated sales group with unbridled customer service website is scheduled for quarter one, 2016. “We are evolving with the dedication. We are all visionaries on our team, operating collectively from demand from our community. Stepping from The Front Porch and into our a strategic direction towards our ongoing success.”• Luxury Farms titles signifies that our product offering is expanding with innovative opportunities, as we are journeying into a more expansive market. As a result of our consistently diligent efforts, we are able to explore a vision beyond our fondest dreams when we first became The Front Porch,” stated Melissa Scott Clark, co-founder and co-owner of Luxury Farms. Scott Clark thanks her partner, Gina Champion-Cain, whose abundant energy and passion for accomplishment is flawlessly consistent and strongly believed it was the time and the opportunity to broaden their vision towards a more expansive marketplace. Looking back, Scott Clark remembers when it began, “We opened our first location on Fort Stockton in Mission Hills in only six months, from conception to grand opening. I literally had to hit the ground running to meet this deadline. Of course, it needed to be perfect, because we would only have one opportunity to be an instant hit. We were immediately. We opened our second location in Coronado a year later. This prime location on Orange Avenue instantly flourished and has captured the hearts of residents and tourists alike.” Staying true to its roots, Luxury Farms will continue to feature a variety of unique gifts and baskets from kitchen and gourmet pantry to home goods. However, they do As Luxury Farms continues its expansion of the new brand awareness, they will seek out unique neighborhood Luxury Farms store locations throughout San Diego and Northern California. have their sights on some distinctive new products for

The Crow Show Marks First Anniversary for

North Park Art Center

The Studio Door celebrates one year of exhibits, classes and cultural events

In addition to the success of the business, Stillman was able to significantly The North Park arts gallery and studios, The Studio Door, celebrates its one-year anniversary in February with the return of last year’s popular add to his own accomplishments. His artwork was seen in an exhibition at exhibition The Crow Show and new workshops for artists. The festivities the Louvre Museum, featured in a group show during SCOPE Miami Beach, and he was commissioned by Got Milk? to paint a life-size cow for charity. kick off February 6 with an artists’ reception. The Studio Door has stated the new year with a continued focus as an The visual arts exhibition will showcase diverse artworks from around the country as well as from Greater San Diego. The exhibition is being juried arts incubator dedicated to the creative marketplace and the promotion of by Michelle Deziel, an independent curator and art consultant who was contemporary artists. The core of their activities will continue to be to assist artists with the business side of selling art as well as creating opportunities formerly curator with Norton Simon Museum of Art in Pasadena. The exhibition dates are February 5 through 28, 2016 at The Studio Door to bring greater attention to San Diego’s visual artists.• (3750 30th Street, North Park–San Diego). The opening reception will be held from 6 to 9 p.m., Saturday, February 6. Also during the month, The Studio Door will host a night of Jazz music in the gallery, a twist on the popular wine & paint nights, creativity workshops and much more. A complete schedule can be found online atwww.thestudiodoor.com. “The first few months were a bit like a nail-biting thriller as we attempted to keep to our exhibition and programming calendar intact while vigorously reinventing the storefront offices into a functioning arts center,” said owner Patric Stillman. “I’ve read that many start-ups learn that they can accomplish more than they could image during the first year and this has certainly been true for The Studio Door. I’ve been blessed by an active creative community and the loving support of my family to keep my eyes on the prize. I can’t imagine having sustained the energy to establish this business without all of the encouragement. It’s a thrill to be trumpeting the first anniversary because Guests of the Studio enjoy the exhibits that are open to the public. it’s a shared victory.”

PresidioSentinel.com •


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Local News

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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New Rental Car Center Opens

Facility Consolidates Rental Car Companies Serving the Airport

The new consolidated Rental Car Center officially opened for business at San Diego International Airport this past month. The 2-million-square-foot Rental Car Center houses most of the rental car companies serving the airport, including national brands, as well as local, independent and small business rental car companies, in one central location off Pacific Highway. The new facility replaces the group of buildings on Harbor Drive that have for years housed most rental car companies serving the airport. In a related change, all rental car customers will be carried to and from the terminals in 16 new alternative-fuel shuttles owned and operated by the Airport Authority. This fleet replaces the approximately 81 shuttles now operated by the rental car companies. “When I look at the new Rental Car Center, I see a facility that does it all,” said San Diego County Regional Airport Authority Board Chair Robert Gleason. “It improves the customer experience from start to finish; it helps us maximize use of our 661-acre footprint in a sustainable way; and it bolsters the airport’s role as a key economic driver.” Moving the rental car companies to the north side of the airport and consolidating them into one building will dramatically reduce rental car traffic on Harbor Drive, as well as the number of shuttle buses competing with passengers getting to and from the airport. The new shuttle buses will operate almost exclusively on a new interior airport roadway. “With this facility, we’re helping to ease congestion on Harbor Drive while reducing the airport’s overall carbon footprint,” said Thella F. Bowens, the Airport Authority’s President/CEO. The building, which is a candidate for LEED Silver certification, also features three new works of public art, with a fourth expected to debut later this year. Fourteen rental car company brands are operating out of the facility, which can accommodate up to 19 brands in total. The facility has room for more than 5,000 cars. The $316 million facility generated approximately 4,600 construction jobs, with $186 million in construction contracts going to local businesses, of that $70.4 million went to small businesses.• The Rental Car Center entrance faces toward the harbor.Photo courtesy of Fausto Palafox

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A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Local News

13

“Romeo & Juliet” at the Balboa Theatre

California Ballet Company (CBC) presents Shakespeare’s “Romeo & Juliet” at the Balboa Theatre Saturday and Sunday, March 12 and 13, 2016. With gorgeous choreography by Charles Bennett, this one hour dance adaptation will take you on an emotional roller coaster from the first note of Prokofiev’s powerful score. The ballet recounts Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy about a pair of star-crossed lovers whose romance comes to a fatal conclusion because of an age old feud between their warring families. “This hour-long adaptation is dependent upon condensation of character and text,” said choreographer Charles Bennett. “It has been my intention to retain the original structure while using dance as a means of expressing poetry.” This season’s production of “Romeo & Juliet” will feature guest artist Jared Nelson and CBC Principal Trystan Merrick alternating in the role of Romeo. The role of Juliet will be shared by CBC Principal Ballerina Chie Kudo and Principal Dancer Ana da Costa. Guest Artist Justin Flores, last seen on the California Ballet stage as George Wilson in “The Great Gatsby,” will dance the role of Tybalt and CBC Soloist Jeremy Zapanta will appear in the role of Mercutio. The program will also include a new work by guest choreographer Jared Nelson titled “Ruled by Secrecy.” Nelson restaged Septime Webre’s choreography for “The Great Gatsby.” He also stared in the title role. This will be the first time his original work will be seen on the California Ballet stage. The Balboa Theatre is located at 868 Fourth Avenue in downtown San Diego. Tickets may be purchased at The ballet is a romantic tragedy about a pair of star-crossed lovers whose romance comes to a fatal conclusion. www.californiaballet.org or Trystan Merrick and Ana da Costa are cast as Romeo and Juliet. at 858.560.6741.•

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14 Theatre News Balboa Theatre

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Brawls! Booze! Botox! Broadway/San Diego brings “The Realish Housewives of San Diego: A Parody” to the Historic Balboa Theatre February 2 through 7, 2016. The new, original play was created and written by veteran Chicago-based comics and Second City writers Kate James and Tim Sniffen and is produced in association with Pop Up Theatre. Get ready for oodles of hometown reality in this totally original and outlandish parody performance, where you’ll meet Rovanka, the baroness of an uncertain ethnicity; Claudia Louise, glamorous and conniving in equal measure; Desiree, neck supermodel; Brooke, self-made business tycoon; and Gwen, the only one in the bunch with half a brain. Cast for the tour includes: Katie Caussin (Gwen), Katy Carolina Collins (Claudia-Louise), Jackson Evans (Randy), Emjoy Gavino (Desiree), Lori McClain (Ravonka), and Lindsey Pearlman (Brooke). Laugh along as these loony ladies who lunch, along with your host, Randy, take on the current events and the people making headlines in San Diego... that is, if they don’t strangle each other first. Even the audience gets in on the act in this can’t-take-your-eyes-off-it train wreck that’s guaranteed to leave you and your best “frenemies” laughing ‘til you cry your false eyelashes off! The Balboa Theatre is located at 868 4th Avenue in downtown San Diego. Tickets can be purchased at www.broadwaysd.com.•

Landmark Theatres In the spring of 2011, director Stig Björkman met Ingrid Bergman’s daughter Isabella Rossellini and she suggested they make a film about mama. With Rossellini’s help, the filmmaker was able to tell Bergman’s story through her own words and images. Seven time Academy Award nominee and three time Academy Award winner Ingrid Bergman was one of the most talented actresses of Hollywood’s Golden Age, with great performances in films such as “Casablanca” (1942), “Gaslight”(1944), “Spellbound” (1945), “Notorious” (1946), “Anastasia” (1956) and “Autumn Sonata” (1978). Through never-before-seen private footage, notes, letters, diaries and

interviews with her children, “Ingrid Bergman–In Her Own Words” presents a personal portrait and captivating look behind the scenes of the remarkable life of a young Swedish girl who became one of the most celebrated actresses of American and world cinema. The film, which is partially subtitled, includes the voice of Alicia Vikander and music by Michael Nyman. “Ingrid Bergman–In Her Own Words” opens February 12, 2016 at Landmark’s Ken Cinema, located at 4061 Adams Avenue, for an exclusive engagement. It is 114 minutes long and Not Rated. By the MPAA. For information and times, call 619.819.0236, or visit www. landmarkTheatres.com. Film times and dates are subject to change.•

The cast of “The Realish Housewives of San Diego: A Parody” will cause you to laugh to tears.

Old Globe Theatre The World Premierer of “The Last Match,” by Anna Ziegler and directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch, runs February 13 through March 13, 2016 at Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre of the Conrad Prebys Theatre Center. The US Open tennis semifinals are underway. As Russian phenom Sergei Sergeyev and American superstar Tim Porter do battle under the lights on center court, Galina and Mallory, the funny and complicated women who share their lives, watch anxiously from the sidelines. But as the back-and-forth action unfolds, we journey into the minds of the players and the lives of the two couples Troian Bellisario stars as Mallory in the World in a fast-paced and moving Premiere of Ziegler’s “The Last Match.” exploration of family, Photo courtesy of The Old Globe. parenthood, and the legacy we leave behind. Before it’s game, set, and match, more than a championship will be won or lost. Developed in the Globe’s 2014 New Voices Festival, Anna Ziegler’s energetic new play is a funny and visceral look at the sacrifices we make to stay on top. The cast includes Patrick J. Adams (Tim), Troian Bellisario (Mallory), Alex Mickiewicz (Sergei) and Natalia Payne (Galina). The creative team includes Tim Mackabee (scenic design), Denitsa Bliznakova (costume design), Bradley King (lighting design), Bray Poor (sound design), David Huber (vocal coach), Caparelliotis Casting/Lauren Port, CSA (casting) and Diana Moser (production stage manager). The Old Globe is located in San Diego’s Balboa Park at 1363 Old Globe Way. For information and tickets, call 619.234.5623•

• PresidioSentinel.com

Ingrid Bergman stars as Joan of Arc, in a memorable performance and adaptation.

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619.366.0698

4141 Park Blvd. • Mission Hills


A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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First Annual

Local News

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Mission Hills 5k Scheduled to Take Place on March 19

The first annual Mission Hills 5k is scheduled to take place at 8 a.m., Saturday, March 19. Promising fun for the whole family, this fun run/walk will wind through the scenic, historic neighborhoods of Mission Hills, beginning and ending at Grant K-8 (1425 Washington Place). Runners of all ages and fitness levels are encouraged to register at www.missionhills5k.com. According to event organizers, the Mission Hills 5k is designed to bring the local community together in achieving a healthy, fun-filled goal: reaching the finish line. All proceeds from the event will help fund science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) programs at Grant K-8. The idea for the event was conceived last year by a small group of Mission Hills residents The current map was submitted on January 27, 2016. No changes are expected. and Grant K-8 parents who were inspired by other school-led community events. After months for residents, visitors and emergency responders. Single lanes only will of meeting with city event planners as well as administrative leaders be closed, barricades will ensure a clear map route and trained personnel at Grant K-8, and sharing event information at Mission Hills Town will be available throughout the route to direct race participants and Council, Mission Hills Town Hall and Mission Hills BID meetings, traffic. The final, approved route is nearing completion and is included in the Mission Hills 5k came to life and has received positive response the visual map included with this announcement. to-date from the local community. Throughout the vast majority of the route, only half the streets will be “The Mission Hills 5k is meant to be a celebration of our beautiful used. This allows maximum accessibility to and from Mission Hills, and neighborhood,” says Kristin Boyd, a member of the Grant School also allows vehicles to park on one side of the road. The organizers have Community Foundation and one of the event organizers. Other coordinated complete closure for the start on Washington Place and Mission Hills 5k committee members include Mission Hills residents Randolph Street; and full closure for the business portion of Lewis Street. Lauri Brennan, Patrice Shumaker, Katy Pinon, Steve Boyd and Since Hawk Street is used for the beginning of the race, it will open fully Jennifer Benson. soon after the start. At 6:30 am, Washington Place will be closed. At 7:30 Kristin notes that close attention has been given in particular to creating am, all other half streets/streets of the route will be closed. the route for this annual event. Event organizers are continuing to work Traffic controllers will be strategically positioned throughout the route, hand-in-hand with city event planners to ensure maximum accessibility and the supervisor of traffic control will be on site as well. Businesses and residents who have questions can solicit questions and comments to info@missionhills5k.com. The entry fee is $25/adult and $15/child before March 11, which includes a Mission Hills 5k t-shirt. After March 11, the price rises to $35/ adult and $25/child. Same-day race registration will be available, but t-shirts will not be guaranteed after March 11. To register individually or form a team (or join a team that has already been created), log on to www.missionhills5k.com.•

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16 What Now?

Lifestyle

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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The Treksters

By Laura Walcher She went north; he crossed the ocean. Both Maggie Espinosa (ME), and Don Gullans (DG) invested months of preparation for their “Camino” treks: Espinosa, 800 miles through the California’s El Camino Real, from San Diego to Sonoma, and Gullans, across northern Spain’s El Camino de Santiago. Gullans spent two months on the trail; Espinosa, in short bites, covered the El Camino over the course of a year. Here, Espinosa is a noted writer and traveler; Gullan is retired from his newspaper clipping service, dances “Flamenco,” contributes time and heart to our churches and schools. Espinosa produced a book; Gullan collected memories; they’re both resting up: LW: What inspired you to take this trip? ME: I’d been mulling around the idea of walking either the length or width of California, but wasn’t sure of the approach. Then I read an article in Westways magazine about Butch Briery—a retired Oregon school teacher—who walked the El Camino Real to visit its 21 historic missions. Bingo! DG: I didn’t walk the Camino to “find direction.” I intended to focus on what it means for me to be fully in the moment as I journey along the rest of my life. LW:  Did either of you consider taking the other trek? ME: I didn’t know about the other Camino until I started walking and met a few hikers who had walked the Santiago. It sounds very appealing, but after testing my fortitude and stamina trekking 800 miles hill-and-

dale through California, I told my husband if I ever utter the words “I’m thinking about walking the Camino de Santiago,” please tie me to a chair. DG:  I have a deep connection to Spain; I’m attracted to the historical, religious and social aspects of the Camino de Santiago. Consequently, I did not consider the California Camino. LW: How did you–and how long did it take you, to prepare, practice, train? ME: I trained on an old treadmill I won on “The Price is Right.” I walked between six to nine miles a day–different from Don’s in that I divided my journey into a year, walking one long weekend every month, and returning home between walks. Prior to launch, I sent an email to family and friends inviting them to join me. Many said yes. My buddy, Tracey Elliott, and I started at the San Diego Mission Alcala and walked four days, 80 miles, to the San Juan Capistrano Mission. We took Amtrak home, and three weeks later I again trained up to San Juan Capistrano to resume the walk. Upon completion, it was only 10 months of actual walking because I lengthened some of my long walking weekends into a week. The final tally was 49 total walking days, 796 miles, 1,841,931 steps... but who’s counting :-).  A few months into the walk, I found I needed to rest in between walks rather than train. DG: I prepared for the walk for more than two years. Guide books were helpful, Paulo Coelho’s “The Pilgrimage” inspired me and the Camino blog kept me up to date. REI staff guided me in selecting the best clothes and equipment. My back pack, shoes and trekking poles are first rate– and I did not exceed the recommended 10 percent of my body weight limit in my pack. P hysical training was important. I broke in my boots, got used to carr ying my pack and using my poles while walking over 300 miles of hilly terrain. I made rookie mistakes and lost–a toe nail. But I learned–and the 500-mile trek across Northern Spain gave me no physical problems, even though, I got cold, hot and tired. Giving up whining and learning to accept “the Camino walking me” was an important lesson. LW:  Did anyone, friends/family, try to talk you out of it, per safety, money, time, energy and investment? ME: Nope. I’m like a dog with a bone when I get an idea. DG:  My family and friends were fully supportive and bought me underwear, socks, pants and a hip flask. LW: What were your expectations vs. your surprises? ME:  I tried to not have any preconceived notions. That was easy because I had no idea what to expect. One big surprise was how horribly sore my feet were! From the ankles up I was fine, but most of the time, my pieds were killing me! I just had to Maggie Espinosa is only the eleventh person to have completed walk through the pain. the walk to Camino.

• PresidioSentinel.com

nother surprise was the kindness of A a Facebook group–“California Mission Walkers.” Many of them, who I had never met, offered their guest rooms and meals. Also, strangers who saw us walking along the side of the road, and thinking we were lost or carless, offered us rides. DG: My expectation was to walk the Camino slowly in two months; and I did it! I hoped to meet interesting “pilgrims” from all over the world while walking, eating and staying in hostels–and I did it. I planned to travel alone. That lasted only as far as the JFK Airport bar in New York, where I met a woman, also awaiting the flight to Madrid. We travelled together the first third of the Camino. Almost everything after that was a surprise, as I accepted what the Camino offered, while I: S cattered my mother-in-law’s ashes in a church altar (with permission) U  sed the Heimlich maneuver when my friend choked W  atched the sun rise while the moon set at the same moment R  ang the wrong church bell in a spiritual exercise and angered the nun in charge W  aked up with someone else’s ear plug in my ear B  rainstormed a children’s story while walking D  rank free wine from a tap welcoming travelers to town W  alked through crumbling ghost towns hundreds of years old M  et many Koreans and people of other faiths on a Catholic pilgrimage S aw miles of countryside and no toilets. (Use your imagination!) V  iewed the stunning Hobbit Shire beauty of Galicia P  icked and ate grapes, figs, almonds and apples D  odged pigs, cows and goats LW:  Describe the best (and the worst!) experiences along the way. ME:  The best ware the people I met. We bonded instantly while traipsing The King’s Highway. The worst was the intense heat in Central California during the summer. And my feet! Also, some of the roads were precarious at best. I was extremely nervous walking on a few windy roads with no shoulder. Dangerous! DG:  The worst of the Camino was the challenge of walking steep hills in wind and cold rain–while in awe of the beauty surrounding me. LW: Was there any point at which you regretted the whole d-n thing? ME:  Numerous times! I questioned why I was doing it–but I haven’t regretted the adventure at all. DG: No regrets. None. LW: One of you took friends; the other of you made friends? Have these been lasting friendships? ME: I took friends and made friends. And, we are all still friends, both the old and the new. DG: I’ve connected with four friends and hope to see them again! LW: How has the experience changed you–if it has? Other than for physical health/safely,

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Lifestyle

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Treksters Continued from page 16 who should not, in your opinion, take such an adventure, a trip/trek? ME:  Being only the eleventh person to have completed the walk, I felt a huge sense of accomplishment. Many times I brush accolades under the carpet, but this one has stayed with me. It took so much more out of me mentally and physically than I expected. My hat is off to Don for completing the Santiago without a break from beginning to end. Even with breaks, I definitely felt the huge physical feat of walking an ultra– marathon every three weeks for a year. I advise people to begin with one section of the El Camino Real. The infrastructure that accommodates walkers on the Santiago is not present on California’s roads, forcing walkers to often deviate from the path, for safety reasons. DG: Did the Camino change me? I’ll answer in six months. However, I already notice that my relationship with nature is more personal. Stepping out each day on the Camino and walking for many hours, rain or shine, with the simple goals of finding food and lodging while I walked west to Santiago de Compostella made life simple. I could learn about myself, my life, while constantly interrelating with the weather, the landscape, the path or road. I now look at the weather and ask it how will we be related today? Is the moon pulling me like it does the tides? I never had these questions before.

Don Gullans took more than two years to prepare for the walk.

LW:  When are you going again? Are you planning a new adventure? ME: Refer to questions number two...tie me to a chair :-). A podcast host recently asked me if I was going to tackle the Santiago, and for a split second a tinge of yes surged through my body. But, the more pragmatic word no took over. New adventure? I just returned from the Bahamas where I was swimming with swine on Piggy Island! So much fun!

Your Neighborhood Church We invite you to check out our new website:

www.uchristianchurch.org and, follow us on Facebook:

 I’m scheduled to go to Baja in March where a group of us will take pangas into the Bahia de Magdelena to pet gray whales :-). So excited! DG: Anyone who feels the desire or call should take the Camino trek. • Maggie Espinosa’s book: “On a Mission: An 800-mile Walk to Discover California’s El Camino Real”—can be purchased on on her website: www.travelwithmaggie.com.

Personal TuneUp with Cath

More balance than not by Cath DeStefano

facebook.com/uchristianchurch 10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship Service 10:20 a.m. Children’s Worship & Wonder

3900 Cleveland Avenue • San Diego, CA 92103 • Phone: (619) 295-4146 An Open and Affirming Congregation, Everyone is Welcome

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I still remember the most out-of-balance person I’ve ever encountered. He worked on Wall Street in New York City. I met him when he came, just in the nick of time, to a consciousness-raising retreat I was facilitating in the rolling hills of Virginia. He was wound so tight I thought he would burst a seam. But by the end of the week, he looked like a different person: human again, relaxed, and with an ease about himself. We can learn from him and others who want less stress and more balance to describe their everyday reality. Here are some suggestions: #1 Unplug. Not everyone needs to, or can, unplug for a week in order to create more life balance. But anyone can take 20 minutes away to refresh. Unplug for 20 minutes. Sit quietly and listen to the sounds around you. Notice your breathing. It is that simple. #2  Discover and monitor the “personal percentages” that work for you among these three: a) doing for others, b) doing for self and c) not doing. You don’t need to be 33.3 percent in each of the three categories. But, if you are 85 percent doing for others, 15 percent doing for self and 0 percent not doing? This is not healthy. Make some new choices. #3 Live your priorities. If you say your friends are important to you,

Please send Invoice to University Christian Churchweave time with them into your life. If you say your relationship with your spouse is important, make time to be with your spouse. If fun is 3900 Cleveland Avenue important, have some! San Diego, CA 92103 A balanced life is not something that you can create and then it Pnone: 619-295-44146lasts forever. We know this. But, using these three approaches, you can certainly have more balance than not.• Cath DeStefano CEO, Speaker, Author, Fun Workshop Leader Human TuneUps I HeArt Fests www.HumanTuneUp.com

PresidioSentinel.com •


18

Music Scene

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Singer Gillian Margot Reinvents a

Diverse Mix of Jazz, Soul & Pop Songs

All-Star Cast and Grammy-Nominated Pianist Combine their Talents

Up-and-coming singer Gillian Margot is just as much at home with jazz standards as she is with R&B, blues and the sophisticated side of pop music. She’s earned an avid global following from Asia to her native Canada and the USA. On her debut album as a leader, “Black Butterfly,” released in 2015 on HiPNOTIC Records, Margot leads a stellar cast of today’s jazz talent including guitarist Freddie Bryant, saxophonist/clarinetist Roxy Coss, pianist/ organist Anthony Wonsey, bassist Richie Goods and drummer Kendrick Scott and producer, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt. Margot’s choice of material spans many decades and just as many styles, a showcase for her depth of knowledge and ability to channel minute shifts in emotion while working seamlessly across musical boundaries. “Black Butterfly” begins with its title track, Margot adding her own lyrics to pianist George Cables’ 1974 gem, “Ebony Moonbeams.” She goes deeply into the gospel underpinnings of Curtis Mayfield’s “The Makings of You,” as she brings the song’s universality to life. She reinvents “Holding Back the Years,” a 1985 hit for British blue-eyed soul band Simply Red, as a starkly direct blues ballad, just vocals and rhythm section until Pelt adds a characteristically crystalline, moody solo. Likewise, Margot and Bryant–playing acoustic guitar–offer an airily terse, individualistic take of the popular Cuban ballad, “Delirio.” A richly bittersweet, vintage 1970s soul-infused piano-and-vocal take of Jimmy Webb’s breakup ballad “Do What You Gotta Do” that draws a straight line back to Roberta Flack’s haunting original. By contrast, Margot’s a-cappella version of Joni Mitchell’s “Conversation” adds new levels of both angst and ironic nuance, with an intuitively lilting Appalachian tinge. The band recasts “It Could Be Sweet”–the 1994 Portishead triphop ballad and a defining moment in chillout music–as deftly syncopated shuffle by Scott creates a low-lit neosoul vibe. Bobby Caldwell’s soul ballad “What You Won’t Do For Love” gives Margot a lowdown Isaac Hayes-style psychedelic soul launching pad for her affecting, imploring vocals. Then she hits a subtly sassy, finger snapping blues groove in a spare but hard-hitting duet with Goods’ bass on her original composition, “Yesterday’s Blues.” The album winds up with a brisk, smoky take of Rodgers and Hart’s “I Wish I Were In Love Again” that’s as gritty as it is cosmopolitan. Gillian Margot got her start in jazz the old-fashioned way, playing several shows a night and leading a wide variety of ensembles in her native Toronto. From there she expanded to the US and then Asia, where she earned a devoted following by constantly gigging and touring in Hong Kong, China and Singapore. A voracious collector of songs, Margot’s disarmingly wide vocal range and style eschews jazz singer clichés for refreshing delivery. “Black Butterfly” (Hipnotic 2015) is an artfully crafted set and speaks to the singer’s passion for musical diversity while showcasing her multifaceted talents. She’s played major venues throughout several time zones with top-tier talent from several continents. “Black Butterfly” is her second album as a leader and her first on HiPNOTIC Records. Gillian Margot will be performing in San Diego at 8 p.m., Friday, March 11 at Dizzy’s Jazz, located at 4275 Mission Bay Drive, with Geoffrey Keezer (piano), Gilbert Castellanos “Black Butterfly” (Hipnotic 2015) is an artfully crafted set and speaks to the Margot’s (trumpet), Alex Boneham (bass), and Christian Euman (drums). passion for musical diversity while showcasing her multifaceted talents. Cover charge is $20.•

Haydn Voyages:

Music at the Maritime

The Hausmann Quartet and the Maritime Museum of San Diego are excited to partner to present the launch of Haydn Voyages: Music at the Maritime, a quarterly concert series aboard the Berkeley–an 1898 steam ferryboat that operated for 60 years on San Francisco Bay. The inaugural season will open on February 21 with future concerts on May 15, September 25 and November 20. All concerts will be Sundays at 4 p.m. The Maritime Museum will be open for touring (free with ticket) and refreshments will be available starting at 3 pm. Concerts aboard this National Historic Landmark, docked in downtown San Diego next to Star of India, will explore the evolution of the string quartet through the lens of Joseph Haydn’s quartet cycle. The programming will set his works alongside those of master composers from our own era and stretching back to his musical ancestors. As the father of the string quartet and one of history’s most innovative composers, Haydn is an ideal guide to this exploration of some of the most powerful, creative music ever written. Each creative program will also include informative and entertaining commentary during the performance from noted UC Santa Barbara musicologist Derek Katz. The inaugural concert will feature Haydn’s first and last complete string quartets, Pulitzer Prize winner Caroline Shaw’s “Entr’acte” from 2011, and American/ Mexican composer Conlon Nancarrow’s first quartet from 1945. Tickets can be purchased at the door or by calling 619.432.2314.•

• PresidioSentinel.com

The Hausmann Quartet will perform on the Berkeley.


A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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Food Scene

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The Crab Catcher Thirty Five and Going Strong By David Rottenberg My grandson’s favorite expression is, “if you snooze, you lose!” I thought of that as I watched the winter San Diego Restaurant Week draw to a close. San Diego Restaurant Week, which takes place twice a year (winter and fall) is both an attraction to tourism and an opportunity for locals to become acquainted with or to experience again some of our county’s best restaurants–at significant savings. Prices have gone up over the years. Now dinner prices range from $20 to $50, depending on where one dines. Many of the popular steakhouses are priced at The view from the restaurant is spectacular. the top of the range. Restaurants often create special menus for the week-long event and The main dining room has an elegant color scheme and a window that looks each menu is prix fixe, fixed price. Most menus are 3-course, with several out to a stunning coastal view. At the right time of day, diners can be treated to selections for appetizer, entrée and dessert. Some menus also list options or colorful sunsets. Seating is uncrowded. Service is attentive and friendly. ala carte items at additional cost. As the name suggests, The Crab Catcher is primarily a seafood restaurant. I took advantage of Restaurant Week to revisit one of my old favorites– Manager Jamie Loomis informed me that fresh seafood items are flown in The Crab Catcher in La Jolla. The restaurant has been in business daily. Chef John changes the menu every quarter to reflect what is seasonal for over 35 years, serving meals to several generations of satisfied and running. clientele. The restaurant is really a family affair, owned by Jerry and The special Restaurant Week menu ($40) offered an aromatic coconut Jeani Burwell, with a kitchen run by their son, John. Chef John grew up curry lobster soup, a tasty broth enhanced by lemongrass and cilantro. in the business and perfected his chops locally, including a stint at the The entrees choices were salmon with winter vegetables, grilled shrimp popular Sushi on The Rocks. Even general manager Jamie Loomis has papparedelle or short ribs (yes, they also serve meat) with garlic whip potato been there for 17 years. in a roasted shallot demiglace. Included desserts were sorbets, Belgian dark The restaurant could not be in a nicer location. The building on chocolate torte and an amazing paradise pie consisting of macadamia nut Prospect Street in La Jolla extends down from street level to Coast ice cream and a chocolate cookie crust topped by warm chocolate sauce Boulevard below. The Crab Catcher is at the bottom level (there is an and whipped cream. elevator on the side), permitting comfortable tables and chairs to be Side dishes were all ala carte. Lobster and crab leg entrees were available set out in the cobblestone courtyard. The bar is in a stand-alone room as upgrades. adjacent to the main restaurant. The regular menu is a delightful roadmap for culinary seafood experience, beginning with outstanding crab cakes, a large portion of crab (not filler) served with roasted tomato, corn, and fennel relish. Salmon entrees come with Shiitake mushroom, smoked bacon and butternut squash risotto. Scallops are arranged on a plate like three large egg yolks surrounding a chutney and potato puree. The dish was flavorful, although the scallops had a slight fishy taste and lacked a firm texture. Maine lobster and crab legs, each over a pound in size, look amazing in size and are amazing in taste. One becomes the center of attention to surrounding tables when either one is served. On the non-seafood side, filet mignon, New York steak, short ribs and chicken are listed on the menu. The latter is particularly good, parmesan crusted and stuffed with creamy oyster mushroom-savoy spinach and bacon stuffing. The Crab Catcher serves excellent cuisine, beautifully presented and graciously served. Portions are somewhat small and prices are comparatively high but the setting and quality have built a loyal following over the years. There is a Happy Hour Daily from 3 to 9 p.m. with drink specials and deals on oyster shooters and much more. On Friday and Saturday nights there is live music in our popular Ocean Tapas Bar. Maine lobster, over a pound each, offers an exceptional taste for the palate. If one hasn’t experienced The Crab Catcher yet, Restaurant Week will return in a few months. But, why wait? It is located at 1298 Prospect Street, St. La Jolla, 92037. Valet parking is available a few doors down the block. Call 858.454.9587 for information and reservations.•

Enjoy Valentine’s Day At The Brigantine

Paradise pie consists of macadamia nut ice cream, chocolate cookie crust, warm chocolate sauce and whipped cream. Yummy!

PresidioSentinel.com •


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Calendar

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

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February 2016 Thru February 21 n Made In America at Mingei International Museum,

located at 1439 El Prado in Balboa Park, will host Craft Icons of the 50 States by Curator: Rob Sidner. This exhibition of traditional and contemporary craft icons highlight distinctive material, excellence of workmanship and makers’ imaginations. Exploring regional and national craft traditions, while expressing each state’s unique contribution to the richness of the American experience, this exhibition celebrates the variety of craft found in America.

Thru February 28 n San Diego Central Library, located at 330 Park

Blvd, will host a new exhibition, Significant Others, spotlighting the art of San Diego artist couples in the Art Gallery on the 9th floor. Additional information on current exhibitions visit www.sandiegolibrary.org.

Thru March 31 n San Diego History Center, located at 1649 El Prado

in Balboa Park, presents San Diego the World: The 1915 Expo–The definitive commemorative exhibition of the 1915 Exposition, demonstrating the legacy of the 1915 Expo that put San Diego on the map, created the nation’s largest urban cultural park, and promoted Southern California as a land of optimism and opportunity. Visit www.sandiegohistory.org or call 619.232.6203 for more information.

Thru May 1 n The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, located at 1875

El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Super Cells: The Power of Stem Cells. This fascinating new exhibition explores how stem cells function in the human body as we will explore how each of us is the result of a handful of tiny stem cells that multiplied to produce the 200 different types of specialized cells that exist in our body. For information, visit www.rhfleet.org/ exhibitions/super-cells.

Thru May 8 n The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, located at 1875

El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Zoo In You: The Human Microbiome. Did you know that trillions of microbes make their homes inside the human body? In fact, these microorganisms outnumber human cells 10 to 1, “colonize” us right from birth and are so interwoven into our existence that without each other, none of us would survive. For more information, visit www.rhfleet.ort/exhibitions/zoo-you.

Thru September 6 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, introduces a new exhibition. Dive into an immersive and highly emotional adventure with Whales 3D, presented by Jean-Michel Cousteau. Visit www.sdnat.org to order tickets on line or call 877.946.7797. February 1 n Reuben H Fleet Science Center, located at 1875 El

Prado in Balboa Park, offers the first Monday of every month for seniors 65 and better to enjoy the Science Center exhibits, a show in the Heikoff Giant Dome Theater and a lecture on the quietest day of the month for only $8. The doors open at 9:30 a.m. to get Senior Monday started early. The lecture this month at 10:30 a.m. is on The Mind of the Dolphin: Studies of an Alien Intelligence. Visitors are encouraged to stay to enjoy the galleries and special senior discounts in Galileo’s Café and the North Star Science Store.

February 1 n Whitney Shay & Robin Henkel perform from 6 to 9

p.m. at Social Tap, located at 815 J Street, #101, San Diego. For information, call 619.398.8938.

February 4 n Bread & Salt, located at 1955 Julian Avenue, is pleased to have Lisa Moore (solo piano.) perform at 7:30 p.m. Her performance, titled “Soft Loud” Fresh Sound, allows the virtuoso pianist performer Moore to play solo music from three of her new CDs–“Mad Rush,” “Prayers Remain Forever,” and “The Stone People.” Moore is an Australian pianist who now resides in New York.

n Robin Henkel performs solo blues from 6 to 8 p.m. at

Nate’s Garden Grill, located at 3120 Euclid Ave, San Diego. For information, call 619.546.7700.

February 4 Thru 14 n The San Diego Jewish Film Festival launches their

26th Season with 60 Films, Filmmakers and Special Guests in five locations. This year the festival will showcase the best contemporary Jewish themed films from around the world, celebrating life, human rights, and freedom of expression. The mission of the Film Festival is to offer outstanding world cinema that promotes awareness, appreciation and pride in the diversity of the Jewish people to attendees of the community at large. For more information and a complete list of programs and prices, please www.sdjff.org or call the JCC Box Office at 858.362.1348.

February 5 n Rockler Woodworking and Hardware, located at 8199 Clairemont Mesa Boulevard in San Diego, is proud

• PresidioSentinel.com

to have partnered with internationally renowned, Robert Sorby of England a Woodturning expert, as he presents a unique demonstration on woodturning. The presentation is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rockler is underwriting this event so there will be no charge to attend. To learn more about Rockler, please visit www.rockler.com or call 1-877-ROCKLER.

n Miss Tess and The Talkbacks will be the headliner

at the AMSDconcerts tonight. They play a brand of music that can only be describes as eclectric. Infused with classic country and honky-tonk, southern blues, New Orleans jazz and swing, and sounds of swamp pop and early rock n’ roll, she and her band take pride in their ability to blend so may different styles of American roots music and call it their own. They will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Laura R. Charles Theater at Sweetwater High School, located at 2900 Highland Avenue in National City. For tickets, please visit www. AMSDconcerts.com.

February 6 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum,

at 1788 El Prado, presents the Canyoneer Hikes. Free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is at 9 a.m. at the Anza-Borrego Deseret Start Park (Calcite Mine And Slot Canyon). Walk rating is intermediate; distance is four miles; elevation changes up to 1000 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www. sndhm.org.

n Ellis Paul will be the headliner at the AMSDconcerts

tonight. He is a master storyteller. He combines the sensibilities of Bob Dylan and Bill Morrissey and delivers it with a passion that sets him apart in the company of a new breed of songwriters. He will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Laura R. Charles Theater at Sweetwater High School, located at 2900 Highland Avenue in National City. For tickets, visit www. AMSDconcerts.com.

February 7 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, at 1788

El Prado, presents Canyoneer Hikes. Free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is at 10 a.m. at the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park (Split Mountain and Wind Caves). Walk rating is difficult; distance is four miles; elevation changes up to 500 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www.sndhm.org.

February 7, 14, 21 & 28 n Wacky Science Sundays with Ms. Frizzle™ and The Magic School Bus© takes place from 12:15 to 2:15 p.m. at theNAT, located at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park. Get ready to explore the wild and wacky worlds of mysterious creatures, fascinating habitats, and phenomenal hands-on science. The event is free with Museum admission. This month’s theme is Germs. Visit www.sdnat.org for ticket information. February 7 thru May 1 n Foundations of Jewish Family Living is offering an

eight-session class for parents and provides a thoughtprovoking encounter with the core values and ideas of Judaism. Parents will gain the knowledge, language and confidence to be a teacher to their own children and support Jewish learning at home. The program is led by Jennifer Melzer Sunday mornings at Temple Solel, located at 3575 Manchester Avenue, Cardiffby-the-Sea. The first session is free. Call Ilene Tatro at 858.362.1154 for information or to register.

February 9 n David & Dorothea Garfield Theatre, located at the

Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center at 4126 Executive Dr, La Jolla, is presents Flix Mix: Dough. An old Jewish baker (played by Jonathan Pryce of “Game of Thrones”) struggles to keep his business afloat until his young Muslim apprentice accidentally drops cannabis in the dough and sends sales sky high. Reception is at 7 p.m.; film at 8 p.m. in the theatre.

February 11 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Nature & Me Storytime at 10:15 a.m. Open to all ages with a parent or guardian (recommended for ages 1 to 5). The event is free with Museum admission. This month’s theme is Birds of Insects. Visit www.sdnat.org for ticket information. February 11 thru 14 n Finest City Improv’s Theater, located at 4250 Louisiana

Street, will hold its National Improv Lovers Unite for

Third Annual San Diego Improv Festival. The festival will offer professional workshops and performances from a selection of hand-picked improve teams from cities around the county and master classes from two of the most well-known improvisers. To learn more about the festival, visit www.finestcityimprov.com.

February 12, 19 & 26 n The Knights of Columbus and the ICF are offering Fish Fry Dinners on Fridays during lent at St. Vincent Catholic Church In Mission Hills. Dinner will be ready at 4 pm (Early Bird-Senior rate and presale prices–$12.00 adults, Children 10 and under, $7.00) each Friday starting February 12th. Advance tickets are for sale after each Mass. Get your tickets for each dinner, in advance! February 12 n Bonnie and Clyde Outdoor Movie Night takes place

from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Headquarters at Seaport, located at 789 W Harbor Drive in San Diego. Looking for a twist on the traditional Valentine’s Day date? Ditch the expensive dinner and flowers and head to the Headquarters for a free outdoor movie screening. With fully-restored 1939 jail cells and mug shot photoops, the former San Diego Police Headquarters is the perfect venue to celebrate the most lawless couple in history. The event is free; guests are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets for the screening. Come early and enjoy a cocktail from Puestro or Season’s 52 and enjoy sweet bites from specialty food shops like Dallmann’s and Venissimo Cheese. For information, visit www.theheadquarters.com.

n Robin Henkel performs solo blues from 6 to 8 p.m. at

Nate’s Garden Grill, located at 3120 Euclid Ave, San Diego. For information, call 619.546.7700.

February 13 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located

at 1788 El Prado, presents Canyoneer Hikes, which are free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is at 9 a.m. at the Sloan Canyon (South). Walk rating is intermediate; distance is four miles; elevation changes up to 1000 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www.sndhm.org.

n San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory at

the Jacob Music Center’s Copley Symphony Hall, located at 750 B Street in downtown San Diego, presents two inspiring concerts from their talented musicians at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. The 1 p.m. Showcase Concert features the intermediate orchestras and wind ensembles led by conductors Juan Cristóbal Palacios and Adam Pezdek. The 7 p.m. Ovation Concert presents the youth symphony’s premier orchestras and wind ensembles led by Music Director Jeff Edmons. For pricing and more information, visit www.sdys.org or call 619.233.3232 x 115.

n Reuben H. Fleet Science Center is holding a Saturday

Science Club for girls in grades 5 through 8 from noon to 2 p.m. This month the topic is Microbes. Investigate the oldest form of life on earth: microbes, which are all around us and even inside of us. Explore the zoo in you, the latest Fleet exhibition, and formulate growing yeast experiments. Prices are members $12, non-members $14. To participate, parents must preregister by calling 619.238.1233 x806.

n The T Sisters will be the headliner at the

AMSDconcerts tonight. California born and raised and now based in Oakland, these three sisters have been singing together their whole lives. They typically accompanied by upright bass, guitar, banjo, percussion and mandolin, captive audiences with close harmonies, inventive arrangements, and plenty of sass. They will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Laura R. Charles Theater at Sweetwater High School, located at 2900 Highland Avenue in National City. For tickets, visit www.AMSDconcerts.com.

February 14 n Spend Valentine’s Day at the San Diego Museum of

Art, located at 1450 El Prado in Balboa Park. Embrace romance with an after-hours, love-themed art tour. Following the tour, visit the May S. Marcy Sculpture Court and Garden at Panama 66 and enjoy a picnic basket for two filled with gourmet sandwiches, a cheese or vegan plate, chocolate truffles and a bottle of champagne, wine or craft beer. Museum tours are offered every half hour from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The cost is $80 for members and $90 for nonmembers. For information, visit www.sdmart.org or call 619.232.7931.

February 15 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located

at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, will host Reptile Round-Up Family Day. What’s as old as a dinosaur and more diverse than any mammal? Why, reptiles, of course! Discover the lives of these incredible

creatures and take part in activities and crafts that celebrate these interesting animals. You’ll also have the opportunity to meet special guest from our Herpetology Department. For information, visit www. sdnat.org.

February 19 n The San Diego American Indian Health Center

(SDAIHC), a private, non-profit, Federally Qualified Health Center, will present “We R Urban” on Friday, February 19, 2016 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at The Bread and Salt, 1955 Julian Avenue in Barrio Logan. “We R Urban” is an American Indian and Alaskan Native art awareness project by youth who represent a wide variety of Tribal Nations. The goal of the event is to highlight the experiences of Native American youth who live in the metropolitan areas of San Diego County. Creations will consist of mixed media, live performances and art exhibits that explore what it means to be “urban.”

February 20 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located

at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Canyoneer Hikes, which is free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is 9 a.m. at the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park (Plum Canyon). Walk rating is intermediate; distance is six miles; and elevation changes up to 1500 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www. sndhm.org.

February 21 n Maritime Museum, located at the North Embarcadero

in downtown San Diego at 1492 North Harbor Drive, is excited to host the Winter Family Day where kids under 12 get in free all day with a paying adult. Kids of all ages get to design and create their own take home crafts. A Historic Bay Cruise on San Diego Bay aboard the Pilot boat is available for just $5 plus the cost of admission. This special family day activities includes rope making, know tying and sail setting from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information, visit www. sdmaritime.org.

February 26 n David Wilcox is the headliner at the AMSDconcerts

tonight. Music is a personal compass for finding his way home. Lining it up with something deep inside, his words becomes image filled poetry that dance to an internal rhythm. He will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Laura R. Charles Theater at Sweetwater High School, located at 2900 Highland Avenue in National City. For tickets, visit www.AMSDconcerts.com.

February 27th n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located

at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Canyoneer Hikes, which are free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is at 9 a.m. at the Crestridge Ecological Reserve. Walk rating is easy; distance is two miles; and elevation change up to 200 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www.sndhm.org.

February 28 n theNAT, San Diego National History Museum, located

at 1788 El Prado in Balboa Park, presents Canyoneer Hikes, which are free and open to the public (dogs or other pets are not permitted on the walks, as they interfere with observing wildlife). The walk today is at 9 a.m. at the Silverwood Wildlife Sanctuary. Walk rating is easy; distance is two miles; and elevation changes up to 200 feet. Wear comfortable walking shoes and a hat. Hiking boots are recommended for desert and mountain hikes. Bring adequate water and food: even the short or easy hikes can demand liquid and energy resources. You may also wish to bring a jacket, binoculars, and field guides. Bring rain gear if rain is a possibility. Get complete hiking information and directions at www.sndhm.org.

n A blues & jazz concert with the Robin Henkel Band

with Whitney Shay starts at 7 p.m. at Lestat’s, located at 3343 Adams Avenue, San Diego. For information, call 619.282.0437.


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING PRIVATE PARTY AD

includes personals, items for sale, garage sales & roomates

25 Word Maximum

5

$ 00

BUSINESS LISTING AD

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

©

•AD SALES POSITION•

•POSTAL SERVICES•

BUSINESS DISPLAY AD 2.25"w x 2.0"h $

35

to place a classified ad

Find out what’s going on in your baby’s mind, strengthen your bond with your baby, and lessen frustration brought on by miscommunication. Interactive presentation led by Jennifer Duncan also includes sing-alongs and bubble time ending with Q&A period. Age: Birth to 4-years old.

House Pet Sitting

• ENTERTAINMENT •

10 years experience, References,Call Sabrina 619.316.5292

VIDEO PRODUCTION

Video production services from conception to final product. Call 619.296.8731

00

Call 619.296.8731

• FITNESS • The Feldenkrais Method® Make any activity more pleasant and effective. You can learn to move with more comfort, strength and skill. Group classes and individual lessons.

Rich Manuccia 619.295.6988

• STUDIO SPACE •

Pajama Storytime

Looking for a studio space to paint, draw or sculpt?

Feb. 2, 9, 16 and 23 (Every Tuesday) from 6:30 to 7 p.m.

2,000 sq. /ft. artists’-op studio–one of SD best kept secrets.

Market Street Group

Members include students, amateur, professional artists. Located in Little Italy, wooden floors, sky-lights, access to studio 24/7, working materials can be stored at studio, easels provided. Market Street Studio Group Studio founded 26 years ago.

PROFESSIONAL LIFE MODELS3 DAYS A WEEK INCLUDED!

All Classified Ads must be Pre-Paid

Monthly fee: $145 More information please contact: Kirby Kendrick kirby4004@aol.comphone: 505.660.4448

35,000 Potential Customers Would be Reading Your Ad Right Now!

100% Support

• WANTED • Wanted to Rent Wanted to rent/share Mission Hills or vicinity studio–guest house–Apt.–granny flat–room. Retired nurse: take care of you, plants, dogs, housesit and other. Call Sandra at 619.297.6480

Even You & 35,000 Potential Customers Would be Reading Your Ad Right Now!

For your goals and transitions. Certified life coach, psychology background. Strong decisions to a centered and fulfilled life are available to everyone. Coaching via Phone or at the Office

Call 619.296.8731

“Famous Book” Club Feb. 3 from 3 to 4 p.m.

The “Famous Book” Club will discuss “Detective Story” by Imre Kertesz. New members are always welcome to attend and participate. Please read the book beforehand. Books are available at the Circulation Desk while supplies last.

LEGO Playtime Feb. 3, 10, 17 and 24 (Every Wednesday) from 5 to 6 p.m.

Kids can have fun and get creative while building with LEGOs.

Feb. 3 at 6:30 p.m.

Celebrate Mardi Gras a few days early with live Cajun and Zydeco music.

1807 Robinson Ave., 204 details at

Star r C o aching .com

Children are invited to an evening storytime with books, singing, and puppets. Feel free to come dressed in your pajamas.

Concert by the Bayou Brothers

619.295.0878

Call 619.296.8731

February 2016 Events Signing Storytime

• SERVICES •

25-35 Word Maximum

3500

Mission Hills Branch Library

Feb. 1, 8, 22 and 29 (Every Monday) from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m.

includes real estate, help wanted & services $

Mission Hills Newcomer Welcome Committee–to help with assembling, delivering Welcome Packages, collecting items from businesses to include, and arranging Newcomer Welcome Events. Call Ginny at 619.295.3904

Join an exciting team and rapidly growing company. Sales experience preferred.

• DONATIONS •

21

• VOLUNTEERS •

• OPPORTUNITIES •

Commissioned sales position for print, video and website ads.

Call 619.481.9817

Classified

Mission Hills Book Group Feb. 4 from 10 to 11 a.m.

RELIGIOUS CALENDAR • UNIVERSAL SPIRIT CENTER

The Mission Hills Book Group will discuss “The Invention of Wings” by Sue Monk Kidd. New members are always welcome to attend and participate. Please read the book beforehand. Books are available at the Circulation Desk while supplies last.

A Center for Spiritual Living

Preschool Storytime

Rev. Kevin Bucy, Senior Minister 858 Front Street(at University and Front Streets) San Diego, CA 92103

Feb. 5, 12, 19 and 26 (Every Friday) from 10:30 to 11 a.m.

Children are invited to a fun storytime with books, singing, and puppets.

Extra parking across the street at Florence School

www.universalspiritcenter.org.

619.291.4728

Children’s Craft Time Feb. 6, 13, 20 and 27 (Every Saturday) from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

SUNDAY MORNING GATHERINGS

Kids can develop their artistic skills while enjoying a fun craft time.

8:00 a.m. Meditative with full message 10:00 a.m. Music-filled gathering

Read to Therapy Dogs

(with Youth Ministry available)

11:30 a.m. Music-filled gathering

Feb. 13 and 27 (2nd & 4th Saturdays), from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Kadampa Meditation Center 3125 Rosecrans Street, Bldg. B 619.230.5852

Meditation Classes most Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. & Saturday at 4 p.m. Kids & Families Sundays at 9 a.m. Prayers for World Peace Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Simply Meditate MWF 12 to 12:45;TT 12:15 to 12:45 p.m

More classes and events listed on our website: www.meditateinsandiego.com

Kids can improve their reading skills by reading aloud to therapy dogs.

Book Sale Feb. 20 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The Friends of the Mission Hills Branch Library will hold a book sale. Stock up on books while supporting your library.

Mystery Book Group Feb. 24 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

The Mission Hills Book Group will discuss a mystery book. New members are always welcome to attend and participate. Please read the book beforehand. Books are available at the Circulation Desk while supplies last.

Mission Hills Branch Library 925 West Washington StreetSan Diego, CA 92103 • 619.692.4910 www.facebook.com/mhlibrary

PresidioSentinel.com •


22 Directory Civic Calendar

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

©

Hillcrest

1st Tuesday

Uptown Planners Joyce Beers Hall in Uptown Mall. 6:30 p.m.

1st Thursday

Uptown Partnership 3101 Fifth Ave. Call 619.298.2541. 4:30 p.m.

Thursdays 7–8:30 pm

San Diego Uptown Rotary Club The Uptown Rotary Club has moved to their new home at Jimmy Carter’s Mexican Cafe, 3172 Spruce at the corner of 5th. Breakfast meetings are held every Thursday 7 to 8:30 a.m. Guests are welcome to attend a meeting to learn how to become part of this dynamic organization and see why their motto is “Service Above Self.” For information, visit www. sdurotary.org or call 619.894.0140.

Kensington-Talmadge 2nd Wednesday

Kensington-Talmadge Planning Committee Kensington Community Church. 6:30 p.m. For information, call 619.284.0551

Linda Vista

2nd Monday

LVCPC Agenda– Linda Vista Community Planning Committee Agenda Linda Vista Library meeting room. Contact Jeff Perwin at 619.806.9559 for details 6 pm.

3 Tuesday rd

Tech Committee–Technology Committee Bayside Community Center. Contact Xiogh Thao for detail at 858.278.0771 or email xthao@baysidecc. org or Info@lindavistaSD.org or visit our website www.lindavistaSD.org.

3rd Wednesday

LV Historical– Linda Vista Historical Committee Bayside Community Center. This committee is collecting historical photos, documents and memories of Linda Vista’s past. For more information, contact Eleanor Frances Sennet at 858.277.3817. 4 p.m. LVCollab– Linda Vista Collaborative Bayside Community Center at 3pm. Contact Monica Fernandez at 858.278.0771 or mfernandez@ baysidecc.org. For details visit www.facebook. com/LVCollaborative

Salon Services

Trained in New York & Europe Serving Mission Hills Since 1980

4141 Park Blvd. San Diego, CA 92130

619.366.0698

3rd Wednesday (Odd Months)

TCCAC– Tecolote Canyon Citizen’s Advisory Committee Tecolote Nature Center. Contact Eloise Battle for details. 7 p.m.

3rd Thursday

Linda Vista Town Council Baha’i Faith Center Alcala Knoll Drive Contact Thomas Kaye 858.277.6793 at 6:30 p.m.

4th Monday

LVCPC– Linda Vista Community Planning Committee Linda Vista Library Meeting Room. Contact Ed Cramer at 619.222.2047 for details. 7:00 p.m.

4th Wednesday

LVPC– Linda Vista Planning Committee Monthly Meeting Linda Vista Library Meeting Room at 6 pm. Contact Jeff Perwin 619.806.9559 for details, minutes and agenda at www.LindaVistaSD.com. Linda Vista View Linda Vista Town Council Community Newsletter Contact Thomas Kaye at 858.278.6973

Various Wednesdays

LVNewsletter– Linda Vista View Civic Association Community Newsletter. Bayside Community Center. Contact Sarah Granby at 858.405.7135 or email sgranby@lvcasd.org. 2:00 p.m.

This Space is Waiting for Your Ad...

Mission Hills

February 24, 2016

Mission Hills Garden Club This month’s meeting will be “Growing Edibles in a Drought” by Nan Sternum. The meeting will be at the Mission Hills Church at 4070 Jackdaw from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Members are free; guests pay $10 which becomes part of the membership fee if they join that evening. For more information,visit www. missionhillsgardenclub.org.

Ocean Beach

Ocean Beach Planning Board Ocean Beach Recreation Center, 4726 Santa Monica Ave. Call 619.523.1700. 7–9:30 p.m.

4th Wednesday

Ocean Beach Town Council Ocean Beach Recreation Center, 4726 Santa Monica Avenue. Call Jere Battan at 619.515.4400 for information. 7 p.m.

Point Loma

February 10, 2016

Monthly Meeting–Valentine Floral Design Show Open to the public 10 a.m. to noon. There will be a $20 admission charge for nonmembers. Please wear your name tag. Betty Patterson-del Sol has been the San Diego County Fair flower show coordinator for many years. She is a floricultural instructor at Southwestern, Mira Costa & Palomar Colleges and additionally a lecturer and business consultant. She will create several Valentine floral designs for us that will be raffled as door prizes. Raffle tickets will be sold for $1 each or $5 for six. No free name tag raffle tickets this monthly The meeting is at Portuguese Hall, 2818 Avenida de Portugal, San Diego, CA 92106. More information is available at www.plgc.org.

• PresidioSentinel.com

Put Your Name In Front of 35,000 Potential Customers! For more information, Call 619.296.8731


Pacific Beach

Pacific Beach

S ol

di P en 499,000

$

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$

di

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329,000

1,942,000

$

4615 Pico Street 15

3506 Del Rey Street

4902 Toyoff Way

2 bed/2 bath beach condo, top floor with views, wood floors and many upgrades and only $329,000!

Single family detached home blocks to Mission Bay, close the freeways and more. 2 bedrooms/1 bath, updated, 2 car garage!

Alvarado estates luxury, 4,800 square foot home with gorgeous grounds !

See more details at www.SDHomePro.com

See more details at www.SDHomePro.com

#

JONATHAN SCHNEEWEISS J.D., LL.M. Broker Voted in San Diego Magazine’s,

“Best in Client Satisfaction,” 2008—2016

“Best in Client Satisfaction,” 2008—2016

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ng

di

uc 529,900

Mission Hills

$

2738 Escala Circle

6 bedrooms, 5 baths, and 4348 esf. and 1.6 acres on the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Fresh paint, new flooring, and updated kitchen and baths. Serenity at its finest!

Gorgeous unit in the Bridges at Escala. Granite, stainless, more. Coveted corner unit, exceptional amenities in this centrally located community.

Your Property to Sell Let us put our marketing plan and negotiation skills into motion to help you receive maximum value for your property. Anywhere in the county, any size, any condition!

Maureen and Antoinette

Maureen and Antoinette

Maureen and Antoinette

619.800.1103

619.800.1103

619.800.1103

Mission Hills

Mission Hills

Mission Hills

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

619.800.1103

BRE# 01378508 • 619.279.3333

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2496 Colinas Paseo

“Best in Client Satisfaction,” 2008—2016

Mission Hills & Beyond

P

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889,900

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

d

Mission Valley

Maureen and Antoinette

“2013, Finalist for San Diego Broker of the Year.”

BRE# 01378508 • 619.279.3333

El Cajon

$

JONATHAN SCHNEEWEISS J.D., LL.M. Broker Voted in San Diego Magazine’s,

“2013, Finalist for San Diego Broker of the Year.”

BRE# 01378508 • 619.279.3333

A classic Craftsman with vintage charm, perched on an elevated lot above a quiet street only blocks to the center of Hillcrest. Enjoy urban living at its finest, This 2/1 property has huge potential for a buyer that wants to put their own stamp on it.

SCHNEEWEISS PROPERTIES

JONATHAN SCHNEEWEISS J.D., LL.M. Broker Voted in San Diego Magazine’s,

“2013, Finalist for San Diego Broker of the Year.”

3695 Indiana Street

See more details at www.SDHomePro.com

SCHNEEWEISS PROPERTIES

579,000-$619,000

W an

SCHNEEWEISS PROPERTIES

Hillcrest

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ng

Alvarado Estates

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$

23

Real Estate

A Publication of Presidio Communications • February 2016

©

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

1,175,000

4275 Altamirano Way Step back into time with this perfectly preserved 1952 onelevel home on an A+ location in the Presidio area. Two bedrooms and two baths in 1850 spacious square feet with dual-paned windows, hardwood floors, newer stucco and roof. Kitchen and bathrooms have original tile in fabulous condition. Large two car garage. Homes of this size in this location at this price point are very rare.

Call Jim Scott, Broker CalBRE #830226 at 619.920.9511

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Mission Hills

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4067 Lark Street Charming 1,388 square foot bungalow located steps from the village on a wide and quiet street. This home features central air conditioning, tankless hot water heater, freshly refinished hardwood floors, new landscaping, and recent paint. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths and a one -car garage.

1,550,000

$

3950 Alameda Place

Classic Mission Hills home, 5 Bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Large canyon lot with a huge flat back yard. Very rare 100 feet of street frontage. Secluded and quiet street, this home offers pleasant canyon views. A very functional layout with a bedroom and full bathroom on the main level. Large and usuable basement perfect for storage or an office.

Whitney & Balsamo

3485 Hawk Street

619 .8 5 5 .5 2 11

Real Estate

d

$

Landmark Urban Estate–Whitney & Balsamo hired to Get the job done after two previous agent/listings failed W–B listed AND obtained the buyer. A Happy Seller!

Whitney & Balsamo

Whitney & Balsamo

Pacific | Sotheby’s International Realty CalBRE #00766752 • CalBRE #01051230

619.855.5211

Call Jim Scott, Broker CalBRE #830226 at 619.920.9511

Mission Hills ol S

1,900,000

Pacific | Sotheby’s International Realty CalBRE #00766752 • CalBRE #01051230

1835 Altura Place

First time offered since 1972, 1835 Altura Place is a 3286 square foot Craftsman home. The location is one of the best in Mission Hills. 4 large bedrooms, including one on the main level. The woodwork is exceptional!

Balboa Park d

$

1,575,000

Call Jim Scott, Broker CalBRE #830226 at 619.920.9511

ol S

Mills Act Craftsman, 3 Br 2 Ba, steps to eateries & boutiques. Mid $800’s. Call us for first opportunity!

Charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath bungalow close to the village. Stylish newer kitchen and bathrooms. Gleaming hardwood floors and period details. Ready to move in today. Private yard and off-street parking.

Mission Hills

Two New Mission Hills Listings coming this month... Amazing one acre view estate, over 5000 sq ft pool and spa. Under $3Mil.

$

1227 Fort Stockton

Call Jim Scott, Broker CalBRE #830226 at 619.920.9511

Call Jim Scott, Broker CalBRE #830226 at 619.920.9511

695,000

4,500,000

d

795,000

S ol

$

$

2500 6 Avenue 1106 th

#

2015, Whitney-Balsamo assisted in setting a new record sale price for a “92103” residence... this 6000 sq ft palace in the sky! Sellers TRULY appreciate real estate brokers who actually bring them a platinum buyer, as W-B did for this spectacular residence!

Whitney & Balsamo

Pacific | Sotheby’s International Realty CalBRE# 00766752 • CalBRE# 01051230

619.855. 5211

2,250,000

4021 Miller Street Whitney-Balsamo had the privilege of selling this magnificent Henry Hester designed contemporary this year... the FOURTH time for them to sell this special residence! 36 years of cultivated respect in the “92103” community! Call us before signing a listing contract!

Whitney & Balsamo

Pacific | Sotheby’s International Realty CalBRE# 00766752 • CalBRE# 01051230

619. 855. 5211

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. Our readers hereby informedthat all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD Toll-Free at 1-800.669.9777. The Toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800.927.9275

PresidioSentinel.com •


N ew ! Situated on a spectacular canyon setting, this pristine 2,343 square foot home presents a rare opportunity. While the views and privacy afforded by the heavilywooded 17,900 square foot lot are unmatched, that is nothing compared to the unusual and huge flat backyard. You have to see this property to appreciate the sweeping vistas from the spacious lawn and patios located right on the canyon rim!

Call

Jim Scott , Broker, CalBRE #830226 to

arrange for a private viewing. 619.920.9511 • j i m @ s q r e . c o m • $ 1,695,000

Scott & Quinn has two offices, in Mission Hills at 1111 Fort Stockton Drive, in South Park at 2973 Beech Street, and has sixteen agents. The company also features Scott & Quinn Property Management. Founded in 1982, Scott & Quinn is the oldest full service real estate firm in Mission Hills and is still locally owned and operated. Jim has been a homeowner in Mission Hills since 1976.

www.JimScottHomes.com

Thank You for Reading this Months Issue! - Presidio Communications -

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Presidio Sentinel, February 2016, Vol. 17, No. 2w  

The Presidio Sentinel is a commentary-driven newspaper that provides coverage on local, regional and national issues that impact the lives o...

Presidio Sentinel, February 2016, Vol. 17, No. 2w  

The Presidio Sentinel is a commentary-driven newspaper that provides coverage on local, regional and national issues that impact the lives o...

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