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advocacy

access

helpsheets bc disabilit y benefits

Download our Help Sheets for free from our web library or ask us to mail them to you. Help Sheets marked with an * are now available in English, Traditional Chinese and Punjabi. Help Sheet 12 is available in English and Punjabi.

2* The Persons with Disabilities Benefit Application 3* Checklist for the Persons with Disabilities Benefit 5A Appealing Denial of the PWD benefit: The Reconsideration 5B Appealing Denial of the PWD Benefit: The Appeal Tribunal 6

Persons with Persistent and Multiple Barriers (PPMB) to Employment Application

7* Health Supplements for People with Disabilities

Get Copies

8

Trusts for Persons with Disabilities (PWD)

Online: www.bccpd.bc.ca/ library.htm

9

Employment and People with Disabilities

Email: feedback@bccpd. bc.ca Phone: Call Val at 604-875-0188 Our sincere thanks to the Legal Services Society of BC, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Homelessness Partnering Strategy and the Health Sciences Association of British Columbia for making our 2011 updates to this series possible.

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10 Employment, Education and Training Supplements for People with Disabilities 11A Appealing Denial of PPMB: The Request for Reconsideration 11B Appealing Denial of the PPMB Benefit: The Appeal Tribunal 12 Income Assistance Application Process for People with Disabilities 13 Rate Amounts for PWD and PPMB Benefits 14* Registered Disability Savings Plan and the Disability Tax Credit 15 People with Disabilities on Reserve: The PWD Designation

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


Contents 2 | Editorial by Mary-Doug Wright 4 | Asking for Help: 13 Tips by Shelley Hourston

20 | VocalEye Provides Access to the Arts by Geoff McMurchy

5 | Letter to the Editor

21 | Cheryl’s Kindness Story

6 | Stories of Success Through Technology by Paul Gauthier

21 | A Message from PLAN

8 | Accessibility of Media Technology by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities

22 | Help Emergency Services to Help you

10 | Vancouver Company is an Accessibility Partner by Steven Berg 11 | Resources 12 | Technology and You 14 | Keeping Government Services Accessible by Robin Loxton 14 | Book Your Free Advocacy Access Workshop

22 | How to Recycle Your Technology 23 | Planned Giving: A New Way to Contribute 24 | In Memoriam: Robert Keill

Special 18 | The Art in Her Illness Workshop 19 | A Terrible Poem for Wonderful People by Sam Bradd

15 | Exciting New BCCPD Project Funded by the Ontario Law Foundation by Jane Dyson 16 | BC’s Online Anti-Poverty Community by Penny Goldsmith

Transition is published four times a year by BC Coalition of People with Disabilities. Subscriptions are $15/year. We welcome articles, graphics and creative writing for consideration. The editors reserve the right to edit and/ or withhold material from publication. Transition material may be reprinted without prior permission, as long as the material is published in its entirety, along with this citation: “From Transition magazine, BC Coalition of People with Disabilities, [edition date].” Thank you.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities 204-456 W. Broadway, Vancouver, BC V5Y 1R3 Tel: 604-875-0188 • Fax: 604-875-9227 Transition only: trans@bccpd.bc.ca BCCPD: feedback@bccpd.bc.ca Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement No.40051676

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I

Editorial by

Mary-Doug Wright

As an eager technology user, I’ve developed some useful strategies that can be used by anyone who is looking for technology information that meets their needs.

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’ve always been an early adopter–somebody who’s willing to explore, experiment and work with technology that isn’t yet fully developed. However, I suspect that it’s my 20-year career as a consulting librarian combined with my love of gadgets that won my invitation to write the editorial for this issue of Transition. Being a scientist and an artist at heart, I love toys that help me experience the world in new ways. Today, automation is a fact of life, whether it’s assistive technology, techno-toys or Internet access to services. The irony is that despite our obsession with technology, we can never replace human interaction in making it all work. In my mind, that’s a good thing. Technology can do wonderful things…if you can afford to buy it, learn how to use it, know when and how to upgrade it, and know how to use it safely! Myths abound and it’s easy to believe that “everything is available on the Internet,” that “everyone has access to the Internet–even if only through their local library,” or “everyone can read and understand the manual that comes with the new technology.” As a professional researcher, I can assure you that you can’t find

everything on the Internet. There is no law that requires everything be published and made freely available on the web, nor that it appear in an accessible format. While Internet access may seem as close as your public library, not everyone feels comfortable or is able to use a computer in a public space. And a well-written, comprehensive and understandable manual is a treasure, but sadly hard to find! As an eager technology user, I’ve developed some useful strategies that can be used by anyone who is looking for technology information that meets their needs. Talk to people. Whether your technology question involves a new camera, cell phone or computer, talk to friends, family, neighbours–anyone who is knowledgeable and trustworthy. If you’re the one sharing information, don’t be preachy! That will help those of us who don’t have your experience. If you’re online, try going to the manufacturer’s website and accessing their support. Check out the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) or a community forum to see if someone has already asked and received an answer to your question. If not, you can usually post it yourself. Take advantage of free support chat sessions or toll-free phone support, if available. Next, you can key your question into a few of the major search engines and you’ll often find an answer or discussion of your question. Sometimes you’ll even find a video that is helpful.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


The irony is that despite our obsession with technology, we can never replace human interaction in making it all work. In my mind, that’s a good thing. When I’m considering new technology, I always read reviews (online or at the library), I talk to people I know, and I talk to people in stores. Visit technology stores and ask a lot of questions. Go at different times and talk to different people. Look for a person who is really knowledgeable–a user of the technology– and not just trying to sell a product. Remember, asking a question is never stupid. You won’t get answers if you don’t ask questions, and you probably won’t be the first person to ask them. If possible, try before you buy. Find out what the return policy is and give the product a good test before the time is up. And finally, know yourself… if you’re not an early adopter, don’t be one! Waiting has benefits in lower prices and often a better product. Waiting will also give you more time to talk to people about your technology decision. Mary-Doug Wright is a consulting librarian specializing in health and social sciences information research (http://www.apexinformation.com/) who loves playing with new technology gadgets. In her spare time, she hangs out with her dogs. n

CANADA PENSION PLAN DISABILITY • Were you previously working and now have a disability? • Do you need help to apply for CPP Disability or appeal a denial of benefits?

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities is an expert in Canada Pension Plan Disability (CPP-D) advocacy. We provide: • in person, one-to-one assistance • assistance by phone • free self-help publications on what CPP is, how to apply and how to appeal a denial (available in Traditional Chinese and Punjabi in 2011/12)

What do I need to know about CPP-D? CPP-D has several advantages over provincial disability benefits. And, recipients may receive provincial (PWD/ PPMB) disability benefits in addition to CPP-D in the form of a top-up, if their CPP-D benefits fall below the provincial minimum.

Please contact us to learn more. CPP-D Advocacy Program Telephone: 604-872-1278 Toll-Free: 1-800-663-1278 Website: www.bccpd.bc.ca Program information: under OurWork/Advocacy Access Self-help guides: under Library/Advocacy

Funded by The Law Foundation of BC

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

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Asking for Help: 13 Tips by

Shelley Hourston

Asking for help can be difficult for most of us. Sometimes we’re ashamed to let others know about things we can’t do or that we’re uncertain about our abilities. Asking for help sometimes feels like a sign of weakness or failure. We may also be afraid that our request will be refused or be an imposition. Researchers have found, however, that people underestimate others’ willingness to help.* Here are some tips when you need help to understand technology–or any other area in your life! 1. Don’t assume that you should know how to do something or be able to do everything. We all have different experience, skills and strengths. 2. Recognize when you need help. Most of us will occasionally feel awkward, silly or embarrassed about asking for help. Remember: we all need help sometimes. 3. Don’t wait until the last minute to ask for help. Often problems are easier to fix before they have a chance to become more complicated. 4. Time your request well–don’t ask for assistance when it’s obvious that the person you’re asking is busy, preoccupied or not feeling well.

what you have learned. This will help you to clarify the problem or problems in your mind and to describe what you already know or have tried.

Here are some tips when you need help to understand technology–or any other area in your life!

6. Think about how to phrase your request. Be specific about what you need help with and be direct when asking for assistance. Instead of hinting about your need for help, state your request and explain why it’s important to you or what the person’s help will enable you to do. Maybe your first call for help is to identify and plan how to ask for help on a specific topic. 7. Make the task as easy as possible for the helper–ensure all materials or details are gathered in advance, provide clear instructions and, if it’s a large project, break the work into shifts or activities for different helpers to do. 8. Make a list of people you know who may be able and willing to help, and spread the requests around. Don’t ask the same one or two people repeatedly for help without tapping other resources.

9. Don’t wait until you need help before offering to help others. Become known as a person willing to help out when you can and you’ll build a network of people happy to help you too. 10. If asking for information or feedback, don’t reject or dismiss what is offered to you. Be gracious. 11. Make it easy for a potential helper to say no to your request. Don’t put people on the spot. It may be uncomfortable for both of you if they’re unable to help at this time. 12. Say thank you. 13. Follow-up–let the helper know the outcome. continued on opposite page

5. Learn as much about the problem as you can–and keep a record of sources of information you’ve consulted and

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BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


Questions and unhelpful people Whether you’re asking for help or gathering information about products or services, you will run into unhelpful people. Often, they don’t realize they’re being unhelpful. Sometimes they have misunderstood your question. Or, their answer is filled with jargon or terminology that you can’t understand. Other times, you’ll meet people who are rude, dismissive or disinterested in your problem or question. Here are some tips for getting past unhelpful people to the information you need.  Be well organized. Plan your questions carefully. What words could be used to describe your problem or need? What do you already know and what do you want to know? Make notes and refer to them when you need to.  Be persistent. Sometimes timing and connections are everything. You may have to phone or visit a number of stores/organizations or talk to several people before you find one who can or will help.  Be polite. We are all more inclined to go the extra mile

for people who treat us with respect. And you may need the extra mile!  Be creative. You may encounter people who are just having a bad day. Don’t get frustrated or give up.  If you believe that someone in their store/organization has the answer you need, be patient, polite and persistent. Call again later when you can speak to someone else.  Ask your friends, family and acquaintances if they know someone with the information you’re seeking.  Look for people who share your interest. The photography enthusiast who works in a camera store may be more willing to share knowledge than someone who is simply putting in hours to sell a product. *Francis J. Flynn and Vanessa K.B. Lake. If You Need Help, Just Ask: Underestimating Compliance with Direct Requests for Help. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 95 (1) 2008;128-143. Available: http:// tinyurl.com/yaynrr4 Jodi Glickman. Asking for a Favour: The Three Keys. Harvard Business Review blog. January 12, 2011. Available: http://blogs.hbr.org/ glickman/2011/01/asking-for-a-favorthe.html Jodi Glickman. The Biggest Mistake People Make after Receiving a Favour. Harvard Business Review blog. January 19, 2011. Available: http://blogs.hbr.org/ glickman/2011/01/the-biggestmistake-ppl-make-af.html n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor: I recently spoke with one of your advocates, Ken Walker, about a man I’m working with who has a disability who needs some support to apply for Employment Insurance. Although I learned that this is not an area the advocates can work on, Ken researched any and all alternative possibilities that he could find for me to look into on behalf of this client. It’s easy when we’re busy and have lots of work to do to answer with, “I’m sorry this is not an area we can assist with.” Ken did everything he could think of to assist me and his suggestions and positive helpful approach was very appreciated. Thanks to Ken for doing a great job! Thank you, Cynthia Abbott, RCSS Case Manager, MindWorksBC

The SEGWAYE Program Are you 18-25 years old with a neurological diagnosis? Do you want to: ✔ Discover the right job for you? ✔ Learn the skills you need? Contact us for: ✔ Information and Resources ✔ Referrals ✔ Services at no cost 604-630-3034 www.centreforability.bc.ca

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Stories of Success Through Technology by

Paul Gauthier

Perhaps no one knows better how technology can change lives than EATI clients. Our project, the Equipment and Assistive Technology Initiative (EATI), has been up and running for about 2 years and we’re really beginning to see the fruits of our labour. We’re excited about how people are fulfilling their dreams and goals, and participating more in their communities because of their new technology. EATI provides a source of funding for equipment and assistive devices that relate directly to your disability needs and will help you reach your employment-related goals. With the people we’ve worked with so far, some have reached an employment goal quickly. Others have had a slower path starting with volunteering, learning skills and eventually finding some form of employment. The “bad news” is EATI has also confirmed what many of us working in the community have known for years: there are too many people with disabilities who can’t afford equipment or assistive devices that could dramatically improve their lives. In recent months, we’ve accumulated a mountain of EATI applications from people wanting equipment. And, those who don’t qualify for EATI funding and support, just go without. Part of the EATI mandate is to collect this information on “unmet needs” of people with disabilities living in BC. Our hope is that we’ll FALL/WINTER 2011

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We’re excited about how people are fulfilling their dreams and goals, and participating more in their communities because of their new technology. be able to find more funding in the future to meet at least some of these needs.

New Assistive Technology (AT) Co-operative You may have read in the last edition of Transition (Summer 2011) about the new AT Co-op that’s starting out. The way EATI works now, if you need a screen reader, for example, you need to research screen readers, find one that would suit your needs, find sellers and prices, and so on. Ideally, we envision the AT co-op as a one stop clearinghouse of information for its members. So, for example, the Co-op would tell you the five top screen readers, their pros and cons, and maybe even give you recommendations about where to buy.

Some of Our Successes Here’s a look at just a few of our EATI clients. You can find many more at our website, including short videos on some clients’ success stories. Personally, I was very proud to receive one of the 2011 WOW!clbc Recognition Awards from Community Living BC. WOW, which stands for “Widening our World,” recognizes people who’ve made contributions toward community

inclusion for people supported by the community living sector. The award was largely for the work we’ve been able to do through EATI, helping people with disabilities reach goals, do more and be involved. Note: The names in the following have been changed.

Nancy Goal To work part time as a program leader at a community centre.

Barrier Nancy is blind and unable to read printed material or distinguish colours.

EATI provided Intel reader–transforms printed text to speech Pen friend–a voice labeller which allows users to record information onto self adhesive labels, then “read” out the recorded information Humanware Victora Reader Stream–an Audio book reader

Outcome Nancy now has a part-time position as a program leader at a community centre.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


James

BCCPD and EATI at Ministerial Roundtable

Goal

BCCPD was very pleased to have the opportunity to speak at the recent Ministerial Roundtable on Labour Market Participation of People with Disabilities, hosted by the Honourable Alice Wong, Minister of State for Seniors. Paul Gauthier represented BCCPD at the August 2011 event. He spoke about the Equipment and Assistive Technology Initiative (EATI) and the importance of the Social Development Partnership Program to the community. EATI is a ground-breaking project, funded by the Province of British Columbia, through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Agreement.

To continue volunteering in the community through blogging, filmmaking and public speaking, eventually leading to a part-time business.

Barrier James is a quadriplegic who has neck, shoulder and wrist pain when typing. He can’t sit for long periods due to postural pain.

EATI provided Macbook Pro laptop Nuance MacSpeech–voice to text software

Outcome James has now completed three contract jobs thanks to his new equipment.

Lillian

Left to right: Duane Geddes, Executive Director, Sam Sullivan Disability Foundation Dr. Gary Birch, Executive Director, Neil Squire Society Jennifer Lee, Executive Director, IAM Cares Society Hon. Alice Wong, Minister of State for Seniors Karen De Long, Director, British Columbia Association for Community Living Paul Gauthier, BC Coalition of People with Disabilities Jamie Millar-Dixon, Tourism Employment Specialist, WII-STEP Workforce Inclusion Initiative

Goal To attain a high school diploma, in order to pursue certification from a culinary school and become a chef.

Barrier Lillian is Deaf, so cannot hear instructors in a class environment.

EATI provided Two hearing aids

Outcome Lillian got a part-time job in a restaurant and has recently been promoted to sous chef full time. For more on the AT-Co-operative or EATI, please visit www.bcpsn. org or contact Paul at pgauthier@ bcpsn.org or 1-877-333-7554. n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

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Accessibility of Media Technology The Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics/Paralympics provided a wake-up call to the Council of Canadians with Disabilities (CCD) when people with disabilities contacted us about the inaccessibility of CTV’s coverage of the event. Deaf Canadians and people with vision impairment encountered barriers when they tried to tune-in to CTV’s coverage. A barrier for Deaf people was a lack of closed captions. The streaming video player on CTV’s Olympic/ Paralympic site could only be operated by using a mouse which made it inaccessible to people who use screen readers. Coincidentally, CCD’s newly constituted Access to Technology Committee was in its early stages. The Committee is co-chaired by John Rae, CCD First Vice Chair, and Gary Birch, Executive Director of the Neil Squire Society. On behalf of CCD, National Coordinator Laurie Beachell made a complaint to the Canadian RadioTelevision and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) about the barriers CTV’s coverage presented to members of the disability community. The CRTC said that it could not address these barriers because they were encountered on CTV’s website.

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Improving Access to Media Not only are there barriers in the way that broadcasters make their services available to the Canadian public, the CRTC’s approach to broadcasting has also proven to be a barrier to access and inclusion. When the CCD Access to Technology Committee had its meeting in April 2011, it placed the CRTC high on its priority list. CCD has asked the CRTC to follow a human rights model to regulate Canadian broadcasters on access for people with disabilities. This year, a number of Canadian broadcasters are having their applications for license renewal reviewed by the CRTC. Members of our Committee appeared before the CRTC to deliver our human rights message to the CRTC. John Rae told the CRTC Commissioners that, “What we do need from this hearing, given that it may cover seven years of renewed licenses, is significant additional regulation by the Commission to accelerate the amount of original Canadian programming that is fully accessible in the area of new ways of broadcasting. We do believe the Commission needs to regulate the Internet.” He spoke passionately against making any aspect of access a matter of voluntary compliance.

“[I]t’s always been hard for me to understand that the Commission may regulate who gets licenses, what level of Canadian programming may be provided, but it doesn’t seem to regulate all the ways in which we as customers receive that programming. What we find is that any reliance on voluntarism has been a failure to the disabled community, not just in this area, but equally in the areas of transportation, in the areas of development of products, and so forth.”

For the Deaf Community Committee member Jim Roots focused on the barriers that the Deaf community are seeking to have remedied. “There have been a lot of improvements in recent years. At least five channels now caption almost everything because one of our representatives, Henry Vlug, won human rights complaints to force them to do so,” Jim stated. “We want to applaud you on your new attitude towards captioning complaints. Now when we complain you take some action. Please keep it up. But do more than that. Make sure that the licensees keep the promises they make in response to these complaints.”

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Lack of Cell Phone Options At the CRTC, there has been an evolving awareness of the need to address issues facing Canadians with disabilities. For example, the 2009 CRTC Policy which states, “… that wireless service providers, in consultation with people with disabilities, offer at least one type of wireless mobile handset to serve the needs of people who are blind and/or have moderate-to-severe mobility or cognitive disabilities, noting that it will consider imposing such a requirement in the future, if necessary.” In discussions with people with disabilities, it seems that not all cell phone providers are offering cell phone products usable by the communities described in the CRTC policy.

Add Your Voice CCD encourages Canadians with disabilities to make CRTC complaints when they encounter barriers in any of the areas regulated by the Commission. Complaints to the Commission help to bring down barriers in the television and telecommunications fields. There is an online complaint process. For information about that process, go to http://www. crtc.gc.ca/RapidsCCM/Register. asp?lang=E. Complaints can also be mailed to the Secretary General, CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2 and by fax to 819-994-0218. You can also contact Martine Vallee, the CRTC’s Director of Social and Consumer Policy at 819-997-9254. n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

We couldn’t do it without you Thank you to these organizations, companies and government departments who support BCCPD’s work on behalf of people with disabilities. BC Association for Individualized Technology and Supports for People with Disabilities BC Hydro Employees Community Services Fund BC Rehab Foundation Canadian Co-operative Association City of Vancouver Council of Canadians with Disabilities Government of Canada’s Social Development Partnership Program-Disability Component Health Sciences Association of BC Homelessness Partnership Strategy–Human Resources and Skills Development Canada The Law Foundation of British Columbia The Law Foundation of Ontario Legal Services Society of British Columbia Notary Foundation of BC Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network Provincial Health Services Authority TELUS Employees Charitable Giving Program United Way of the Lower Mainland Vancouver Coastal Health Vancouver Foundation We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.

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Vancouver Company is an Accessibility Partner by

Steven Berg, Simply Computing

Our goal since opening Simply Computing in the early 80’s has been to teach people how to make computer ownership a simple and great experience. We work with our clients to show how they can use technology to enrich and simplify their everyday experiences. This is especially true for our clients with disabilities. Technology is helping to lower many of the barriers people with disabilities face every day, by providing solutions that empower people and give them more of the independence they need to pursue their professional and personal ambitions. We are thrilled to be able to offer the best technology on the market–Apple products– and work with our clients to find the best fit for their needs. Apple has been a leader in assistive technology for over 20

Steve (left) and Alex

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years. In fact, assistive technology is included in its products as standard features to assist with cognitive, visual, physical and motor impairments. At Simply.ca we also go a step beyond offering the right Apple product. There are many retailers of Apple products, but we are unique in providing continuity in support, training, government program information and customization of Apple products with additional hardware and software to address our clients’ specific needs. Breaking down any type of barrier in a person’s life involves some challenge and we pride ourselves on being able to personally support each and every relationship through this challenging, but exciting journey. Whether it is using an iPad to communicate

Breaking down any type of barrier in a person’s life involves some challenge and we pride ourselves on being able to personally support each and every relationship through this challenging, but exciting journey. or using the Apple computer to help you to learn and grow as an individual, staff like myself, in Vancouver, and Rob Conci, in Kelowna, are there to help you do it. We have been working with the Equipment and Assistive Technology Initiative (EATI) since 2010. EATI is a program designed to help people with disabilities with work-related goals (see page 6). Individuals who qualify for the program can choose the technology that would best work with their employment goals and we help by providing knowledge on the technology and support throughout the process. Simply.ca has been involved since EATI’s infancy and together we have helped grow the program to what it is today. The number of EATI clients securing jobs or joining volunteer programs provides a measure of success for the program. In fact, after meeting one EATI client, we hired him! Alex used his EATI funding to provide him with Apple technology to help him address his visual impairment. He’s now an Apple Voiceover trainer at Simply.ca.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


When Apple introduced the iPad, the world of Autism and other disabilities that involve verbal impairments, changed. Other technological solutions that involved bulky, obtrusive, not to mention expensive ($8,000), solutions, made way for new technology. The iPad and Apps developed to help people verbally communicate by using symbols and letters allowed people to become more independent at a fraction of the cost. For example, one of our clients, Jake, who has Autism uses his iPad, Apple computer and Apps such as Proloquo2Go to communicate with his friends and co-workers. He also uses the Everyday Skills App and Social Skills App to learn about life skills. To help develop his writing skills, he uses his Apple computer’s Word Prediction feature. Jake currently volunteers part time and is well on his way to achieving his dream of working with computers as a full-time job. Simply.ca is excited to be growing with support groups like EATI and others, in the field of assistive technology. We feel that we have been an integral part of helping many people achieve their goals of more independence. We encourage people to get in touch with us and let us know what they would like to see and how we can better serve their needs. People can email me at steven. berg@simply.ca or call me directly at 604-714-1466. n

resources Neil Squire Foundation For over 25 years, the Neil Squire Foundation has empowered Canadians with physical disabilities through the use of computerbased assistive technologies, research and development, and various employment programs. Programs include: Employ-Ability; Computer Comfort; Job Focus; Literacy, and more The programs they offer have a few characteristics that make them unique.

A Holistic Approach Programs take into consideration all aspects of the human being. Whether they need to improve only their computer skills or they require a more complex combination of services, they work with each client on an individual basis to identify their particular needs and create an individual action plan for them to succeed.

Self-paced Environment Programs offer a self-paced environment which allows clients to learn at their own rhythm.

Professional Staff The knowledge, dedication and professionalism of their staff and volunteers complete the equation. Phone 1-877-673-4636 Email info@neilsquire.ca Web www.neilsquire.ca

BCITS BC Association for Individualized Technology and Supports for People with Disabilities (BCITS) works with people who have se-

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

vere physical disabilities and helps them to live as well and as independently as possible. BCITS is the home of two main programs: The Provincial Respiratory Outreach Program (PROP) that provides equipment and a wide range of supports to people who use ventilators and other respiratory equipment. The Technology for Independent Living Program (TIL) that provides technology to assist with communication and with managing devices in the home. Phone 1-866-326-1245Â (local and long distance) Email info@bcits.org Web www.bcits.org

CanAssist CanAssist is a university-based organization dedicated to developing and delivering technologies, programs and services that improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. Located at the University of Victoria, they draw upon and bring together the exceptional resources on campus, as well as those in the wider community. While many of their activities support individuals with disabilities and their families in Greater Victoria and throughout southern Vancouver Island, they also routinely receive and respond to requests from across British Columbia, Canada and internationally. Phone (250) 721-7300 Email info@canassist.ca Web http://www.canassist.ca/ n

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Technology and You Here are highlights of the Transition survey “Technology, Communication and Connection.”

1

What do you regularly do online? Buy goods and services___ 37.9% Access government programs and services________________ 65.5% Work/volunteer related activities_ 34.5% Look for information_ ____ 93.1% Download/watch/listen to music or movies_ _____________ 55.2% Use Facebook, Twitter or other social media_ ___________ 69.0%

2

How do you learn about a new kind of technology and how to use it, for example, filling in a government form or learning how to download movies from an online service? Figure it out yourself_ ____ 75.9% Ask a friend_____________ 48.3% Use the provider’s technical support________________ 34.5%

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3

If there is a piece of technology you’d like to have, but can’t afford, what is it? Top responses: Smart phone (2) Iphone (3) Ipad (4) Newer computer (3)

4

What is the piece of online technology/software/service that you just can’t do without? Top responses: Email (4) Laptop computer (5) Facebook (4) Smart Phone (3)

5

If you have friends or family who use technology more–or less–than you do, how does it affect your communication or connection with them? Some responses: I barely talk to people who aren’t online.

It has no bearing on my contacts, as I see them in person regularly. There’s less communication. Does not really affect me– everyone I know is online–family, friends and co-workers. I am frustrated watching my partner be totally tuned in to the computer for hours. I tend to stay in touch more with friends who use it, with one exception, a friend who has no internet/technology experience. My family is technologically literate and I have easy access to communicate when I want. Sometimes my partner is online too often and our communication ends up being fragmented. All my friends are online and this helps communication and event planning. Facebook helps me feel in the loop and, conversely, it can make me feel quite envious of the things I am missing. Facebook can be a double-edged sword. Facebook helps me keep in touch without the cost of long distance. Skype and Gmail phone also helps a lot.

6

Do you think the ability to connect with people electronically, rather than in person, increases your feeling of connection with others or makes you feel more isolated? Connected_ ____________ 27.6% Isolated_________________ 6.9% It’s a balance____________ 65.5%

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


7

Do you go online for information or services from government? Yes____________________ 96.6% No_____________________ 3.4%

8

If you receive income supports (welfare, PWD or PPMB), what do you think of the fact that you’re asked to do more things online (such as completing application forms)? It’s much more convenient and makes services/information more accessible________________48% It’s more convenient________28% It’s about the same_________16% It’s less convenient__________4% It’s much less convenient and harder to get the help I need__4%

9

Overall, do you think the move to all types of online services and activities is more positive or negative? Positive________________ 86.2% Negative_______________ 13.8%

Living in poverty and on disability assistance, it’s harder to get things done online. I cannot afford ink for my printer. I cannot afford a new electric scooter, and it’s getting harder than ever to try and get one from the social service system. Online services are great for helping to manage my activities, but I think it increases isolation because there’s less actual human contact. For those of us whose social lives are limited by their disability, the internet can provide a certain amount of social connection and it can also make it easier to arrange social events when possible. It is de-humanizing. To purchase accessible tickets online through Ticketmaster, buyers with disabilities must call.

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What else would you like to tell us about the pros and cons of online living? Some responses: More should be available online than what is. I have to go down to the Ministry office (I’m on PWD) to drop off forms in person that could easily be processed online. Some friends are less likely to visit because of social networking and they don’t seem to have the same need to connect in person. Another con is the cost of my internet service. It is very hard to be able to afford to have it at all, the prices are incredibly high.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

We cannot use the online option. For people with mobility problems like myself, online “living” opens up the world in a big way. I am concerned that some people can’t afford computers, adaptive devices or a monthly internet bill required to access these services. Editor’s note: Readers should be aware that the people who responded to this online survey are a certain group: people who are comfortable using a computer and the internet. To gather information that truly represents a cross-section of people with disabilities, information would need to be gathered through other means as well, such as interviews or written questionnaires. Thanks to everyone who shared their opinions and experiences. n

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Keeping Government Services Accessible by

Robin Loxton

Computers and the internet have opened a lot of doors for people with disabilities. To check your bank balance or pay a bill, you no longer need to take a trip to your bank. It can be as quick and easy as hitting a few keys. And, there are services, information, and social networking that can be accessed from your living room that 30 years ago wasn’t even thought of. There is no doubt that computer technology has revolutionized the way we communicate and many other aspects of our daily lives. But not all these changes are necessarily a good thing. How so? As someone who is a front-line advocate for people with disabilities, I see a problem when the only way you can access a service or program is by using a computer. It’s fine if you have the option of downloading a government form from a website, like an application form for Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits (CPP-D). But it becomes a barrier if that is the only way you can obtain the form.

It’s fine if you have the option of downloading a government form from a website, like an application form for Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits (CPP-D). But it becomes a barrier if that is the only way you can obtain the form. Fortunately, the federal government still provides a phone service that allows you to talk to someone and ask them to mail you a CPP-D application form. It’s also a problem when public services are changed because decision-makers assume that everyone has a computer, access to the internet and computer skills. Many people with disabilities on fixed income cannot afford a computer and internet fees, and have never learned how to use a computer. I have a particular concern about the provincial government’s move to computerize access to government services. A current example is the Ministry of Social Development’s “Self-Serve Assessment and Application–Part 1” that was recently introduced as an essential part of the application process for social assistance. Anyone who needs to apply for provincial income or disability assistance must answer over 60 questions on a computerized questionnaire. To do this, the

Book Your Free Advocacy Access Workshop If your organization is interested in learning more about provincial and federal (Canada Pension Plan) disability income supports and health benefits, please contact Jane Dyson at jwd@bccpd.bc.ca to arrange a workshop. Our advocates would be happy to come to your office or we can host a workshop at the BCCPD. Our workshops are free of charge and can be tailored to your needs.

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applicant will need not only language literacy skills–and government websites are famous for not using plain language–but also computer literacy skills. If the applicant can’t manage this detailed, long computer questionnaire, they will need help. So what happens if you need to apply for social assistance and you don’t have a computer and you don’t know how to use one? The Ministry has computers available to applicants at welfare offices or they will direct you to an agency that has computers available to the public. If you need help in using a computer, Ministry policy says that workers are supposed to provide assistance. Although this new computerized application process may work well for people who have computer knowledge and their own computer, advocates have expressed concerns about the complexity of the application questionnaire and that applicants do not always get help when they need it. It has also been reported that some people discovered much later in the process that their application had not gone through because they had unknowingly made a computer error. Clearly, the Ministry of Social Development

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


has more to learn about implementing user-friendly systems. I am not opposed to government agencies introducing computerized web-based application programs. I am opposed to online services that may be difficult to use, becoming the only way to access a program. Social services involve people and require people to deal with people. Many people applying for social assistance have disabilities and other challenges that limit their ability to do things that most people can do. The last thing a new applicant needs to worry about is a computerized application process they cannot manage or understand. The Ministry of Social Development must make sure that they have sufficient staffing to provide the necessary in-person support and assistance to those that need the help and advice. BCCPD, and other community organizations, are watching the situation closely. We’re letting the Ministry know when our clients report problems in accessing information or getting the help they need. Computers and the internet are important tools that can help us do things that we could not do before, but technology can never completely take the place of people. Government decision-makers should keep in mind that most people who walk into a Ministry of Social Development office would much rather deal with a person than being directed to a computer terminal. n

Exciting New BCCPD Project Funded by the Ontario Law Foundation by Jane Dyson In September, we began working with our community partners, PovNet and the Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS), on a one-year project–thanks to funding from the Ontario Law Foundation’s Access to Justice Fund. We’re very excited about this project that will allow us to produce an online training course for community advocates on Canada Pension Plan Disability (CPP-D) applications, Reconsiderations and appealing to the CPP-D Review Tribunal (you can read about PovNet’s online courses on page 16). The online format is particularly suited to people in rural or more remote areas, and we will be focusing our outreach work on these communities. Part One of the CPP-D course will focus on applications; Part Two will focus on Reconsiderations and appeals to the Review Tribunal. Under the supervision of a CLAS lawyer, we’ll develop the course content, and we’ll work with PovNet to design the online materials. PovNet will train the BCCPD’s CPP-D advocate to facilitate the course and assignments, and moderate online discussions.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

The course will be offered once during the project and will be a win-win for all of us: PovNet will have the infrastructure for course and BCCPD will have a trained facilitator able to offer the training at any time to advocates across Canada. We will also produce a plain language self-help manual or workbook on appealing to the CPP-D Review Tribunal. The publication will include case examples and will invite users to respond to questions based on these examples and on their own personal situation. This interactive style will help users understand what is needed for a successful Tribunal appeal. While the manual will be designed as a self-help tool, it will also be a useful resource for community advocates and will review relevant case law. It will be available on the BCCPD website (in English, Traditional Chinese and Punjabi), through the Law Foundation of BC’s Clicklaw portal and will be mailed to community groups and individuals across Canada upon request. n

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BC’s Online Anti-Poverty Community by Penny Goldsmith

“It just seems it was so long ago that most advocates didn’t have computers, never mind internet access, and would spend hours on the telephone to get information needed to help people. Sometimes it would take days to get the necessary information. Although there were antipoverty communities back then and provincial organizations, dialogue and information sharing among individual advocates and activists was cumbersome. PovNet has become more than a virtual community, in my view it is flesh and bones with a real heart, it is organic and if the internet failed tomorrow, connections that have been made provincially and nationwide would endure.” –Alayne Keough, PovNet founding member

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PovNet began in 1997 when a group of community advocates from across BC met in Vancouver to talk about this “internet” that they’d been hearing about, and to see if it could be of any use as a cheap communication network. PovNet’s commitment to being accessible to anyone who wants to use its tools is an integral part of creating an online commons. When the PovNet website first went live, we made sure that all of our links had text alternatives for users who did not have high-end computers or who had disabilities which made it difficult or impossible for them to see or read graphics. We still do. We field test our website and online courses to see that they are useable on public sites in libraries and community centres, and we have an ongoing commitment to making our resources accessible to people with disabilities. Our mandate is to expand the technological resources of PovNet, so as many users as possible can interact with each other online, both to share insights about case work and to engage in strategies to effect systemic change. The resources that are available in rural parts of the community differ from those that are available in larger cities. So in Vancouver, for example, a community organizer recently said to me, “I’m getting a bit lazy using email. I need to start talking to people and having more in-person meetings.”

This is because they’re local. But somebody who’s in Massett can’t have that in-person meeting with somebody who’s in Kamloops. So it’s not laziness at all in that case— they have to talk online. PovNet is not about “this is fantastic new technology and this is what we can do with it.” PovNet is a way for us to be able to find the technological resources for front line workers to use to continue to network with each other and do their work more easily.

PovNetU “Well, the best training I had was being a single mom on welfare myself. You never make assumptions about people, once you’ve been there. Have you got a stamp for that thing we are going to send in or have you got a quarter to phone? You know how it feels to be on the other side of the desk.” –Advocate, Vancouver Island PovNetU provides training and education to anti-poverty advocates, community, settlement and other front line workers who might not have easy access to support and resources. These learners include rural advocates, advocates working with immigrant and refugee clients, advocates from First Nations and Aboriginal communities and community workers who do advocacy as a part of their

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


job, but have other responsibilities as well (for example, transition house workers, community centre workers). The two most commonly reported barriers faced by advocates who want ongoing training are geographic and financial. Advocates from rural communities do not have access to courses in their own communities. Front line workers who live in urban communities often do not have the ability to take the time off work to be able to take advantage of courses offered locally. Because PovNetU courses do not require learners to log on at a specific time every day, this allows advocates to do the work when it fits into their busy schedules, without travel or cost requirements. Learners “talk” to each other and to the facilitators of the courses via discussion boards and personal assignments that they complete. Materials and online resources that are used in the courses continue to be available to learners after the courses have finished. When a learner successfully completes a course, she or he receives a certificate of completion from PovNet. Courses are free and anyone doing advocacy or referral work in their community is welcome to join PovNetU. Course topics include: “Introduction to Advocacy,”“Residential Tenancy levels 1 and 2,”“Welfare levels 1 and 2,” “Employment Insurance,”“Seniors Residential Care Advocacy,” “Dealing with Debt,” and “PWD Appeals.”n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

What is PovNet? PovNet provides online tools that facilitate communication, community and access to information around poverty-related issues in BC and Canada. Anyone can use our website to find information and community resources or connect with an advocate. Our online courses, through PovNetU, are for front-line advocates: people who are helping other people in the community. Here are just some of PovNet’s key services and resources.

Website The website is a clearinghouse of links to current legal information on poverty law subjects, as well as hundreds of helpful organizations and essential resources. PovNet’s website hosts thousands of up-to-date links and resources that are organized and described to help you find the info you need. Get links to applications and forms, government info, FAQs, directories, guides and more.

PovNetU Online courses for advocates, community and settlement workers are facilitated by experienced advocates and offer

rich opportunities for learning and collaboration.

Outreach and Networking PovNet works to ensure that its community stays connected and informed via newsfeeds, popular social networking tools, collected feedback, and several multimedia projects.

Find an Advocate PovNet hosts an up-to-date and widely-used directory of advocates in BC and Canada. Visitors can find advocates in their own communities to help with their legal or poverty-related issues.

Learn More PovNet: www.povnet.org PovNetU: http://povnetu.povnet.org povnetu@povnet.org

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Facilitated by two women artists living with chronic illness, this foursession workshop will provide the opportunity for women living with chronic illness to come together to consider the interplay between illness and creative expression. Drawing on examples of other artists’ work, we will use visual and literary exercises and group discussion to explore the value of doing creative work about illness.

The Art In Her Illness Workshop November 3, 10, 17 and 24 1-4 pm At the BCCPD Office

Prerequisites: some experience in the arts, regardless of medium: literary, visual, performance, film or other. Registration required. Space limited to 10 participants. $10-20 sliding scale, for the series. No one will be turned away. Supplies provided. Coffee, tea and light refreshments included. Please contact: shetorethepage@gmail.com for more information and/or to register.

your voice counts | become a member of bccpd I accept your invitation to join the BC Coalition of People with Disabilties and enclose my membership fee of $15 (groups and individuals). I am also sending along a tax-deductible donation of $__________.

1

Name ______________________________________________ Organization ________________________________________

i-

2

Address _______________________________________________ City/Prov_______________________ Postal Code ____________ Phone _______________ Email ____________________________

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Please return your payment/donation with this form, to BCCPD, 204 - 456 W. Broadway, Vancouver, BC V5Y 1R3. You can also become a member or donate online at http://www.bccpd.bc.ca/supportdonate.htm.

Thank you for your invaluable support.

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BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


A Terrible Poem for Wonderful People by Sam Bradd Do you have time for a tour? If so, come with me. It’s a great coalition, BCCPD. We’re in it together For disability rights If the heat doesn’t kill you The coffee just might. This is Val’s area All the supplies you can find. She has lots of friends Of the 4-legged kind. Turning the corner, I hear something crunch. I think Robin is eating A peanutty lunch. The bike parking’s full That’s Ken’s, let me seeAnd Nancy is here To help with part 3. Bibhas supervises AA Like paperwork for tribunals Ashley mutters her cane Likes to trip the wrong-doers. Peter works hard On CPPD, Lillian has a big heart And gives generously. Here comes Transition– Elena, Andrew, AV: with mailout experts Kam David, Marie, Flo + Audrey. Robert has radio Back in his nook And Shelley is writing Surrounded by books. Annette wins appeals And makes it look easy: I found out the secretExtra fresh cheezies.

Joyce and Dorthe wish That we’d have a sink made Thank you to Nancy Who keeps us all paid. Chloe speaks with the Board And arranges big meetings Monthly Liz bakes us Great birthday greetings. “Hello, Coalition!” It’s George on the line. On weekends, who else hears Phones ring all the time? To Navi, Violet, Carol, Amanda and Dan, Thank you for doing what very few can. Kam, Pendra and Dierdre are part of that team Reception is tough but you make it a dream. The community kitchen cooks Sarah, Shannon, Erin and Melanie Where a meal without garlic Is almost a felony. Brian brings his daughter and Raseel’s baby sleeps, Each year Jen and Aimee’s Farm Expands a few feet. Karen builds safety and non-profit capacity, Christine chips away with unending tenacity. Janis is our glue And keeps us in line But the jokes and the riddles, Oh her puns are a crime! Audrey and Flo Are a pod of two peas And supervise office parties With their expertise.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

O

ur man of so many talents, Sam Bradd, is leaving as our Administrative Director to return to school. Sam has been our social media expert, resident cartoonist, lunchtime organizer–on top of his actual job description. We’re happy to say Sam will still be doing occasional work with us. Here’s the poem Sam wrote for us as a parting gift. You’ll see why we’ll miss him.

And of course this place Would not be the same But for the leadership Of steadfast Jane. We know there’s pressure From so many to please And she juggles the problems With the greatest of ease. Our Boards’ campaigns Have paved the way; After 30- plus years, We’re here to stay. n

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VocalEye Provides Access to the Arts by Geoff McMurchy “...A fantastic opportunity for those of us who are blind to continue going to the theatre!” – Lisa West “AD allows me the independence and choice to attend a live theatre production without having to rely on a sighted companion to provide the description.”– Linda Weber Those are the words of blind theatregoers talking about VocalEye, a live Audio Description (AD) service offered by Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture. Live Audio Description has been offered in the US for more than 20 years and the national AD service in the UK serves more than 100 theatres across the country. In Canada, however, the service was almost unheard of until Kickstart’s initiative. Acting on its mandate “to promote practices that will make the arts more accessible to all members of the Canadian public,” Kickstart brought trainer Deborah Lewis up from the US in 2009 to train a team of describers in Vancouver–and “kickstarted” the first live Audio Description service in Canada! Live AD is sometimes confused with Hearing Assistance which just amplifies existing sounds or with Described Video which is scripted, recorded and edited to fit, as the video or film is produced. Live AD is done, as the name implies, in real time, with physical actions, reactions, sight gags and other pertinent visual information provided by the describer, between the actors’ lines,

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through a wireless transmitter to an earpiece worn by the recipient. It’s quite an art in itself, to convey the necessary information, without any personal interpretations and without stepping on the actors’ lines! Kickstart’s AD program debuted on Oct 27, 2009 when their newly trained team described “The Miracle Worker” for the Vancouver Playhouse. They were then invited to participate in the 2010 Vancouver Cultural Olympics, describing Robert LePage’s “Blue Dragon”, Realwheels’“Spine” and a selection of alternative performances at “Hive3.” In September 2010, Kickstart launched their first full season of live Audio Described theatre in Canada, describing 15 productions at five venues in Vancouver, Richmond and North Vancouver. “It was a very exciting first season for us here in Vancouver, with demand for our service doubling since March,” says VocalEye Coordinator Steph Kirkland. “We’ve had

patrons coming from Surrey, White Rock and New West and, thanks to some of them, we’ll be describing our first production (Don Quixote) at the Surrey Arts Centre next season.” VocalEye will be back for another full season at the Vancouver Playhouse and Arts Club Stanley Theatres, with other venues in Vancouver to be confirmed. “When we first approached the theatres about live Audio Description, they said, ‘Blind people don’t go to the theatre.’ Well, they do now,” says Kickstart Board Chairperson Linda Chernoff. “And in this climate of massive funding cuts to the arts, the participating theatres–Vancouver Playhouse, Arts Club, Richmond Gateway, Presentation House and Touchstone Theatre–are to be commended for taking the risk and making arts accessibility a priority.” www.vocaleye.org | facebook.com/vocaleye n

VocalEye Audio Description Team: Steph Kirkland, Rick Waines, trainer Deborah Lewis, Khaira Ledeyo and Teri Snelgrove

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


A MESSAGE FROM

Personal Network Development: Weaving the Ties that Bind Our wish for security and a loving community for our loved ones and friends with disabilities, illness or old age is a shared desire that exists in our community. As friends, family members or those who are in isolation, we are already connected by strong ties of understanding and experience. At the heart of Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network (PLAN) is the belief that in creating a caring community, a person in isolation can have an active social network, playing an important role in bringing resilience, purpose and joy to an otherwise solitary life. Building on over 20 years of experience in facilitating hundreds of personal

support networks for people living in isolation, Weaving the Ties that Bind is an online course of study using PLAN’s proven approach to provide family and friends with the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate a social support network. With the knowledge of how to facilitate a social support network, you will have the tools to re-chart a life of isolation towards a life at the centre of an active and caring social network.

transition

subscription form

Yes, I would like to receive Transition magazine 4 times per year. Please add me to your mailing list; I am enclosing my $15 annual subscription fee. Name _____________________________ Organization _____________________________ _____________________________ Address ____________________________

Course Date: Oct. 24-Dec 4 Register two seats and receive the second seat at half price. Promotion Code: weavingfortwo PLAN.

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Contact PLAN at 604.439.9566 or www.plan.ca. n

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City/Prov _____________________ Postal Code ___________________

Email ________________________ _____________________________

Cheryl’s Kindness Story Cheryl became a Pay It Forward BC (PIFBC) member after seeing the movie, Pay It Forward (Kevin Spacey and Helen Hunt http://tinyurl.com/e74wj). After asking for a new supply of PIFBC kindness cards, she called me to share a story about one of her acts of kindness. Last Christmas, she made little bags and filled them with food, gloves, toques, a lottery ticket, a Christmas card and a PIFBC kindness card. She gave the bags to homeless people in her neighbourhood. Cheryl notes that one woman called her an “earth angel” and made her “feel so good inside!” Another recipient asked for her phone number so that she could share her lottery winnings if her bag contained a lucky ticket. Cheryl told her that if she won she should keep it all. Join our ever-growing troupe of kindness ambassadors across BC. Contact Shelley at 604875-0188 (toll-free 1-877-232-7400) or email wdi@bccpd.bc.ca.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

Please check one: I’d like to receive Transition in the following format: ❒❒ PDF (by email) ❒❒ I’ll read it online ❒❒ Paper (by mail) ❒❒ Text disc (by mail) ❒❒ Audio tape (by mail) Please make cheques payable to “BCCPD” and send to us at Transition, c/o BCCPD, 204 - 456 W. Broadway, Vancouver, BC V5Y 1R3. For information on BCCPD’s privacy policy, see the Privacy Statement in this Transition.

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How to Recycle Your Technology

Help Emergency Services to Help You

Recycling computers, laptops and electronics is very important for the

environment. The Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) works with Cowley and Company

government-approved recyclers to ensure all end-of-life computers are safely recycled. Transition magazine -- ad drafts ERA provides donation and recycling programs for the following equipment and more: • desktop computers • laptops • printers • peripherals • monitors • servers • phone systems ERA provides specialty recycling programs for offices, schools, and organizations for cell phones and toners. ERA will ship your boxes and you 1 can start your own recycling program.

Cowley & Company Car Accident Lawyers

How it works • • • •

The ERA collects computers, laptops, and electronics for donation Dr. Lee A. Cowley, D.C., LL.B. and recycling. Once300-13805 items come to the Surrey, ERA warehouses, 104 Avenue, BC V3T 1W7 they are tested and sorted by age and quality. P: 604-583-3000 F: 604-583-3045 Reusable items are refurbished, donated or resold. W: cowleylawcorp.ca End-of-Life items are recycled with government-approved recyclers in Canada.

Learn more at http://www.era.ca/ or call Toll Free 1-877-9-EWASTE. n

Cowley & Company Car Accident Lawyers

Dr. Lee A. Cowley, D.C., LL.B. 300-13805 104 Avenue, Surrey, BC V3T 1W7 P: 604-583-3000 F: 604-583-3045 W: cowleylawcorp.ca

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If you call 9-1-1, will emergency personnel understand your needs? The BCCPD has worked with the BC Ambulance Service (BCAS) to help you be prepared. Now, people with disabilities and seniors can voluntarily and confidentially provide BCAS with information that will help them respond better to your needs, if you ever have to make an emergency 9-1-1 call from your home. Here’s how: • You fill in a form, outlining your “functional needs”. For example, if you have difficulty speaking and use a wheelchair, you would check off both the Communication and Independence boxes. • Email or fax the completed form to BC Ambulance Service. • BCAS will enter the information for your address into their dispatch computer database. If you have to call 9-1-1 from your home address, your information will appear on the BCAS computer, so they know what functional limitations you have in order to respond to your 911 call better. Download a copy of the form from: www.bccpd.ca/ projects/emergency.htm. n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition


Planned Giving

A New Way to Contribute Tax savings

The BCCPD has a new Planned Giving program. Planned Giving is the opportunity to think ahead about causes or organizations that you may want to financially support beyond your lifetime. You can take the time now to gather information and leave instructions in your will. By planning ahead, you can research charities, or have someone research charities for you, that fit your values. You won’t feel rushed or pressured to make a decision and you can ensure that your money is spent in the way that you want.

You can realize significant tax savings with Planned Giving. For example, stocks, bonds and mutual funds that you may have in a trust can be transferred in your will to a charity and a tax receipt will be issued. A bequest from your estate of cash or RRSPs will reduce the taxes that your estate will be required to pay. Other ways of donating give twofold value: by naming the BCCPD as the beneficiary in a life insurance policy, you do not incur any costs now and a tax receipt is issued when the estate is settled.

Benefits

To learn more

There are many benefits to Planned Giving. By writing down your wishes, you will have increased peace of mind and control over your finances. Through Planned Giving, you can provide a significant future donation without reducing your income today. A gift in your will to a registered Canadian charity is taxdeductible. And, your Planned Gift helps the BCCPD to be here in the future for those who need us.

Our donors are important to us and we’ll work with you to be recognized in the way that you’d prefer. If you would like more information about Planned Giving, please contact Jane Dyson at the BCCPD at jwd@bccpd.bc.ca or 604-875-0188. She will send you BCCPD Planned Giving information for you to review with your financial planner or lawyer, family and friends. n

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

You’ve always been there for others. It’s part of who you are. Now, you can continue to give beyond your lifetime with Planned Giving. Your bequest to BC Coalition of People with Disabilities will promote and protect the dignity and independence of people living with a disability.

Find and follow BCCPD at www.bccpd.bc.ca/links.htm.

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transition Founding Editor Richard A. Watson Editor/Layout Ann Vrlak Cover Design Fiona Gamiet Contributors Jane Dyson, Shelley Hourston Proofreaders Amanda Schuldt • Andrew Quinn Alternate Formats Val Stapleton • Elena Kubaseck-Berry Admin Assistant Elena Kubaseck-Berry Mailout Coordinator Janis Walsh Editorial Statement The views and opinions expressed within the pages of Transition are not necessarily those held by the total membership or Board of Directors. The material presented herein is meant to be thought-provoking and to promote dialogue. Transition is a forum to share information within the disability community, and with government and the general public. It is also an opportunity for people with disabilities to display creative talent. Disclaimer Any firm or company advertising in Transition is for our readers’ benefit and does not constitute an endorsement by the BCCPD.

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In Memoriam: Robert Keill by Mildred de Haan and Shirley Birtwistle enjoyed many long talks, visits and We lost a strong and passionate advocate for people with dismeals with her and her family. When Woodlands School abilities when Robert Keill passed closed, Bob read about a man who away on August 8. Mr. Keill’s driving force in adwas being placed in Squamish. During the man’s time at Woodvocacy was his youngest beloved daughter, Catherine. At each of his lands, he had not had one visicountless meetings, the first thing tor. Bob was appalled and took it upon himself to “adopt” him. he did was carefully place a picture of Catherine in front of him For over 20 years, he drove to Squamish two or three times each and say, “This is why I’m here.” Bob was always available to month to take him out and ensure he was being well cared for.   families needing advice, comfort Catherine’s staff became Bob’s or support. He never gave up and second family. For every special said the things that needed to be occasion, he was invited for a meal said, whether to politicians or the with them.  He was not only Cathpublic. erine’s Dad, he was their Dad also. Bob was a great friend of Rest in peace, Bob, for a life the BCCPD and he had the pleaSanareAd 3,to 2011 2:20 PMwell Transition lived andmagazine a job well done. You sure of livingFebruary next door BCCPD will be sorely missed. n president, Johanna Johnston. He

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IEH treatment helps in reducing pain and anxiety, relieving stress and depression, providing support during chemotherapy, strengthening the immune system, reducing effects of trauma, accelerating wound healing and post spinal cord injury, detoxifying from substance misuse and reconnecting with the body. It is designed to complement, rather than replace, conventional approaches to health care. www.sanare.ca Tel: 604.727.4186

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Marija Djordjevic #103-853 Richards St. Vancouver

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

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125

3”H x 2 ¼”W OR 2”H x 3 ½”W

INSIDE POSITIONS

*The more ads you book, the more you save. Prices shown are cost per ad/per edition.

Not-for-profit rates Ad size | position

1

All ads are black ink only, except back cover

Ad price per number of editions* 1 2-3 4

Dimensions Other sizes and orientations may be accommodated

COVER POSITIONS Outside back cover feature | Full colour

1100

900

750

5 ¾”H x 7”W

Front or back inside cover

550

400

300

9 ¼”H x 7”W

Full page

400

300

250

8 ½”H x 7”W

1/2 page

225

175

125

4”H x 7”W OR 8 ½”H x 3 ¼”W

1/4 page

125

100

75

4”H x 4 ½”W OR 8”H x 2 ¼”W

1/8 page

75

60

50

3”H x 2 ¼”W OR 2”H x 3 ½”W

INSIDE POSITIONS

*The more ads you book, the more you save. Prices shown are cost per ad/per edition.

BC Coalition of People with Disabilities | Transition

page 25

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FALL/WINTER 2011


Disabilities and the Digital Divide  

What are the pros and cons of technology for people with disabilities?