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27/02/2017

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The Spirit of Ireland

Vol 2, Issue 1 • Spring / Summer 2017 • $4.95

Marks of Heritage

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Markedly Personal

Top Travel Tips

Every line has a meaning and each mark etched into our precious metal creates another part of the story - your story. Ogham, an ancient Celtic language, follows it’s own set of rules - reading from bottom to top, this Celtic Alphabet can be custom made to create names that mean the most to you, giving your loved one a truly uniquely crafted piece of jewelry which will become a talking point for years to come....

ARTS & CRAFTS

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Vol 2, Issue 1 • Spring / Summer 2017

TM

DO DUBLIN

Galway

GASTRONOMY 02

In Association with

The North American Celtic Trade Association

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74470 26857

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time to

Explore...

Give your family an unforgettable experience at The K Club This five star resort is nestled amidst 550 acres of lush Irish countryside in the heart of Ireland’s Ancient East yet is only 30 minutes from Dublin International Airport.

one of Ireland’s hidden treasures

The K Club is ideally located for those who wish to explore the wonders of Ireland but also offers a selection of on-site experiences, including falconry, fishing, horse riding through the Irish countryside and championship golf.

• Three daily sailings to all three Aran Islands

Offering a range of family friendly accommodation including interconnecting family rooms and two-bedroom suites, The K Club is guaranteed to have the perfect option for your family.

• Bicycles, jaunting cars and mini-buses available for hire • Explore traditional Irish heritage and stunning scenery

your discovery starts here

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For more information call +353 (0) 1 601 7200 or email sales@kclub.ie

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Spectacularly beautiful,


whatever the weather!


Arts & Crafts | ???

Welcome

Inbound tourism is at record levels in Ireland, with more than 9.5 million visitors last year. If you look at this as a head for head figure per capita, that’s two tourists for every resident living on this island.

EDITOR

Trish Phelan trish@devlinmedia.org

MANAGING DIRECTOR John Hogan

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Tommy Quinn

PRODUCTION MANAGER Joanne Punch

SALES

Dermot Kelly, Paul Halley, Linda Hickey, Eamonn McGabhann

DISTRIBUTION

North American Celtic Trade Association Celtic Marketplace Tourism Ireland Barnes & Noble

PHOTOGRAPHY

Tourism Ireland 345 Park Ave, 17th Floor New York, NY 10154 www.ireland.com

The strong dollar to euro rate and our great big friendly welcome is a factor, as is the recent announcement by Norweigan Air of flights to and from the USA for as little as $69 each way. Low cost carrier WOW are also getting in on the act, announcing a regular service from Cork and Dublin to Chicago from July of this year. So if you’ve been planning a visit to the Emerald Isle, now is the time to take the plunge. This is a bumper issue, yet even in 264 pages it’s impossible to capture the essence of this beautiful place in such a small space. Ireland is vast, varied and wild beyond imagination. We drop in on some special destinations and magical places that you really should make it your business to see, after all, life is for living and in Ireland the living is easy! There are tracks and trails all over the country but no matter which one you follow – and getting lost is often the best part - within sight and sound of the ocean or buried beneath dark hills, craft workers are busily at work as their fathers and forefathers would have done for centuries before. Making everything from harps to candles, Curragh’s to drystone walls, pottery to Irish lace, they echo a history of creativity and tradition. We talk to some special people who re-create the history of Ireland every day in their work, selling their wares both at home and abroad. And finally we drop in on some special friends in the USA & Canada who open their hearts and their doors to visitors, bringing a little piece of Ireland to their community every day. Enjoy!

Trish

Editor

Stefan Schnebelt www.stefanschnebelt.com www.irelandinpictures.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN One Little Studio www.onelittlestudio.com

JP DEVLIN USA

76 Ellsworth Rd, Hyannis 02601 MA, USA 4

Whilst every effort has been made to make the information contained herein as comprehensive and accurate as possible the publishers accept no responsibility for additions, omissions or errors. No part of this publication can be copied or produced without the editor’s consent in writing.


Spring / Summer | 2017

CONTENTS 9____ IRELAND CALLING You could spend years touring Ireland and still find surprises around every corner. The Emerald Isle is a landscape ‘cum dreamscape, so come on over and find out for yourself

12___ NORTHERN LIGHTS As sights go it’s hard to top Ireland’s Causeway Coast. Vast and spectacular, the incomparable beauty of the northerly route from Donegal to Downpatrick is a feast for the senses

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39___ GO WEST Spectacular cliff paths, lunar landscapes and craggy outcrops, the raw landscape and savage beauty of Ireland’s ‘wild west’ is untamed and magnificent

67___ GALWAY GASTRONOMY Having been awarded European Region of Gastronomy for 2018, the county prepares to deliver a fantasy for foodies and large helpings of fun

87___ LAND OF LAKES Ancient castles, mysterious pagan idols, a global Geopark and Europe’s oldest pub; there’s quite a journey to be had around Ireland’s Lakeland counties

110 117 155

WILD AT HEART

The Kerry and Cork section of the Wild Atlantic Way provides the perfect backdrop to the start or end of an Atlantic odyssey

133__ LADY LIMERICK A thriving city with a buzzing university vibe, Limerick is a slick, colorful city full of contrasts​

145__ CRYSTAL COUNTY Known the world over for its crystal, Waterford has much more to offer including the ideal location for a secluded castle wedding

155__ DO DUBLIN The landing place for most visitors, Dublin is more a town than a city, which is what makes it so much fun. Let us tell you how to ‘Do Dublin’

187__ MAGICAL MEATH More ancient than the Pyramids, Ireland’s most famous mythical site is where heritage and history unite

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247__ STORE STORIES Drop in to your local Irish store for a chat, a cup of tea and a copy of Spirit of Ireland magazine. We chat to some of the storeowners who bring Ireland to your door


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A rural retreat in the heart of Ireland... A rural retreat in the heart of Ireland...

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woodlands lakes, Leslie Estate one of the last great Irish estatesand stillglittering in the hands ofCastle its founding family.isSteeped in history, full Irish estates still in the hands of its founding family. Steeped in history, full of character and charm, it is the ultimate Irish rural escape. of character and charm, it is the ultimate Irish rural escape.

Only 80 minutes from Dublin and 60 minutes

Castle Leslie Estate offers an idyllic setting for

from 80 Belfast, Castle Leslie Estate a variety of Only minutes from Dublin andboasts 60 minutes accommodation andLeslie activities to suit all atastes. The from Belfast, Castle Estate boasts variety of

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Castle Leslie Estate, Glaslough, Monaghan t: + 353 47 88 100 www.castleleslie.com Castle Leslie Estate, Glaslough, Monaghan t: + 353 47 88 100 www.castleleslie.com


THE LAND

OF DREAMS SPRING IS WITH US AND YET ANOTHER INSPIRING VISTA PRESENTS ITSELF. IRELAND TRULY IS A LANDSCAPE ‘CUM DREAMSCAPE AT THIS TIME OF YEAR.

I

n fairness, the only other time the Emerald Isle sports such a picture-postcard exterior is between the start of the summer and the end of winter. This could well be the best time to visit Ireland but then again as the saying goes, ‘one man’s wine is another man’s vinegar.’ In this regard, Spirit of Ireland came across a steely couple from the city of Pittsburgh on a recent visit to Connemara. For us folk resident all year-round in Ireland, January can sometimes leave us feeling sourer than curdled cream. We reckon Mother Nature takes a bit of a breather in January after an 11-month stint of bringing flashbulb iridescence to the country. But for Mike and Sandy Besserfield, January represents a whole different ball game. Every fourth year, they explained, they visit the west of Ireland in the winter to ingest the crisp, clean air. Michael Jackson might have had his oxygen chamber, but for Mike and Sandy, there’s nothing quite like a good blast of fresh air in the west of Ireland.

Mike's cut-off denims and Sandy's t-shirt cut a dash and had all the watching sheep goggle-eyed. They waxed lyrical on the joys of wintering in Ireland. ” It even beats watching the Steelers”, Mike enthused. The thing is, spring is very much the operative word in Ireland irrespective of the season. People here tend to walk with a spring in their step from January to December. It’s as if they’re walking on sunshine no matter what the weather, with an insatiable appetite for the craic, the freude and the bon homie. Joy in the heart seems to be encoded in the DNA of Irish people. Consistently voted as the friendliest people in the world with Condé Nast Traveler ranking Dublin and Galway among the top six friendliest cities in the entire world! Sure it’s no wonder there’d be a spring in your step. They say you can tell someone is racy of the ‘auld sod’ by their gimp or, as they say in the vernacular, their gait. And it is true, the Irish are walking tall.


LAND OF DREAMS

After a period when the economic recession had us all a bit hunched up, the Irish can again look the world squarely in the eye. But don’t just take our word for it. The latest Nielsen Global Survey of Consumer Confidence and Spending Intentions states that, at the end of 2016, consumer confidence in Ireland was at its highest level since the recession, making the Republic now the sixth most confident country in Europe. So Ireland is a confident nation. And people like to mix with confident people. Is that another reason why 2016 tourism figures reported a massive 30% increase in North American visitors to Ireland? Tourism is the island's largest indigenous industry; responsible for in excess of 4% of GNP in the Republic of Ireland and employing approximately 200,000 people. Our friends and family in the USA and Canada are our blue-chip investors in Tourism Ireland. In 2016, we gave a mighty Fáilte to a record 1.6 million North American visitors to the island of Ireland, an increase of 18.3% on the same period in 2015. In overall terms, last year was a record-breaking year for Tourism in Ireland, with almost nine million visits taking place in the first 11 months of the year. Bearing in mind that the population of the Irish republic is just under five million, that’s a whopping two to one ratio of visitors to residents! There were 8,919,700 million visits to Ireland up to the end of November 2016, an 11% increase compared to the same period in 2015. Among tourism chiefs in Ireland, the declared aim is to grow overseas tourism revenue this year by 4.5%, to €5.7 billion,

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LAND OF DREAMS

for the island of Ireland. And with our crystal ball in hand, Ireland is seriously well-geared to capture an even bigger slice of the world tourism market going forward. Things are already shaping up very nicely on that front as 2017 gathers momentum. More airline seats than ever before are on offer from the US and the strong dollar means it’s really a no-brainer when it comes to choosing Ireland as a holiday destination. No wonder Tourism Ireland is confidently predicting a +6% increase in visitor numbers and +9% increase in revenue from North America this year. To that end, at the beginning of the year, a delegation of 17 tourism companies from Ireland and the United States undertook a busy schedule of travelling to the major cities in the States, showcasing the island of Ireland via a 60-minute TV show format and engaging in networking sessions with travel and lifestyle journalists. The schedule coincided with the announcement by Norwegian of new flights to the island of Ireland from New York (Stewart International Airport) and Providence (Rhode Island), which means that the total number of transatlantic airline seats in the summer of 2017 will be 60,000 from 20 North American gateways to the island of Ireland. That’s 10,000 additional seats (+20%) compared to the summer of 2016. But maybe you’ve already been to Ireland? Okay, but, like the iceberg that sank the Titanic, remember that two-thirds of it is hidden. Perhaps, you’re one of the unlucky ones and have never been to Ireland. Well, then come to your senses and give all five of them the holiday of their lives with a visit

to one of the most unique places ever invented. Ireland truly is a land of beauty and artistry. It drips with honors. The WAVE (Western Agents Vote of Excellence) awards are presented annually to recognize the most outstanding destinations, tour operators, travel agents, airlines and cruise companies. Recently, Ireland was voted the “destination with the highest client satisfaction” at the WAVE awards in the US, beating off strong competition in the same category from other destinations including Britain, France, Italy and Greece. Survey after survey tell us that that satisfaction with Ireland among departing American visitors is extremely high, especially in relation to our ‘friendly, hospitable people’, the ‘easy, relaxed pace of life’, our ‘beautiful scenery’ and ‘natural, unspoilt environment’. And what about the issues of safety? Or the absolute convenience and value? What about our traditional and contemporary cultural and historical heritage? Our nature, wildlife and flora? How much can you take in? How big is our lexicon of superlatives? Why come to Ireland? Because Ireland has it all. From the haunting beauty of the pure, unspoiled landscapes and the drama of the coastline, to the urban buzz of the country's dynamic cities mixed with the magic of thousands of years' worth of culture and history, Ireland is a country that never fails to surprise.

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Northern Ireland | CAUSEWAY COAST & GLENS

Captivated by

THE CAUSEWAY COASTAL ROUTE THE CAUSEWAY COASTAL ROUTE IS RATED AS ONE OF THE TOP FIVE ROAD TRIPS WORLDWIDE AND WHEN YOU DRIVE IT, YOU’LL SEE WHY.

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@storytravelers

Northern Ireland | CAUSEWAY COAST & GLENS

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Northern Ireland | CAUSEWAY COAST & GLENS

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t’s an ever changing tapestry of scenery and colors, set against a dramatic coastal backdrop that will take your breath away.

Every year local holiday makers join tourists from all over the world as they flock to the Causeway Coast and Glens. Not only does the area offer spectacular landscapes, but there is so much to see and do in the area. As well as being a natural adventure playground with long sandy beaches, inland waterways, endless walking and cycling trails, the area has developed into a prime destination for families to come and enjoy fun activities. Dotted along the spectacular Causeway Coastal Route are many of Northern Ireland’s most beautiful coastal towns and villages, where many activity providers offer endless opportunities for family fun and new experiences. Whether you are the adventurous type or not, the Causeway will lure you out of your comfort zone and get you enjoying new thrills, be it kayaking, canoeing, surfing, abseiling, or zip-lining - you will find it impossible not to take up one of the many opportunities designed to unleash your wild side.

You’ll need plenty of time to search the wide variety of accommodation on offer here, there is everything from luxurious hotels and guesthouses, first class bed and breakfast homes, self-catering cottages, hostels, caravans and camping. You can’t visit the Causeway Coast and Glens without including a few “must see” attractions. Top of the list has to be Northern Ireland’s most famous tourist attraction - the UNESCO World Heritage Site Giant’s Causeway. Renowned for its polygonal columns of layered basalt, it is the only UNESCO World Heritage Site in Northern Ireland. The result of a volcanic eruption 60 million years ago, the Giant’s Causeway is the focal point of the designated ‘Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’ and has attracted visitors for centuries. No matter how many times you visit, the natural beauty of the Causeway never ceases to take your breath away and the legends and history surrounding it capture the imagination of old and young alike. The Giant’s Causeway Visitor Center is full of interactive spaces to keep young ones amused while learning the history of the area. The grass roof in the center offers 360 degree views of the causeway coastline and inside, kids can watch the mythical Finn McCool on the big screen, unlocking the secrets of this inspirational landscape. A short drive from the Giant’s Causeway is the famous Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. The geology, flora and fauna have won Carrick-a-Rede recognition as an area of special scientific interest. Fulmars, kittywakes, guillemots and razorbills breed on the islands close to the rope bridge that boasts an exhilarating experience for those brave enough to cross. Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede Island over a 23m deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Once you reach Carrick Island, the reward is seeing the diverse birdlife and an uninterrupted view across to Rathlin Island and Scotland. There is only one way off the island - back across the swinging bridge – just don’t look down! As you drive along this part of the coast you can’t miss the iconic ruin of Dunluce Castle. First built on the dramatic coastal cliffs of north County Antrim by the MacQuillan family around 1500, it was seized by the ambitious MacDonnell clan in the 1550s, who set about stamping their mark on the castle under the leadership of the famous warrior chieftain Sorley Boy MacDonnell. In the 17th century Dunluce was the seat of the earls of County Antrim and saw the establishment of a small town in 1608. Visitors can explore the findings of archaeological digs within the cobbled streets and stone merchants’ houses of the long-abandoned Dunluce Town. Another must see is Mussenden Temple, located further along the coast in the beautiful surroundings of Downhill Demesne. It perches dramatically on a 120-foot cliff top, high above the Atlantic Ocean on the north-western coast of Northern Ireland, offering spectacular views westwards over Downhill Strand

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Northern Ireland | CAUSEWAY COAST & GLENS

Beach life is a big part of your trip to the Causeway and there are lots of new experiences awaiting you along the shoreline.

towards Magilligan Point and County Donegal, and to the east, Castlerock beach towards Portstewart, Portrush and Fair Head. The historic landmark was built in 1785 as a summer library with the architecture inspired by the Temple of Vesta in Tivoli, near Rome. Both the Temple and the surrounding views are among the most photographed scenes in Ireland. Another top attraction on the coast is Ireland’s oldest working distillery, the Old Bushmills Distillery. The original grant to distil was signed in 1608 by King James 1st and there has been distillation on this site ever since. If you fancy getting a bit more active, then don’t miss a trip to the scenic and tranquil Roe Valley Country Park on the outskirts of Limavady. It offers spectacular riverside views and woodland walks along with opportunities for salmon and trout fishing, canoeing, rock climbing and orienteering. The River Roe plunges through spectacular gorges and its banks are clothed in mature woodland. No visit to the area is complete without seeing the beauty of Glenariff Forest Park – the unique Waterfall Walkway, opened 80 years ago, has been significantly upgraded along its three-mile length which passes through a National Nature Reserve. Three waterfalls provide a rich backdrop for photographers, as do the other forest trails that offer panoramic landscapes and peaceful riverside walks. Beach life is a big part of your trip to the Causeway and there are lots of new experiences awaiting you along the shoreline. The area offers many water based activities helping you to make the most of your time enjoying the stunning sandy beaches and natural inland waterways. The area boasts some of the best surf in the world, making it a great place for surfing the

waves. Feel the thrill of riding the wave for the first time or get some tips from the professionals. You can also try a dive with excursions to Rathlin Islands, sea safaris and bird watching trips in this area well known for its beautiful scenery and marine wildlife. If you have just booked a short stay and want to take in as much of the beauty of the local area as possible, you can book one of the many local tours. Day trips are available around some world famous sites or a multi-day tour takes in the stunning scenery, attractions and activities, fueled by delicious local food and drink served up with a traditional warm welcome. You can book an organized tour, a bespoke private tour, or a self-guided tour and discover the unique charm of the Causeway Coast and Glens. One to look out for is a Game of Thrones® sightseeing trip where you get a unique ocean perspective of many of the stunning locations where this popular fantasy series was filmed. Much of the food served in the Causeway Coast and Glens will have been raised, caught and grown locally. Traditional recipes are very much to the fore, but expect the resident accomplished chefs to serve up their own contemporary twists. Many restaurants specialize in seafood harvested from the local waters. Local lamb, beef, pork and poultry is amongst the best anywhere, and is featured on most menus. The 120-mile Causeway Coast Route is undoubtedly an area of magnificent contrasts, recognized internationally as ‘One of the World’s Great Road Journeys’ it is well worth a visit for a day, a week or longer. For more information and ideas on how best to enjoy this spectacular destination go to. www.visitcausewaycoastandglens.com

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Northern Ireland | CAUSEWAY COAST & GLENS

Top of the ‘must see’ list has to be Northern Ireland’s most famous tourist attraction - the UNESCO World Heritage Site Giant’s Causeway. Renowned for its polygonal columns of layered basalt, it is the only UNESCO World Heritage Site in Northern Ireland.

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majestic majestic

† 2. The definition of † 2.

[adjective] ma•jes•tic describing the breathtaking beauty of the stunning castle ruins and the feeling you’ll experience as you take a walk in the footsteps of our ancestors at Dunluce Castle, Portrush, Northern Ireland.

[adjective] ma•jes•tic describing the breathtaking beauty of the stunning castle ruins and the feeling you’ll experience as you take a walk in the footsteps of our ancestors at Dunluce Castle, Portrush, Northern Ireland.

visitcausewaycoastandglens.com #VisitCauseway

visitcausewaycoastandglens.com


NORTHERN LIGHTS

VISIT

Saint Patrick’s Country

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NORTHERN LIGHTS

DOWNPATRICK, NORTHERN IRELAND IS THE HISTORIC COUNTY TOWN OF DOWN AND ONE OF IRELAND’S OLDEST TOWNS.

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he town is built on three drumlins and until very recently, almost entirely surrounded by water and marshes. This made it an excellent defensive site in prehistoric and medieval times.

Downpatrick has been known variously by Irish, Latin or English names – Dun, Dunum or Downe. The early medieval Irish name, Dun Lethglaise could mean ‘fort of the green-sided place’. It was John de Courcy and the Normans who added ‘Patrick’ to ‘Down’ to claim ownership of the saint. Patrick landed where the Slaney River flows into Strangford Lough (now one of the most important maritime sites in the world) in County Down. Clearly politically astute, as well as charismatic, Patrick knew the importance of making influential friends. His first conversion was Dichu, the local chieftain and brother of the High King of Ulster. In a barn donated by Dichu, Patrick preached his first sermon in Ireland. Today on this site at Saul (Sabhal, pronounced Saul, is the Irish for barn), stands a much-visited stone replica of an early church with a round tower. SAINT PATRICK’S TOWN The later seat of the High Kings of Ulster, burial site of the patron saint and medieval capital of County Down, Downpatrick is an essential stop for those who are interested in saints, scholars and Irish Christian heritage. Spend some time at The Saint Patrick Centre, a major multimedia exhibition and learn about Patrick’s life. Visit the ancient Down Cathedral beside Saint Patrick’s Grave and then walk down the historic Georgian Mall to Down County Museum which displays artefacts from Patrick’s time. Take a train ride on the only narrow gauge steam railway in Ireland through Saint Patrick’s Country with the Downpatrick & County Down Railway to Inch Abbey where many of the legends of Patrick were written down in Medieval times. You can visit the first church in Ireland at Saul and the Holy Wells at Struell with their healing waters, all within a mile of the town. Or you can climb nearby Slieve Patrick and see the largest statue of the Patron Saint in the world and trace his footsteps on Saint Patrick’s Trail to the River Slaney where he began his mission in Ireland. Whatever you choose to do you will be rewarded with this hidden world which is Saint Patrick’s town. DOWN CATHEDRAL AND SAINT PATRICK’S GRAVE Down Cathedral was built on the ancient hill of Down in the 12th Century and has become a place

of pilgrimage for 1,500 years. The massive granite stone marks Saint Patrick’s Grave and it is here that people from all traditions leave wreaths on the grave every March. DOWN COUNTY MUSEUM Situated in the Georgian County Gaol, Down County Museum holds an important collection of Early Christian objects and artefacts from Saint Patrick’s Country, including carved stone crosses. It also provides works of art, commemorative material and publications relating to the Patron Saint. Facilities include a shop, café and permanent exhibitions about the gaol and life in County Down, as well as regular temporary exhibitions. Also featured are commemorative items and sculptures of Saint Patrick showing his legacy in Down, for example, the ninth century Downpatrick High Cross is displayed in a new extension within the Museum. MOUND OF DOWN You can see one of the most important and dramatic early medieval Irish forts beside the River Quoile behind Down County Museum. It is the site of a motte for a timber castle, built by the Norman John De Courcy, who founded Inch Abbey on the other side of the river. THE SAINT PATRICK CENTRE Located in Downpatrick, this is the only permanent exhibition in the world dedicated to telling the story of Saint Patrick and includes an interactive exhibition and Imax presentation. The Center offers a cafe, art gallery, craft shop, terraced gardens and Visitor Information Centre. It is a must-see stop for visitors with an interest in Christian Ireland. Guided tours of Saint Patrick’s Country can be organised via the Center. Admission rates are available online, www. saintpatrickcentre.com DOWNPATRICK AND COUNTY DOWN RAILWAY This is the only full size heritage railway in Ireland, and from here you can travel by steam train to Inch Abbey, (the well preserved remains of a Cistercian monastery). You can also visit the museum to sit in the historic railway carriages, and learn more about what it was like on board a vintage railway train. The museum and steam train operate seasonally – prices and opening times are available online at www.downrail.co.uk INCH ABBEY Having destroyed the nearby Cistercian Abbey of Erenagh in 1177 on the grounds that it was fortified against him, John de Courcy rebuilt a monastery 19


NORTHERN LIGHTS

at Inch for this order as an act of atonement in the 1180s, inviting over Cistercians from Furness in Lancashire. It became the center of English influence in East Ulster. Attempting to impress the local populace, de Courcy commissioned one of these monks, called Jocelyn to write a life of Saint Patrick. SAUL CHURCH The first ecclesiastical site in Ireland was given to Patrick by the local ruler Díchu, one of his first converts when he landed at Inbher Slane (the Slaney River). The word Sabhall means barn in Irish and the site developed into a monastery which was restored by Saint Malachy around 1140. The two stone buildings beside the church, each with a stone roof, are from this period. The current Church and Round Tower were built in 1932 at the same time as the massive statue on nearby Slieve Patrick to commemorate 1,500 years since Patrick’s arrival in Ireland. STRUELL WELLS Among the first Holy Wells in Ireland, and blessed by Patrick when he arrived in Down, the Wells have attracted pilgrims since at least

the Middle Ages. Pilgrims have wandered down the secluded valley among the wells and have taken the waters which are claimed to have healing powers. The site also contains a ruined church and ancient Bath Houses which are unique in Ireland. HOME OF SAINT PATRICK FESTIVAL Saint Patrick the man and his achievement were the central inspiration for a 17-day long festival which began in March 2017 and encompassed three weekends. The number 17 was central to the 2017 Festival offering an additional 17 special events that fell into three themed weekends – including Pre-Christian: Myths & Legends on the first weekend (celebrating first peoples and first cultures); Spiritual Journeys on the second weekend (celebrating spiritual across the world – ancient and modern; and Contemporary Celebrations on the third weekend (a weekend of processions, traditional religious ceremonies and family entertainment). For further details about this annual Festival visit www.saintpatrickscountry. com/HomeofSaintPatrick Facebook & Twitter: @PatricksCountry #HomeofSaintPatrick

Saint Patrick’s Country Where history & heritage live www.saintpatrickscountry.com

Ag freastal ar an Dún agus Ard Mhacha Theas Serving Down and South Armagh

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THE SPIRIT OF

Northern Ireland NESTLED AMONG THE ROLLING DRUMLINS OF THE ARDS PENINSULA ON IRELAND’S NORTH EASTERN SEABOARD, THE ECHLINVILLE DISTILLERY IS A PLACE WHERE OLD MEETS NEW.

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here Irish whiskey heritage is revered and ancient distilling crafts have their place alongside innovation in the quest to produce the finest spirits.

The recently opened still-house stands proudly alongside the 200-year-old Echlinville Manor House, former seat of the Echlins, who were among the most influential families in 18th century Ireland. The Echlin family has moved on, but in their place another family are creating a new and exciting story. Echlinville laid down their first barrels of single malt and pot still whiskey in 2013. It came of age last year, but continues to slumber in oak in the distillery’s maturation hall. FIELD TO GLASS Echlinville is believed to be Ireland’s only field-toglass distillery, using only their own barley, grown in fields in the Ards Peninsula where rich soil, saline air and a mild micro-climate combine to create the perfect conditions for producing spirit with a distinctive character and flavour. Echlinville has revived the tradition of distillery floor malting – an age-old technique rarely used in

modern distilleries. They have also opted to depart from industry norms in their distilling process, by ‘trickle pot distilling’ - slowing down the stills to maximize the spirit’s contact with the copper. “The slower the distillation, the sweeter and better the spirit” explains Echlinville owner Shane Braniff, “it may not be the most cost-effective way to make whiskey, but we won’t compromise on quality.” It is the combination of age-old tradition and stateof-the-art innovation that make Echlinville’s spirits particularly special. THE ECHLINVILLE EXPERIENCE The Echlinville Distillery is proud to offer the opportunity for you, your family and friends to make your very own bespoke cask from a completely unique batch of whiskey. Take your spirit from barley to barrel under the expert guidance of your distiller, while staying in the glorious 19th century manor house. Choose your spirit from single malt or pot still. Mill the barley, lay down a fermentation and then distil. Get to grips with the science and art of distilling while crafting your whiskey to your own predilection and taste. Select from an array of casks to age and finish your spirit, and Echlinville will keep it under 21


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THE PATRON’S PROMISE The Echlinville Distillery is proud to offer you the opportunity to own a cask of their finest Irish whiskey. The Patron’s Promise Private Reserve Cask Offer sees the inaugural distillation of only 144 casks of Echlinville whiskey, crafted to each Patron’s exact requirements. This is a unique opportunity for collectors and connoisseurs to become a very special part of Echlinville’s already proud history. For more information, visit www.echlinville.com/ cask

their watchful eye while it ages to perfection. When it is ready, the family can also facilitate the design of your very own bottle and label. While visiting the distillery there is lots to see in and around the Ards Peninsula. Echlinville is just one hour from Belfast – one of Europe’s most fashionable and friendly cities; birthplace of the Titanic and a Lonely Planet ‘must see destination’. The distillery sits near the shores of Strangford Lough, a designated area of outstanding natural beauty, where St Patrick arrived in Ireland and built his first church. A short ferry journey across the lough lies Game of Thrones territory at Castle Ward – the filming location for ‘Winterfell’. This little corner of Ireland has much to offer. We are proud to be at the heart of it, and we invite you to join us. THE SPIRIT OF BELFAST Anyone who has enjoyed a dram at Belfast’s Harp Bar or The Duke of York – sanctuaries for whiskey lovers from around the world – will know of Dunville’s Whiskey and its place among the icons of Irish whiskey heritage. Dunville’s memorabilia adorns the walls of both establishments, mementos from this iconic Belfast brand’s heyday. Dunville’s was among the world’s best known whiskeys until Belfast’s Royal Irish Distillery fell silent in 1936. The Echlinville Distillery is now the proud custodian of this historic brand – The Spirit of Belfast – with three quality whiskeys, worthy of the Dunville’s name and reputation. Dunville’s PX 10-year old single malt has restored Dunville’s to its rightful place among the premier whiskeys of the world. It has just won its third World Whiskies Awards for Best Irish Single Malt 12 Years and Under – an unprecedented achievement. Together with Dunville’s Three Crowns, a premium

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vintage blend of superior aged whiskeys, and with Dunville’s Three Crowns Peated and an exceptional Rum Finish limited edition whiskey due for release this year, Dunville’s is bringing ‘The Spirit of Belfast’ to a new generation. Dunville’s Irish Whiskeys are available across the USA from totalwine.com FIELDS OF GOLD Gin lovers need look no further than at Echlinville Distillery who are proud to present Ireland’s first super premium single estate pot still gin. This Single Estate Irish Pot Still Gin is made with a unique barley neutral base spirit distilled from Echlinville’s homegrown malted barley. To distil your own neutral spirit is something of a rarity in the gin business, and sets Echlinville Gin apart from its competitors. Echlinville owner Shane Braniff believes few distilleries in the world can offer a gin of such provenance. He said: “The heart of gin may be juniper, but the soul of any spirit comes from its connection to the place where it is made. We are very proud of our roots in the Ards Peninsula, and that sense of place is the essence of our gin. Our own Echlinville barley, Strangford Lough seaweeds, indigenous whin bush petals and an array of hand-picked botanicals give our gin a true connection to the land and the sea.” From grain to glass, every stage of Echlnville Gin’s journey has been perfected at the distillery. The malt barley base neutral spirit gives Echlinville Gin balanced complexity, malt character and creamy mouthfeel that appeals to whiskey enthusiasts and gin devotees alike. It is as comfortable sipped neat as it is in the company of elderflower tonic and mint, its recommended serve. Echlinville Single Estate Irish Pot Still Gin will be available soon from totalwine.com www.echlinville.com


The Echlinville Experience. Stay and Distil in the heart of County Down.

Create own unique cask of Irish whiskey Take your spirit from barley to barrel under the expert guidance of our distiller while staying in our 19th century manor house.

The Echlinville Distillery is at the heart of Ireland’s whiskey renaissance. We invite you to be part of it.

www.eclinville.com T: 00 44 (0)28 4273 8597 E: info@echlinville.com @Echlinville The Echlinville Distillery


CORRAQUILL CRUISING HOLIDAYS

If you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of modern life, then a relaxing Dutch barge cruise on the Irish waterways is the answer. From the moment you step onto one of our traditional Dutch barges you enter a world of peace and tranquillity. Experience the sheer beauty of the countryside, villages and towns. Enjoy some of the world’s best pubs and restaurants where you will be treated to the finest food, drink and live entertainment. Famous Irish hospitality comes free!

FOR GENERAL ENQUIRIES AND WHERE TO FIND US:

Corraquill Cruising Holiday Corraquill Lock No. 1 Derrylin, BT9 T: + 44 2867748712

E: info@corraquill-cruising.com W: www.corraquill-cruising.com


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A COOL CRUISE

INLETS, LAKES AND BUBBLING RIVERS – FERMANAGH IS A WATER WONDERLAND.

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n fact, more than one-third of the county is under water, so there really is only one true way to experience the majestic surroundings.

A trip on one of Corraquill Cruising’s adorable Dutch Barges can take you the whole way down to Leitrim via the Shannon-Erne Waterway. This opened in 1994 and runs from Belturbet to Leitrim, a distance of some 63 kilometres. Corraquill Cruising is a small privately run business operating four traditionally built barges. While your barge may look all very ‘picture postcard,’ once on board you soon realize that you get all of the creature comforts you would expect to find in a regular vacation home, right down to a cozy wood burning stove! Everything you might need is on-board including fully equipped galleys, hot and cold running water, lounges and a full sized shower in the bathroom - in fact all of Corraquill Cruisers have full sized showers – an unexpected though welcome luxury! Also provided are all the tools you need to be a good captain, from navigational charts, mooring tools, to life jackets and of course binoculars to help you see those all-important navigational markers. There are several barge options depending on the size of your party. The smallest barge is called

‘Double Dutch’ – small but perfectly formed. Although it is the “smallest” boat in the fleet with capacity for 6 adults, in reality there is plenty of space. The ceiling height in the saloon is six foot and the boat is equipped with a full sized en-suite double bedroom in the back cabin, a double bed in the front cabin and a convertable double bed in the main galley area. There is even a solid fuel stove on board which makes a cosy addition if the nights start to get a little chilly. Or you might take a jaunt out in ‘Dutch Courage,’ an 8-berth barge with 2 double bedrooms at each end, 2 bunks in the middle of the vessel and a pull down double bed in the saloon area. Once all the paperwork is out of the way and you have done your instruction you will be taken out and given some instruction on how to steer and moor your barge. After 20 minutes or so of instruction, you will be captain of your own barge and then the fun begins. A whole new world of peace and tranquillity opens up in front of you. It’s hard to explain the sheer beauty of gliding past lush countryside, pretty villages and towns. Along the way you can stop off at out of the way pubs and restaurants where you will be treated to the finest food, drink and live entertainment. 25


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

A Dream Like Destination Few places in Ireland are more savagely beautiful than the republic’s most northern county, County Donegal. Carved by time and nature, the entire northern coastline is spectacularly beautiful. A largely Irish-speaking region bordering the Atlantic Ocean, Donegal is teeming with castles, rugged coastline, forests, lakes and bogland. It was voted number 1 on The National Geographic Traveler ‘cool list’ for 2017 due to its beautiful scenery and open, wilderness like landscape. 26


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

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Amelia’s Irish Design 29 Upper Main Street Letterkenny, Donegal

Handmade in Ireland with skill and passion

Tel. 087 2434060 /ameliasirishdesign

Mourne Antiques 38 Upper Main Street Letterkenny, Donegal

Antiques to collect and decorate

Precious Jewelry to treasure

Tel. 074 9126457 / mourneantiques


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

A SAVAGE Beauty FEW PLACES IN IRELAND ARE MORE RAW AND UNTAMED THAN THE WILDS OF DONEGAL AND THERE IS NO BETTER WAY TO ARRIVE HERE THAN TO DO SO BY AIR, LANDING AT ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST SCENIC AIRPORTS

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he majestic beauty of the Mount Errigal dominated landscape that embraces the approach and landing paths to Donegal Airport, to say nothing of sweeping in over miles of white sandy beaches, is the stuff that dreams are made of. Little wonder therefore that when PrivateFly - the private jet booking service - asked a panel of international travel experts and travel fans for their most scenic airport approaches, Donegal made the top 10, coming in at number 7. One voter described landing at Donegal as follows: “There’s nothing more breathtaking than flying over the rugged coastline of Donegal. Awe-inspiring to

say the least. The rugged landscape transports to a time long ago and much forgotten.” Another commented: “You arrive in the Emerald Isle adjacent to one of the most beautiful beaches in the world; Carrickfinn with a backdrop of the majestic Mount Errigal on one side and an array of craggy islands on the other. The clear turquoise blue sea is a bonus on a sunny day!” Donegal Airport is the most natural, dramatic and exciting access point to Donegal and to the Wild Atlantic Way whether you are headed south via Yeats county or north to Fanad Lighthouse, Malin Head (the film location for the new Star Wars movie) or on to the 29


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Causeway coast. In fact, in these parts you not only get to experience the majestic beauty of the Slieve League Cliffs or the wild wilderness of Malin Head, you might get to see the Northern Lights, otherwise known as Aurora Borealis. What makes Donegal such a great destination for viewing one of nature’s most breath-taking phenomena is its northerly location and the absence of light pollution. The Northern Lights, or the aurora borealis, are colorful displays in the sky formed from collisions of particles from the earth’s atmosphere and the sun, which cause the air particles to light up. Named after the Roman goddess of dawn, the Aurora occurs when highly-charged electrons from the solar wind collide with different atmospheric elements in the ring surrounding the North Pole. Like Donegal, it is pure and untamed and like the weather, predictably unpredictable, but when you do see the sky light up with color, it is a sight that will stay with you forever. Another heart stopping moment is to take a boat trip off Fanad Head or Slieve League (a jaw-dropping experience in its own right) where you get to see whales, dolphins, seals and porpoises in their natural habitat. You may even spot a shark! In 1991 the Irish government declared Irish waters a whale and dolphin sanctuary – the first of its kind in Europe – and the Donegal coastline is at the very heart of some of the best places to see these beautiful creatures. Getting to Donegal nowadays is easy; leaving is a real wrench. Stobart Air offer a twice daily service from Dublin with an average flight time of just 55 minutes. Operating under the Aer Lingus Regional brand, it gives International passengers access to Donegal through the Aer Lingus reservations website including a convenient check through service.

Tí Linn is a unique Café,serving artisan cuisine which marries Irish traditional and modern tastes, and is renowned for it’s home baking and coffee by Illy. The craft shop has a large selection of local and national crafts, knitware and gifts, with something for everyone from the discerning shopper to the passing tourists.

Win CIE Tou ner of rs “Gold A International ward 20 15” of Excellen ce and Best Vis it in all Ire land

paddyclarkebavin@gmail.com Guided Tours & Shuttle bus to the Cliffs

Winners of the National Heritage Award 2016 from CIE Tours International

Bunglass Road, Teelin, Co, Donegal Phone:(074) 973 9077 30

Another heart stopping moment is to take a boat trip off Fanad Head or Slieve League (a jawdropping experience in its own right) where you get to see whales, dolphins, seals and porpoises in their natural habitat.


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Whether you’re exploring these northern nooks and crannies in flowering springtime, blazing summer sunshine, cool, crisp autumn breezes or atmospheric wind-swept winters, you’re always in for an unforgettable treat.

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

33 KK0202 AL US Sprit of Ireland 87.5x245.indd 1

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CEANN DE MHÓR THITHE SOLAIS NA HÉIREANN

ONE OF THE GREAT LIGHTHOUSES OF IRELAND

Visitlearn the historic building, learn Visit thethe historic building, about the science Visit historic building, learn Visit the historic building, learn aboutabout the science of lighthouses, of about lighthouses, hear stories lightkeepers the science of lighthouses, hear stories about lightkeepers theby, science of for lighthouses, in about days gone and, not the fainthearted, in days gone by, and, not for the hear stories about lightkeepers hear about lightkeepers climb tostories the top of the tower for spectacular views fainthearted, climb to the top of the days for tower not for spectacular in days gone by, and, and, not for the theviews of land of in land andgone sea. by, andto fainthearted, fainthearted, climb climb tosea.the the top top of of the the Ortower recreate the past and stay in a Lightkeepers for spectacular views of land Or recreate theof pastland and stay in a tower for spectacular views houses in this unique and unspoiled Gaeltacht Lightkeepers houses in this unique and sea. and sea. and unspoiled Gaeltacht (Irish

(Irish speaking) area. Our refurbished houses are speaking) area. Our refurbished each named after another lighthouse visible from houses are each in named after Or recreate the past and stay a Or recreate the past and stay in a it, Toraigh, Inis Trá Tholl aguslighthouse Dún Riabhaigh. another visible from it,

Lightkeepers in unique Toraigh, Inis Trá Tholl agus Dún Lightkeepers houses houses in this this unique Riabhaigh. and unspoiled Gaeltacht (Irish and unspoiled Gaeltacht (Irish Further details: www.fanadlighthouse.com speaking) area. Our refurbished Further details: www.fanadlighthouse.com speaking) area. Our refurbished info@fanadlighthouse.com 00 353 83 8091199. houses are each named after info@fanadlighthouse.com 00 353 83 8091199. houses are each named after another another lighthouse lighthouse visible visible from from it, it, Toraigh, Inis Trá Tholl agus Dún Toraigh, Inis Trá Tholl agus Dún Riabhaigh. Riabhaigh.

Dunree View

Dunree Dunree View View

Tory View


NORTHERN LIGHTS

SEE THE LIGHT

in Fanad

SITUATED IN NORTH DONEGAL, THE FANAD PENINSULA WITH ITS RUGGED ATLANTIC COASTLINE, SECLUDED BEACHES, UNSPOILED LANDSCAPE AND VIBRANT LOCAL CULTURE IS ONE OF THE GREAT SECRETS OF THE COUNTY.

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t the tip of the peninsula, Fanad Head or Cionn Fhánada as it is locally known in Irish, is the location for one of the most beautiful lighthouses in the world and in 2016, it opened to the public to visit and to stay in, for the first time in its 199-year history! Fanad lighthouse stands at the point where the deep Lough Swilly fjord meets the Atlantic Ocean. It was first lit on St Patrick’s day, 1817, built as a consequence of the sinking of HMS Saldahna, a British naval vessel scuppered on adjacent rocks in 1811 with the loss of 254 lives. Today, it is still a working lighthouse, providing the same steadfast service to all vessels at sea. The light is now fully automated however, the light-keepers have left and their homes have been renovated to provide luxury accommodation for anyone wishing to break away for a time. The three self-catering cottages boast no wi-fi and a very unreliable phone signal! Otherwise every modern comfort is supplied to ensure you have the ultimate getaway. Perched on the edge of the ocean, you are ideally placed to watch the sunset and the sunrise. The Aurora Borealis is visible from here and on any clear night and visitors will be spellbound by the stars in the night sky. Daily guided tours allow visitors to experience the life of the light-keeper for themselves, to hear about the history of the lighthouse, some of the tragedies in the surrounding sea, to view the spectacular scenery and to learn about the new technology that watches our coastline today. Climb the 79 granite steps to the top of the tower and take in the panoramic views. There are three other lighthouses to see from here and you might very well see dolphins or other cetaceans passing by! Staying here, you might forget about the great amenities on your doorstep however you are ideally positioned between two of Donegal’s best golf links courses, Portsalon and Rosapenna. Sea-kayaking, surfing, angling and hill walking are all available in the area. Get the tastes of Donegal in local restaurants and did we mention the local pub is just a 10-minute walk away? The lighthouse is in a Gaeltacht or Irish speaking area and the Irish language is very much alive here. Fanad lighthouse is one of the Great Lighthouses of Ireland, one of 12 lighthouses around the coast of Ireland now open to the public. It is run as a community not-for-profit for the sustainable development of the area. www.fanadlighthouse.com

www.greatlighthouses.com 35


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Go West The west of Ireland has long been a magnet for writers, artists, playwrights and musicians – all inspired by the soft light, the gentle mists and almost ethereal scenery; prepare to be enchanted.

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At the Heart of the Wild Atlantic Way

WWW.FALLSHOTEL.IE | Tel: 065 7071004 | e-mail: reservations@fallshotel.ie

Carrygerry Country House, near Newmarket-on-Fergus and just minutes away from Shannon is a 200 year old Manor tastefully restored to its former glory, set in an idyllic mature country setting. On arrival you will experience a relaxed and unique country house atmosphere with open fires and antique furniture. There are 11 bedrooms, all individually styled in keeping with the house.

Our Conservatory Restaurant is open for Dinner from Tuesday to Saturday from 6.30pm to 9.30pm. Our A’la Carte Menu offers, fresh locally sourced produce and a complete well balanced menu. Set Dinner Menu for ₏29.00 is served from 6.30pm to 9.30pm Tuesday-Saturday (3 Courses plus Tea/Coffee)

We cater for Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings, Christenings, etc, for enquiries call 061 360500 or email: info@carrygerryhouse.com | www.carrygerryhouse.com


GO WEST | CONNEMARA

THE CONNEMARA

TRAIL

THE CONNEMARA PENINSULA IS ENDLESSLY INSPIRING WITH A RICH TROVE OF SUBLIME SCENERY.

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on na mara means ‘inlets of the sea’ and the coastal roads certainly bear this out as they twist around small bays and coves, many with hidden beaches. The interior by contrast is a mixture of rusty bogs, lonely valleys and shimmering lakes. At its heart are the Maumturk Mountains and the peaks of the Twelve Bens mountains with a network of scenic walking and biking trails. Everywhere the land is laced with classic stone walls and the soft tones of Gaelic are spoken, as this is one of Ireland’s Gaeltacht (Irish speaking) areas. No visit to Connemara is complete without visiting the majestic Inagh Valley. Traveling past Ballynahinch Lough to your right, you will see the

ruins of the ‘castle on the lake’ which once served as a prison to those who ill-treated animals. ‘Humanity Dick’ Martin would treat the offenders to a stay on the island – ball and chain included. He ultimately founded what we know now as the RSPCA. Be sure to stop off in Recess while you’re there and visit Joyce’s Craft Shop where you can buy some beautiful Connemara marble keepsakes. Turn back towards Clifden and after about 500 metres turn right onto the R344, which takes you through the Inagh Valley. Meandering past Lough Inagh, the Twelve Bens are to the left, with the Maum Turk mountain range to the right. This is a stunningly beautiful scenic route, taking you past

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GO WEST | CONNEMARA

turf stacks, sheep and glorious countryside until you emerge at the other end of the valley. Here you can turn left to return to Clifden and visit Kylemore Abbey on the way, the monastic home of the Benedictine Order of nuns. While there you can visit the visitor centre, pottery studio, craft & retail store and restaurant. It’s a beautiful castle structure with a love story behind it and set in the most romantic location. From there you can enjoy the Connemara National Park which is situated near Letterfrack and covers some 2,000 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths and grasslands. Some of the park’s mountains are part of the famous Twelve Bens range. Attractions include exhibitions, nature trails, red deer and Connemara ponies. At Cleggan you can take the ferry out to Inishbofen Island which you can explore on foot or hire bicycles. Cleggan is also famous for its beaches and for horse-riding where you can trot for miles along the golden sands. Make sure to visit the pretty town of Clifden along your way; a vibrant and cosmopolitan village on the very edge of Europe. Being Connemara’s largest town, it is often referred to as the capital of Connemara, and it might be the prettiest ‘capital’ of all, nestled amidst breathtaking mountain scenery and beautiful rugged coastline. If you fancy a stop-over, the Station House Museum is a great accommodation and dining base. Clifden has several venues for traditional Irish music. Here too you can visit the ruins of Gothic Clifden Castle.

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After Clifden take the R341 via Ballyconneely where you can visit the Connemara Smoke House which specialize in smoked salmon and tuna. On the Smokehouse Tour, you can watch how they fillet and traditionally prepare the salmon, then hand-slice and pack the finished product and enjoy a tasting of the fantastic Smoked Salmon. CONNEMARA MARBLE Connemara is bounded on three sides by the Atlantic Ocean and encompasses a wide variety of natural and semi-natural habitats, reflecting its great geomorphologic and geological complexity. Among the more unusual are extensive deposits of soapstone and veins of green marble and vivid white quartz. Connemara Marble is famous the world over. It is a serpentine-rich rock, popular as a decorative facing stone and used by craftsmen to fashion all manner of household items. With its ‘forty shades of green’ and its wild patterns, it represents perfectly the landscapes of the Emerald Isle. If you want to see it in its raw stage, stop by the Joyce family who own a marble quarry in Recess. Their factory is based in the village, on the N59 between Clifden and Galway where Joyce’s Craft Shop and Art Gallery can also be found. Connemara is one of nature’s natural playgrounds. You could spend all of your vacation here and still be left longing for more. This remarkably beautiful place will leave its indelible mark and it might just steal your heart.


GO WEST | CONNEMARA​

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GO WEST | CONNEMARA​

Clifden is a vibrant and cosmopolitan village on the very edge of Europe. Being Connemara’s largest town, it is often referred to as the capital of Connemara, and it might be the prettiest ‘capital’ of all, nestled amidst breathtaking mountain scenery and beautiful rugged coastline.

On a crossroads overlooked by the Connemara National Park, Letterfrack is renowned for its live traditional Irish music. Each year Bog Week (Summer) and Sea Week (late Autumn) attracts musicians from all over for music, hillwalking and craic. 42


B:8.625” T:8” S:7.25”

In Ireland we live in the now. So don’t worry about tomorrow. Enjoy today’s stroll among Dublin’s landmarks, the stories that unfold on the Guinness Storehouse tour, or the enchantments of Ireland’s countryside. The unanticipated, the poetic and the astonishing, they’re all in the now. Come and share the now with us. Visit Ireland.com

B:11.0625” T:10.5” S:9.75”

JUMP INTO THE NOW. WE’LL KEEP A SEAT FREE FOR YOU.


CONNEMARA| KYLEMORE ABBEY

AN ENDURING Love PERHAPS ONE OF IRELAND’S MOST ICONIC BUILDINGS, THE ROMANTIC HISTORY OF KYLEMORE ABBEY IS AN ENDURING LOVE STORY

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CONNEMARA| KYLEMORE ABBEY

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oday the castle is known as Kylemore Abbey and its romantic setting and story draws visitors from around the world. On the 4th of September 1867 the first stone was laid, which began the construction of Kylemore Castle. It was built by a wealthy Englishman, Mitchell Henry, who spent his honeymoon in Connemara. A decorative trowel which was used in the stone laying ceremony was presented to Margaret Henry, a tribute indicating that the castle would be built for her with every element planned for her delight and comfort.

As you enter the front door of Kylemore Abbey you cannot help but notice the beautiful carved angel which guards over it. In the hands of that angel is the coat of arms of Margaret Henry’s birth family, the Vaughan’s of County Down. Margaret’s arms over the front door proudly proclaim this as her castle. Mitchell hoped that Kylemore Castle would become the ‘nesting place’ of his family, a luxurious retreat in an idyllic landscape that would feature all the innovations of the Victorian age. Mitchell Henry was by profession a talented doctor and surgeon. He inherited a vast fortune from his father who had established a successful business empire in

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CONNEMARA| KYLEMORE ABBEY

Manchester, England. With this fortune he bought the 15,000 acre Kylemore estate and commenced work on Kylemore Castle as well as on another sumptuous abode for his family in London. At Kylemore Margaret, Mitchell and their large family revelled in the outdoor life of the ‘Connemara Highlands’. Margaret took on the role of the country lady and became much loved by the local tenants. The Henry’s were compassionate landlords who put great energy into improving the lot of their tenants. Mitchell became heavily involved in Irish politics and was an advocate for Irish Home Rule and social justice in Ireland. Sadly, this period of family contentment did not last long for the Henrys. In 1874, just a few years after the castle was completed, the family left Kylemore for a holiday in Egypt. Margaret fell ill while traveling and after two weeks of suffering she died. She was just 45 years

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old and left behind a family of nine children, including her youngest daughter, Violet, who was just two years old at the time. Margaret’s body was beautifully embalmed in Cairo before being returned to Kylemore. According to local lore, Margaret lay in a glass coffin which was placed beneath the grand staircase in the front hall, where family and tenants alike could come to pay their respects. Although Henry remained on at Kylemore after Margaret’s death, life there was never the same again. In 1878 work began on the neo-Gothic Church which was built as a beautiful and lasting testament of Henry’s love for his wife. When Henry died he was united with Margaret once more- their remains lay alongside one another in the little brick mausoleum nestled in the woods of the glorious Kylemore estate.


Come and see our beautiful 1,000 acre estate and 6 acre Victorian Walled Garden.

KYLEMORE ABBEY

& VICTORIAN WA L L E D G A R D E N

Restored Rooms in the Abbey • Gothic Church • History Talks and Guided Tours Woodland & Lakeshore Walks • Café & Tea House: Craft & Design Shop Pottery Studio • Artisan Chocolates • Handmade Gifts

Phone 353 (95) 52001 Web: www.kylemoreabbey.com Email: bookings@kylemoreabbey.com


Sail with us to the Aran Islands or Cruise under the Cliffs of Moher!

Welcome aboard!

Daily sailings to the Aran Islands from Doolin. March to October Visit the spectacular Dún Aengus fort on Inis Mor, get away from it all on Inis Meain or take a quick trip to the smallest one – the beautiful island of Inis Oirr. Cruise under the Cliffs of Moher while admiring the scale and majestic beauty of the Cliffs of Moher on our 1 hour voyage of discovery. Several departure options, 7 days per week, March to October. Pre-booking online recommended.

Tel: +353 65 707 5949 Email: info@doolin2aranferries.com www.doolin2aranferries.com


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DESTINATION

Doolin

DOOLIN IS THE QUINTESSENTIALLY PRETTY IRISH VILLAGE, WITH BRIGHTLY PAINTED HOUSES AND THE HUM OF TRADITIONAL MUSIC EMANATING FROM A TRIO OF PUBS THAT HAVE REGULAR SEISIÚNS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.

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t is also famed for its setting, being just 6km north of the Cliffs of Moher near the Atlantic ocean.

The area is hugely popular with music-seeking tourists and there are scores of good-value hostels and B&Bs in the area. It’s also a place to catch a boat out to the offshore islands of Aran or to see the Cliffs of Moher from an entirely different perspective. The Cliffs of Moher are probably Ireland’s most iconic sight yet a land view doesn’t quite give the same perspective as approaching this awesome rock formation from the sea. Doolin2Aran Ferries operate a one-hour cruise to the cliffs 3 times every day from mid-March through to end of October. This fabulous journey allows passengers to see for themselves the 8km continuous rocky wall, varying in height from 407 to 700 feet/ 124m to 214m, broken into the most fantastic forms and innumerable caves. There is audio commentary on board in several languages – and of course your on-board expert will regale you with a variety of local tales like the time our boat was used to film the sea cave scene in the Harry Potter movie.

A combination trip allows you to experience the Cliffs of Moher as well as visiting Inis Oírr (translates as “Eastern Island”) – and the closest island to the pretty town of Doolin. There are many attractions on the island – ancient castles, one of Ireland’s most beautiful beaches, a modern playground and several pubs and cafes. Take a pony and trap, hire a bicycle or walk the uncrowded, tiny roads. For a real escape to tranquillity, visit the middle island, Inis Meain. Alternatively, you might like to visit the ‘big’ island, Inis Mór – the largest of the three Aran Islands. Its most famous attraction is the cliff-edge fort, Dun Aengus. Inis Mór is the most visited island, with up to 2,000 visitors each day during the busy summer season. The island is a lively place at night, with great Irish music and dance shows. Kilronan, the main village, has several dining, shopping and accommodation options. It also has the only ATM on the islands (genuine off-shore banking!). Doolin2Aran Ferries can take you to any one of the islands for the day or you can opt to stay overnight and return the following day, sampling island life for yourself for a night or two in traditional style. www.doolin2aranferries.com

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i Sp

Re rit ad of I er rel s O and ffe r

One Destination

A LIFETIME EXPERIENCE

Best time to visit is after 4pm • To be sure of Entry

• Magical Sunsets

• Kids Go Free

• Great Photo Opportunities

• Less Crowded

• Open until 9pm in July & August

PRESENT THIS FLYER WHEN MAKING YOUR

€4.50 entry

PURCHASE TO RECEIVE A SPECIAL REDUCED ENTRY PRICE OF €4.50 FOR ADULT ADMISSION AFTER 4PM

*Valid for admission after 4pm only *Reduced price refers to full adult admission price only

Co. Clare, Ireland. T: +353 65 7086141

E: info@cliffsofmoher.ie www.cliffsofmoher.ie

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: This flyer is only valid at The Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience and must be presented on arrival to avail of discounts. Offer is valid against full adult admission rate only after 4pm and does not apply to any other rate category. Offer valid for each adult in the party. Offer not valid for tickets purchased online. Not valid in conjunction with any other offer or promotion. Will be invalid if reproduced, damaged or tampered with in any way. No cash value is offered in lieu. Offer available to Spirit of Ireland readers only. The Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience reserves the right to withdraw offer at any time. Promoted by The Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Burren and Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark


??? | CLIFFS FALLER

A GREAT

FALL LIKE MOST CHILDREN DOOLIN MAN PETER FITZPATRICK HAS HAD HIS SHARE OF FALLS, HOWEVER FEW CAN SAY THAT THEY FELL OFF THE CLIFFS OF MOHER AND LIVED TO TELL THE TALE!

“N

o one has ever survived falling from the Cliffs of Moher apart from me, so I do consider myself a very lucky guy. One day after school when I was 13, myself, my brother and one of our friends cycled over to the cliffs, where we wanted to go down to the beach on one of those goat paths. It took us about an hour to get half way, but then, as my brother explained, I slipped and fell about fifteen meters straight onto the rocks. I have no memory whatsoever of that day or the following two weeks. My brother got down to me and our friend ran all the way back up the cliff and out onto the road to stop a bus, and luckily there was a doctor from Australia on it who came straight to help. They brought down whatever they could to keep me warm, but it took another six hours to rescue me because of the fog, and the helicopter nor the boat could get close enough to the shore. When they realised it wouldn’t work, they sent someone to the three pubs in Doolin to get all the men they could find. They needed all the help possible to set up a tripod system to lift me back to the top. There were 40-50 people working to rescue me.

I fell at about 6pm and they rescued me only after midnight. I broke everything on my left side; my legs, my knees, my ribs and even my jaw and nose. Luckily my brain had no injuries. I was all wired up for two months, they kept me in a coma for two weeks, and I even had to learn how to walk again. It went into the news, and Tv3 actually reconstructed the whole story and made a short documentary about it. I was a well-known kid in Doolin. The helicopter pilot is retired now, but he decided to write a book, called Nine Lives, about his search and rescue experiences. He dedicated a whole chapter to me, as it was one of the biggest operations at that time. Since my case the Doolin rescue centre grew from a 20 by 20 foot shed and a boat, to one of best equipped rescue centres in the world. Without all these people I wouldn’t be here today, and I am so grateful for the work they do. Not just the people that day, but the coast guards all over Ireland who work so hard as volunteers and save so many lives.” This and many other fascinating real life stories are told in Varga’s book, Humans of Dublin. 51


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A WHOLE

NEW LIGHT THERE ARE FEW PLACES THAT SURPASS THE BREATH-TAKING CLIFFS OF MOHER ON THE WEST COAST OF IRELAND

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t 214 meters (702 feet) tall and stretching for 8 kilometres (5 miles), they are a sight to behold. Feel the chills run down your spine as you realize that besides the nearby Aran Islands, the next-closest land mass is America. For those of you who have never been here before there are simply no words to describe the feeling or the sight when you first encounter the mighty Cliffs of Moher. As you walk along the trail with the cliffs coming into view, a strange thing happens. The white noise and the worries of everyday life simply disappear. Your stomach will plummet in sheer awe; your breath will catch in your throat. Its like staring into the sky on the clearest of nights, when stars fill your vision and you realise how vast the universe is - you feel small and insignificant yet somehow totally at one with the world. That’s the effect the cliffs will have on you. They are so vast and so beautiful; you cannot help but feel overwhelmed. Even if they are hidden in the mist falls of the Atlantic, the sheer rock of black shales and sandstone harboring nests of screeching seabirds are picture postcard perfect. It’s an awesome experience to be sure, but like most things, planning is everything. Would you visit a

theme park in the middle of the day? Probably not if you could help it; well the same logic applies here. Yes, you still get to experience the magnificence of the cliffs no matter what time you go, but like the theme parks, go early or go late when you have the place to yourself and you get to enjoy it all a whole lot more. The whole ‘far from the maddening crowd’ vibe really applies and besides, the vistas at dawn and dusk out on the edge of the world are beyond imagination. To watch the sun creep up or go down behind the cliffs while listening to the absolute silence, is like an out of body experience. As the orange and pink sunset bathes the cliffs in an ethereal light, the show adds a whole new dimension to this iconic spectacle. So put the Cliffs of Moher on your visitors list or bucket list for sure. But plan ahead. Arrive a couple hours before the visitor’s experience closes, learn about the cliffs and their history, then wander about at your leisure to enjoy the beautiful views or head over at the crack of dawn when the bird chorus and fresh air will put an appetite on you for hearty breakfast after you watch the dawning of the day at the one and only Cliffs of Moher.

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??? | ARAN ISLAND FERRIES

ISLAND LIFE

A VISIT TO THE WEST COAST OF IRELAND WOULD NOT BE COMPLETE WITHOUT CHECKING OUT THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS OF ISLAND LIFE.

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ocated just 10 nautical miles from shore, the Aran Islands are a haven for flora and wildlife, and a bastion of traditional Irish history, culture and heritage. Inis Mór, the largest island, boosts over 50 historical attractions including several well preserved forts, the Seven Churches, Arkin Castle, and an extensive labyrinth of Celtic dry stone walls that traverse the entire island. Dún Aonaghasa, the most famous of the many prehistoric forts on the island, stands spectacularly on top of the sea Cliffs overlooking the Atlantic since 1100BC. Located close to Dún Aonghasa, is the beautiful village of Kilmurvey, speckled with many little craft shops selling the products of local artists inspired by the Celtic traditions of the island. Visitors to Inis Mór can also relax on blue-flag beaches, and enjoy a number of walking and cycling routes around the island. The main village on the island is the picturesque Kilronan, which has a wide selection of restaurants serving high quality local produce, traditional Irish bars and a variety of accommodation from Hotel to the new Glamping Pods. Inis Meáin, the most traditional of the three Islands, was a retreat for Irish playwright, John Millington Synge, and a small museum is now located in the cottage where he resided on the Island. The island has managed to maintains this very relaxed traditional way of life and many visit this island to truly escape

the hustle and bustle of modern life. In addition to a trip to Synge’s Cottage, and the islands forts, visitors can enjoy sandy beaches and breath-taking scenery at a leisurely pace. Inis Oírr is the smallest of the Aran Islands and is home to numerous historical attractions, including the much photographed wreck of former cargo ship ‘Plassey’, which ran onto rocks on 8th March 1960. At just three square km in size, and with very little traffic, Inis Oírr is walker’s paradise. The main village on Inis Oírr lies beside a beautiful beach in the shadow of O’Brien Castle perched on top the hill above it, a particularly stunning site at sun set Based in Ros a Mhil, County Galway, Aran Island Ferries are a family run company offering daily sailings to Inis Mór, Inis Meáin and Inis Oír with an average journey time of 45 mins. Operating a fleet of state-of-the-art vessels, Aran Island Ferries offer passengers maximum comfort with minimum journey times and excellent amenities such as full bar service on board. Our team work closely with our customers to offer a range of bespoke package deals throughout the year in association with businesses on the islands. www.aranislandferries.com 55


LAND OF DREAMS

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LAND OF DREAMS

The Wormhole Dun Aengus is breathtaking, no question about it, but there’s so much more to see on Inis Mor besides visiting the famous fortress. Off the beaten path but worth the effort is The Wormhole, Poll na bPéist. It is a striking natural rock formation just west of Gort na gCapall, the only village on the southern coast of the island. The “péist” is the reptilian sea monster of Gaelic folklore. The large rectangular hole in the coastline shows the power of the sea to wear away the limestone, and also shows quite clearly how limestone itself is made of joints that form at right angles. The water rushes into the Wormhole through an underground cave, or when the tide is high, spills over and fills it up from above like a natural outdoor swimming pool. Due to the challenging dive, the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series has been held here several times – but most of the time Poll na bPéist sits quietly undisturbed. It really is an awesome sight to behold.

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GO WEST | MAGICAL MAYO

WILD

Mayo WHETHER YOU INTEND ON VISITING MAYO FOR THE FIRST TIME, OR IF YOU ARE RETURNING TO REDISCOVER A FAVOURITE HOLIDAY DESTINATION, OR MAYBE BACK HOME TO VISIT FAMILY OR FRIENDS, YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME IN MAYO, THE HEARTBEAT OF THE WILD ATLANTIC WAY.

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n so many ways, Mayo is a county that perfectly exemplifies Ireland. Everything that we love about the country and all the images we associate with it, can be found here. The beaches: long, sweeping stretches of soft sand, the towns and villages: charming funky little hubs where there’s always some craic to be found, the mountains, the hills, the history and of course, the people. For visitors and locals alike, Mayo is home to a host of attractions and activities. What better way to discover Mayo’s charm than taking to the great outdoors? Mayo embraces the Atlantic Ocean with many of the county’s unforgettable landmarks

dotted along its coastline - majestic Croagh Patrick, Clew Bay, Achill’s unmistakable cliffs, the Stacks of Broadhaven and Dun Briste. Mayo’s Atlantic coastline is a playground for those with an adventurous spirit, offering world class deep sea fishing, surfing, coasteering, kayaking and kite surfing. Mayo is at its wildest and most adventurous along its stretch of the Wild Atlantic Way. This 2,500km coastal driving route is one of the most captivating, coastal driving routes in the world. Expect thundering surf, epic cliffs, stunning scenery and phenomenally fresh seafood in cosy bars and coastal restaurants along the way. 59


• 5 convenient locations to serve you • Free Return Shuttle Service with full day hire • Free Trail Side Assistance

The Original and Best Bike Hire Operator for the Great Western Greenway

Create Magical Memories

• Free Parking at all Locations • Friendly Knowledgeable Staff • Premium Brand Bikes and Accessories

Create memories to treasure at Ireland’s Most

What’s NeW iN 2017? • Pirate Adventure Park now includes NEW Chair-O-Planes

• #1 tripadvisor 2011, 2012, 2013

Beautiful Historic Home, the award-winning rides, slides, boats and trains of the Pirate

Clew Bay Bike Hire, Westport, Co. Mayo info@clewbaybikehire.ie Tel: 098 24818

Adventure Park, 3 Star Caravan & Camping Park, Westport Train Tour and the Adventure Activity Centre. Check out our website for upcoming special events!

STAR AWARDS

AS CHOSEN BY READERS

and Helter Skelter rides • Adventure Activity Centre – now in partnership with Killary Adventure • Birds of Prey Centre • The Giant Wheel - at 36m high! • International Mini Meeting, May 25-28th • Harvest Country Music Festival, August 26th to 27th

BEST SERVICE TOURISM BUSINESS AWARD

www.westporthouse.ie

Ireland’s National Marian Shrine

Culture • Heritage • Faith Events • Spiritual Retreats

T: +353 (0) 94 93 88100 E: info@knock-shrine.ie W: www.knockshrine.ie


GO WEST | MAGICAL MAYO

Take the opportunity to explore Erris and North Mayo, awarded the best place to go wild by the Irish Times. This area is a haven for walkers, anglers and golfers alike, with Ballina’s Ridge Pool on the river Moy renowned worldwide for its salmon angling, the Foxford Way walking trail and championship links golf in Carne Golf Links. The Great Western Greenway connecting two of Mayo’s premier tourist locations Westport to Achill Island offers an award-winning family friendly biking and walking trail with stunning scenery, historic villages, ancient ruined abbeys, arts and crafts, the Gourmet Greenway and Mulranny’s famous goats to discover along the way. The rich heritage of Mayo means that there’s plenty for the culturally curious to explore too. The National Museum of Ireland – Country Life, located in Turlough near Castlebar tells the story of rural life in Ireland through the years, while the Jackie Clarke Collection in Ballina shares one man’s genius collection of Irish historical material. Mayo is

steeped in religious heritage reminding us the county was once a place of spiritual reflection for the religious, among them St Patrick, Ireland’s national saint. A tour of Westport House, one of Ireland’s best loved attractions, offers a fascinating insight into the history of the area. Built in 1730 on the ruins of Grace O’Malley’s 16th-century castle, this charming Georgian mansion retains much of its original contents and has some stunning period-style rooms. This extensive estate complete with real life dungeons, verdant gardens, an aviary, mini-railway, Pirate Playground and lake with swan style pedalos appeals to history lovers and families alike. County Mayo has its own International Airport known as Ireland West Airport Knock, the gateway to the West of Ireland. The airport serves more than 25 scheduled and charter destinations across Ireland, Europe, the UK and further afield. So why not come and see for yourself, Mayo, the perfect location to Escape, Explore and Enjoy!

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GO WEST | MAGICAL MAYO

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GO WEST | MAGICAL MAYO

A walker along the boardwalk at Ballycroy National Park

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F

r. Patrick Peyton was born on 9th January 1909 in the town land of Carracastle in Attymass Parish.

Patrick’s wish from boyhood was to be ordained a priest but his family in Ireland were unable to meet the cost of his education. After immigrating to the USA however Patrick returned to full-time education and studied for the priesthood. In his final year in the seminary he was diagnosed as having tuberculosis - at that time an incurable disease. Fr Patrick became very weak and was given little hope by the medical team however his faith never wavered and through prayer he recovered to full health – to the amazement of the medical profession. Soon after, in1941 Patrick Peyton was ordained a priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross and a remarkable life and mission dedicated to our Mother Mary unfolded. He became a household name for years in Catholic homes around the globe. He was a great pioneer in evangelisation through media and he enlisted some of the best talent of TV and film of the time to help with his mission to keep families united and strong through prayer. His great Family Rosary Crusades attracted literally millions in many cities all over the world. In 1998 a Centre was opened in memory of Fr Patrick Peyton CSC, the aim of the Centre is to continue his mission in the promotion of prayer, especially family prayer and the Rosary. The Centre strives to meet its objectives through its involvement with religious programmes in schools, adult spiritual renewal courses, retreats, pastoral meetings and personal spiritual counselling. The Centre is a popular tourist attraction in the North Mayo Region for spiritual retreat, religious and historical tourism. It is part of the ‘Museums of Mayo’ and the ‘Spiritual & Celtic’ networks.

Attymass, Ballina, Co Mayo www.fatherpeytoncentre.ie Open Monday-Friday 9.30am-5.30pm We are dedicated to telling & keeping alive the fascinating story of the humble Irish Priest who brought his message of Peace and Family Unity to 26 million people around the globe. The Catholic media pioneer who harnessed the power of Hollywood. Fr Patrick Peyton C.S.C, The Priest who reached the stars!

fr.peyton centre

Guided Tours

Restaurant Homebaking

Gift Shop Multimedia Presentation Memorabilia Exhibit


??? | MAGICAL MAYO

A Spiritual Retreat While in the magnificent surroundings of Mayo why not visit the beautiful and spiritual Father Peyton Centre - a popular tourist attraction dedicated to telling the fascinating story of Father Patrick Peyton who brought his simple message of peace and family unity to 26 million people around the globe.

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Located in the centre of Ballyvaughan village, heart of the Burren, adjacent to Aillwee Caves, Cliffs of Moher and Galway City

Mid point on Wild Atlantic Way

Accommodation - Open all year

Family owned and managed

Food served all day

Traditional Music Sessions in the bar

Sunday Lunch

CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR PROMOTIONS

Hylands-Burren-Hotel

Main Street, Ballyvaughan County Clare +353 (0)65 - 7077037 www.hylandsburren.com info@hylandsburren.com


GALWAY GASTRONOMY

A GASTRONOMIC DREAM

County Galway

IT’S HARD NOT TO LOVE GALWAY. BRIGHTLY PAINTED PUBS RING OUT WITH LIVE MUSIC, ENDLESS STREET CAFES OFFER DELICIOUS TREATS WHILE ALSO PROVIDING FRONT-LINE VIEWS OF STREET PERFORMERS AND LIVELY BANTER OF STUDENTS AND PASSERS-BY.

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t’s a very pretty city, steeped in history, with a contemporary and cultured vibe. Remnants of the medieval town walls sit alongside shops selling Aran sweaters, handcrafted Claddagh rings and stacks of second-hand books. Bridges arch over the salmon-stuffed River Corrib, and a long promenade leads to the seaside suburb of Salthill with Galway Bay a stone’s throw away and the source of the area’s famous oysters. Food is definitely a thing here. On the last weekend of September each year, the cosmopolitan town of Galway hosts the Galway International Oyster Festival, one of the biggest events in Ireland’s social

calendar. A feast of live entertainment, gourmet food, fine wine and of course Oysters and Guinness are enjoyed by some 10,000 people with guests and luminaries from all over the world. Little wonder then that with such a fine tradition for food, the city successfully pitched for the title of European Region of Gastronomy for 2018. It will be one of just two European Regions of Gastronomy – the second being North Brabant in the Netherlands. The European Region of Gastronomy Award recognises innovation and integration in gastronomy, culture, tourism and economy. Successful bidders go on to mount a major, year-long programme showcasing their region and its produce. Galway’s bid 67


GALWAY GASTRONOMY

was submitted on behalf of Galway County Council, Galway City Council, Galway Mayo Institute of Technology, Teagasc and Ruth Hegarty of Egg & Chick Projects, with the support of the local food community. The award provides a platform “for the continued growth of Galway as a destination known for the quality of its food sector and the strength of the connection between its people, the land and our gastronomic traditions,” said Peter Roche, Cathaoirleach of Galway County Council. FOOD CULTURE The Galway brand of food and culture has been strongly developed over the years with a total of 16 food festivals, and two food trails and tours. There are already two Michelin Star restaurants (Loam and Aniar) in Galway, alongside countless hidden gems that are stars in their own right. The style of food obviously varies greatly at these restaurants but what they all have in common is the warmth and individuality that has always been at the heart of Irish hospitality and no matter how diverse the courses, the basic building blocks are the excellent raw materials for which Ireland has a wonderful reputation. Our famous pastures make for a wide range of fabulous products, notably beef and lamb, while our rivers and seas provide an abundance of fresh fish 68

and seafood. Local produce is a point of pride in the best kitchens everywhere and a growing interest in specialist production is reflected in the availability of products like hand-smoked fish and meats, baked goods and preserves plus a wide range of organic vegetables and fruit, many of which are sold at local farmer’s markets. Galway celebrates its food culture in many ways. It hosts the Galway Food Festival in March of each year and ‘Food on the Edge’ is an annual food symposium in October, attracting some of the world’s top chefs to the Wild Atlantic Way. Some would say it is a fitting tribute to win the ERG (European Region of Gastronomy) Award, after all, visitors to Galway will happily acknowledge the fine tastes and traditions of Ireland’s most Irish city. Becoming a Region of Gastronomy provides Galway with an excellent opportunity to build on the strong food following it has already established by building its gastronomic profile further nationally and internationally to offer visitors a truly unique culinary experience. GMIT lecturer Jacinta Dalton said that, “This is a very exciting initiative for Galway and the West of Ireland, this is our time to shine on the international food stage.” And shine it will. A key objective of the European


GALWAY GASTRONOMY

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Galway’s FINEST 4 STAR HOTEL Explore the Wild Atlantic Way

Salthill Hotel is renowned as one of the finest four star hotels located on the Wild Atlantic Way. With unrivalled views of the Clare Hills and Galway Bay, Salthill Hotel provides easy access to all the sights and sounds of Galway City and beyond.

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CONNEMARA SALTHILL HOTEL CLIFFS OF MOHER SHANNON AIRPORT

DUBLIN

Let Salthill Hotel be your vacation base as you immerse yourself in the spectacular beauty of the Wild Atlantic Way. Explore the breathtaking coastal landscape of Connemara or the magnificent Cliffs of Moher. Book your dream vacation with Salthill Hotel today.

Exclusive Vacation Packages from $149pps Call: 011 353 91 522711 Email: reservations@salthillhotel.com Visit: www.salthillhotel.com Salthill Hotel, Promenade, Galway.

Award Winning restaurant just 10 minute detour from Wild Atlantic Way Voted No1 in Athenry on Trip Advisor & Certificate of Excellence.

Award Winning Restaurant in Athenry the most Historical Town in Galway - Just a 10 Minute detour from the Wild Atlantic Way and 15 Minutes from Galway City

Located in the Fields Of Athenry, Galway, Ireland /the Old Barracks Restaurant

www.oldbarracks.ie

Historic Walled Town with 1916 memorial monument.


GALWAY GASTRONOMY

Region of Gastronomy award is to contribute to a better quality of life in European regions by highlighting distinctive food cultures, educating for better health and sustainability and stimulating gastronomic innovation. The city council are delighted to take on the challenge which opens up a whole new avenue for tourism, promoting the area as a food tourism destination. “Galway already has a fine tradition for food and now we get a chance to shout about it,” explains Brian Barrett, Head of Economic & Community Development at Galway County Council. “It is both a challenge and a privilege to ensure that Galway is a shining gastronomic light both nationally and internationally.” SETTING THE BAR Within the EU, Ireland already sets the bar for standards in meat and dairy production. It is the largest exporter of beef in Europe and sitting on the western Atlantic shores, Galway has the added benefit of enjoying the freshest fish catch in Europe, renowned for its seafood. The county and its surrounding area are positively teaming with amazing restaurants, hostelries, traditional pubs selling ‘pub grub’ and any number of little cafes churning out delicious fresh produce. Food, gastronomy and hospitality are increasingly important as sources of growth, competitive advantage, cultural identity and creative experiences for Europe’s regions. Regions play a key role in the gastronomic value chain, from agricultural food production to food processing, providing gastronomic experiences and hospitality in hotels and restaurants and attracting visitors with regional gastronomy products. “Galway, West of Ireland aims to be to the forefront of this thinking,” Mr Barrett says. MADE IN GALWAY A related and very significant initiative is ‘Made in Galway,’ another very successful and now well established brand. The Made in Galway website contains details on local food and craft producers and the retailers that stock them. A Facebook page provides regular details on local markets, retail events, fashion shows and exhibitions. Producers regularly update their own pages to showcase new products, special offers or events. Made in Galway also supports markets at events such as the Galway Food Festival, Connemara Mussel Festival, and Bia Lover in Athenry to name but a few. The Made in Galway website is an ideal place to source gifts particularly if you are buying something for someone special who is overseas. There’s nothing quite like getting a gift that is a small bit of home. As George Bernard Shaw aptly put it, “There is no sincerer love than the love of food.” And there is no place finer to experience food at its very best than in Galway, European Region of Gastronomy for 2018. www.galwaygastronomy.ie www.madeingalway.ie

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World famous for oysters, lobster, crab and all seafood Open Daily: 12 noon – 10pm

The Weir, Kilcolgan, Co. Galway. Tel: +353 91 796113 info@moranstheweir.com www.moranstheweir.com

CYCLE HOLIDAYS IRELAND

The local bike tour operator with 17 year experience of running tours along the West coast of Ireland. This is but a moment of the rugged and powerful beauty that awaits you as you cycle at your own pace.

www.cycleholidaysireland.com Call toll free on 888 234 1233 Email info@cycleholidaysireland.com


GALWAY GASTRONOMY

The Made in Galway website contains details on local food and craft producers and the retailers that stock them

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FOODIE TRIPS & TREATS CALLING ALL FOOD FANS! DOES THE MENTION OF FARM-TO-FORK CHEESES, FRESHLY CAUGHT SEAFOOD, WORLD-FAMOUS STOUTS, AND IRISH COFFEE MAKE YOUR MOUTH WATER?

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hen you’ll love CIE Tours’ Savor Ireland trip, now available with an additional dining experience at L’Ecrivain, one of Dublin’s five esteemed Michelin star restaurants - for a limited time only, while space is available. The perfect opportunity to try countless incredible bites while really discovering the Emerald Isle’s rich culinary tradition. Savor Ireland takes serious foodies–and really anyone who appreciates a good bite–through seven nights and eight days of tastebud-led discovery. From the moment you settle into Ireland, the fun begins. After all, the very first afternoon of your trip already features a cookery talk and demonstration at Limerick’s Milk Market, followed by an evening enjoying a medieval-style banquet served in a 15th century castle. And that’s only day one. As the week progresses, you’ll have the chance to savor the freshest goats, goudas, and more at St Tola farm, take part in a hands-on cooking class focused

on authentic Irish dishes at Dingle Cookery School, and stroll through centuries of brewing excellence while sipping featured ales at the VIP Smithwick’s Experience. That’s all in addition to the many memorable dining experiences that CIE Tours has lined up for you. From a three-course meal overlooking the awe-inspiring Gap of Dunloe at Heather Restaurant and Gardens to lunch at the home of television chef and food writer Catherine Fulvo to dinner with a lively side of traditional Irish songs and dancing at Merry Ploughboy Pub, Savor Ireland travelers get to relish in plate after plate of amazingness. With only two departures in 2017 space is limited. Tour prices start at just $2698 per person, and with almost everything included, you are encouraged to reserve your space quickly for this unique Irish culinary adventure. Best piece of advice for this exciting itinerary? Two words: come hungry!


To discover more about Galway's creativity To discover discover more more about about Galway's Galway's creativity creativity To visit www.madeingalway.ie visit www.madeingalway.ie www.madeingalway.ie visit www.galwaygastronomy.ie


Be inspired by Galway’s archaeology, history, science and arts at Galway City Museum! Open Tues – Sat, 10am – 5pm Sundays 12pm – 5pm

(from Easter Sunday to end of September)

logo

FREE

ADMIS

SION!

www.galwaycitymuseum.ie

✆ 091 532460

✉ museum@galwaycity.ie


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image National Museum of Ireland

Galway City Museum

CENTRALLY LOCATED BEHIND THE FAMOUS SPANISH ARCH, GALWAY CITY MUSEUM HAS THREE FLOORS OF EXCITING EXHIBITIONS ENGAGING VISITORS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGY, HISTORY, SCIENCE AND ARTS OF GALWAY CITY AND HINTERLAND.

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he museum is one of Galway’s most popular cultural hotspots and welcomes over 200,000 visitors per year. Complimented by The Kitchen Café which looks out on to some of the finest remains of the city’s medieval wall, Galway City Museum is perfectly situated on the banks of the River Corrib offering unparalleled views across the city.

Highlights include the Galway Civic Sword and Great Mace. The sword dates from the Charter of King James I in 1610, which granted authority for the carrying of such a weapon before the Mayor. The Great Mace, a stunning piece of ornamental silver-work, was crafted in Dublin in 1710, was presented to the town by Edward Eyre, Mayor of Galway in 1712. The museum is also home to two iconic symbols of Galway; the original statue of Padraic Ó Conaire carved by sculptor Albert Power in the 1930s to commemorate one of the greatest modern writers in the Irish language; and a traditional Galway Hooker sailing vessel, namely the Máirtín Oliver which was made especially for the museum in 2006 and hangs theatrically in the museum atrium. Visitors can explore the prehistoric and medieval archaeology of Galway through artefacts and interactive displays on the ground floor with the earliest stone tools dating from 5500 - 4000 BC and medieval pottery from all over Europe. Galway’s wartime history is told on the first floor in Revolution in Galway, 1913-1923 and Galway & the Great War. The Revolution exhibition was created to mark the Centenary of 1916 and commemorates the men and women from Galway who played a significant role in shaping the nation. A significant collection of material relating to the revolutionary period is currently on display including a

‘green ensign’ flown from Moon’s Corner during the visit of King Edward VII to Galway in 1903; a German Mauser from the Asgard; a collection of items belonging to Liam Mellows (1895-1922) who lead the Rising in the West, including a chess piece carved in Mountjoy Jail before his execution in 1922; an RIC revolver; a biretta belonging to Fr Michael Griffin; an autograph book from Ballykinlar internment camp, County Down belonging to Volunteer Crowe from Bohermore, Galway; and a bronze bust of Proclamation signatory Éamonn Ceannt by Domhnall Ó Murchadha. The exhibition also includes footage from the period and an interactive display with further information on Galway people, places and memories. The SeaScience exhibition in the science gallery reveals marine life along Galway’s coastline through fun and informative displays. A new and upcoming addition to this very popular exhibition is Sea Science – the Wild Atlantic, due to open in May 2017. Originally developed and commissioned by the Marine Institute Galway for the 2016 SeaFest, this is sure to be an exciting and colourful addition. The museum also hosts a number of temporary exhibitions, including the current Irish Historic Towns Atlas: Galway/Gaillimh from the Royal Irish Academy. This exhibition showcases beautiful maps, plans and views tracing the topographical development of Galway city from its origins as a medieval borough and seaport. Developed in conjunction with the RIA this exhibition marks the launch of the Galway edition of the Irish Historic Towns Atlas by Jacinta Prunty and Paul Walsh. www.galwaycitymuseum.ie 77


Study in Ireland at GMIT

Logo usage guidelines www.gmit.ie March 2014

@GMITInternational @GMIT_Inter

Contact details: Usstudents@gmit.ie Ciara Enright from New Jersey currently studying Bachelor of Business in Event Management and Public Relations – Year 1

The document is subject to change. Please do not save this file locally, always refer to the master copy on the GMIT intranet.

Scholarships available! Please view www.thea.ie for information on the Homecoming Study Programme.


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STUDY IN IRELAND AT

GMIT

GALWAY MAYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY IS IRELAND’S LEADING INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND A FANTASTIC, FUN PLACE TO STUDY.

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he Irish Government invests over €782 million annually in research funding, into Ireland’s higher education institutions. The impact of this funding is immense and has had a transformative effect on Ireland’s higher education sector which now plays a lead role in defining world-class research, contributing to significant world-changing scientific discoveries. Galway is Ireland’s third largest city and is world renowned as a center for the arts and an important national hub for the medical device sector. Recently Galway has been recognised for its focus on the creative economies and has been awarded the European Capital of Culture 2020. This designation will showcase the city and region at its best in arts, culture, music, theatre and education. Galway is a multicultural city with over 30 nationalities living in the region offering something for everyone and welcoming all who choose to study, visit and live here.

WHY STUDY IN GMIT? Situated on the ‘West Coast of Ireland’ along Ireland’s ‘Wild Atlantic Way’, Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT) is an award winning multi-campus higher education Institute with 7,000 students, across five locations in counties Galway and Mayo. It is the only Institute of Technology in Ireland to have won the ‘Sunday Times Institute of Technology of the Year’ three times; in 2004, 2007 and 2015. GMIT offers undergraduate and postgraduate programmes across a range of disciplines, including; business, engineering, sciences (including health sciences), agriculture, wood technology, design and tourism & arts. GMIT awards are recognised on Ireland’s National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ) which links in with the European Qualifications Framework (EQF). This ensures all qualifications are quality-assured and recognised internationally. Many programmes also enjoy prestigious professional accreditation in disciplines such as; Accounting (ACCA, CPA, ACA & CIMA), Engineering (Engineers Ireland) and our Medical

Science programme which qualifies graduates to work in a laboratory in an Irish University Hospital. The college was founded in 1972 to provide learners with the technical skills and knowledge required by Ireland’s expanding industrial sector. Today, it continues to work closely with industry to ensure all programmes are industry informed, current and relevant. Many GMIT programmes also include accredited work-place learning, better known as internships, which enables students to practice what they have learned during their degree, in a real-life working environment. This important link with industry, along with the strong focus on student experience, is why many international students continue to choose GMIT in Ireland as their European destination for their overseas Bachelor’s Degree. STUDENT LIFE GMIT’s main campus is in Galway City, a vibrant city by the sea. It’s a safe and friendly city, famous for its festivals, live music events, theatres, restaurants, pubs and shops. In fact, a quarter of Galway’s population are students, making it one of the most vibrant University cities in Ireland! GMIT’s student population includes over 30 different nationalities. U.S students will receive assistance finding accommodation and a welcome/induction programme is provided upon arrival. There are also over 30 sports and cultural societies which students can join. And then there is the scenery – so easy to access and so stunningly beautiful. Connemara, the Burren and Mayo, just to name a few, are within a short drive of all campuses. SCHOLARSHIPS The Ireland Homecoming Study Programme (IHSP) is open to the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Irish emigrants living in the U.S. who are interested in completing undergraduate study in Ireland. Relevant applicants will qualify for the IHSP Exclusive Tuition Fee of €7,500 per academic year. For further information: http://thea.ie/ ihsp/about-ihsp-programme or contact usstudents@ gmit.ie 79


Yeats Country Hotel, Spa & Leisure Club Rosses Point, Co. Sligo

Member of Brian McEniff Hotels

Ideally located just 5kms from Sligo City Overlooking the Stunning Atlantic Ocean and Co. Sligo’s Championship Golf Course one of Ireland Top 10 Courses

Reservations: 00353 71 9117100 Email: info@yeatscountryhotel.com Web: www.yeatscountryhotel.com


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County

COUNTY SLIGO PACKS QUITE A PUNCH WITH ITS COUNTRYSIDE’S LUSH SPLENDOUR AND VIBRANT CULTURAL SCENE.

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t was Sligo that most inspired poet William Butler Yeats who revelled in its mysticism and beauty. He, like many visitors today, was intrigued by places like the prehistoric Carrowmore Megalithic tombs, the iconic Benbulben and the lake island of Insifree. Located in the North West of Ireland, Sligo is the principal city for the surrounding area and its primary commercial base. Yet it still retails the charm of a booming country town with pedestrian streets lined with colorful shop fronts, stone bridges spanning the River Garavogue and the hum of music emanating from one of its many hostelries. Sligo encompasses a vibrant city set in a county of stunning natural beauty, easily accessible by road, rail and air. The International Ireland West Airport

Knock is very close by. The old regional airport no longer lands aircraft but its hanger is the site for a thriving Sunday market filled to the brim with artisan products and genuine local talent. Sligo’s enviable mountain and rural landscape, its Wild Atlantic Way seascape, rich cultural heritage, fine cuisine, music and tradition all combine to offer the visitor the very best of hospitality from a warm and welcoming community. Sligo is the Surf capital of the Wild Atlantic Way, offering world class surfing at Mullaghmore, Strandhill and Easkey. Combined with tranquil lakes and mountains and countless beaches to stroll along, visitors can choose from kite boarding, offshore diving, bird watching, water sports, horse riding and fishing – or something more relaxing at the Voya seaweed spa. 81


??? | YEATS COUNTY

There are three magnificent championship Golf links, with fairways adorned with mature trees, natural water features and unspoiled views of the county. Walkers will be spoilt for chose with ample walks along forest paths, mystical mountains or the surf drenched coast. Horse riding is a popular way to see it all at a more leisurely pace. Music is embedded in the culture here and there are endless trad sessions and live music venues. Sample award winning locally sourced cuisine, choose from a host of fine dining restaurants from the vibrant café scene or try a food experience on the Sligo Food Trail. www.sligofoodtrail.ie Sligo is a county of myths and legends. It inspired the poetry of Yeats and the music of Coleman, Westlife and Dervish; its cultural and literary heritage is world famous. Beneath the iconic Benbulben mountain is Drumcliffe Churchyard, the burial place of WB Yeats. Close by is Lissadell House and Gardens where Yeats spent much of his time in his beloved Sligo. The Model, home of The Niland Collection is one of Ireland’s leading contemporary arts centers with works by many including Jack B Yeats. There is a vibrant theatre tradition kept alive by the Hawk’s

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Well Theatre and Blue Raincoat Theatre Company. The county is one of the most important archaeological sites in Ireland with over 5,000 megalithic sites, including the massive grave complex at Carrowkeel and Carrowmore - the largest and one of the most important megalithic cemetery in Europe. There is something for everyone in Sligo. Visit the Sligo Folk Park in Riverstown; Ballymote’s Eagles Flying; numerous farmers’ markets; Sligo Abbey; boat trips to Innisfree and Inishmurray; Sligo museum, or climb Knocknarea to the tomb of the legendary Queen Maeve then sooth the feet with a seaweed bath in Enniscrone and Strandhill. After enjoying the day, relax in accommodation to suit all tastes – hostels, camping and caravanning parks, holiday homes, bed and breakfasts, country houses and an array of hotels in urban and rural settings. Sligo has a spectacular array of festivals and events throughout the year. The highest caliber of international, national and local artists grace Sligo venues. From sport, music, dance, visual arts, street and theatre performances to food and crafts. You’ll be spoilt for choice! www.sligotourism.ie


E:INFO@SLIGOTOURISM.IE T: + 353 71 9171905 WWW.SLIGOTOURISM.IE


Visit Eagles Flying

Irish Raptor Research Centre SCIENTIFICALLY MANAGED SANCTUARY FOR BIRDS OF PREY & OWLS Experience Eagles swooping only inches over your head and landing on your arm. Eagles Flying is Irelands largest Raptor Centre and home to more than 100 raptors and another 350 birds and animals (out of 85 species). Our focus is on a hands-on experience

» Bird Whisperers » Interactive Shows » Photo opportunities » Touch Zoo » Over 100 raptors and 350 birds & animals » All-weather suitable » Multi Award winning

Opening times:

10.30 - 12.30 and 2.30 - 4.30 (2 Hour Programmes)

2 shows Daily 11.00am and 3.00pm 7 Days 1st April - 7th November

Ballymote, Co. Sligo Phone: (353) 71 9189310 | www.eaglesflying.com


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FLY HIGH IN

Sligo

NESTLED IN THE GREEN HILLS OF SOUTH SLIGO, IRELAND’S LARGEST SANCTUARY FOR RAPTORS AND OWLS, THE IRISH RAPTOR RESEARCH CENTRE (EAGLES FLYING) IS SITUATED ON MORE THAN 27 HECTARES OF MATURE PARKLANDS NEAR BALLYMOTE.

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urrently the centre is home to more than 100 eagles, hawks, owls, falcons and vultures. Altogether there are more than 450 birds and animals out of nearly 100 different species in the centre.

and other animals and there is no risk whatsoever for any member of the audience. The shows are unique you have never been that close to raptors! Even rain cannot spoil this experience, as the shows can be presented indoors.

Established in 1999 as an institution for research on birds of prey, parts of the area were opened to the public in 2003. Now it is one of the major tourist attractions in the northern part of Ireland. Thousands of visitors flock to see the spectacular bird shows with eagles, hawks, falcons, vultures and owls. Amongst many other awards, Eagles Flying was awarded the Certificate of Excellence by TripAdvisor in 2015 and 2016, both years getting 5 out of 5 points.

During the shows -starting at 11 am and 3 pm every day and lasting for approximately one hour - the birds are presented in their natural environment. Before and after the show the visitors can walk the parklands and enjoy the birds displayed in aviaries or on perches close to the walking path. Staff are always on hand to provide information on the birds and answer questions.

Twice daily scientists train these birds for visitors and give information about the biology of these magnificent creatures. During the interactive bird shows visitors can experience different types of raptors flying right over their head or landing next to them. Some have a wingspan of up to three metres. It is also possible to touch some of the animals and some members of the audience may even have one flying on to their own hand. Eagles Flying have developed a very special, friendly way of working with raptors

For the ones who prefer something cuddlier; there is also a large supervised petting-zoo. Here, visitors can get hands-on with guinea-pigs, pigs, rabbits, lambs, goats, donkeys, ferrets and many more. Rosie the 350 kg pig gives kids a proper piggy-back ride, Grizzly, the raccoon, is a gifted pickpocket, Tui and Allan, the tame foxes make perfect (live) fur collars for fashion conscious ladies and Monty, the 4-meter Python, even makes a perfect scarf for at least 6 people at a time.

www.eaglesflying.com 85


ELECTRIC BIKE TRAILS FOR CYCLING IN THE NORTH WEST OF IRELAND Cycle Cycle the the traffi trafficc free free Shannon Shannon Blueway, Blueway, 88 Km around Lough Key Km around Lough Key Forest Forest Park Park or or take take a a 22 to to 44 day day tour tour in in the the Leitrim Leitrim Countryside Countryside by by electric electric or or regular regular bike. bike. Hire Hire a a top top of of the the range range electric electric bike bike or or choose from a range of regular choose from a range of regular hybrid hybrid bikes, bikes, children’s children’s bikes, bikes, child child carts carts and and seats. We provide back up transport seats. We provide back up transport if if needed needed at at any any stage stage of of your your cycle cycle tour tour and and have have all all the the local local information information that that makes a cycle a really memorable makes a experience. experience. Electric Electric Bike Bike Trails Trails is is a a family family run run business determined to business determined to provide provide you you with with a a professional professional and and friendly friendly service service with with a a bike bike hire hire base base at at Leitrim Leitrim Village Village Co. Co. Leitrim Leitrim and and Lough Lough Key Key Forest Forest Park, Park, Co. Roscommon. Co. Roscommon. CHECK OUT THE SHANNON HIGHLANDS TOUR OR THE CASTLE TO CASTLE TOUR www.electricbiketrails.com Leitrim Wild Atlantic Way Ad-1-2 Page .pdf

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info@electricbiketrails.com

1

04/04/2014

+353 87 7386439

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Explore the Waterways in Leitrim

Situated just two hours from the major cities of Dublin, Galway and Belfast, Leitrim is a county where you can explore, experience and enjoy unspoilt landscapes and breath-taking scenery alongside bustling towns and quaint villages. Experience the ‘Wild Atlantic Way’ or enjoy scenic Northern Ireland from your base in Leitrim, where you can enjoy lively home grown traditional entertainment in a variety of venues, soak up the culture and heritage through exhibitions and historical sites. Savour the peace and tranquillity by a lake’s edge.

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enjoyleitrim.com

www.


LAND OF LAKES | LEITRIM

Watery WONDERLAND

LOCATED JUST 40 MINUTES FROM IRELAND WEST AIRPORT KNOCK AND JUST TWO HOURS FROM BELFAST, DUBLIN AND GALWAY, LEITRIM IS A COUNTY WHERE YOU CAN EXPLORE, EXPERIENCE AND ENJOY UNSPOILT LANDSCAPES AND BREATH-TAKING SCENERY ALONGSIDE BUSTLING TOWNS AND QUAINT VILLAGES.

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njoy lively traditional music sessions; soak up the culture and heritage of Leitrim’s Historical sites or experience peace and tranquillity by a lake’s edge. Endless possibilities await you! Leitrim is known for its traditional music and there are sessions held all year-round in many of the its traditional Irish pubs in towns and villages across the county. The county also been home to many from the literary world including John McGahern and Booker Prize Winner DCB Pierre and served as a muse for WB Yeats in his famous poem ‘The Stolen Child’. The county is also steeped in history and heritage and historical sites and places of interest such as Parke’s Castle, The Costello Chapel and Glenview Museum tell the story of the county’s development down through the ages.

Leitrim is defined by water which influences the county’s character and the activities that take place there. Not only are there a remarkable variety of lakes, rivers and canals, there is also access to the dramatic waves of the Atlantic Ocean. The longest River in Ireland, the Shannon River and Europe’s longest navigable inland waterway the ShannonErne Waterway both flow through the county offering great cruising opportunities and whether you enjoy paddling, walking or cycling the Shannon Blueway, a series of trails both on and off the waterway, will make your vacation in Leitrim stay in your memory forever. Leitrim is the ideal base for your vacation where just a short distance away, you can discover Ireland’s West Coast along the Wild Atlantic Way, explore the unique landscapes of Northern Ireland or visit the sites and monuments of Ireland’s Ancient East. www.enjoyleitrim.com 87


LAND OF LAKES | LEITRIM

Leitrim is defined by water which influences the county’s character and the activities that take place there. Not only are there a remarkable variety of lakes, rivers and canals, there is also access to the dramatic waves of the Atlantic Ocean.

The pretty Stanford Village Inn at Dromhair specializes in fresh and smoked cuisine.

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LAND OF LAKES | LEITRIM

A restored plantation castle of the early 17th century, picturesquely situated on the shores of Lough Gill, Parkes Castle was once the home of Robert Parke and his family. 89


ROSCOMMON ROSCOMMON


LAND OF LAKES | ROSCOMMON

ROSCOMMON

Regal, Raw, Real

INNOVATIONS IN TECHNOLOGY AND TRANSPORT CONTINUE TO BRING US ALL CLOSER TOGETHER AND MAKE THE WORLD A SMALLER, MORE CONNECTED PLACE.

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ever before has mankind had such a myriad of destinations available at the click of a button.

A combination of low cost air travel and social media have conspired to make a journey to the most remote of destinations seem like an achievable objective. Snapchat, Facebook and Instagram allow us to post travel experiences for friends and family to see who may be thousands of miles away, sharing thoughts and images with those who choose to click and engage with our special memories. People are beginning to realise that although we can travel to all corners of the world, the unique tourist experience that we all crave

is becoming less and less attainable. What travellers really want to experience is a sense of belonging, something that triggers a time in our lives when the family were all packed into the car and driven for what seemed like days to a relative’s house for some well deserved rest and recuperation. The memories of stopping in towns and villages along the way for Irelands best ice-cream or the chance to spot a local sporting legend in his place of work , perhaps a random act of kindness in the form of a cup of tea from a stranger that made the journey seem worthwhile. These are the moments that fill the memory banks long after the journey has passed. Roscommon is a place where such memories are still made. Whether entering from the north or south of the county, the image of 91


LAND OF LAKES | ROSCOMMON

rugged stone walls surrounding pastures along the way hint that the traveller has ventured into a place that is in touch with its rich history and heritage. The warmth and openness of the people here offer a glimpse of a county that refuses to adopt the cynicism of modern life. A place where innovative technologies are adapted to provided visitors with top quality services and amenities in comfortable affordable surroundings. North county Roscommon offers visitors an array of experiences unlike any other throughout Ireland. The Arigna Mining Experience set on top of the majestic surrounds of the Curlew Mountains overlooking several lakes is the countries last remaining working coal mine. Former miners now operate as local tour guides offering a unique opportunity to experience the history of the mine and its rich cultural heritage dating back over 400 years. The Miner’s Way marked hiking trail offers spectacular views augmented with local community culture and the opportunity to follow in the miners’ footsteps across the countryside. Next to Arigna sits the quaint town of Boyle, a buzzing hive of activity, the town is home to Boyle Abbey, an impressive and well-preserved 13th century Cistercian monastery with both a west of England and Burgundian influence in the design. A restored gatehouse from the 16th / 17th century houses an exhibition about the Abbey and its history. King House, one of the county’s four great heritage houses, is the beating heart of the town, here visitors can avail of an interactive tour through the house and be regaled of tales of banquets,

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murder trials and tragic romance. The recently renovated Courthouse in the town crescent houses a unique model railway village that captures the attention of the more easily distracted members of the family. On Saturdays the town hosts a vibrant farmers market and during the summer months a thriving Arts festival, which brings visitors from near and far. Adventure tourists looking for new experiences won’t have far to travel, the spectacular Lough Key Forest & Activity Park is located in the hinterland of the town. One of Ireland’s most popular tourist sites, the park has a wonderful visitor centre with a treetop canopy walk, indoor activity (Boda Borg maze), outdoor adventure playground for children and a lakeside cafe. There are plenty of open areas to picnic or even barbecue, as well as a fantastic lake with great water activities and boats for hire. Bikes and Segways are available for hire in the park. Castle Island in the centre of the park is also the location of Ireland’s greatest mystical love story. Activity seekers visiting the county will also be delighted to know that the country’s largest inflatable water park can also be found in Bay Sports, situated on the shores of another of Roscommon’s crown jewels Lough Ree. An adventure haven set on the outskirts of the historic gateway town of Athlone, Bay Sports is an activity & adventure centre that caters for all ages, just beware of the marauding Vikings! Culture and heritage enthusiasts never need to look far in Roscommon to find a site that ignites the imagination. Visitors can retrace their family genealogy in the


LAND OF LAKES | ROSCOMMON

historic Strokestown Park House and Gardens or retrace the steps of Irelands most infamous Queen, Medb at the ancient royal capital of the high kings of Ireland Rathcroghan, from where she launched her audacious bid to capture the Brown Bull of Cooley. The historic Táin March is still celebrated each summer in one of Roscommon’s many festivals; enthusiasts throng Rathcroghan to retrace the steps of Queen Medb as she set off on her notorious quest. Other heritage sites of interest can be found close by in the County town, Loughnaneane Park a splendid public amenity grounds is set in the shadow of the towns historic Castle and Abbey. Roscommon Town in the heart of the county also hosts the acclaimed Lamb festival each summer in the centre of this picturesque vibrant town, where family owned business and high end retail shops combine to create the perfect retail mix. The regular racing festivals together with the thriving arts centre and museum ensure the town has something to offer all year round. So for those of you feeling slightly unengaged by the extremes of the modern world, just take a moment to ask yourself what is it I’m really looking for? The answer, ask a Rossie if you are lucky you might just find one happy to share some real experiences!

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Kilronan Castle Estate Kilronan Castle Estate Kilronan Castle Estate BALLYFARNON, CO. ROSCOMMON. BALLYFARNON, CO. ROSCOMMON. BALLYFARNON, CO. ROSCOMMON. BALLYFARNON, BALLYFARNON, CO. CO. ROSCOMMON. ROSCOMMON.

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+353 71 9618000 +353 71 9618000 +353 71 71 9618000 +353 +353 71 9618000 9618000

enquiries@kilronancastle.ie enquiries@kilronancastle.ie enquiries@kilronancastle.ie enquiries@kilronancastle.ie enquiries@kilronancastle.ie

Lough Rynn Castle Lough Rynn Castle Lough Rynn Castle Lough Rynn Castle Estate & Gardens Estate & Gardens Estate & Gardens MOHILL, CO. LEITRIM. Estate & Gardens MOHILL, CO. LEITRIM. MOHILL, CO. LEITRIM. MOHILL, MOHILL, CO. CO. LEITRIM. LEITRIM.

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Spa Spa Spa


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In Love

WITH LONGFORD THE ANCESTRAL HOME OF THE FARRELL CLAN, COUNTY LONGFORD HAS A LONG AND VARIED HISTORY, STRETCHING BACK ABOUT 9,000 YEARS.

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ituated in the heart of Ireland, the county was part of the early medieval territory known as Teathbha or Teffia. By the 12th century, it had become the lordship of Annaly, under the O’Farrell clan, hence the name ‘Longphort Ui Fhearghail’ – O’Farrell stronghold. The Anglo-Normans arrived in the area by the end of that century, but failed to establish strong, widespread settlement. This meant that Longford was very much a frontier county, with the influence of the historic Gaelic clans retaining much of their influence and power. In 1570, the O’Farrells submitted to Queen Elizabeth I and at that stage Annaly became the county of Longford.

A RURAL RETREAT Longford town is a bright, bustling center whose skyline is dominated by the spire of Saint Mels Cathedral otherwise known as the ‘Longford Phoenix’. It has a fine selection of accommodation, award winning restaurants, cafes, pubs and music venues, as well as some excellent boutiques and shopping outlets.

Entertainment venues include The Backstage Theatre and Centre for the Arts, The Longford Arms Hotel and Longford Cineplex as well as a number of quirky cafés and music venues. When the hustle and bustle of city life becomes too much then the relaxing pace of life in County Longford offers a restorative and regenerative break away. The River Camlin flows through the northern part of the town where a delightful walkway along the river leads to the Mall Park, recreational area and sports complex. The park is an oasis of calm and tranquillity, well used by local residents and visitors alike. At the opposite end of the town, walkers and cyclists can enjoy meandering or cycling along the pathway of the Royal Canal which stretches over 146km from Dublin to Longford. The canal route provides the perfect opportunity for those with a love of the waterways to explore remote sections of the Irish countryside. Built in 1798 and first opened in 1817, the canal line was closed in 1961 due to developments in road and rail transportation. Officially reopened as a navigation 95


LAND OF LAKES route in 2010, it now connects Spencer Dock in Dublin to Richmond Harbour in the quaint canal side village of Clondra in County Longford. Clondra is the point at which the waters of the Royal Canal, the River Camlin and the mighty River Shannon meet. This allows for a myriad of activities to take place in the area including water polo, kayaking, canoeing, angling, and canal cruising. The harbours along the route of the canal are hives of activity during the summer months with many festivals and events taking place along the banks of the Canal. EXPLORE THE COUNTRYSIDE County Longford is a tranquil and mainly low-lying landscape with Cairn Hill, referred to affectionately by locals as Corn Hill, being the highest point, standing at 916 feet. Tourist Trails which criss-cross the county provide memorable days of discovery for drivers, walkers, cyclists and those enjoying the inland waterways of Ireland. The Royal Canal, Lough Ree, Lough Gowna, the River Shannon, as well as the many smaller lakes and rivers offer endless opportunity to take part in water sporting activities. Water polo, canoeing and kayaking, white water rafting and water tubing are all enjoyed by visitors to the area. Those with a less energetic holiday in mind can while away the hours canal cruising, boating, coarse and game angling.  An eclectic mix of travelers from all walks of life arrive into Longford, the unique biodiversity

of the county being of particular interest to those with a love of nature. Excellent forest walks and large stretches of bogland, some in relatively pristine condition and distinct to the midlands of Ireland, provide fascinating grounds for exploration, observation and discussion. County Longford is also accessible to those with a love of flying small aircraft. The award winning village of Abbeyshrule in South Longford is home to Abbeyshrule Airfield, the only airfield in the midlands of Ireland and the base for a number of flying schools. This airfield is also the host of the longest running air show in Ireland, attracting large crowds from home and abroad on an annual basis. Those who wish to keep their feet firmly on the ground play on Longford’s 18-hole championship golf course which overlooks the county town. Supporting all of the attractions and activities of the county is a diverse calendar of social, cultural and sporting events as well as an eclectic mix of festivals. The true beauty of Longford lies in its rural charm, the hospitality of its people and the breathtaking views of its quiet countryside of farmland, lakes and bogland. HISTORY & MYTHOLOGY Throughout the county there are many historical sites and monuments from the different phases of Longford’s history. Prehistoric monuments include portal tombs at Aughnacliffe and Cleenrath, both associated to the Irish legend of Diarmuid and

Walkers and cyclists can enjoy meandering or cycling along the pathway of the Royal Canal which stretches over 146km from Dublin to Longford. The canal route provides the perfect opportunity for those with a love of the waterways to explore remote sections of the Irish countryside

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LAND OF LAKES Grainne. The jewel in the crown is the extraordinary Corlea Bog Trackway, near Kenagh, dating from 148 BC, part of which is preserved in a unique visitors’ interpretive center. Early church and monastic sites include Ardagh, founded by St Patrick. This beautiful village also has fascinating links to Saint Brigit as well as many more ancient Kings and Queens. Longford has strong associations with the legendary Queen Maeve who, according to the epic Irish tale, An Táin Bó Cúailgne, traversed the countryside while en route to steal the coveted ‘Brown Bull of Cooley’. It was here that Queen Maeve met her death while bathing on the beautiful island of Inchcleraun (Inis Clothran) on Lough Ree. Her nephew, and slayer, Furbaide Ferbend is reputedly buried on Cairn Hill, Longford’s highest point. The Táin continues even today with an annual walking festival retracing the route from Rathcroghan in

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County Roscommon to Longford and then on to the Cooley Penninisula in County Louth. Much more ancient than this tale is the legend of Midhir and Étain, set at the hill of Brí Leith in Ardagh. This legend, ‘The Wooing of Étain’ which spans over a thousand years, is a tale of the lives and loves of the beautiful Étain and her association to the Fairy prince Midhir. While based mainly at the hill of Brí Leith in Ardagh, it is also connected to the legendary sites of Uisneach, Tara and the ancient boglands of Corlea in Kenagh, Co Longford. GETTING HERE Longford lies at a junction of main roads which lead to many of the major towns and cities of Ireland so its accessibility to the rest of the country make it a prime location as a holiday base. The town is also situated on the Sligo-Dublin train line as well as a variety of bus routes, so there’s no excuse not to visit!

L o 1 p c o i


LONGFORD TOURISM OFFICE

www.longfordtourism.ie www.visitlongford.ie

Longford Tourism Office Market Square Longford Town Contact Numbers: 043 3354277 – 085 8888876 Email: info@longfordtourism.ie info@visitlongford.ie

Longford Tourism Office is located in the center of Longford town and open Monday to Friday 10.30am – 5.30pm. The staff of the Tourism Office provide a wide range of supports for visitors to the county including maps, literature and general advice on exploring the area as well as accommodation information and touring itineraries.

Contact Person: Ms. Anna Delaney

/longfordtourism

‘Explore Longford’ is our Heritage App available to download for android and apple iOS devices.


“WAITING TO BE DISCOVERED”

Planning a trip to Ireland? Why not get off the beaten path and visit County Cavan in Ireland’s Ancient East. Experience stunning scenery, thousands of years of history, fun festivals, friendly people and award-winning local food. You’ll be surprised at what you’ll find here. Cavan Tourist Information Office Johnston Central Library Farnham Street, Cavan, Ireland. t: +353 (0) 49 433 1942


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VISIT

Cavan ‘AN CABHÁN’ IS THE OLD IRISH NAME FOR CAVAN. IT’S A SECRET PLACE, SLIGHTLY ON THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED, A PLACE WHERE YOU CAN WIND DOWN AND DELVE DEEP INTO THE REAL IRELAND.

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arm people, delicious food, tranquil lakes and thousands of years of history are here in spades, linked by a network of waterways coursing through its heartland. It lends the place a sense of serenity. The rolling, ancient drumlins of Cavan are alive with poetry and heritage; nowhere more so than amid the life-affirming beauty of Cavan Burren Park. An enduring archaeological and geological wonder located on the slopes of Cuilcagh Mountain, Cavan Burren Park boasts breathtaking views over the surrounding countryside. Its ethereal landscape is dotted with giant boulders and ancient megaliths

that give the visitor a sense of walking through the pages of a fantasy novel. Learn how this ancient valley was hewn from the earth by giant ice sheets in the park’s information centre, or enjoy one of four marked walking trails through dramatic and beautiful landscapes. Cavan is a place where life moves at a more relaxed pace. This, along with its intoxicating beauty, makes it a walker’s paradise. The county boasts a wide array of marked trails through ethereal woods and wide open countryside. The land and water here is fresh and pure, and so too is its produce. This is a county with some of the finest food in Ireland. In recent years Cavan has 101


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been rightfully recognised for its culinary delights and the ‘Taste of Cavan’ food festival, which takes place on 11th and 12th August, is the perfect showcase for the country’s best food producers. If history is your thing, the new World War One Trench Experience at Cavan County Museum is a must–see. It is the largest World War I replica trench found anywhere in Ireland or the UK. Inside the museum, housed in a beautiful Georgian building, you will find over 5,000 years of history, including ancient weapons and tools and fascinating relics of bygone ages, alongside a tea room and gift shop full of memories to bring home.

Ireland is a land of castles and conquest and Cavan has its fair share of ancient fortifications. For a tour with a difference, go to Cavan Canoe Centre and request a boat trip to the island castle of Clough Oughter. Extraordinarily beautiful in its isolation, Clough Oughter stands like a silent sentinel on an island in the centre of a vast and charming waterway. This Norman castle has witnessed fire and bloodshed but has quietly stood the test of time. Cavan is an exciting, enticing, mysterious, historic and scenic county - one that must be explored at your leisure and where you’re sure to receive a warm and friendly welcome. For information on County Cavan visit www.thisiscavan.ie

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COMFORTABLE, FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED – THE ERRIGAL COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL IS A LITTLE GEM IN THE HEART OF CAVAN.

deally situated in the historic town of Cootehill the location is the perfect base for every visitor to explore all the many attractions in the area such as Cavan Museum, Tanagh Outdoor Education Centre, Golfing, Walking and Fishing.

Tranquility and sincere hospitality are the essence of this 4 Star Family hotel which offers 30 beautifully appointed bedrooms in the main house and 12 beautifully appointed rooms in lodges adjacent to the hotel. All rooms have super-comfort king-size beds, individually controlled air-conditioning, power showers, flat-screen TV and complimentary wireless internet access with work desks. At Reynard’s Restaurant you can enjoy overlooking landscaped gardens and stunning flower displays while chefs prepare the finest dishes using only the freshest of seasonal and local produce .The Brewery Bar offers a more relaxed dining option or simply enjoy a pint of stout or an Irish coffee. The Errigal Country House Hotel is renowned as one of the finest wedding venues in Cavan. Whether it is an intimate celebration, a civil ceremony, a humanist ceremony or a more exuberant affair there is only ever one wedding per day and the setting is ideal with magical flower gardens and an abundance of spectacular settings such as the Hotel’s Grand Stairway for capturing special memories. For a bit of pampering let the aroma of candles, gentle music and soothing essential oils transport you into a heaven of calm and serenity at the Riverside Beauty & treatment Rooms. www.errigalhotel.com

ERRIGAL COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL

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Enter a world of elegance and sophistication at the family run Errigal Country House Hotel, Cavan located just a mile outside Cootehill town and nestled between counties Monaghan and Cavan. This 18th century house has been lovingly refurbished to a contemporary design offering style and character along with the best traditions of Irish hospitality.

Errigal Country House Hotel Cavan Road, Cootehill, Co. Cavan Tel 049 555 6901 | Email: info@errigalhotel.com www.errigalhotel.com 103


COME TO CORK | WILD ATLANTIC WAY

GATEWAY TO THE

Wild Atlantic Way

THE CORK COAST BEGINS THE SLOW BUILD-UP OF BEAUTY THAT CULMINATES IN MANY HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WILD ATLANTIC WAY - BUT WHAT YOU FIND HERE IN CORK IS ALREADY LOVELY. LARGELY GENTLE AND GREEN, IT IS PERFECT FOR AIMLESS WANDERING, MEANDERING WILDLY THROUGH INLETS AND HIDDEN COVES, AND CULMINATING IN A BUSTLING CITY THAT MORE CLOSELY RESEMBLES A THRIVING COUNTRY TOWN.

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IT’S IN IREL AND. GO SEE NICE SCEN AND STUFFERY .

straight ne transatlantic. Fly go s ha t or irp A k or C egian. vidence with Norw from TF Green Pro ay , Cork’s your gatew It’s kinda a big deal ic Way and to The Wild Atlant East. Ireland’s Ancient

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COME TO CORK | WILD ATLANTIC WAY

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reland, an island nation that bridges North America and Europe; an island that has always been known for its stunning scenery and warm welcome.

We are a country that holds a special place in many American hearts given our long-standing connections. Today, Irish emigrants regularly return to sample and experience our rich and vibrant culture and traditions as well as soaking up some of the most breath-taking landscapes found anywhere in the world. More recently there has been some great news for anyone thinking of paying a visit to the Emerald Isle. Cork Airport, the country’s second largest airport, has now become Ireland’s newest transatlantic airport. Norwegian Air will commence low-cost, direct services from Boston/Providence in July, with plans to expand its transatlantic offering to include New York in the coming year. Also, WOW air is offering connectivity to Cork via Rejkyavik from nine cities across the US and Canada, including Boston, Los Angeles, Miami, Montreal, New York, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Toronto and Washington DC. So now there’s no excuse not to come and explore the south of Ireland and immerse yourself in the very best of what we have to offer.

Cork Airport is the perfect gateway to the South. When you touch down at Cork Airport, you are just minutes from the centre of a cosmopolitan city situated in the heart of the Munster region. Cork is a city that has managed to maintain its hospitality, wit and friendliness, which can be experienced while enjoying a creamy pint of stout in any of the many colourful pubs. Cork is also known as the gourmet capital of Ireland so there’s always a tantalising selection of fine foods on offer whether it be ‘pub grub’ or top of the range gourmet fare. And when Lonely Planet says “Everything good in Ireland can be found in county Cork”, it makes perfect sense to begin your Irish adventure here. Once you have soaked up the thriving city and its culture, why not explore the Wild Atlantic Way or Ireland’s Ancient East, two of our most popular tourist attractions. The Wild Atlantic Way is a remarkable coastal route that stretches for 1,500 miles along Ireland’s dramatic western seaboard. Starting (or ending) in Cork, this route leads you through one of the world’s most dramatic coastal landscapes, one that has inspired its own particular language, literature, art, song and dance.

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COME TO CORK | WILD ATLANTIC WAY

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COME TO CORK | WILD ATLANTIC WAY

Cork Airport is a great gateway to the stunning ‘Ring of Kerry,’ but first head off and kiss the Blarney stone in Blarney Castle, in the hope of gaining some Irish luck and the famous ‘gift of the gab’. The Wild Atlantic Way really is a place to experience nature at its wildest, a place to explore the history of the Gaels and their religion; a place to experience great events, amazing food and drink, fantastic music and the craic. Or choose to head east and become mystified by Ireland’s Ancient East. 5,000 years of history is waiting for your visit, as you encounter the land of the fearless and valorous Celts and High Kings of ancient Ireland. As you venture along the East, be amazed by the hallowed Rock of Cashel. Begin to comprehend the legendary tales of the isle through its jewelled landscape and recognise why this land of saints and scholars attracted so many visitors, friend and foe, throughout the centuries. Although a relatively young state, the Irish people have been a proud and welcoming nation for centuries. Cork, with its vibrant and quick witted people is at the epicentre of this tribe and will welcome you with open arms as you carve out your very own Irish experience. Begin a love affair with Ireland that will never end.

Discover “Murphy’s Pub & Islanders Rest Guest House” on Sherkin Island, one of Ireland’s most accessible off-shore islands.

...only a stone’s throw from Baltimore “The Islander’s Rest”, Sherkin Island is the ideal location for a short break, away for the hustle and bustle of the mainland. We have 21 ensuite bedrooms, most with a stunning view of Baltimore Harbour. We’re only ten minutes by ferry from the fishing village of Baltimore in West Cork. With a regular ferry service, you can easily use “The Islander’s Rest” as a base to explore the wonders of West Cork, or simply to rest on the tranquil setting of Sherkin Island Sherkin Island, Co.Cork T: 00353 +28 20116 E: info@islandersrest.ie

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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | WILD AT HEART

Wild AT HEART LOUIS MULCAHY IS CONVINCED HE’S GOING TO LIVE TILL HE IS 100. IRELAND’S PREEMINENT POTTER AND WELL KNOWN POET - THREE COLLECTIONS PUBLISHED AND A FOURTH ON THE WAY - IS 76 YEARS YOUNG AND HE MAINTAINS A CYCLING AND WALKING REGIME THAT KEEPS HIM FIT.

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or good measure the genes he inherited, on both sides of his family, spell longevity. Whatever about the odds of the naturalised Kerryman receiving a big, fat cheque from the State in 24 years time, it’s a sure-fire bet that when he potters along to meet his maker, he’ll still have his boots on.

“If I stopped doing what I’ve been doing for nearly 50 years, I’d be a gonner in the morning so I’ll keep going for as long as I can,” says the founder of Louis Mulcahy Pottery. Doubtless living, working and exercising in one of the most beautiful parts of Ireland helps to forge a peace of mind and a healthy body. Truth to tell, Ballyferriter and the entire west Kerry region is the stuff of picture postcards; a veritable landscape cum dreamscape. The thousands of exquisite pieces at the Louis Mulcahy Pottery are an artistic reflection of the Ballyferriter idyll. Forty and more years down the road, Louis Mulcahy Pottery is now famous worldwide and a brand that in Ireland stands out on its own merit amongst the top names like Prada, Tiffany, Gucci. Here, it’s very much a case of think pottery, think Mulcahy. From his base near the supremely picturesque and culturally rich village of Ballyferriter (10 miles west of Dingle) in county Kerry, Louis has built up a business over the last five decades which has become renowned not just around all four corners of the Emerald Isle but right across Europe and the US. Louis Mulcahy is a blueblood of the potters’ art; a potter par excellence whose beautifully designed and hand decorated pieces have made him unique. For Louis and his colleagues big is especially beautiful. The simplicity of his designs, the beautifully crafted and imaginatively decorated large vases, jars, urns, bowls, lamps, masks and druid figures are simply must-have stoneware and porcelain pieces for the most discerning buyers. Using a sophisticated palette of colours to generate hugely distinctive luminous glases, the Mulcahy line of durable pottery is forever eye-catching and Louis’ one-off pieces are destined to be collectors’ items in years to come. Louis Mulcahy Pottery has been the stand-out operator in the domestic pottery industry from the time Louis won first prize for pottery in the National Crafts Competition in 1970 before he moved his workshop from Blackrock, county Dublin to Ballyferriter. In 2004 he became the first Irish craftsman to receive an honorary degree from the National University of Ireland in recognition of his brilliant skills and contribution to his adopted community along the Atlantic coast. Louis himself has been dubbed the Godfather of his craft in Ireland. However, it hasn’t always been rosy in the garden for Louis and his Danish-born wife Lisbeth who is a tapestry artist and weaver with her own art business in Dingle’s main shopping street. Indeed, the hardworking Irish speakers have had to be resourceful and imaginative to thwart the ravages of a massive downturn in the Irish economy, which came with the death of the infamous Celtic Tiger in the mid-noughties. “It was a really desperate recession. It kicked in towards the end of 2006 and a lot of potters went out of business. We dug our heels in though and came out the other end. We were left with around half

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Louis Mulcahy Pottery is very much back on an upward curve these days. A gentle momentum began in 2015 which was added to in 2016. So far, in 2017, things have been going well. Working hand-in-glove with Louis and Lisbeth in Ballyferriter is their son Lasse, the company’s Managing Director. It was Lasse who led them through and out of the recession. The saying, ‘the apple didn’t fall far from the tree’ is a cliché bordering on a truism in Lasse’s case, for he has inherited his father and mother’s design skills, vision and business nous. Like his parents, Lasse is, quite literally, very much hands-on at Louis Mulcahy Pottery. He is a fully-trained potter, having spent some years serving his time in Denmark as well as Dublin. Lasse (brother to Jette and Sally) is busy putting to bed a new  computer system which will make administration much easier. “Lasse is office-bound quite a bit of the time, but he has already done a fantastic job in designing specific ranges of products for special orders, and I know that he has plans to take the business in a new and, hopefully, more lucrative direction,” Louis avers. “Part and parcel of making attractive and value-for-money pottery is trying out new ideas. Unfortunately, you can’t design by committee. The range has to be the imagination of one person and for now, until Lasse has the new systems bedded down, I’m still engaged on the design and making

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of new ranges and one off pots. Lasse and our chief thrower John Sheehy are much better throwers than me. They have been very highly trained and its quite easy for them to look after the bigger pieces,” adds the former television cameraman turned master craftsman. The upswing in the Irish economy has seen the behemoth of Irish pottery interests recover a large amount of its former lustre. While its reputation for excellence never dimmed, the recession reduced peoples’ ability to afford that excellence. But the Mulcahys defied the storm. And now with increasing online sales, a loyal customer base in Kerry and surrounding counties together with a healthy stream of visitors who come from all over Ireland and abroad, Louis Mulcahy Pottery is on an upward trajectory. In 2009 Lasse decided to expand the business by adding a café and invited his wife Emer Fallon to manage it. The café, which started off as a twelve-seater space, has expanded yearly to meet demand and has garnered a reputation for serving exquisite food in inspiring surroundings. Dingle crabmeat, Dingle Peninsula cheese and local spiced beef all feature on the menu and daily specials include savoury tarts, fish-cakes and a chilli-crab sandwich. Café favourites include raspberry and dark chocolate brownies, Kerry apple cake and freshly baked scones and brown bread. Unsurprisingly the café is recommended by Georgina Campbell and McKenna’s Guides – which all contributes greatly to delivering a unique experience for visitors passing this way along the Slea Head drive of the Wild Atlantic Way.

Photo by Stefan Schnebelt

the number of employees and half the turnover we would have made at our peak (circa 2001), but we were a much leaner and, overall, healthier company by the end of the process.”


WILD ATLANTIC WAY | WILD AT HEART

Photo by Stefan Schnebelt

Truth to tell, Ballyferriter and the entire west Kerry region is the stuff of picture postcards; a veritable landscape cum dreamscape

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Kerry Calling County Kerry contains some of Ireland’s most iconic scenery: surf-pounded sea cliffs, soft golden strands, emerald-green farmland criss-crossed by tumbledown stone walls, mistshrouded bogs and cloud-torn mountain peaks with one of the country’s finest national parks as its backyard.

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

On the Edge

OF THE WESTERN WORLD

IT SEEMS AS IF THE WORLD IS IN A STATE OF FLUX, BOTH POLITICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY. THANKFULLY HOWEVER, AT THE EDGE OF THE WESTERN WORLD, LIKE A DIAMOND SPARKLING IN THE ROUGH, THE BEAUTY OF THE KERRY LANDSCAPE NEVER CHANGES.

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ounty Kerry is priceless in the eyes of the people of Ireland and it’s a viewed shared by the 1.7 million visitors to the county each year. It is, in all respects, the jewel in the crown of the ‘Wild Atlantic Way’ and a veritable lighthouse for travelers keen to navigate their way to the most south-westerly part of Europe. Helping these visitors navigate their way around county Kerry’s unique, unspoilt terrain is a hobby locals treasure. It comes naturally to them. Hardly a coincidence then that it was technology from Kerry-based company Altobridge which enabled AeroMobile to make history when they

launched the world’s first commercial in-flight mobile communications service. Then again, wasn’t it county Kerry that put the spring in the step of St Brendan the Navigator who reportedly ended one momentous voyage by discovering the North American continent in the 6th century and over a thousand years the laying of the trans-Atlantic undersea communications cable from Valentia in 1866 that heralded the birth of globalization! St. Brendan is an important figure in the folklore of Kerry and of the Dingle Peninsula in particular. This is an area that plays host to more than two thousand splendidly preserved archaeological sites.

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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

The Dingle Peninsula is an area that plays host to more than two thousand splendidly preserved archaeological sites. A mountainous ďŹ nger of land which juts into the Atlantic Ocean, it has played host to an array of tribes and races for almost 6,000 years.

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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

A mountainous finger of land which juts into the Atlantic Ocean, the Dingle Peninsula has played host to an array of tribes and races for almost 6,000 years. One cannot but be impressed by its archaeological heritage. As to the area’s folklore, history and mythology? Wow! How long have you got? Our best advice is to have a peep at the exciting new community driven on-line Dingle / Corca Dhuibhne History Interactive Timeline project before you tramp the ancient soil there. There’s no better way to arm yourself with information on the lives and culture of the people of the Dingle Peninsula through the earliest prehistoric era and on to the monastic period, from the Desmond Wars to the devastation of the Great Famine right up to the present day. Present day attractions in Dingle are many and varied. For instance, take Fungie (but not literally, of course!). Fungie - as named by local fishermen - is the Dingle Dolphin and is a rare breed of dolphin because he seems to prefer humans than fellow dolphins and appears to be thriving in living out a solitary existence. A male bottlenose, he can be seen during the summer months catching a fish commonly known as a “Garfish” (a species which had not previously been recorded as part of a dolphin’s diet) from the mouth of Dingle harbor, his home for many years now. If Fungie takes a hike out while you’re there, you could join him in doing so . . .on land. Try the seven-day Dingle Peninsula guided walking tour. The hikes are challenging,

varied, exciting, and spectacularly scenic, usually culminating in a celebratory beer at a conveniently located pub or one found in the middle of nowhere! A word of caution. If you’re driving around Dingle and west Kerry, you’ll have to watch the road carefully so as not to be entranced by the stunning Slea Head and Blasket Sound. Traveling to the most westerly point of Europe check out the Great Blasket Centre and Louis Mulcahy Pottery works nearby. For the literati among you, the Blasket Island Centre (Ionad an Bhlascaod) in Dunquin celebrates the story of the Blasket Islanders, the unique literary achievements of the island writers and their native language, culture and tradition. It’s the next best thing to a visit to the island. Situated on the tip of the Dingle Peninsula it is a fascinating heritage center/ museum honoring the unique community who lived on the remote Blasket Islands until their evacuation in 1953. And let us remind you that while Ireland is the only English-speaking country in the Eurozone, the Dingle Peninsula is a Gaeltacht area (an area where the Irish language is widely spoken in the home, workplace or school). Oidhreacht Chorca Dhuibhne is an Irish Language Cultural organization, based in Ballyferriter (a village nestled in a stunning green valley between the majestic hill of Croaghmarhin to the south and a ridge of jagged peaks to the north—Sybil Head and the Three Sisters) and it provides a number of courses which cater for adult learners, with heritage and activity courses throughout the year. 119


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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

County Kerry is in all respects the jewel in the crown of the Wild Atlantic way and a veritable lighthouse for travelers keen to navigate their way to the most southwesterly part of Europe.

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WATERVILLE HOUSE AND GOLF LINKS

Ocean front family run Guesthouse, Restaurant and Bar opened in 1980. The restaurant has been praised by gastronomic writers worldwide. It’s not hard to see why as the Chef/Proprietor, Henry Hunt, takes pride in serving fresh local produce. Panoramic views from the dining room overlooking Ballinskelligs Bay and friendly service will give you the perfect dining experience. For total relaxation why not enjoy an overnight stay in one of the comfortable guest rooms. Cliff Road, Waterville, Co. Kerry Tel. 066 947 4330 www.thesmugglersinn.ie

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Stay at the Brewery www.westkerrybrewery.ie

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The Georgian Manor is a 18th century manor house that sits on a narrow isthmus facing the wild Atlantic with beautiful Lough Currane on its eastern perimeter. Aside from its comfort and charm, the four star residence has 13 bedrooms and a private Fazio designed practice facility. Guests enjoy preferential tee times and access to fi shing the famous Butler’s Pool and private rivers and lakes.

CONTACT

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Waterville Golf Links is a championship links rated 10th in Golf World “Top 100 in Britain and Ireland”. It is the #1 course in the Republic of Ireland whose membership includes, among players, Tiger Woods and Mark O’ Meara. Waterville hosted the 2014 Irish Seniors Amateur and, as in the years past, it is the favorite links for US Tour players before the British Open.

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WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

The beautiful Gallarus Oratory near Ballyferriter is a small, boat-shaped, stone church with a tiny window and one of the oldest churches in Ireland.

Take time to explore the beautiful Gallarus Oratory near Ballyferriter. It’s a small, boat-shaped, stone church with a tiny window and one of the oldest churches in Ireland. Sit on a ledge and drink in the ancient, spiritual atmosphere. It’ll bring you back in time as you gaze out over the bay and the Sleeping Giant. The Slea Head route also pays homage to the stunning Counmeenole beach, a small horseshoe bay which gets the full brunt of the Atlantic. Secluded with beautifully clean, soft sand, it truly is a hidden gem. Sheer cliffs and thunderous waves form a magical backdrop. Here you can retrace the scenes which were filmed for the Hollywood blockbuster “Ryan’s Daughter” in the early 1970s. Elsewhere on your trip, you could do a lot worse than to visit the village of Annascaul which is situated close to both the Slieve Mish Mountains and the long sandy beach at Inch. It is a paradise for walkers, painters, photographers or just those looking to reinvigorate the soul. Annascaul was the birthplace of Antarctic Explorer Tom Crean.

Near Cloghane-Brandon on the north shore of the Peninsula, is Loch a Dúin which is one of the most significant ancient sites in the country, containing a most remarkable series of monuments from the Bronze Age. In this valley of 1,500 acres, there are 90 stone structures dating from 2500 BC up to modern times. Guided and self-guided walks can be taken through this area. For its part, the village of Castlegregory is a hub of watersports such as windsurfing surfing and kitesurfing. The area is a magnet for anglers and lake fishermen due to the proximity to Brandon Bay, Lough Gill and Gleentenassig Forest Park. With such a galaxy of things to tickle the senses, it’s no wonder figures recently released confirmed that 2016 has been the best ever year for visitors from the United States and Canada. Our American family feel right at home over here – but sure isn’t West Kerry the next parish!

Supported by Kerry County Council Tourism Unit Further information: tourismoffice@kerrycoco.ie www.facebook.com/enjoykerry

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In Killorglin the three-day Puck Fair in August will leave you gobsmacked! It’s the oldest traditional fair in Ireland. You’ll be reminded of the country’s pagan beginnings and you’ll get to see a wild mountain goat being crowned as King of all he surveys. Party with the people and partake in the parades, street entertainment, busking, face painting, music and dance. This truly needs to be experienced to be believed. 124


gifts | food | drink

gifts | food | drink

Killarney National Park Tel: 064 663340 E: info@ladiesview.com gifts | food | drink

www.ladiesview.com Enjoy breathtaking views gifts | food | drink of Killarney's Lakes from our new roof terrace Cafe "Altitude"

South Pole Inn Home of Antarctic hero Tom Crean 1877-1938

Gift Shop * Cafe * Bar Throws * Perfumes Kinitwear * Jewelry Lace and Headwear

Hot Food – Cold Beer – Warm Welcome Lower Main Street, Annascaul, Co. Kerry 066 9157388 southpoleinn@hotmail.com

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Enjoy our breathtaking setting and a warm Irish welcome

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the difference...family run www.lakehotel.com hh

The Lake Hotel : Lake Shore : Muckross Road : Killarney : Co. Kerry : Ireland : Reservations +353 (0) 64 66 31035 : info@lakehotel.com


WILD ATLANTIC WAY | KERRY

KENMARE & SNEEM STORY Along the southernmost edge of the Iveragh Peninsula, the Ring of Kerry skirts the peaceful, sheltered Kenmare Bay. This richly wooded area, brushed by the Gulf Stream and sheltered by high mountains to the north, has an almost languorous feel. From the palms and grassy beach paths of Derrynane National Park at the mouth of the Bay, to the thick canopies of trees along the route, from the hedgerows of monbretia and rhododendrons to the green forested islands just off shore –it’s no wonder some call this the Garden of Ireland. This is great walking country, with lakes, rivers and open sea, and mountains all around – heather and gorse covered slopes to the north, and dreamy views across the Bay to the blue peaks of the Beara Peninsula. And it’s crowded with early history – stone circles, stone forts, standing stones, bullaun stones and ringforts. Visitors take to the water too – on sea safaris out into the Atlantic, or staying in the shelter of the Bay to kayak, fish, swim and sail.

Captain Raymond Ross operates Kenmare Bay Sea Safari from Kenmare Bay cruising along the section of the bay that separates the Beara and Iveragh Peninsulas – areas of outstanding beauty and special areas of conservation. 127


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Along the Ring, half way up the Bay, tiny Sneem – whose Gaelic name means the Knot – is a village of colourful houses and two little squares, where travellers stop for sustenance before heading across the mountains to Killarney or continuing eastwards beside the water to Kenmare. At a turbulent time in his life, Charles de Gaulles escaped to Sneem, where, he said, “I was at peace with myself”. At the head of the Bay, where the two mighty peninsulas of Iveragh and Beara meet the edge of Killarney National Park, is Kenmare - an elegant 17th century market town – called “Neidin” or “the nest” in Gaelic. This welcoming, lively place buzzes with 5 star hotels and chic spas, B&Bs, smart restaurants, arty shops, cozy cafes and dozens of friendly pubs with live traditional music sessions. Yet – even in the center of towns and villages along this southerly stretch of the Ring – you’re still surrounded by nature, and only ever moments away from relaxing peace and tranquility.

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IRISH MUSIC, SONG AND DANCE f estival of f ol k

Sponsor of the National Folk Theatre’s Festival of Folk

www.siamsatire.com

Siamsa Tíre, Town Park, Tralee

Box Office: (066) 7123055


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TAKE PART IN LIVING

IRISH TRADITIONS SIAMSA TÍRE CELEBRATES ITS 50TH SEASON OF ORIGINAL TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC, SONG AND DANCE PERFORMANCES FOR AUDIENCES WORLDWIDE

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ocated on the Wild Atlantic Way in County Kerry, Siamsa Tíre is an Irish cultural highlight not to be missed! As one of Ireland’s busiest theatres and arts centres it is the home of Ireland’s only theatre company dedicated to protecting and developing original Irish traditions of music, song and dance – the National Folk Theatre of Ireland. At its heart lies a professional core group of full-time performers who have grown up through Siamsa Tíre, supported by selected artists drawn from the local community, all trained in the unique Siamsa Tíre style. The National Folk Theatre cultivates Irish art forms by creating and performing Folk Theatre stage productions at home and abroad, It develops new works (its most recent production ‘Anam’ tours this September), and it trains the local community in the Siamsa Tíre cultural traditions through its Training Academy. Siamsa Tíre’s plush 350 seat theatre welcomes audiences from all over the world as it takes them back in time and brings Irish folklore to life through

dramatic narratives in traditional music, song and dance from May to September. This year’s Festival of Folk presents three main productions: celebrate typical family living across the four seasons in rural Ireland 100 years ago in Fadó, get a glimpse of the lives of the Blasket Islanders brought to life on stage in Oileán, or experience thrilling music, song and dance from the four corners of Ireland in Turas (meaning Journey in Irish). The Training Academy of the National Folk Theatre also offers workshops allowing visitors to take part in these living Irish traditions and learn an Irish song or dance from the performance repertoire.  From October to April, Siamsa Tíre theatre hosts a wide range of theatre events, and its gallery spaces display the work of artists from Ireland and abroad throughout the year. Siamsa Tíre also offers a full bar service including whiskey or local beer tastings.  Don’t miss a truly authentic traditional cultural experience you will never forget! www.siamsatire.com/events 131


Explore, Discover, Be Inspired...

Heritage Culture History

You’ll find it all in Limerick!

Limerick.ie


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LOVE LIMERICK

LOVE Limerick FOR CENTURIES THE CITY OF LIMERICK HAS HAD A GRAVITATIONAL DRAW FOR VISITORS AND TODAY ITS POPULARITY IS REACHING NEW FOUND LEVELS.

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uch of its pull historically has been down to its geography, located at the mouth of the majestic River Shannon, which fills into the river’s estuary and meets the wild Atlantic swell.

and dynamic product and one that acts as a base for and gateway to iconic attractions like the Ring of Kerry and Dingle Peninsula in Kerry; Cliffs of Moher and the Burren in Clare and magnificent Connemara in Co. Galway.

It’s the reason why the Vikings came here, sailing up the great river as early as the 9th century. It’s a reason why many still come here – to enjoy how this great city celebrates the stunning waterway as well as much more besides, its proud history and culture included.

But it’s the evolution of Limerick’s own tourism offering that is proving the winning mix for visitors. A decade or more of investment in the offering today delivers a celebration of the city, its culture, history, the Shannon itself, sport and much more besides. Probably one of the city’s greatest successes has been how it has bridged the past and present to face it positively towards the future.

Geography is also another reason for Limerick’s emergence as one of Ireland’s fastest growing tourist destinations as it is, for growing numbers, becoming a base and gateway to the stunning coastal counties of Kerry, Clare and Galway. From an international tourism perspective, having Shannon Airport on its doorstep, with direct links from seven US cities this year, makes it even easier than ever to get to. A twenty-minute drive from the airport and you land in a city with its own exciting

King John’s Castle, for example, has a storied 800year history that is wonderfully captured in a €6m revamp that includes an engaging new interpretative centre/museum that is making it one of Ireland’s fastest growing visitor attractions. There’s the captivating Hunt Museum, with its 2000 strong collection of ancient and modern ethnographic treasures and much more. In between the two on 133


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the historical trial you have St. Mary’s Cathedral, the oldest building in Limerick, beautifully preserved and in daily use still today. A former European City of Sport, Limerick is arguably one of the best Irish examples of sport tourism – a product strongly developed and drawing in tens of thousands annually. Munster rugby weekends have gained legendary status as one of the city and province’s great passions comes to life with thunderous force at the Thomond Park stadium, with these magical weekends setting a standard that’s replicated throughout the year in a city that pulsates after dark. Then there’s mass participation events like the Great Limerick Run, one of Ireland’s largest events, with 14,000 set to take part this year on the May Bank Holiday weekend. There’s an innate and warm welcome, a real sense from Limerick people that they want you here to show-off this proud new and modern coming of a great old city shortlisted as European Capital of Culture 2020. They’ve had some great cultural flag-bearers over the years to be proud of; from writers like Frank McCourt, Darren Shan and adopted son Donal

Ryan; the late, great actor Richard Harris and current Hollywood darling Ruth Negga. The Cranberries have been Limerick’s big international rock band of the past two decades and Bill Whelan’s Riverdance has become a global phenomenon. Yes, all that. Artists like John Shinnors and Sean Keating, along with Ireland’s only biennial art exhibition, Eva International, have put Limerick on the wider visual art map. Limerick City Gallery of Art in the historic Georgian part of the city, holds work by both these artists in their permanent collection. Limerick boasts a wealth of working artists, art collectives and galleries and its internationally renowned School of Art and Design has an excellent reputation, not alone for fine art but its fashion department is ranked as one of the world’s top 50 fashion colleges too Not to forget the food as this leaves a really strong taste in the mouth and a yearning to return. Given its location at the heart of the Golden Vale, it’s no surprise to find the best produce in Ireland being duly celebrated throughout the city. In fact, it’s what Limerick does best; takes everything its best known for and puts it before you on a plate with a real sense of celebration.

The 13th Century King John’s Castle in the historic King’s Island, Limerick

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TO THE

Manor Born THE PICTURE-POSTCARD VILLAGE OF ADARE IS JUST 16KM SOUTHWEST OF LIMERICK AND WELL WORTH THE DETOUR IF YOU HAPPEN TO BE DOWN THIS WAY.

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ften referred to as Ireland’s prettiest village, Adare’s main street is right out of a story book with its string of perfectly preserved thatched cottages built by the 19th-century English landlord, the Earl of Dunraven, for workers constructing Adare Manor. Today, the pretty cottages house craft shops and restaurants with the gates to the ‘big house’ right at the entrance to the village. The glorious Adare Manor is the former seat of the Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl. The present house was built in the early 19th-century, retaining some of the walls of the 17th-century structure. The manor is a feast to the senses, a magnificent Gothic pile with multiple arches, magnificent gargoyles, elaborate

bay windows and exquisite decorative finishes. In its day Adare Manor was a miracle of both craft and engineering. Now owned by Limerick-born businessman JP McManus, his wife Noreen and the McManus family (who bought the manor and its 840-acre estate for a reported €30 million) Adare Manor is currently undergoing major refurbishment and it is on schedule to open in the fall of this year. The renovations will honour the building’s architectural heritage as a Neo-Gothic masterpiece and embody the hotel’s signature style, while incorporating the latest in contemporary luxury, technological innovations and comfort. It is being expanded to include a new bedroom wing, bringing the total number of rooms to 104 bedrooms; while the 135


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addition of a splendid new ballroom will have the capacity of 350 people catering for events, weddings and international conferences. World-renowned golf course designer Tom Fazio is leading the redesign of the property’s highly anticipated golf course, set to debut in September 2017, which when complete will take its place among the finest golf courses in Europe. The Carriage House [Club House] and adjoining Manor Lodges will receive a full upgrade and renovation. There will also be a new state-of-the-art spa, pool, relaxation area, boardroom and cinema. The surrounding 800 acres of parkland, walled gardens and walking trails will be enhanced for guest enjoyment and an extensive tree planting program (over 2,000 signature trees) is underway which will add to the beauty and environmental benefit of Adare Manor for future generations. Celebrity guests have included Bill Clinton, Tiger Woods, Hugh Grant and Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones, among others – but all guests here are treated like a celebrity so if you really want to push the boat out, there’s no better place to make a splash that here.

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The manor is a feast to the senses, a magnificent Gothic pile with multiple arches, magnificent gargoyles, elaborate bay windows and exquisite decorative finishes.

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Making MakingMemories Memories Making Memories

Pulsating with vibrant life, culture and history, Wexford is the place to be this summer. With its Pulsating with vibrant life, culture and history, Wexford is the place to be this summer. With its Pulsating with vibrant life, culture andand history, Wexford ishidden the place to beyou thiscan summer. With its to natural beauty, outstanding gems, guaranteed natural beauty, outstandingattractions attractions andmesmerising mesmerising hidden gems, you can bebe guaranteed to natural beauty, outstanding attractions and mesmerising hidden gems, you can be guaranteed to create memories that you will savour for years to come. create memories that you will savour for years to come. Pulsating with vibrant life, memories culture and history, Wexford theyears placetotocome. be this summer. With its create that you will savourisfor natural beauty, outstanding attractions and mesmerising hidden gems, you can be guaranteed to create memories that you will savour for years to come.


SUNNY SOUTHEAST

Wonderful WEXFORD

WEXFORD IN IRELAND’S ANCIENT EAST, IS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES IN IRELAND FOR A FAMILY HOLIDAY THIS SUMMER. IT HAS THE SEA, AN EXTENSIVE COASTLINE WITH ALL ITS PRETTY TOWNS, THE SCENERY AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, IT HAS THE SUN.

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he largest county in Leinster and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the south and by the Irish Sea to the east, it’s also the sunniest spot in Ireland, clocking up more hours of sunshine than anywhere else in the country. The sunny south east has literally something for everyone – whether it’s a family holiday, weekend away or just a day out for lunch and a stroll on a sandy beach.

from water sports such as sailing and kayaking to horse riding, karting, seal watching or just sunbathing and swimming at any one of Wexford’s 13 beaches.

FAMILY FUN

There’s Pirate’s Cove in Courtown Harbour, a treasure trove of entertainment for all the family which includes kids’ karting, adventure camps, bowling, Pirate’s Cove train and much more.

For families, Wexford has everything – whether your kids love the great outdoors or are just as happy playing on a beach, there’s something special for everyone. For families the range of activities is wide ranging

You can sail around the Saltee Islands with Sailing Ireland – and whether you’re a seasoned sailor or a total beginner, Sailing Ireland will ensure you get the wind in your sails!

The Dunbrody Famine Ship and Irish Emigrant Experience visitor centre is a spectacular feature of the New Ross quayside. This ship is an authentic 139


SUNNY SOUTHEAST reproduction of an 1840s emigrant vessel and provides a world-class interpretation of the famine emigrant experience. Moored on the bank of the River Barrow this award-winning tourist attraction allows visitors to take a trip with a difference by travelling back in time to see and feel the sense of sadness and excitement felt by famine emigrants setting sail for a new life. Wells House & Gardens is a great Victorian house in the heart of Wexford built in the 1600s and which was renovated along with the gardens in the 1830s by Daniel Robertson. Among its myriad of attractions are woodland walks, a living house tour, daily garden tours, a craft courtyard, terrace gardens, archery, clay pigeon shooting, falconry and an animal farm – definitely a highlight on any visit to Wexford! BEAUTIFUL BEACHES If you just want somewhere great to swim and sunbathe, you’ve come to the right county as Wexford has plenty of beautiful spots – including six blue flag beaches and seven beaches which have been awarded Green Coast Awards. Courtown is Wexford’s most famous beach but there are many more beautiful coves and beaches to choose from – these include Kilmore Quay and the Saltee Islands, Ballymoney and Carne beaches, and one of the biggest beaches in the country, Dodds Rock. On the way to Hook Head, check out Dollar Bay or Booley Bay beaches. Let’s not forget Rosslare Strand’s blue flag beach; Rosslare has been a tourist resort for over 100 years and prides itself on being the sunniest spot in Ireland as it receives 300 hours more sunshine each year than most towns in Ireland. There’s also Ballinesker

and Curracloe beaches where Brooklyn and Steven Spielberg’s movie Saving Private Ryan was filmed. WALKING TOURS AND TRAILS For those who love walking, history and the outdoors, Wexford has something to suit every passion with historical and heritage walks, garden trails and craft trails. There’s a heritage walk through Enniscorthy which is on the banks of the River Slaney and overlooked by the old 1798 historic battle site of Vinegar Hill. There is a diversity of walking trails to accommodate a range of abilities and interests: mountain and hill walking; coastal; riverside; woodland; historic and scenic. There is an exceptionally varied landscape ranging from long sandy beaches in the east to the wild Hook Peninsula in the south-west. You can walk through bird-rich polders beside Wexford town or traverse the slopes of Mount Leinster and the Blackstairs Mountains in the west. In between, you can choose from a wide range of quality walks through quiet rural landscapes of diverse character and all steeped in the history of the island long regarded as ‘the end of the known world’. The Norman Way is a heritage trail that runs along the south coast of Wexford which includes medieval sites that will help visitors to understand the Norman way of life that first took hold in Ireland over 800 years ago – a true treasure of Ireland’s Ancient East. A FEAST OF FESTIVAL FUN If it’s culture you’re after Wexford’s got plenty. Wexford town is home to the National Opera House which hosts the prestigious Wexford Festival Opera every year and also includes a Fringe Festival running simultaneously plus the Spiegeltent Festival which features just before the main festival (October 2017). This state-of-the-art building is now an allyear-round performance art theatre. For lovers of food and music the Enniscorthy Rockin Food Festival (August 4th-7th 2017) is a great way to sample the local cuisine and for fans of all things Americana, check out the 4th of July America Festival in New Ross. There’s a wealth of entertainment – whether it’s the great outdoors, exceptional food, medieval heritage, cultural and historic attractions, shopping, festivals or just some good old fashioned family fun on one of Wexford’s beautiful beaches. There’s a wide range of excellent accommodation sure to suit all budgets and styles. From top quality, family-friendly, 4-star hotels, guesthouses or self-catering accommodation for those looking for home comforts and plenty of budget-friendly hostels. There are accommodation options in Wexford to suit every visitor. For more information on what Wexford has to offer, see http://visitwexford.ie

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There’s a wealth of entertainment – whether it’s the great outdoors, exceptional food, medieval heritage, cultural and historic attractions, shopping, festivals or just some good old fashioned family fun on one of Wexford’s beautiful beaches.

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Take a guided tour at the world’s oldest intact working Lighthouse

• • • • •

Hook Lighthouse is a gem on Ireland’s Ancient East located on the tip of the Hook Peninsula in Wexford, Ireland. Named ‘The Flashiest Lighthouse in the World’ by

The Dunbrody Famine Ship Experience & Restaurant The Dunbrody Famine Ship Experience is a must stop on any tour of Irelands Ancient East. This award winning family attraction, moored on the quayside in New Ross, takes visitors back in time to the 1840’s. Explore our replica emigrant vessel both above and below deck. Listen to real life stories as costumed performers set the scene for the arduous journeys taken by so many during the Great Irish Famine. As well as the ship’s tour, the Dunbrody Visitor Centre houses a charming riverview restaurant and the Irish America Hall of Fame.

Open all year Enjoy the Cafe and Gift Shop Free parking and an extensive picnic area Free Wifi Relax by the Sea and look out for seals, dolphins and even whales!

For information & bookings call:

051 397 055 / 051 397 054

www.hookheritage.ie


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GET HOOKED! WEXFORD HAS MANY BEAUTIFUL ATTRACTIONS BUT PERHAPS THE MOST ICONIC IMAGE OF THE COUNTY IS THAT OF HOOK LIGHTHOUSE, THE OLDEST OPERATIONAL LIGHTHOUSE IN THE WORLD.

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he 800-year-old lighthouse stands proudly on Hook Head at the tip of the Hook Peninsula in County Wexford. It is a true gem on Ireland’s Ancient East. Visitors from across the globe enjoy climbing the 115 well-worn steps of the tower, stepping back in time and exploring the thick-walled chambers. The tour experience at the lighthouse takes you on a journey through time; you first meet the life-size hologram of St Dubhán, a monk who tells of perishing nights spent with fellow monks in the 5th century warning sailors against dangers with a beacon they kept alight on the headland. Make your way to the second floor and meet another life-size figure, the Knight William Marshal, dubbed by the Archbishop of Caterbury as the greatest knight that ever lived. He tells the tale of his empire in the southeast of

Ireland, how he built Kilkenny Castle and Tintern Abbey how he built the Hook lighthouse tower in the 13th century in order to guide shipping to his port at nearby New Ross. On the third floor you can hear tales of times gone-by, of life as a lighthouse keeper in Ireland. And when you reach the tower balcony, enjoy the sea breeze on your face as you gaze at the miles of stunning coastline and an awesome 360-degree view of Ireland’s southeast. Finish your tour in the newly opened watch-room offering a panoramic observatory across the estuary. Guided tours of the lighthouse tower are on offer seven days a week sharing with visitors one of the greatest experiences on Ireland’s Ancient East. For further details on the Hook Lighthouse tour experience or to book; see www.hookheritage.ie 143


Irelands’ oldest city

Dublin

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CRYSTAL COUNTY | WATERFORD

Waterford,

IRELAND’S OLDEST CITY WATERFORD IS WHERE YOU’LL FIND IRELAND’S OLDEST CITY. IT IS AN AREA RICH IN HERITAGE WITH A STUNNING COASTLINE KNOWN AS THE COPPER COAST, TRADITIONAL TOWNS AND VILLAGES, MAGNIFICENT MOUNTAINS AND LUSH GREEN COUNTRYSIDE.

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ust 1 hour and 45 minutes-drive from Dublin Airport, Waterford is part of Ireland’s Ancient East and there are plenty of visitor attractions and activities to choose from. Waterford has a stunning coastal drive dotted with golden beaches with the dramatic backdrop of the Comeragh mountains.

New for 2017, the Waterford Greenway is a spectacular 46 km off-road cycling and walking trail along an old railway line which runs between Waterford and Dungarvan. The Waterford Greenway runs from the Viking City alongside the River Suir, out by Mount Congreve Gardens, through Kilmacthomas, across eleven bridges, over three impressive viaducts

and through a 400m-long tunnel; with wonderful views of the Comeragh Mountains and Dungarvan Bay. In Waterford City you can visit one of the top visitor attractions in Ireland – Waterford Crystal and also take the time to visit the award winning Waterford Treasures Museums of Reginald’s Tower, Bishop’s Palace and the Medieval Museum – all situated in the historic and atmospheric area of Waterford city known as the Viking Triangle. Waterford has a wide variety of accommodation options including hotels, self-catering and B&B’s. Waterford is also well known for putting on great festivals – look out for two big food festivals; one in 145


CRYSTAL COUNTY | WATERFORD April (Dungarvan) and another in September (Waterford City). There’s even a Christmas festival called Winterval to rival the best of any German Christmas market! One of the most popular activities for visitors to Waterford is to visit is the seaside resort of Tramore. Popular for many years with families from all over Ireland, recent years has seen the regeneration of Tramore into a surfer’s paradise, with a cool cafe vibe on the promenade. Families still have lots to do there with the beautiful beach, fairground attractions and the Lafcadio Hearn Japanese Gardens – well worth a look see! For those who like big houses and gardens – look no further. Waterford has an array of country houses and gardens to delight any visitor, from Mount Congreve; recognized as one of the great gardens of the world, to Curraghmore, home to Lord and Lady Waterford; to the grand homes of Tourin, Dromana and Cappoquin in the Blackwater Valley. Visitors to this area should make a point of visiting the award winning historic town of Lismore, where they can enjoy a visit to Lismore Castle Gardens and the Lismore Heritage Centre. Why choose Waterford? Because of all the lovely things to see and do of course, but most of all, because the people are warm and friendly and you’ll receive a Céad Míle Fáilte - which is the Irish language for a hundred thousand welcomes. www.visitwaterford.com

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One of the most popular activities for visitors to Waterford is to visit is the seaside resort of Tramore. Popular for many years with families from all over Ireland, recent years has seen the regeneration of Tramore into a surfer’s paradise, with a cool cafe vibe on the promenade. Families still have lots to do there with the beautiful beach, fairground attractions and the Lafcadio Hearn Japanese Gardens – well worth a look!

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Email: info@ainedunneweaver.com Ballymakenny, www.ainedunneweaver.com Drogheda, Co. Louth, Ireland.

BALLINALACKEN CASTLE HOTEL Luxury stylish accommodation and dining in an award winning restaurant

Situated 3 miles from Doolin Village and within easy reach of the Cliffs of Moher, the Aran Islands, Connemara & Galway, it would be difficult to find a more beautiful place on the West coast of Ireland. ROOMS OFFER spectacular panoramic views of the Aran Islands, the Cliffs of Moher and Galway Bay FOR MORE INFORMATION: Email: info@ballinalackencastle.com Phone: +353-(0)65 7074025 www.ballinalackencastle.com

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David’s Marquee Hire are your local specialists in marquee and tent hire for any event Our marquees are waterproof, fire retardant and can be erected in almost any venues making them ideal for wedding receptions, conferences, private functions corporate events and parties. E:info@davidsmarqueehire.com T; 045 861040

M: 087 4198611


CRYSTAL COUNTY | WATERFORD

A Dream LOCATION

WHAT COULD BE MORE ROMANTIC THAN EXCHANGING YOUR WEDDING VOWS ON AN EXCLUSIVE PRIVATE ISLAND?

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unique luxury resort offers all of this and more in the glorious surroundings of one of Ireland’s most acclaimed castle hotels set on its own 310-acre island.

Waterford Castle is a luxurious retreat of world class standing, offering superb castle accommodation near the coastal city of Waterford. Conveniently situated for both Cork and Dublin airports this dream destination is justifiably listed as one of the 50 Best Hotels in the World; in the ‘top Ten Hotels of Europe (Condé Nast Traveler 2016

Readers’ Choice Awards) and ‘Best Wedding Venue 2016’ by a leading Irish wedding magazine. Past and present combine at Waterford Castle where a rich and robust history blends seamlessly with contemporary luxury. Originally erected as a single stone tower during medieval times, Waterford Castle has evolved into an extraordinary internationally renowned destination, with magnificent halls and rooms each ordained with fine art, period furniture and fixtures. Unique details can be found at every angle of the castle structure from ornate original plaster ceilings to Elizabethan stone fireplaces. 151


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Settled by monks from the sixth to the eighth century, the island was taken and guarded by the Danes during the Viking era. A long line of AngloNormans, The Fitzgerald family owned and occupied the castle as their home for eight centuries. The renowned Mary Fitzgerald, a distinguished socialite who dominated the social world in the late 1700’s to the early 1800’s, was renowned for her amazing parties and spectacular events at the castle. It is said that on her return to the family seat at

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CRYSTAL COUNTY | WATERFORD

Mr Christian Schuetz & Mrs Stefani Schuetz Waterford she would be rowed in state across the river to the castle with 24 musicians on her elegant barge. Today the 16th century castle offers luxury, privacy and exclusivity like few other destinations. Imagine the wonderful sense of anticipation as you enter the massive studded oak doors on your wedding day. Think about how exciting it would be for your guests to board the ferry across to your own island for a very special day. In terms of location and setting Waterford Castle simply cannot be beaten and the authentic interior, sublime service and genuine hospitality will live in the heart of your guests forever.

“I still feel like this day was a dream. I am so grateful to everyone who made it so special. Getting married in Ireland was the most amazing experience in the world and the best day of my life.”

Dining at Waterford Castle provides an opportunity to taste the best of traditional and contemporary Irish cuisine. The Resort’s Head Chef holds the prestigious YesChef award of Best Chef of Ireland 2017. Under his direction the culinary team uses only the finest local produce and creates a truly memorable dining experience. The award-winning Munster Room Restaurant is critically acclaimed in the Michelin Guide and is holder of two AA Rosette accredited. The Resort’s Mixologist was awarded the title of National Cocktail Champion 2017 by BAIreland. Waterford Castle hosts the most romantic weddings in Ireland’s Ancient East from small intimate gatherings, to large traditional and formal receptions. Award winning wedding coordinators make wedding dreams come true. Their attention to detail, commitment and professionalism turns each beautiful wedding into a magical experience. Waterford Castle really is the stuff of dreams, whether for an anniversary, honeymoon, special event, or for the most special event of all, your wedding day. What bride hasn’t dreamed of a legendary castle on an island haven, exclusively hers for the day? At Waterford Castle this is just the beginning. Leave your worries at the shore – and leave your guests longing for more. 153


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DUBLIN:

THE ULTIMATE CITY BREAK DUBLIN IS HANDS DOWN ONE OF THE MOST AMAZING CITIES IN THE WORLD TO EXPLORE. HERE’S HOW TO SQUEEZE THE MOST OUT OF IT IN ONE WEEKEND.

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runch by the river, then roar like a Viking. Shop ‘til you drop, then walk with the luminaries. Go to a gig, then dance like a diva. Do it all in a weekend in Dublin. And that’s just for starters.

Find what you’re looking for at the Little Museum of Dublin’s intriguing U2 Exhibition. Check out the Irish Whiskey Museum complete with a taster of the ‘water of life’ (Uisce beatha in Irish). Then appease those hunger pangs with a slap-up feast of old Dublin fare at The Woolen Mills. Located at the foot of the Ha’penny Bridge it’s ideally located to take a

classic Dublin picture. For a great pint and even greater craic, pull up a stool for a trad session at Whelan’s Bar or at The Brazen Head – Ireland’s oldest pub. For something more upmarket check out the mixers at the Vintage Cocktail Club and take things late at the one and only Dice Bar. Get out and about by hopping on the DART for a trip around the bay. In 25 minutes you’re devouring crab cakes at The Bloody Stream in Howth or scaling gorse-covered mounds on Killiney Hill followed by seafood chowder in The Tramyard in Dalkey. 155


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Both beautiful, urban towns with views to die for, the Howth-Dalkey bayside ride is not to be missed. CEOIL AND CRAIC Let’s be real, a weekend in Dublin is the muse behind the music, the craic of the comedy, the village atmosphere cuddled up in a cosmopolitan city. TripAdvisor named it Europe’s friendliest – twice! Isn’t it time you made friends on the ultimate city break? Have 48 hours to jam-pack the craic into your weekend? Sample barbecue bites at Bison Bar before some bitesize culture at The Little of Museum and a world-class tipple at the Vintage Cocktail Club. If you’re feeling peckish, Dublin is the ultimate foodie city. Try traditional Beef & Guinness Stew at Hatch &

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Sons Irish Kitchen. Dine out on steamed cockles and mussels at the riverside Woolen Mills or simply take your pick from the artisan stallholders at the Temple Bar Food Market every weekend – get here via the Ha’penny Bridge, walk through Merchant’s Arch, and hey presto, you’re there. Music is in Dublin’s DNA... U2, Thin Lizzy, The Frames, Sinead O’Connor, The Script – and there are plenty more like them in town, so grab a gig at Whelan’s, The Brazen Head or The Cobblestone, join a Traditional Irish Music Pub Crawl or just listen to the tunes from the buskers wafting down Grafton Street. Grafton Street is also a shopper’s paradise and Brown Thomas store is Ireland’s answer to Harrods of London.


DO DUBLIN

Dublin is Utopia for those who love to shop, a place where international stars appear alongside gems like Siopella, vintage Lucy’s Lounge and the quirky Dublin Flea Market. Bike around Europe’s biggest urban park, discover why bubbles go down not up in a pint of Guinness at The Guinness Storehouse. Go behind bars at what used to be one of the most brutal jails in Dublin in Kilmainham or come face to face with a perfectly preserved Iron Age body at the Irish National Museum. And as much as Guinness is synonymous with Ireland, who hasn’t heard of Jameson Irish Whiskey? Well the new Jameson Distillery experience at Bow Street opened its doors in March after a multi-million euro re-development. Now offering three fully-guided experiences, you can choose from ‘The Bow Street’

option, a tasting tour focusing on the stories of Jameson’s rich heritage and on-going innovations, while ‘The Whiskey Makers’ and ‘The Whiskey Shakers’ experiences provide more in-depth whiskey and cocktail masterclasses - both including the opportunity to sample whiskey straight from a cask in the distillery’s new live maturation house. Less than half an hour from the city and it’s shake off those cobwebs time! Channel your inner rambler with a walk at the foothills of the Dublin Mountains, grab a ‘99 ice cream at Dun Laoghaire pier, hike up Howth Head, or make dreams come true at the Wishing Stone on Killiney Hill! www.ireland.com

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Priceless treasures that belong to everyone. Free admission to the greatest collections of Irish heritage, culture and history in the world.

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Free Admission: Please visit www.museum.ie


DO DUBLIN

It’s shake off those cobwebs time! Channel your inner rambler with a walk at the foothills of the Dublin Mountains, grab an ice cream at Dun Laoghaire pier, hike up Howth Head where you can sink a pint at the Abbey Tavern or make dreams come true at the Wishing Stone on Killiney Hill!

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Traditional Steak & Seafood Restaurant and Bar

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DO DUBLIN

Traditional Steak & Seafood Restaurant and Bar

‘The Angler’s Rest offers an extensive menu and can cater to all requirements to suit your budget in the welcoming ambience of it's French

STORIES OF DUBLIN threadbare-style and elegance.

‘The Sackville Terrace is renowned for summer dining, while the ‘Salmon

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THE BRICKS AND MORTAR OF DUBLIN’S STREETS PROVIDE THE STAGE FOR WHAT IS further enquiries contact us on TRULY For A GREAT CITY. TO FIND THE HEART OF DUBLIN HOWEVER, LOOK TO EVERYDAY Ph: 01-820 4351 Email: info@theanglersrest.ie LIFE AND TO ITS PEOPLE. www.theanglersrest.ie

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he warmth and welcome applied Peter explains: “Being a Dubliner is more about loving Dublin and being part of its cultural life. What to daily life makes modern Dublin’s heart beat with the vigour of the I love most about Dublin is its people, its diversity of many culturesTraditional that reside here. cultures Steak & Seafood Restaurant andand Bar the many languages and accents you can listen while walking on the streets. We are all One such person is Peter Varga. Originally from Hungary, he is different yet at the same time we are all fundamentally the same.” the soul behind a hugely successful project called ‘The Angler’s Rest offers an extensive menu and can cater to all Humans of Dublin. It’s the people,ofplaces and quirky things that make requirements to suit your budget in the welcoming ambience it's French Dublin really special. For example, sitting on a small Peter was working in a Dublin cafe when he decidthreadbare-style and elegance. ed to begin a photo project that would change the traffic island at the intersection of Adelaide Road course of his life. Inspired by the success of similar and Leeson Street is a little red-brick kiosk. Its red ‘The Sackville Terrace is renowned for summer dining, while the awning ‘Salmon makes it look like someand white-striped projects internationally, he began to walk the streets Room’ canand caterphotographing for intimate groups Phoenix room movie but it’s actually a of Dublin, interviewing thoseand the stylish thing upstairs out of an old French small The building he met along the way. wantedoftouptalk to and the menus to - withHe a capacity to 100 suit café. all requirements’ . dates back to 1928 when it was built to house a water pressure station, public everyday people who lived and worked in the city, uncovering their stories. The result is a remarkable lavatories for ladies and a telephone booth. They For further enquiries contact us on collection of character studies which captures the now serve the most delicious coffee and the welPh: 01-820 come here is as genuine as you will find anywhere vibrancy and diversity of Dublin life. 4351 Email: info@theanglersrest.ie www.theanglersrest.ie

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DO DUBLIN in the city. Ned McCarthy is the current owner and the kiosk has been in his family since 1954 when Ned’s dad stopped off for a pint after work and ended up buying a kiosk in the middle of a road! Another fabulous place for a bit of banter in Dublin is the Tram Café in Dublin’s Wolfe Tone Square. Once a graveyard, the square now provides a little respite for those shopping at the nearby Jervis Centre or for workers in the many office buildings that surround it. Sitting in this modern square is a beautifully restored vintage tram where you can soothe your feet and satisfy your thirst in a 1920’s era carriage. How the tram got here is one of the many stories told by Peter Varga:

“I was on these very narrow country roads trying to figure out the way back, when suddenly there’s this beautiful tram sitting in the middle of a field,” explains Dave. “I pulled over to have a look, and the tram and scenery was so beautiful, I thought it would make a fabulous café”. There was nobody in sight, no houses close by and hardly any traffic, so Dave drove another two miles before he found a small shop. He went inside and asked about the tram and who owned it, but he got no answers. So Dave tried a different tactic. A few weeks later he went back to the shop and bought €30 worth of completely unnecessary stuff, and then he enquired about who owned the tram. This time he got a name. No phone number, but at least he had a name. Again a few weeks later, he went back to the shop, bought another €40 worth of completely unnecessary stuff and asked for the phone number of the owner. The shopkeeper wouldn’t give it out, but assured Dave that if he left a number it would be passed on to the owner. A week later Dave got the fateful phone call. The tram was for sale and Dave jumped at the chance to buy it. Dave then had to find a builder to restore the tram to its former glory and in so doing, he found a new partner in the business. Three years and much hard labour later, and the café is open – and Dubliners love it. “I guess determination is key to success, but seeing all those people coming in, ordering, making comments on the interior, or just simply smiling and taking photo makes worth of every minute of that hard work,” Dave enthuses.

Once upon a time there was an old, worn tram in a field in County Cavan. A man called Dave was visiting friends in the area but he got lost along the way, and in trying to find his way back to the main road, he spotted something unexpected in a nearby field.

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With all the pints of Guinness flowing you may not realize that Dublin actually has an awesome coffee scene. And what better way to interact with locals and have a bit of a chat than over a nice cup of something hot and sweet?


See the city like a local. The DoDublin Card includes: • Direct Airlink Transfer • Hop on Hop off City Tour • Dublin Bus Travel • FREE Walking Tour • FREE Little Museum Entry 3 Day Card for €33

3 Day Travel Card

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DoDublin Cards available at Dublin Airport: Bus & Travel Information Desk (T1) or Airlink Bus Stop (T1 & T2) City Centre: Dublin Bus Head Office, 59 Upper O'Connell Street Online: www.dodublin.ie

The Dubliner’s Guide to Dublin

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DO DUBLIN | DUBLIN BUS

BANTER GALORE

when you ‘DoDublin’ DUBLIN HAS MUCH TO OFFER AND SO MANY WONDERFUL ATTRACTIONS THAT WHEN YOU ARRIVE IN THE CITY FOR THE FIRST TIME, IT MAY BE DIFFICULT TO FIGURE OUT WHAT TO DO FIRST.

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he best place to start is with the DoDublin ‘Hop-On Hop-Off’ tour which allows visitors to not just sightsee, but explore all aspects of this wonderful city. This tour gives visitors the ticket to truly explore the city with the very best guides. DoDublin tour guides, born and raised in the city, know the city like the back of their hand so if you’re looking for a true Dublin experience, you will find it on the green DoDublin buses. When you know the city as well as

the guides do, you don’t need a script, so each tour is a unique story telling experience, with personal anecdotes thrown in for good measure. All drivers are Dublin natives, Fáilte Ireland trained and know every nook and cranny, anecdote and scéal across the streets broad and narrow of our fair city. Racking up almost 250,000 miles every year these guys are the best tour guides in the country. Priding themselves on having the ‘banter’ with Irish and international tourists alike, the 63 DoDublin 165


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When in Rome... Temple bar is ďŹ lled to the brim with pubs, clubs and craic galore. Still a cobble stoned area of Dublin, it retains much of its authenticity and original charm while still being a fun ďŹ lled entertainment centre for visitors.

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DO DUBLIN | DUBLIN BUS drivers were surveyed as part of the rebrand exercise to understand a little more about them and the 2.5 million commercial customers they show our capital city to every year. Although there have been no marriage proposals on their buses, it seems Dublin’s fair city is where people like to remain…… eternally! A Dublin Bus driver for 29 years, Martin Connolly said; “I’ve had the remains of three lovers of Dublin City on my bus. Their families scatter their ashes in their favorite spots across the city – the River Liffey is the most popular!” The old Irish sod is another favorite as tourists visiting the Phoenix Park scoop up some of the earth to scatter on the graves of loved ones back home in the USA. It seems there’s a desire for the famous Dublin wit to travel too. One driver had his voice recorded by an Irish man living in Argentina so they could get a better understanding of what ‘craic’ means. The DoDublin tour visits the most famous attractions such as the Guinness Storehouse, Kilmainham Gaol, St Patrick’s Cathedral, EPIC – The Irish Emigration Museum, the Phoenix Park and the Docklands. As great as the Dublin attractions are, it is the DoDublin drivers that will make the tour special as they share stories about their city, both the well-known stories, and the lesser known stories too. You might find out why the Irish harp faces to the left on government buildings but to the right on Guinness products, or the story behind bullet holes on the O’Connell Monument, or ask where the Little Museum of Dublin is… one of Dublin’s best kept secrets! Questions around where to eat and where to drink are most important to tourists visiting Dublin. The legend of the little people is alive and well as many of the drivers said they are still asked where to find a real life leprechaun.

“Well there’s the Irish Leprechaun Museum in Dublin city,” Martin Connolly explains, “but if you go a bit further afield, up in Carlingford you can meet Ireland’s last Leprechaun Whisperer. They even have an annual Leprechaun hunt and in 2009, Leprechauns were afforded protected by the EU under the European Habitats Directive!” This and many other amazing facts roll off the tongue of these witty drivers. For example, did you know that Dublin Mean Time was in place until 1916 when the city was over 25 minutes ahead of GMT in London. Or that Dublin Zoo used to be home to the first MGM studio lion? Even Napoleon gets a look in. His toothbrush, snuff box and lancet are on display in the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. And then there’s the one about how body snatchers robbed boxer Dan Donnelly’s grave in Bully’s Acre graveyard and years later his arm ended up in the Hideout, a pub in Kilcullen. DoDublin drivers are a busy bunch. DoDublin drivers are a busy bunch. Between The Hop On Hop Off Tour, Day Tours, and the Ghostbus Tour they travel 275,000 miles across the city and county each year. They’re an honest lot too as one driver found a bag with €3,500 left on his bus! It was duly returned to a very relieved tourist while he was visiting Trinity College. The ‘DoDublin’ tour is highly recommended – there really is no better way to see and really experience the city with amazing tour guides that feel like firm friends. You might even end up joining in a sing-song - and don’t worry about not knowing the words, the guides will have lyric sheets on hand to help you and they’ll lead the singing with gusto. See dodublin.ie for more.

MAGNIFICENT MALAHIDE CASTLE IS A STONE’S THROW AWAY

Malahide Castle is a magnificent medieval castle just 10 minutes from Dublin Airport. The castle is set on 250 acres of parkland with a story dating back to the 12th Century. Enjoy daily tours of the castle, visit the ornamental walled gardens and dine or shop at the Avoca Café and Retail store. We look forward to your visit.

For reservations please contact +353 1 8169538 or book online at www.malahidecastleandgardens.ie

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Sweny’s Pharmacy is featured in James Joyce’s Ulysses, and is described in sumptuous detail within the novel, a description which stands to this day. Today, Sweny’s is maintained by volunteers dedicated to preserving the shop as it was in Joyce’s time. Here you will find a selection of second-hand books and the perfect location for daily readings of Joyce’s works. Not forgetting, of course, the lemon-scented soap that made the shop famous!


DO DUBLIN | DUBLIN BUS

SIP, SIP, HORRAY! When in Dublin you simply must try a cool pint of Guinness, whether it be in a pub or at the home of Guinness in the heart of Dublin - accessible on the DO DUBLIN bus trip. While you’re at it, explore all of the tastes of Ireland by heading for the newly restored and refurbished Jameson Distillery on Bow Street for a tour and a taste of ‘Uisce Beatha,’ the water of life. As they say in Dublin, “that’ll put hairs on your chest!”

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alahide Castle is accessible on the ‘Do Dublin’ tour – you can take a special trip out around the coastline taking in Dublin’s bay-side and visiting the glorious Malahide Castle and gardens. This is one of the oldest castles in Ireland with some parts of the structure dating back to the 12th century. The Great Hall is still used to this day for special banquets. It is one of the most important medieval rooms in Ireland. It was built in about 1475 as the castle’s banqueting room and today it is decorated with some

of the finest Irish paintings – some on loan from the National Gallery. The castle even has its own ghost. An arched doorway in the corner is traditionally known as Puck’s Staircase. Legend says that Puck was the castle jester, a tiny bearded man who lived in the turret who killed himself after his heart was broken by a visiting ladies’ maid. His ghost has kept watch over the castle since then, reappearing whenever there are upheavals or major changes here. He has been seen here many times! 170


Local flavor. Breathtaking scenery. Unique performances. Enjoy authentic Ireland & Britain experiences on CIE Tours’ NEW special access vacations. Limited Time Offer – Dine at a Michelin Star restaurant on us!*

Get professional photography advice from an expert.

Delight in the music and dance of Ireland & Britain.

Discover the incredible tastes of Ireland on this eight day tour filled with the flavors of farm-to-table cheeses, freshly caught seafood, world-famous stouts, Irish coffee and more. Enjoy food-focused experiences including cooking classes and talks with esteemed chefs.

Capture it all on these photography-focused tours. Spend two evenings with a celebrated local photographer who will share tips for shooting award-winning photos, and travel with a photography expert dedicated to sharing his knowledge.

Delve into traditional and modern music when you go behind the scenes to meet performers and musicians. Whether you prefer traditional, classical, or lively Celticinspired melodies, surround yourself in an authentic musical experience.

IRELAND’S WILD ATLANTIC WAY – Photo Access | 9 or 13 days, from $2234

SCOTTISH DREAM – Backstage Access 8 or 9 days, from $1864

IRISH CLASSIC – Photo Access 12 or 13 days, from $3145

BEST OF BRITAIN – Backstage Access 9 or 10 days, from $2368

SCOTTISH ISLES & GLENS – Photo Access 12 or 13 days, from $3706

JEWELS OF IRELAND – Backstage Access 14 or 15 days, from $3308

Plus you will dine in style at L’Ecrivain, a Michelin Star restaurant, when you book by May 31, 2017. With only 5 Michelin Star restaurants in Dublin you’ll experience some of the finest cuisine the city has to offer. SAVOR IRELAND – Culinary Access 8 days, from $2698

IRISH SUPREME – Photo Access 10 days, from $5354

* Prices are land only, per person, based on double occupancy and vary by departure date. Book by 05/31/17 and receive a free upgrade to dinner at a Michelin Star Restaurant in replacement of scheduled dinner on Day 5 of the itinerary. Not combinable with any other CIE Tours offers or discounts, and not available on Group travel. Valid on new bookings only, may be withdrawn at any time, is subject to availability and other conditions may apply. Call for details.

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DO DUBLIN | GLASNEVIN

DEAD Interesting IT MAY SEEM ODD, BUT GLASNEVIN CEMETERY IS A DEAD INTERESTING PLACE. THERE ARE ALL SORTS OF FASCINATING FACTS TO DISCOVER HERE AND AN ABUNDANCE OF FANTASTIC STORIES.

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ince 1828 more than 1.5 million people have been interred in Glasnevin - rich and famous, paupers and politicians, artists, warriors and heroes, they all resting side by side in this renowned Victorian garden cemetery. In fact, there are actually more people ‘at rest’ in Glasnevin than there are living residents in the whole of Dublin City. This and many more fascinating facts unfold as the story of Ireland is told.

presented a real challenge for cemeteries all over. In Dublin for example, anatomy schools and the Royal College of Surgeons required vast numbers of bodies for dissection. Adult remains fetched £3 (the equivalent of six-month’s salary), while children’s bodies were sold by the inch. Times were very hard and as bodies were in short supply, a lucrative business developed for the less discerning of Dublin’s entrepreneurs.

The key to Glasnevin’s success is the popularity of its tour guides whose enthusiasm for their tours is compelling. Brimming with banter and charm, each tour guide is passionate about sharing their love of the heritage and history in Glasnevin. And it’s easy to see why; there’s inspiration around every corner, and with one and a half million stories underfoot, there’s no shortage of tall tales.

Cemeteries all over employed a wide range of methods to thwart grave robbers, paying watchmen and erecting walls and watch towers around them. In Glasnevin they even erected a mobile watchtower that could be moved around as fresh graves were dug to keep the blagards at bay.

For example, did you know that body snatching was a thriving business back in the early 19th century. It 172

It was a strenuous business gave robbing, but sometimes they got a break when a body might have valuable jewelry on them which was of more interest than the body itself. This was the case with


DO DUBLIN | GLASNEVIN Lisburn lady Margorie McCall. She was buried in 1705. Hours after her funeral, grave robbers exhumed her body and tried to cut off her finger to steal one of her rings. As they made the final cut, Margorie shot bolt upright – shocked out of the coma-like state she was in. The terrified body snatchers fled, Margorie walked home, and when her grieving husband opened the front door, he saw Margorie decked out in her burial shroud. He fainted on the spot. And have you ever heard the saying ‘saved by the bell?’ It originated in Victorian times when people were buried with a string on their finger attached to a bell at ground level. If a misfortunate person were to wake up below, they tugged on the string to ring the bell and alert somebody to their plight. And what about the famous ‘wake’ after a person dies? A chance for a Hooley to be sure, but it also had a practical purpose; it allowed a day or two for the person to ‘wake up’ before they went off to their eternal resting place. As well as all sorts of colourful facts, the entire history of Ireland is regaled with charm and humor by the gravesides of Ireland’s great heroes in Glasnevin. The First World War, The Easter Rising and The War of Independence are all unearthed and dissected via enjoyable historical anecdotes and visits to graves including those of Eamon DeValera, Michael Collins, Daniel O’Connell, Countess Markievicz and many more Irish heroes. This popular attraction offers a window into Irish history, and the tour is filled with wry stories that bring it to life. Add in a trip to the fantastic museum afterwards and it’s clear that to leave Dublin without visiting Glasnevin would be a grave mistake!

GLASNEVIN CEMETERY MUSEUM & GUIDED TOURS

Ireland’s history carved in stone TOURS • RE-ENACTMENTS • GENEALOGY

VISIT NOW

More Information is available on the world wide web

www.glasnevinmuseum.ie

We c a n a l s o b e c o n t a c t e d v i a e l e c t r o n i c m a i l o n b o o k i n g @ g l a s n e v i n t r u s t . i e or if you would just prefer to telephone and speak to a human please call (0)1 882 6550

Irish Tourism Industry Awards 2015/16 RECOGNISING SUCCESS and INNOVATION

WINNER

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??? | DUBLIN HORSE SHOW

DUBLIN

Horse Show

WHETHER YOU’RE INTO SADDLE BAGS, HANDBAGS OR EVEN GLAD-RAGS, THERE’S AN EVENT FOR ALL IN THE HEART OF DUBLIN CITY: THE TRULY UNIQUE DUBLIN HORSE SHOW.

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orses hold a special place in the heart of many Irish people, whether young or old, home or abroad. And for those people nothing lives up to the Dublin Horse Show, which this year takes place from Wednesday August 9 to Sunday August 13. Going strong since 1864, the Dublin Horse Show is not only one of the oldest equestrian shows in the world, but is widely regarded as one of the best. It attracts tens of thousands of visitors from all over Ireland, and beyond, and presents a great opportunity for a glimpse of the thriving Irish equestrian scene. Some of the best international horse and rider combinations come from all over the world to compete at this prestigious Show, which has as its pinnacle Friday’s FEI Nations’ Cup™ presented by Longines for the Aga Khan Trophy, a prize steeped in lore and tradition, as well as the big money prize of the Longines Grand Prix on Sunday, which attracts the best equestrian combinations of the week. But horses aren’t the only attraction over this five-day event. For the entire week the Dublin Horse Show is the place to be. The Show is almost as well known for its socialising as its competitive action, which is saying something in a city that is renowned the world over for its hospitality. A great choice of bars, restaurants and eateries are scattered throughout the ground, and the proximity to Dublin city centre, make the visitor experience a really enjoyable prospect. You mightn’t expect it at an equestrian show, but if unique craftsmanship is your thing, then the Dublin Horse Show is also the place to go. Exhibiting all week are the best upand-coming craft makers in Ireland with some of the most creative examples of contemporary ceramics, furniture, and jewelry to be found. They complement the hundreds of shopping stalls that are set-up for the show where you’ll find everything from riding boots, to Irish knitwear, to art work and beyond. Bespoke hats are the order of the day for the Dundrum Town Centre Ladies Day, when summer outfits to dazzle are on display. Pencilled into diaries months in advance Ladies Day at the Dublin Horse Show is an annual favourite for every fashionista. And don’t forget the children! With pony rides, musical entertainment and face-painting the kids will be completely taken care of. Running from Wednesday August 9 to Sunday August 13 the Dublin Horse Show is an event for all. Tickets are on sale now. For more information visit www.dublinhorseshow.com

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9-13 AUGUST 2017 A place for action. AN EVENT FOR ALL.

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Experience the internaaonal phenomenon in its home town

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DUBLIN

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A NEW DIRECTION IN

IRISH DANCE

JOHN McCOLGAN, DIRECTOR OF RIVERDANCE LOOKS BACK AT OVER 20 YEARS OF THE PHENOMENON THAT BROUGHT IRISH DANCING OUT OF THE DANCE HALLS AND ONTO THE WORLD STAGE.

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rom the moment the first Riverdance performance took place in Dublin in 1994, we knew that something special had occurred. Producer Moya Doherty, composer Bill Whelan and myself, set about creating a stage show that could build on the thrill, the spectacle and the sheer creative energy of that first performance featuring Michael Flatley and Jean Butler. The challenge was not simply to achieve a working production. We wanted to open out the new vision of Irish dance, to have it share a stage with other world dancing. We dreamed that by doing so, these dances would mingle and spark off each other so as to create a performance with its own identity. It would be a performance rooted in the folk memory and arts of the Irish people, yet fresh, unique and exciting, and accessible to people everywhere. In Dublin in 1995 the first performance of Riverdance met with an acclaim that was loud with the pride and pleasure of the Irish public. Then in turn in London, the West End’s first night applause made it clear that this performance could and would travel outside Ireland to rapturous approval. But could it go further? None of us will ever forget the first night in New York, when a glittering audience filled six thousand seats in Radio City Music Hall. In the tension that always precedes curtain up, I looked across the rows of expectant faces of those six thousand, and wondered how they would react. Had we overreached ourselves? Could this show that had come from all our hearts really take another city and a different continent by storm? In the thunderous standing ovation that followed, we knew what the entertainment world now knows: that Riverdance had crossed all boundaries and taken its place as a performance the whole theatre-going world would enjoy.

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Riverdance returns home to Dublin this summer, to the Gaiety Theatre from June 21st to September 3rd, giving visitors the opportunity to experience the international Irish dancing phenomenon in the city where in all began. Tickets available on www.Riverdance.com.

There are now several companies touring the world. These companies, named after Irish rivers - The Foyle, The Shannon, The Barrow - have become a kind of extended family, even a small village. The dancers, musicians and singers don’t simply perform together; they travel the world together, looking after each other, sharing their energies and aspirations, pushing each other to new heights and to the highest of standards. I know that for the Irish dancers and all the other performers the thrill of the dancing itself is magnified by an inner pride. It is pride that comes from knowing that they are bringing the dance and music of their own countries, their own people, to the world at large. 177


TRÈS BON MEETS

Céad Mile Fáilte LIKE THE PERFECT TRINITY, NOEL TYNAN’S DUBLIN BASED BAR, RESTAURANT AND GUEST HOUSE ARE INTRINSICALLY LINKED AND ALL EQUALLY SPECIAL.

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e Bon Crubeen is an Irish-French fusion that oozes chic and charm. It offers an enticing mix for the palate with its award winning French-Irish bistro style. Think great Irish produce meets fine French cuisine and you begin to get the picture. This bustling restaurant is ideally located in the city centre and as it is very close to theatres, it is perfect for an appetising early bird menu with specials from 5pm to 6.30pm daily. If you have more time, go and spend the entire evening with regularly changing set menu from 6.30pm daily. Or you might just swing by for a glass or two of wine or a cocktail as you watch the world go by. If the traditional Irish pub is more your scene, then then head for sister property ‘The Celt’ in central Talbot Street. This is your typical convivial Irish watering hole, full of personality in the heart of the city and offering hearty

‘pub grub’ and traditional Irish music every night. Traditional Irish hospitality is on the menu at the Celtic Lodge Guesthouse. Located just a few minutes-walk from both Connolly Train Station and Busáras, the main bus station in Dublin, all of the popular Dublin attractions are within easy walking distance such as the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin Zoo, Book of Kells at Trinity College, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin Castle and the Old Jameson Distillery. So you can be in the heart of all the action, have a tipple in a great Irish pub and dine like a king without spending a kings ransome. It’s a pretty good mixture, or as they say in France, Très bon. www.leboncrubeen.ie www.thecelt.ie www.celticlodge.ie


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LIVE IRISH MUSIC 7 NIGHTS IN CELT ​P​UB SET DINNER MENU 7 NIGHTS IN LE BON PRIVATE DINING FOR GROUPS OF 20 TO 200 179


Delightful Dublin Hotel

CITYWEST HOTEL IS IDEALLY LOCATED FOR A DUBLIN CITY BREAK BEING JUST 20 MINUTES FROM DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AND THE CITY CENTRE – HOME TO SOME OF IRELAND’S TOP ATTRACTIONS INCLUDING TEMPLE BAR, GUINNESS STOREHOUSE AND TRINITY COLLEGE WITH THE BOOK OF KELLS TO NAME A FEW.

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isitors can enjoy easy access to both the city and some wide open countryside using the LUAS (light rail network) which stops directly at the hotel, for quick and affordable access. The hills of Wicklow – known as the Garden of Ireland - and the plains of Ireland’s horse county, County Kildare, are a mere half hour away, allowing easy access to Ireland’s 40 shades of green and its bustling capital, even on a short trip. And with a newly renovated lounge, lobby, bars and a newly opened restaurant; The Woodlock Brasserie; Citywest Hotel is the

perfect place for a relaxing break, a family getaway or a romantic retreat. Whatever brings you here, you’ll find everything you need on site. Choose from a great selection of spacious guest rooms – from standard to executive suites and everything in between. The recently revamped leisure centre has everything you might need including a 20 metre heated swimming pool with Jacuzzi, a sauna and steam room, a fully equipped gym with separate functional zones, fitness classes and a huge selection of the world’s best brands in free weights and cardio machines.


A PIECE OF HISTORY

In October 1949, The Irish Times reported that four plaques were unveiled on buildings occupied by Irish Volunteers, 4th Battalion, during the 1916 Easter Rising. The buildings in question were located at the South Dublin Union, [now St. James’s Hospital], Roe’s Distillery, Marrowbone Lane Distillery and Watkins Brewery. This ceremony took place in the presence of the former Taoiseach, WT Cosgrave, who also served with the 4th Battalion at the South Dublin Union. The Irish Independent also reported on the event, stating that: “the parade, which was headed by the Army No. 3 Band, assembled at Emerald Square, off Cork Street, where the 4th Battalion mobilised on Easter Monday, 1916. A colour party bore the Tricolour and the flag which was raised over the Marrowbone Lane building in 1916, and which was loaned for the commemorative parade by General Mulcahy, Minister for Education”. Each of the four plaques bear the following inscription in Irish:

There is even an 18-hole golf course on-site, designed by the late Christy O’Connor Junior. A par 70, it is one of the most highly regarded courses on the East Coast and being as it is set in Citywest’s graceful, 240-acre parkland setting, with its mature trees, superb putting surfaces and water features, it boasts spectacular views of the Dublin Mountains from its perfectly manicured fairways. But that’s not all, there is also 16,500m2 of event space on site which attracts some of the largest national and international conferences, exhibitions and events.

For great value stays when visiting Ireland, visit: www.citywesthotel.com

Ins an troid I gCoinnibh Fórsaí Shasana I Rith Seachtain na Cásca, 1916, Bhí an foirgneamh seo I seilbh Óglaigh den Cheathrú Cath, Briogáid Átha Claith, D’Óglaigh na hÉireann. Oifigeach I gCeannas An Ceannphort Éamonn Ceannt. English translation: “This building was occupied and held by Volunteers of the 4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Volunteers, against British forces during Easter Week, 1916. Commanding officer for the area of occupation Commandant Éamonn Ceannt. One of the 4 plaques, which went missing from Marrowbone Lane Distillery ended up at Citywest Hotel where it remained for many years before recently being donated back to the 4th Battalion who are currently in conversation with several institutions regarding the safe-keeping, display and restoration of this precious plaque. These include Kilmainham Jail(OPW), the National Museum of Ireland and the GPO exhibition (Shannonside Tourism). 181

Photograph is provided by kind permission of Liam Dempsey, 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Relatives Group.

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CITYWEST HOTEL, DUBLIN • 764 Guest Bedrooms • Only 20 minutes from Dublin International Airport & City Centre • 18 Hole Golf Course • Health & Leisure Club citywesthotel.com

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• Great selection of Bars & Restaurants • 172,000ft2 of total event space • Free parking & free high speed Wi-Fi

BOOK NOW T: +353 1 401 0500 E: info@citywesthotel.com

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2006

2017

Ireland’s Largest Regional Shopping Centre RETAIL THERAPY WHILE ON VACATION...

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ASHION FOOD FILM” all here for you while on Vacation. Where better to do this than all under one roof in a great mall – ideal for browsing, eating, laughter and fun – as well as picking up some great keepsakes. A shopping experience second to none in Ireland’s glorious horse county is Whitewater Shopping Centre. With the Curragh plains to the south-west and the River Liffey to the east, Whitewater enjoys a unique location at the heart of Ireland’s thoroughbred county. As it celebrates 11 years in business this year, Ireland’s largest regional shopping center attracts over 5 million local and international shoppers each year since opening its doors in 2006. Only 14 miles from glorious five-star K Club, located off Junction 10 on the M7 Motorway, this award winning center provides 1,700 easily accessible car parking spaces as well as shop mobility services for convenience and accessibility. Recognized by its airy atmosphere and architectural fluidity, Whitewater is home to over 70 high-end international and home grown brands including Debenhams, Marks &Spencer, H&M, Zara, Carraig Donn, Kilkenny Design, Best Menswear, Pamela Scott & River Island, Vila Clothing, Sixth Sense, Oasis, New Look, Lifestyle Sports and iConnect. Foodies will savor a visit to Whitewater’s 16 food outlets which

include Nando’s, Chopped, Costa, Starbucks and Quigleys Bakery, while movie buffs can experience the latest block busters at Whitewater’s impressive 6 screen Odeon cinema in 2-D or 3-D format. A dedicated customer service team are always on hand to assist visitors. Open all year round, the centre has something to offer all the family. With fashion and beauty events, lunchtime concerts and recitals, a free Kids’ Club and celebrations of all seasonal events, Whitewater has earned its place at the heart of the community. Whitewater Shopping Centre is a safe, inviting experience where style and quality merge with a commitment to providing a 5 star shopping experience to customers. It has earned Whitewater a loyal customer following and it’s place at the heart of the Kildare community. Commenting award winning Centre Manager, Ingrid Ryan said: “We very much look forward to welcoming our visitors from near and far to pursue the latest fashions, avail of all our wonderful services, indulge in our wide and varied food offerings and enjoy the best of Newbridge at Whitewater”. For further information on Whitewater Shopping Centre and events see www.whitewatersc.ie 183


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ELEGANTLY

IRISH

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hether you are seeking to join a luxury small group day tour with a handful of like-minded travelers, or whether you are looking for private arrangements - whatever the duration, an elite team of ladies and gentlemen will ensure that your tour of Ireland will be hugely memorable. “We travel in style and comfort,” explains Founder and President Cathal O’Connell. “I guess we’re known for that. But for me, it’s always been about the journey.” Broadly speaking the company offer 5 kinds of tours. Private Tours of Ireland are considered a specialty and Elegant Irish Tours position themselves as an upgrade to everything else on the market without going over the top on price. Whether you are alone or a pair or a group small or large, the company can tailor a fantastic private tour to your personal requirements. Elegant Irish Tours started out by offering private day tours to individuals, couples, families and small groups. With a private day tour from Dublin you’ll enjoy all the highlights of the regular big bus tours but with personal attention from your guide and a degree of flexibility which makes exploring new lands so exciting. Popular routes include the Cliffs of Moher, Giants Causeway, Wicklow Mountains, Galway, Waterford, Belfast, Kilkenny, Glendalough and Powerscourt. You’ll be picked up in the morning and dropped back in the evening. Travel in style with Elegant Irish Tours!

ELEGANT IRISH TOURS SPECIALIZE IN CRAFTING THE FINEST TOURS OF IRELAND FILLED WITH AS MUCH FUN, CULTURE AND AUTHENTICITY AS POSSIBLE.

Another option are luxury small group day trips. Do you love the structure and ease of day trips but dislike traveling with a relatively large group on a tour coach? Then the small group day trips may be just what you are looking for – offering daily trips to Ireland’s most popular attractions and places of natural beauty. You can choose between the Cliffs of Moher (west) and Giant’s Causeway (north). Look forward to all the benefits of a regular tour with the added benefit of a small intimate group size and the most luxurious vehicles on the market. Elegant Irish Tours use state of the art Mercedes - Benz Sprinters and the group will never be larger than 16. Enjoy a hotel pick-up in the morning and (optional) lunches at some of Ireland’s finest restaurants if you’d like to make the day a real treat! For those arriving by cruise, there are great private shore excursion options. Would you like to explore the legendary Irish hinterland? Compared to the relatively high prices offered by the cruise lines this is a fantastic service and excellent value. Tours are structured to get you back to the ship well before sailing, no matter what – so if you are calling at Dublin, Dun Laoghaire, Cork, Cobh or Belfast, make sure to enquire about the shore excursion of a lifetime. And let’s not forget about the golfers among you. Mother nature provides Ireland with some of the best golf courses on earth, so just contact Elegant Irish Tours and let them know which courses or regions you’d like to play, along with any hotel & leisure requirements, and they will be happy to get the ball rolling for your trip of a lifetime. 185


FREE HOLIDAY GUIDE & MAP

Discover

Boyne Valley 2017 Birthplace of Ireland’s Ancient East

discoverboynevalley.ie


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DISCOVER

Boyne Valley THE BOYNE VALLEY IS SITUATED IN THE HEART OF IRELAND’S ANCIENT EAST. IT WAS ONCE IRELAND’S ANCIENT CAPITAL AND ITS MOST SACRED AND MYTHICAL LANDSCAPE.

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n 1849 William Wilde, father of Oscar, wrote of the Boyne that the history of Ireland may be traced through its monuments. This remains true today. Moreover, its sites and monuments are amongst the best examples of their kind in Europe and are all within a short distance of each other. In one day you can visit the great prehistoric tons at Brú na Bóinne (Newgrange and the sites of the infamous battle of the Boyne. You can look out from the Hill of Tara, sharing the view with the ancient High Kings of Ireland, or be mesmerised by the detail of the Celtic Crosses at Kells. You can stand in awe at the gates of Trim Castle, the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Europe, or pay your respects at the shrine of St. Oliver Plunkett in Drogheda. MEDIEVAL BUILDINGS GALORE Trim is situated on the banks of the River Boyne in an area of natural fertile plains. The town developed around Trim Castle, overlooking the river to the north and west of the castle. In the 13th century it was enclosed within a circuit of stone walls. Augustinian (1202), Franciscan (1260), and Dominican (1263) friaries were established, indicating the growing prosperity of the town. In the later medieval period Trim became an increasingly exposed frontier, standing between the hostile worlds of the AngloNormans and the Gaelic Irish.

Bective Abbey was founded in 1147 for the Cistercian order by Murchad O’Maeil-Sheachlainn, King of Meath. It was Ireland’s second Cistercian abbey; a ‘daughter house’ to nearby Mellifont. Bective became an important monastic settlement, but was suppressed following the dissolution of the Monasteries under Kind Henry VIII in 1543. Nearby Mellifont Abbey was one of the wealthiest and most influential monastic houses in medieval Ireland. The Abbey derives its name from the Latin Font Mellis meaning ‘fountain of honey’. Slane Castle is the residence of Ireland’s most famous aristocrat Henry Conyngham, the Marquess Conyngham. Slane Castle in its existing form was reconstructed under the direction of William Burton Conyngham, together with his nephew, the first Marquess Conyngham. The reconstruction dates from 1785. Slane is one of the most attractive villages in Ireland, created in the 1760’s by the Conynghams, a military family who rose to prominence at the time of William III. The centre of the village, known as the ‘Square’ (actually an octagon) has four identical Georgian houses, referred to locally as ‘The Four Sisters’ The nearby Hill of Slane rises 158m above the surrounding countryside and can be seen from Hill of Tara, 16km away. A well preserved tower can be found among the ruins of a Franciscan Monastery, 187


??? | ??? dating from 1512, itself built on site of a monastery founded by St. Erc, a follower of St. Patrick. SACRED SITES The Hill of Tara was the seat of the High Kings of Ireland and the most sacred site in ancient Ireland. Tara gets its name from Teamhair na Ri meaning ‘sanctuary of the Kings’ and it is important as the traditional inauguration site of the ancient High Kings or Ireland. Although few of its monuments survive the test of time, it is an evocative place, much celebrated in Irish myth and legend. Brú na Bóinne is one of the largest and most important prehistoric megalithic sites in Europe. The site is dominated by three large passage tombs – Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth – which were declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1993. Passage tombs consist of a burial chamber reached by a long straight passage lined with stones, and set within a large mound known as a cairn. They are usually sited on hilltops and grouped in cemeteries. Although primarily burial sites, they also served as status symbols, focal points for the community, places to honour dead ancestor’s ad as territorial markers. Constructed during the New Stone Age (or Neolithic Period) the tombs at Brú na Bóinne are around 5,000 years old. Although the people who built these tombs were primarily farmers they also possessed expertise in engineering, geology art and even astronomy. At dawn on the morning of the winter solstice, and for a number of days before and after, the main chamber at Newgrange is illuminated by a beam of sunlight for 17 minutes. This alignment is too precise to have occurred by chance. It is thought that Newgrange is the oldest surviving deliberately aligned structure in the world. Constructed around 3,200 BC, Newgrange is 500 years older than the pyramids of Egypt and 1,000 years older than Stonehenge in England. The Cross of Muiredach at Monasterboice is the finest High Cross in Ireland and is highly regarded as one of the best surviving examples of Irish religious art. Christianity was introduced into Ireland, probably from Roman Britain, during the 5th century AD, around the time of the collapse of the Roman Empire. Monasterboice is one of Ireland’s earliest and best-known religious sites. Its name derives from the Irish Mainistir Bhuithe meaning ‘the monastery of Buite.’ Visit www.discoverboynevalley.ie for further information or download the Official Discover Boyne Valley App and Audio Guide.

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Image: Casper Diedrick

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Constructed around 3,200 BC, Newgrange is 500 years older than the pyramids of Egypt and 1,000 years older than Stonehenge in England 189


Ireland’s first, finest, largest, most celebrated 18th century house on the banks of the River Liffey

“This I believe the only house in Ireland to which the term palace can be applied” Richard Twiss, 1775

+353 1 628 8252 castletown@opw.ie www.castletown.ie

Castletown House, Celbridge, Co. Kildare House open 12th March to 31st October 2016 Just 20km from Dublin City Centre Parking: Exit 6, M4, Celbridge West or on Main Street Celbridge and a 10 minute walk from the village. Dublin Bus: 67 from Merrion Square to Main Street Celbridge


CASTLETOWN HOUSE | CASTLETOWN

STYLE & ELEGANCE

Personified

CASTLETOWN HOUSE, IN THE HISTORIC VILLAGE OF CELBRIDGE, COUNTY KILDARE IS A GLORIOUS SETTING IN ITS OWN RIGHT.

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nce again visitors have the added bonus of a fantastic programme of exhibitions and events running right throughout the year. It is a magical way for visitors to experience the glory of a Palladian country house while taking part in some magical events.

The programme is extensive and can be viewed online with some very special treats. For example, style and elegance comes to Castletown this summer courtesy of the Galerie Ferrero, in Nice, France with a selection of previously unseen photographs of Princess Grace of Monaco. Through the lens of Irish born photographer Edward Quinn, we witness her first meeting with Prince Rainier at the Royal Palace in Monte Carlo, a photo opportunity by Paris Match to which both parties reluctantly agreed. Photograph by photographs their story unfolds and we see unexpected glimpses of Grace’s world: the world 191


CASTLETOWN HOUSE | CASTLETOWN

of the court, of high societies and celebrities, of public commitments and royal duties and at the same time, the private world of family life of personal encounter Other highlights this season include an Antique Fair with the Irish Antique Dealers Association, the Irish Wolfhound Club Championship Show, outdoor theatre on the lawns and a series of evening concerts in the Long Gallery under the original 18th century Murano glass chandeliers. Castletown welcomed over half a million people in 2016 and continues to work with Fáilte Ireland as one of the main attractions within Ireland’s Ancient East. The house and gardens are just 20km from Dublin City and 29km from Dublin Airport with free car and coach parking on the estate from Exit 6, M4, Celbridge West. For tickets to attend the plays or concerts, or to plan your visit to this magnificent Irish Palace, refer to www.castletown.ie

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WELCOME TO THE START OF YOUR IRISH VACATION…

For all your car rental requirements, call Attracta at 1800 331 9301 Attracta Lyndon, Vice President, USA/Canada

E-mail: info@dan-dooley.ie Web: www.dan-dooley.ie

Like us on


A cruise on Shannon Princess is the perfect way to discover the very soul of Ireland. The Shannon Princess is the perfect way to explore what the river and her loughs have to offer. Guests on board will enjoy all the indulgent comforts of their own private floating luxury hotel, an unforgettable experience that will create memories forever. BOOKINGS & INFORMATION www.shannonprincess.com

Email: info@shannonprincess.com

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Coasts & Castles

Cruise Ireland’s WATERWAYS TAKE A LUXURY HOTEL BARGE CRUISE ON THE RIVER SHANNON AN AREA OF NATURAL BEAUTY, UNSPOILED LANDSCAPES, WILD FOWL RESERVES, HISTORY, ANTIQUITY AND FOLKLORE – A TRIP OF A LIFETIME.

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ll aboard on the Shannon Princess, a boutique hotel barge that cruises the fabled River Shannon and its loughs in Ireland. This luxurious barge provides accommodation for up to 10 guests in 5 en-suite cabins. Owned and operated by Ruairi & Olivia Gibbons, the couple have combined their passion for hospitality and boating into a unique traveler experience. Enjoy living life at the glorious pace of the Shannon Princess on a magical barge vacation. Cruise through the heart of Ireland, moor at riverside villages, and experience private guided shore visits. Thoughtfully designed throughout, the Shannon Princess provides all of the indulgent comforts of a private floating hotel. The classic Saloon mixes contemporary styles with local arts and antiques and it has a beautiful flower

filled viewing deck. Each of the 5 stylish light filled staterooms can be configured as twin or double cabins and all have modern en-suite bathrooms. A large terrace style sun deck with oversized rattan sofas, armchairs, dining table & BBQ area add to the Shannon Princess experience. Deluxe onboard accommodations include air conditioning, spa pool, Wi-Fi, delicious cuisine and curated wines. Shannon Princess is proud of its reputation for fantastic food, with an emphasis on modern local cuisine. Each day menus are prepared by sourcing the finest and freshest free range and organic produces from farm shops and country markets along the River Shannon and from the coast. Onboard Shannon Princess your hosts and their attentive crew delight in showcasing a carefully chosen selection of excellent fine wines, whiskeys and spirits from local distilleries, craft beers and indulgent liqueurs,

all perfect as a complement to gourmet dining or for sundowners on deck. Designed to suit all tastes, there are four distinct cruise experiences. The Classic Cruise is a great mix of sightseeing, shore excursions and cruising while enjoying all that the River Shannon has to offer. Enjoy morning strolls through lakeshore lanes, relax on deck as you cruise through ever-changing landscapes, crumbling ivy covered ruins, medieval garrisons & sleepy market villages. Extra activities may also be added on a pay as you go basis such as golf, fishing & horse riding. The Walking Cruise includes a walking itinerary that enables guests to incorporate a walking holiday with a luxury cruise, visiting carefully selected areas of interest and taking place over 5 days of the 6-nights cruise Daily walks cover between 14 & 20 km. Families will love the Family Charter, a perfect casual cruise choice for families of all ages or for a group of friends. It is relaxed in style, tailor made and above all great fun. This is a very popular cruise choice and has always delivered above and beyond expectation. Golfers will love the Golf Cruise which includes three of Europe’s best golf courses. Test your skills at the K Club, Adare Manor Golf Resort, Lahinch Old Course and Glasson Golf & Country Club. Set among the backdrop of lush Irish countryside and scenery, you will play on some of the finest golf courses in Europe. The Shannon Princess can be booked on an individual cabin basis or as an exclusive charter for up to 10 guests. Cruises are a fixed 6-night/7- day duration, commencing Sunday and ending on Saturday, April through to October. www.shannonprincess.com 195


Northern Ireland | ANTRIM & MOURNE

Thatcher’s Rest AFTER SHAMROCKS AND HARPS, THATCHED COTTAGES ARE ONE OF THE MOST ICONIC SYMBOLS OF IRELAND.

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here’s nothing quite as picturesque as a quaint single-story thatched house nestled between stone walls, fields of green and the Irish Sea.

Newgrange monument and the Hill of Tara. In fact, the world famous Tara Brooch dating back to 700AD was discovered on the beach at Bettystown – quite a find for some lucky beachcomber!

If you plan on visiting Ireland’s Boyne Valley or if you are looking for a base to discover Ireland’s Ancient East, you will find it hard to beat ‘Irish Cottages’ at Bettystown, County Meath. The town itself is a thriving village with a long stretch of sandy beach from Laytown to the mouth of the River Boyne at Mornington. It is less than a 30-minute drive from the prehistoric

In this idyllic setting Roger and Liz Pickett run their beautiful ‘The Cottages’ business. The couple are passionate about this unique oasis and you will typically find them pottering about adding features and extra touches to make their guests stay all the more special. There are six cottages to choose from, varying in size and design, all with pretty names like Honeymoon


??? | ??? Cottage, Apple Loft Cottage and Little Orchard. The setting is outstanding, looking out onto a wonderful 6 mile stretch of sandy beach all within picturesque gardens in a private hamlet-like oasis. The Cottages have been in Liz’s family since 1908. Roger and Liz completely renovated the entire property spending two years re-modeling, re-thatching and upgrading the cottages, making them state of the art whilst retaining their sense of tradition and charm. Roger, an engineer, is always coming up with ingenious ways of improving things whilst Liz, an artist and avid gardener, lovingly tends to the interiors and the picturesque flower gardens that make up the grounds and set this stunning scene. It is this perfect balance and attention to detail that makes an escape here one to be cherished. In the immediate area there is lots of choice in terms of beach side cafes, restaurants, coastal and river walks and an abundance of excellent golf courses. The cottages are ideally set within Ireland’s Ancient East, offering the perfect base from which to explore the mysterious and ancient beauty in the surrounding area including the UNESCO World Heritage site Newgrange, the site of The Battle of the Boyne and historic Drogheda town. Irish Cottages are easily accessible by ferry or plane with Dublin airport just 25 minutes from your cottage gate. Dublin City center is a mere 45 minutes away and well serviced by public transport including a train journey that takes in spectacular views of Dublin Bay. www.cottages-ireland.com

Six luxury 300 year old thatched seaside holiday homes in Ireland’s Ancient East

Winner Best Holiday Beach Home in Europe 2016! www.cottages-ireland.com T: 00 353 41 9828104

E: info@cottages-ireland.com

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Athlone Castle Visitor Centre

Luan Gallery

explore engage enjoy

contemporary visual art

Visitors to Athlone Castle will discover the Luan Gallery is Athlone’s municipal visual art history of the town through a series of interactive gallery. Featuring exhibitions of contemporary and exhibitions where the stories of its people, castle traditional art. and battles are brought to life. Bookings: Tel: 090 6442130 or Email: info@athlonecastle.ie LUAN GALLERY

RIVER TAXI SERVICE

www.athlonecastle.ie

www.luangallery.ie

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Private Parties, Family & Corporate Outing or Any Occasion Call Terry on 087 230 1981 or email barracudaboattrips@gmail.com barracudaboattrips


Image by Ros Kavanagh

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ATHLONE

Castle

RIGHT AT THE HEART OF IRELAND’S ANCIENT EAST, NESTLED ON THE BANKS OF THE MYSTICAL RIVER SHANNON SITS ATHLONE TOWN. VISIT ATHLONE CASTLE VISITOR CENTRE AND EXPERIENCE A MAGNIFICENT IMMERSIVE JOURNEY THROUGH TIME.

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limb the steps to the Castle Keep via canons and mortars to plan your attack. Climb higher still to the castle battlements and look across the majestic Shannon weir and town rooftops. Take a step back in history through playful interactive exhibitions, touch screen animations and immersive presentations. Replica weapons, period costumes, life sized sculptures and stunning graphics help to illustrate the stories of bitter battles fought. Enter the 360º cinema and witness the bloody re-enactment of the Great Siege of Athlone. Be transported to the centre of the cannon fire that raged in 1691. Explore the handling collection and country life display to discover the trades, crafts, industries and appliances of industrial Athlone. Be serenaded by Athlone’s famous son, John Count McCormack and learn about his foray into Hollywood.

Don Military garb and stand to attention while exploring the history of Ireland’s defence forces and Athlone’s Army Barracks. Athlone Castle Visitor Centre and Museum is a family friendly, interactive attraction. It features a wonderful collection of artefacts and modern exhibitions. The rich histories of Athlone Castle, its town, battles and people are all explored and brought to life from the earliest to modern times. Audio guides are available in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Chinese. This popular heritage attraction is the perfect stop off point in the heart of Ireland along the exciting and culturally interesting route of Ireland’s Ancient East. Athlone Castle is a treat for all the family, with dress up areas throughout, courtyard picnic facilities, outdoor chess and medieval tent and picturesque views. www.athlonecastle.ie 199


The Lime tree Cafe / Beautiful historical Gardens / Adventure centre Accommodation set in stunning surroundings loughcrew.com | info@loughcrew.com | +353 49 854 1356


Coasts & Castles

SOMETHING OLD,

something new at Loughcrew

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ore than 5000 years ago, before Stonehenge was built and before the Egyptians put up the Great Pyramids of Giza, there were people in Ireland building passage tombs to bury their dead. ughcrew is possibly the oldest cemetery in the world – predating the Egyptian pyramids by 2,000 years. The old Irish name for the Loughcrew Mountains is ‘Sliabh na Cailli,’ the Mountains of the Witch. Legend has it that a witch walked across the hills with stones in her apron, dropping them as she passed, creating the stony mounds that are scattered across these hills. The mountain tops here are crowned with the remains of what may once have constituted up to 100 chambered cairns. Though many have been destroyed over time, the site remains an awe inspiring, mysterious place and a fine tribute to Ireland’s Neolithic vision. Today there are over 30 mounds and cairns to be discovered, mostly on the two main hills, Carnbane East and Carnbane West. The cairns are identified with letters, Cairn T being the largest at approximately 120 feet in diameter. This cairn was once covered in white quartz like its nearby neighbour at Newgrange. Also similar to the mounds at the Boyne Valley complex, Cairn T has the Irish cruciform layout with a large central chamber and side chambers. In 1980 Irish-American researcher Martin Brennan discovered that Cairn T is directed to receive the beams of the rising sun on the spring and autumnal equinox, when at sunrise natural light pours down the passage and illuminates the artwork on the back stone. This alignment is similar to the illumination at Newgrange, which is aligned to catch the rays of the winter solstice sunrise. Visitors to the Loughcrew site can walk up Carnbane East to Cairn T, a ten minute walk up a grassy hill from a small car park. During the summer months there is a guide at Cairn T. At other times it remains locked, however a visit to nearby Loughcrew Gardens is worth the trip and here you can pick up the key to Cairn T.

LOUGHCREW HOUSE & GARDENS Take a walk through centuries of time and a landscape fantasy at the glorious Loughcrew House and Gardens. The central area of approximately six acres includes a lime avenue, extensive lawns and terraces, magnificent herbaceous borders and a physic border. Within the gardens stand a medieval mote and St Oliver Plunkett’s family church and Tower House. The church is ideal for weddings, popular on this private estate, where you can take over the entire house for parties and events. There are many pretty walks throughout the grounds including the ‘long’ lake walk around Lough Creeve which passes forest and rockery and it also has a fairy ring. Start and end at the welcome coffee shop for a quick pit stop before discovering the delights of the fine country pile that is Loughcrew House. Built in the 1850’s, the house was designed by Charles Robert Cockerell. The originally house was built and burnt down on 3 separate occasions, the final fire taking place in 1964 with the current inhabited part of the house renovated from the original adjoining heating rooms for the orangery. Loughcrew House is positively majestic, sitting 200 acres of parkland and within a valley below the Loughcrew Cairns. A fine, traditional Irish county house, the interior has been decorated with Emily Naper’s great artistic flair with an emphasis on comfort and relaxation. The house is available for exclusive rental on a self-catering basis and can sleep up to 17 people. The back windows overlook the fabulous cobbled courtyard which contains a reception hall, an ideal venue for a private party or for exclusive weddings. The reception hall can accommodate up to 120 people, which can be extended significantly with the addition of a marquee. The house can be rented in its entirety for long weekends or week-long breaks – the ultimate in luxury and privacy for small groups looking for a novel place to stay when discovering Ireland’s Ancient East. www.loughcrewhouse.ie

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DISCOVER KILKENNY in Ireland’s Ancient East,

the perfect getaway in 2017

MEDIEVAL KILKENNY

FAMILY ADVENTURE

FESTIVALS

Kilkenny Castle

Castlecomer Discovery Park

TradFest 2017

Rothe House

Dunmore Caves

Cat Laughs 2017

Smithwick’s Experience

Reptile Village

Savour Kilkenny 2017

St Canices Cathedral

Kilkenny Cycling Tours

Kilkenomics 2017

www.visitkilkenny.ie

kilkennytourism @LoveKilkenny


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SAVOR

Kilkenny KILKENNY IS ONE OF THE TOP HERITAGE AND CULTURAL DESTINATIONS IN IRELAND WITH A VIBRANT COSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE IN A SETTING RICH IN ANCIENT HISTORY.

Kilkenny’s appeal is broad. Perfect for family holidays, a weekend city-break or even just lunch and a stroll, no matter your age or interests, Kilkenny has something special for you.

and a wealth of excellent bars, cool cafés, delis and more. Savor Kilkenny 2017 takes place from 26th – 30th October and is now one of Ireland’s favorite food festivals.

Now firmly on the map as the Medieval capital of Ireland, various initiatives showcase the many attractions of the area. The Medieval Mile Pass, at just €29 includes admission to many of Kilkenny’s top tourist attractions including Kilkenny Castle and Rothe House and Garden, and discounts in various cafes and restaurants.

Kilkenny’s setting in a county and countryside rich in beautiful scenery and picture perfect towns along the River Nore makes getting active fun. Leave the city behind, and you can discover idyllic biking and hiking territory with a wide range of scenic walking or cycling tours to choose from. For a 2-hour introduction to the city, try Kilkenny Cycling Tours, or for the more adventurous, to with ‘Go With The Flow’ or Pure Adventure and have an adventure on a river! Whether you choose white water rafting or gentle canoeing – it’s perfect for groups and families.

Following an extensive five-year excavation, renovation and construction on the site of the 13th century St Mary’s church and graveyard, The Medieval Mile Museum was launched in February of this year. Exhibiting an immense treasure trove of artefacts, fine examples of medieval sculpture and Renaissance tombs, it is a highlight not to be missed. Home to a growing number of festivals from the tunes of Trad Fest (March 2017), the wide ranging Kilkenny Roots Festival (end April 2017) to the craic of Cat Laughs (June 2017) and the debates of Kilkenomics (November 2017), there’s a Kilkenny festival to suit every taste. For 2017, Kilkenny’s thriving food scene continues to grow. The Taste of Kilkenny Food Trail is one of many perfect ways to feast on the best that Kilkenny has to offer and be introduced to the best that Kilkenny has to offer. Year-round Kilkenny enjoys a buoyant artisan food community, six cookery schools, award winning restaurants (including two Michelin starred restaurants), food festivals, a weekly farmers market

There’s a wealth of entertainment - whether it’s the buzzing nightlife, exceptional food, medieval heritage, cultural attractions, outdoor activities, shopping, festivals or just some good old fashioned family fun. If you like to shop, Kilkenny has it all. From artisan arts and crafts, bespoke jewelers and unique boutiques, through to major high street brands and modern shopping centers. There is a wide range of excellent accommodation to suit all budgets and styles. From top quality family-friendly 4 star hotels, guesthouses ranging from ultra-modern to Georgian splendor, self-catering accommodation for those looking for home comforts and plenty of budget friendly hostels. For more information on what Kilkenny has to offer: www.visitkilkenny.ie 203


Family run Four Star Hotel in #IrelandsAncientEast. Multiple award winning hotel and restaurant. Ireland’s best wedding venue 2015 and world’s best wine list 2016. Visit www.lordbagenal.com for all special offers and upcoming events. Leighlinbridge, Co. Carlow, Ireland Phone: 00 353 599 774000 | Email: info@lordbagenal.com


Ireland’s Ancient East | CARLOW

LIVE LIKE A Lord THE FAMOUS BARROW WAY IS A NATIONAL WAYMARKED HIKING TRAIL IN IRELAND’S SUNNY SOUTH-EAST, BEGINNING IN ROBERTSTOWN, COUNTY KILDARE, SPANNING OVER 100 KILOMETRES, AND ENDING IN ST MULLIN’S, COUNTY CARLOW

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he Barrow Way follows the course of the River Barrow, so where nicer to stay, nested in the historic village of Leighlinbridge on the banks of the river than at The Lord Bagenal Inn? The Kehoe family run this 4 Star deluxe hotel offering riverside views of one of Europe’s finest navigable waterways. Using this luxurious hotel as your base, you can explore the South East of Ireland where you will be spoilt for choice, whether its enjoying a morning coffee in the bright and airy lobby, refreshing evenings on the 200 seater deck, or relaxing beside one of the open fires in the cosy bar area. You are sure to unwind after a long day exploring the local delights. What began as a family-run restaurant in 1979

has now evolved into an award winning restaurant, most recently winning the prestigious “World’s Best Wine List 2016” – World of Fine Wine in the #Wineawards2016. Serving food daily from 8am10pm, offering a variety of International dishes, along with daily specials prepared with the finest local ingredients, complimented by an incomparable relaxed and friendly service. Opulent fresh floral displays can be found each day throughout the public areas of the hotel - a lovely touch that brings the pretty outdoors ‘indoors’. Contemporary Irish artists adorn the walls to bring an eclectic gallery experience for the Kehoe family’s international guests. 205


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UNIQUE

IRISH HOMES UNIQUE IRISH HOMES IS ONE OF THOSE ‘BEST KEPT SECRETS’ THAT YOU HOPE NO ONE ELSE HAS DISCOVERED.

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eb based and indulging self catering visitors, the business manages vacation lettings of some of the finest, often quirky, private homes in stunning locations.

online were all beautiful, but when one steps into the home situated on a hill above the Wild Atlantic Way with the Aran Islands in view, it is a sight that is beyond words.”

The aim is to offer a premium experience to guests from the outset, and the Unique Irish Homes website has an obsessive appeal that holiday browsers find as irresistible as flicking through a favourite magazine.

Some of the homes particularly exemplify ‘unique’. Mularchy’s Chalet for example, is a tiny one room home that hangs on the side of a cliff in County Waterford. Sleeping accommodation is on a mezzanine platform and there is a Michelin star restaurant a few yards away. It is one of the most consistently popular rentals. By contrast, Careysville House is a six-bedroom Georgian country house on the Blackwater in County Cork. Overseeing a 150-acre estate, it carries the fishing rights to one of the finest stretches of water in Ireland. The first Irish salmon of 2017 was caught here.

Each individual home has a dedicated page with ample photographs to illustrate rather than exaggerate a short summary of the location, as well as suggested links to local activities or hobbies. The homes themselves are mostly second homes for the owners and come with all the accumulated personal character and charm that that implies. “In fact it felt more like having been lent a lovely house by good friends than a rental. It is spacious and extremely comfortable, good beds, linens, comfortable couches, an extremely well equipped kitchen if you are into cooking, which I am.” writes one visitor in the review section of The Hollies. Another guest in Sea Mist offers “The home and location were beyond our expectations! The pictures

Above all, the Dublin based promoters want the visitor experience to be relaxing. “I see the role of Unique Irish Homes as a facilitator, for all the people like me, who want our holiday experience to be comfortable, relaxing and completely individual – and that’s what we do.” explains Rosie Campbell. www.uniqueirishhomes.ie 207


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

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NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Ceoil, Craic & Craft The craft scene in Ireland is vibrant and dynamic, offering a range of different skills from weaving and pottery to glass blowing and woodwork. Discover the cultural traditions that have been passed down through the generations and see how some of the island’s oldest creative techniques are used today. Look out for the small studios dotted throughout tiny villages and in coastal towns and see where the makers ďŹ nd their inspiration. With local talent and a rich heritage, Ireland really is the place to experience authentic craft and excellent design. 209


Breaking the Mold Belleek Pottery craftspeople create every piece of pottery by hand using techniques that have been perfected down through the generations since 1857. Each piece of Belleek passes through 16 pairs of hands from design to ďŹ nished piece ensuring the tradition of quality and perfection is maintained.


IRISH CRAFT

CELEBRATING 160 YEARS

Belleek Pottery 1857 - 2017 2017 IS A VERY SPECIAL YEAR AS BELLEEK POTTERY CELEBRATES ITS 160TH ANNIVERSARY!

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he historic Pottery boasts a reputation of product excellence that dates back to 1857 when founder John Caldwell Bloomfield declared that any piece with even the slightest flaw should be destroyed. Over 160 years later, this golden rule is still strictly adhered to - the result is perfection. Each piece of Belleek is created by 16 individual artisans. From design to production to quality control, the process has changed very little since 1857. Belleek Designers continue to develop signature designs reflecting the heritage of Belleek including the world renowned, artisanal baskets. Each porcelain basket is hand-woven and decorated with delicate flowers, each crafted, applied and painted by master artists. To celebrate this remarkable milestone, Belleek designers have gone back to the archives and reintroduced a truly special collection of pieces representing a wide range of design, skill and craftsmanship that has flourished over the past 160 years. The Belleek Archive Collection comprises sixteen very special pieces, each representing a decade in the rich heritage of Belleek since its foundation in 1857. Each item is a numbered Limited Edition with its own special backstamp, a ‘must have’ for every Belleek Collector! The Collection boasts an impressive range of figurines. The earliest piece in the Archive Collection is the Group of Greyhounds representing the decade 1857 – 1867. This impressive group of four greyhound figurines was designed sometime before 1867 by Reverend Halahan Dunbar, a good friend of Robert Armstrong, one of the founders of Belleek Pottery. There are twenty separate moulds used in the production of this elaborate figurine! The world renowned craft of Belleek basket making is showcased beautifully with the Henshall Handled Basket representing the decade 1887 – 1897. This beautiful handled basket is named after William Henshall who came to Belleek in 1867 bringing the skills & art of porcelain basket & flower making. Over the next forty years he developed the art, designing over twenty different baskets. The Henshall Handled Basket features 60 leaves, 40 pips & buds and 29 flowers, all handmade, hand-applied and hand-painted in beautiful pastel colours!

One of the most iconic pieces in the Archive Collection is the Round Tower Centrepiece representing the decade (1897 – 1907). This piece was designed in the latter part of the 19th Century. It is based on the Belleek trademark and may have been made originally as an exhibition piece as it is not shown in any early catalogues. It was rediscovered in the early 1980s and head modeller Hugh Gallagher was able to find all the mould parts and reassemble the piece! A much sought after piece from the Archive Collection is the Papillon Vase representing the decade 1987 – 1997. This colourful vase is based on an old hand painted earthenware vase made by Belleek in the 19th Century the Papillion Vase was created for the Belleek Collectors International Society in 1933. Less than one hundred were made on that occasion, making it a very collectable and much sought after! Each piece in the collection has been carefully chosen and there truly is something for everyone from figurines, baskets, tableware, vases, a statuesque Mantel Clock and a last but least the 160th Anniversary Plate which beautifully depicts a image of the Belleek Pottery building in the 1860s alongside the same scene as it is today. It is the fusion of the quality, craftsmanship and heritage of Belleek that has ensured it has not only survived but has thrived over the past 160 years and we now look forward to the continued strength and success of this truly special brand for generations to come! www.belleek.com 211


www.irishcraftsonline.com

WE SHIP WORLDWIDE . . . from Doolin on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

IRISH CRAFTS Doolin, Co. Clare, Ireland.

IrishCraft-213*276mm.indd 1

Tel: +353 (0)65 7075 836

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Is fear lán doirn de cheird ná lán mála d’ór

“A HANDFUL OF SKILL IS BETTER THAN A BAGFUL OF GOLD” THIS OLD IRISH PROVERB RINGS TRUE FOR THE MANY TALENTED CRAFTERS THROUGHOUT RURAL IRELAND WHERE SKILLS ARE PASSED FROM ONE GENERATION TO THE NEXT, OFTEN WITHIN THE SAME FAMILY.

Traditional Crafters seldom use written measurements or patterns, instead relying on the skills & accuracy developed through rigorous apprenticeship & experience. From the Donaghys in Donegal, to the Hardings in Cork; small independent family crafters create unique & beautiful things. “We do things our way, the old way and the best way” says Simon Harding, of Lee River Leather. Simon learned his trade from his dad Peter & prides himself in producing durable leather goods with detailed Celtic embossing “our belts and wallets have travelled the world and are still going 25 years later”. In the scenic, Gaeltacht village of Kilcar, Wendy & Kevin Donaghy proudly handed over the reins of their beloved Studio Donegal to their son. This iconic weaving business is renowned for hand-woven excellence, producing beautiful, timeless garments. Tristan is proud to carry on their traditional values “Our genuine handwoven tweed sells all over the world in exclusive top end craft shops. We have maintained our brand ethos of being the only

genuine hand- weaving mill in Ireland and that will always be our hallmark”. That said, it’s not enough for this generation to simply follow in the footprints of the past, they need to find ways to use their traditional skills to create contemporary crafts. No one knows this more so than Anne Beehan of Áine Knitwear in Clonlara, Co. Clare, Anne grew up watching her grandmother knit and fell in love with the intricacy & elegance of Aran Knitting, starting to knit herself at just four years of age. She feels there is a growing market for hand-crafted garments that marry the traditional with modern design. “It’s about creating the next generation of Irish Knitwear — updating traditional Aran knitwear and creating a classic look” Ireland has a proud heritage of craftsmanship, innovation and creativity – there are many wonderful products lovingly produced on a daily basis – it’s now time to explore & find your very own “little piece of Ireland”, visit Irish Crafts, Doolin, Co. Clare. www.irishcraftsonline.com 213


Siopa na bhFíodóirí

Recommended by leading guide books.

THE WEAVERS’ SHOP, DINGLE, KERRY, IRELAND

We make and sell Lisbeth Mulcahy’s exclusive designs in weaving. The shop also stocks work by other Irish designer/makers | pottery | knitwear | jewellery | candles | leather | prints | cards | toys

T: +353 66 9151688

www.lisbethmulcahy.com


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A DINGLE DELIGHT

FRAMED BY ITS FISHING PORT, DINGLE PENINSULA’S CHARMING LITTLE CAPITAL MANAGES TO BE QUAINT WITHOUT EVEN TRYING.

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n the heart of its colourful high street you will find Siopa na bhFíodóirí (The Weavers’ Shop) the combined studio and retail outlet of Lisbeth Mulcahy, one of Ireland’s best known designer/weavers and tapestry artists. Lisbeth loves her surroundings and like many in her field, she takes her inspiration from the glorious landscape and colors of her surroundings. “I started weaving shortly after moving to Chorca Dhuibhne (The Dingle Peninsula) way back in 1975 where I found my creative home. I opened Siopa na bhFhíodóirí (The Weavers’ Shop), my weaving studio and shop in Dingle in 1986. “I design all the woven goods on sale in the shop and while the scarves, stoles and throws are made by contract weavers in Kerry and Donegal (in order to keep them affordable), I make the wall hangings in the weaving room which is open to view from the shop. “I only sell my work from Siopa na bhFíodóirí and through my on-line shop at www.lisbethmulcahy.

com with a limited selection being available at Potadóireacht na Caolóige/Louis Mulcahy Pottery.” As well as the standard wall hangings, Lisbeth makes unique woven tapestries inspired by the amazing landscape of west Dingle where “living right on the edge of the world, I feel so in touch with the elements and so close to the Universe. “ Currently most of her work is made for exhibitions, but Lisbeth also works to commission and has made 15 large tapestries for the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs. These tapestries are hung in Irish Embassies around the world. Lisbeth has also made tapestries for corporate businesses, the church and for private customers, both in Ireland and around the world. “I make all this work in my studio at home” she explains. If visiting these parts, it is well worth stopping in to the pretty Siopa (a listed building) where you can see Lisbeth at work and maybe take a little bit of Dingle home with you.

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IRISH CRAFT

A CRAFTY

JAUNT

GOING FOR A ‘JAUNT’ IS A WELL KNOW PHRASE IN IRELAND. IT MEANS GOING FOR A LEISURELY TRIP AND IT DERIVES ITS NAME FROM THE JAUNTING CAR, WHEN PEOPLE WOULD TAKE A JAUNT OUT ON AN OPEN TOPPED HORSE DRAWN CARRIAGE, BLANKETS AT THE READY TO KEEP OUT THE COLD.

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arm wooly blankets and scarves are pretty essential in these parts, particularly in times gone by when the only central heading was the comfort of a cape like blanket thrown over the shoulder. Today the tradition lives on in a different way, and you can experience the jaunt and the blankets while out discovering the Killarney National Park from the best vantage point ever. If you visit Killarney in County Kerry, then a trip on a jaunting car is a must. The tradition of the jaunt and the families that operate the cars date back hundreds of years, like Killarney Jaunting Cars - a family run business operating here for over 220 years. Today the business is operated by Michael Tangney Senior and his children Paul, Laura & Michael. Michael Senior ran his first jaunting car tour back in 1959 when he took Gloria De Haven (an American Actress) on a tour of the National Park. Throughout his life he has met many people from all walks of life and in 2011 he was delighted to welcome back one of his dearest friends’ Maureen O’Hara to Killarney, and she shared some fond memories of her time on a jaunting car with John Wayne in the film “The Quiet Man.” Your ‘jaunt’ takes in the glorious Muckross House, a nineteenth century Victorian mansion set against the stunning beauty of Muckross lake and the National Park. As a source of inspiration, Killarney comes close to perfection, which is something that the folks at Mucros Weavers happily agree with. The magnificent scenery and nature of Killarney National Park with its distinctive combination of mountains, lakes, woods and waterfalls under ever changing skies, provide inspiration to Master Weaver John Cahill, who designs and weaves the products produced by Mucros Weavers in the beautiful surroundings of Muckross House. “We weave scarves using only the finest quality yarns, on believe it or not, Hattersly looms that are almost 200 years old. The older the loom the softer the scarf! Because all our scarves are individually woven they have a selvedge on each side ensuring they will last and its gives each scarf its quality finish,” explains John. Colorful scarves, stoles, capes and rugs are made from premium yarns such as wool, mohair and alpaca. The range is complimented with a variety of ladies and gents tweed headwear as well as lady’s capes and gent’s waistcoats in tweeds to match the headwear. All products are exquisitely soft and artfully woven. From humble beginnings, Mucros Weavers have grown to supply over one hundred shops worldwide, in countries such as the USA, Canada, France, Germany and Japan. The company is also delighted to have had several garments purchased by National Geographic for the N G online store, all the sales of which go to supporting national park areas, conservation and wildlife which is something close to their hearts in Muckros. 216


NORTHERN LIGHTS | DONEGAL

Take a Jaunting car out through the Killarney National Park to Muckross House. There you can see life as it was centuries ago on Muckross Farm and bring home some genuine Irish craft from Mucros Weavers 217


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Liz actually mixes the colours and dyes the wool herself. “I have total control, yet no control as there is always some magic in the air,� she laughs.

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THE LOOM IN BLOOM ANY DISCERNING VISITOR TO IRELAND WANTS TO FIND THE ESSENCE OF THE PLACE - TO EXPERIENCE THE ART, HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE COUNTRY AS IT IS TODAY, IN 2017.

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rish writers, poets, artists and artisans reflect the real, inner Ireland in their work. One such person is Liz Christy, a textile designer, hand-weaver and artisan who paints with wool and the loom is her canvas. Located outside Castleblayney in County Monaghan, Liz’s studio looks out on to the beautiful rolling hills (drumlins) of the Monaghan countryside. Every day Liz sees wonderful, vivid colours in the local landscape. This, together with inspiration from Impressionist artists (particularly Claude Monet) fills Liz with ideas which Monaghan’s Queen of Colour translates into beautifully hand-woven scarves, wraps and throws.

Liz Christy’s work really can be described as pieces of ‘Wearable Art’. The National Gallery of Ireland commissioned Liz to interpret their most popular painting, Meeting on the Turret Stairs by Sir Frederic William Burton RHA (1816 – 1900) into a scarf. The vivid blues and reds of the scarf are very striking and it is currently available in the gallery shop after numerous re-orders. Liz loves talking about her work and explaining how she takes inspiration from all that she sees and reads.

She takes great pride in keeping the age old craft of hand weaving alive and reveals the story behind every scarf, wrap and throw. Her studio is open to the public for demonstrations and visitors are amazed at the speed of the shuttle on the loom. “Visitors love to see the loom coming alive,” says Liz, “and to see how the intricate patterns, shapes and colour of the wool takes on a life of its own. There is definitely something mystical and magical about the entire process.” The birthplace of the poet Patrick Kavanagh and the Kavanagh Museum are just 10 miles from Liz’s Studio. The Stony Grey Soil of Monaghan is reflected in her Kavanagh Collection with the muted greys, browns and autumnal reds of the scarves, wraps and throws as lyrical as Kavanagh’s poetry. For the independent traveler there is much to see and do, on, as Robert Frost puts it, ‘the road less traveled,’ and Ireland’s Ancient East epitomises this. County Monaghan alone is full of artists and artisans, from Liz Christy hand-weaver to batik and glass artists, to ceramicists and furniture makers. Check out www.lizchristy.com and make contact with Liz to visit her at Swallow Studios and see her wearable Art in the making. 219


IRISH CRAFT

WEST END KNITWEAR 2017 MARKS THE 60TH ANNIVERSARY OF WEST END KNITWEAR LTD. TODAY, THE THIRD GENERATION OF THIS FAMILY BUSINESS HAVE THEIR EYES FIRMLY FIXED ON THE FUTURE.

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n 1957, after creating beautiful Aran designs with her mother and grandmother for many years, Molly Cullen recognized a market for fashionable Aran style knitwear and established West End Knitwear Ltd in her home village of Monasterevin. Proud to keep the tradition alive, West End Knitwear Ltd was continued by Molly’s sons Paul and John Cullen who saw the opportunity to incorporate the best traditional aspects of their mother’s Aran sweaters into modern and fashionable styles. These new styles became the benchmark for modern Aran cable knit sweaters. Today West End Knitwear Ltd is the largest Aran knitwear producer in the world with a vibrant workforce under Molly’s grandsons Niall and Barry Cullen. Both their Aran Crafts and Nua collections are manufactured to the highest standards using the finest quality materials: merino wool, pure new wool, linen/cotton, cashmere and introducing new super-soft merino wool. West End Knitwear are hugely appreciative of all who have supported them over the last 60 years and they look forward to a bright future and another 60 years.

IF YOU ARE VISITING THE IRELAND SHOW IN SECAUCUS, POP OVER TO SEE WEST END KNITWEAR IN SUITE #513 220


Northern Ireland | ANTRIM & MOURNE

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JAM ART ROOTED IN A DESIRE TO SHOWCASE THE ABUNDANT AND TALENTED ARTISTS EMERGING IN IRELAND TODAY, JAM ART FACTORY FIRST OPENED ITS DOORS ON PATRICK STREET, IN THE HEART OF DUBLIN’S HISTORIC LIBERTIES IN 2011.

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ince then, this independent gallery and design shop has been showcasing smart, contemporary Irish art to a growing band of avid fans. Handpicked artists fill the gallery with fresh concepts in print, using both traditional and contemporary techniques. Jam Art Factory stock ceramics, textiles, jewelry and street art in strange and wonderful forms, always working with the artists to create exciting new designs. In 2013, brothers Mark and John opened a second location in the lively surrounds of Crown Alley in Temple Bar, and today, Jam Art Factory ships prints all over the world, providing a platform for independent artists to exhibit their work and solving all your home and gift dilemmas! They have two websites www.jamartfactory.com for pretty much everything and jamartprints.com solely for prints.


Northern Ireland | ANTRIM & MOURNE

Artist Adrian Margey in his Portrush Studio

‘Carrick-a-Rede Adventurers’ by Adrian Margey

ARTIST ADRIAN MARGEY’S OPEN-STUDIO WEEKENDS

On the North Coast

THE STUNNING WORK OF PORTRUSH BASED ARTIST ADRIAN MARGEY HAS BEEN TAKING THE ART MARKET IN NORTHERN IRELAND BY STORM IN RECENT YEARS.

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ailed by the Belfast Telegraph as “one of the rising stars of a new generation of Ulster artists”, his innovative depictions of Irish landscape, iconic landmarks, and musical traditions have been captivating art lovers throughout Ireland and beyond. Self-taught, Adrian cites the Fauves, the Irish Impressionists and the indigenous artists of South America as his main influences. He combines a kaleidoscope palette with lazy brushstrokes and expressive knife work to create his distinctive originals. His use of bold colour, strong shapes and expressive texture conjures up moods and often evokes an emotional response from the viewer. From dynamic Belfast and Dublin cityscapes to nostalgic depictions of Donegal, Connemara and the Mourne Mountains, Adrian’s creations truly bring Ireland’s beauty to life on canvas. It is however Adrian’s ability to capture the essence of his beloved North Coast that has brought the artist most notoriety in recent years. So inspired by the areas landscape, Adrian has moved his studio and gallery space to the seaside town of Portrush which boasts three sandy beaches and the world renowned

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Royal Portrush Golf Club. Adrian’s spacious gallery space overlooking the Atlantic provides visitors with a welcome refuge from the elements and houses a wide selection of the artist’s contemporary and traditional original pieces and limited edition prints. The gallery is open to the public each Saturday from 11am – 6pm throughout the year. In July and August the gallery is open Friday – Sunday 11am – 6pm. Viewings can be arranged outside of these times by phoning ahead. During your visit you will more than likely find the artist at the easel and on hand to discuss the work on show and guide those interested in commissioning a piece through the process. Whether you are wanting to add to your collection or simply have a relaxing browse, this well stocked gallery and artist’s studio overlooking the Atlantic is a must visit destination if you are heading to the North Coast. For further information please visit www.portrushgallery.com or Tel: 07841593762. Adrian holds regular exhibitions across Ireland each year. Details of these exhibitions can be found on his website – www.adrianmargey.com.


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‘Heat of the Moment’

‘Donegal Road’

‘The Road Home’

‘Ballintoy Harbour Calm’

H&W Reflections

‘Dunluce Dreams’

‘Majestic Causeway’

‘City Nights, Belfast’

‘Mussenden Memory’

‘White Park Bay’

‘Glenveagh Moods’

‘Whiterocks from Royal Portrush’

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Martina Hamilton CO LLEC TI ON

Made in Sligo, Ireland

www.thecatandthemoon.ie


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Celtic Jewels PRIZED BY MEN AND WOMEN ALIKE, CELTIC JEWELRY IS A TREASURE AMONG POSSESSIONS BECAUSE OF ITS UNIQUENESS IN BEAUTY AND SYMBOLISM.

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wing to its lasting power, many metal Celtic jewelry pieces have been discovered over the centuries. One common item found are torcs, a metal ring worn around the neck and fastened usually to the front. Often worn in conflict, warriors would wear nothing but the torc as they marched into battle. In fact, Cassius wrote about how the great Boudicca went into battle wearing nothing but a great necklace of twisted gold (a torc worn snuggly around her neck). Around the same time that Celtic culture found its way into Ireland, the Irish Iron Age took hold, combining the new Celtic culture with old Irish and pagan customs. While iron was used for tools, jewelry and other pieces were made from the more impressive and long-lasting bronze and gold as these metals became available. Torcs or collars are associated with prestige in Celtic

culture; kings and gods would wear them. One example of a surviving torc is the Broighter Collar. The Broighter Collar was found with the Broighter Hoard, which also included many other pieces of ornate jewelry. The collar is made of gold and decorated with a curved, geometric pattern that is typical of Celtic art at the time. At around 600 AD, Christianity began to surface in Ireland. The Christian influence resulted in crosses, which were very common around the ninth century. Religious beliefs then mixed with Celtic and Irish art, producing a new style of illumination most notably in manuscripts - the Book of Kells being the best example. This form of decoration maintains the geometric, interlaced style that we associate with Celtic jewelry. Celtic influence is still very strong in Irish jewelry today. It is used today to honor Irish and Celtic history and tradition. Through modern Celtic jewelry, the masterful craft and values of the past live on. 227


Northern Ireland | ANTRIM & MOURNE

MARTINA HAMILTON

Jewelry Design

MULTI-AWARD WINNING JEWELRY DESIGNER, MARTINA HAMILTON WORKS FROM HER STUDIO IN SLIGO TOWN WITH HER SMALL TEAM OF MASTER GOLDSMITHS.

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ewelry Designer Martina Hamilton is the owner of The Cat and the Moon Craft Boutique in Sligo, which showcases her personally curated selection of work from Irelands leading artisan craft makers. She is also the director of the Hamilton Gallery in Sligo, which hosts monthly solo exhibitions by Ireland’s leading visual artists. Martina’s own jewelry designs are focused on delivering statement pieces, around which complementary collections are then created. She works exclusively in hallmarked sterling silver and gold. She has enjoyed many prestigious commissions, including the creation of bespoke cufflinks for President Barak Obama during the Saint Patrick’s Day celebrations in Washington DC.

Two new collections are launched by Martina each year. Her most recent are the Island Link and Shore collections. Island Link is inspired by her discovery of a lost chapter in her family history and the links she has begun to forge with her ancestors and their family descendants who lived on the beautiful tiny Dernish Island, just off the coast of her native Sligo. The collection features bracelets and necklaces of hand crafted individually intertwined links and sculpted bars, made in sterling silver and rose gold, combined on sterling silver chain. “My ancestral links to Dernish became a very important focal point for me over the last couple of years,” she explains. “Dernish is no longer an inhabited island, there are now just remnants of the small but thriving community and homesteads that had lived there up until 40 years ago. Exploring the island, meeting people and distant family members with whom I now know I share a

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heritage has given me an even deeper sense of connection with Sligo.” “It was rough weathered iron mooring rings on the wall at Milk Harbour helped me begin the collection. These simple rings were used to tie off the boats that linked island life to the mainland. I watched the tide coming in, and watched it beginning to cut Dernish off from the mainland, with looping channels of ocean water forced in around the north and south edges of the island. The encircling water inspired me to introduce an almost liquid-like finish to the new collection”. “I would love this link collection to hold the possibility of a story for the wearer; that the natural simplicity of different links and forms will invite the wearer to create their personal narrative around the elements of the piece, that it might embody new links to loved ones, links to family and friends, to the past and to the future.” Sligo (the shelly place) has inspired Martina’s work for many years and was the inspiration for her Shore collection. “Sligo is such an historic place, there are shellfish middens found around the coastline dating back thousands of years to Neolithic and Mesolithic times proving our county is amongst the oldest human inhabited places in Europe. It makes you keenly aware as you walk along Sligo’s shell strewn beaches just how beautiful and valuable your finite piece in that journey is. With my Shore collection I wanted to create a collection that was an exuberant celebration of the journey we are on, and the simple lines of the scallop shell which are both radiant from and also convergent towards a point, seemed to embody this idea immediately.”


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CELTIC Connections

SOLVAR IS AN AWARD WINNING JEWELRY MANUFACTURER CRAFTING IRISH JEWELRY SINCE 1941.

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third generation family run Irish business, the company combine their passion for Ireland with their love of fine jewelry. Based in the heart of Dublin, Ireland, Solvar has become a market leader in the design and manufacture of Irish and Celtic jewelry.

This year, Solvar is delighted to launch a new Celtic Initials Collection. The collection features initial enamelled discs in 18K gold plate. Each Initial was designed using Celtic calligraphy to celebrate our wonderful heritage; choose the one that means the most to you.

Each piece of Solvar jewelry is individually designed, drawing inspiration from Ireland’s rich heritage and unique icons to provide a cherished memory of Ireland. Master designers craft each piece in the finest detail to the highest standard, using centuries old craftsmanship skills.

Many centuries ago, in an Irish monastery, Celtic calligraphy was created in the pages of illuminated manuscripts. The ornate letters entwined with richly decorated knot work are today instantly recognisable as Irish.

All sterling silver and gold jewelry is hallmarked by the Assay office in Dublin castle. The Dublin Assay Office is one of the oldest Assay offices in the world. It was founded in 1637 to ensure only the purist quality gold and silver was used in the crafting of jewelry throughout all of Ireland. Still located today in the grounds of Dublin Castle, every piece of Solvar’s fine jewelry continues to be hallmarked in the traditional way by the assay office as a symbol of quality and reliability.

Celtic culture is interwoven with stories and the Celtic Knot tells a tale of enduring love. It reflects the convergence of mind, body and spirit - a message which is as powerful and mystical today as it was in those ancient times. Today the Book of Kells remains a testimony to the artistry which produced this lasting legacy. The twists and turns of the Celtic Knot symbolise the timeless nature of the human spirit. With no beginning and no end, this intricate decoration is a sign of eternal life and never ending love. www.solvar.ie

With no beginning and no end, the Celtic Knot is a sign of eternal life and never ending love. 229


The

StorytellersTale... As an Executive Director on the Board of NACTA, Paul O’Neill is well known to Irish stores throughout the USA and Canada. Paul’s jewelry is universally praised for its beauty, precision, quality and attention to detail on both sides of the Atlantic - his jewelry always tells a story of Celtic heritage. What is perhaps less known however is that talented as Paul is at jewelry design, it was not his first choice of career. In fact, he fell into the jewelry business quite by accident. Paul originally studied computer programming at college and he went on to head up marketing and logistics for the All Ireland Group, a major Irish distributor of top electrical brands. In early 2003, Paul’s father-in-law purchased the well-known Celtic & Heraldic Jewelry Company and Paul’s business knowledge proved invaluable in the migration of files and generally getting the company up and running. As somebody who is always very ‘hands on’ Paul also took an active interest in the design and manufacturing process, and under the watchful eye of his father-in-law, he discovered a new passion and soon to be new career as a jewelry designer. Trish Phelan talked with Paul O’Neill about how he ‘fell into’ something he now loves & about the success of Boru Jewelry, the company he now jointly runs with his wife Lisa.

How did you get involved in jewelry design? When we purchased Celtic & Heraldic, Joseph Kelly, the lead designer came on board and over time we knew we needed to change our creative process as design technology and customer trends changed. I have always had a keen interest in design and with my computer background I took to CAD (Computer Aided Design) like a duck to water! So I immediately started revamping our core lines, using and keeping the true origins and message that Joe Kelly had created, but making them more contemporary, with cleaner, sharper lines. The first design I did was the revision to the original Mo Anam Cara ring, created in the early 1990’s by Joe, and a design that meant a lot to us in terms of message and popularity. The revised My Soul Mate Ring (BR10) remains to this day one of my favourites. What is your process when creating a new piece or line? Is it trial and error? Do you reject and start again? Generally the theme will come from either source material that I have read with a strong connection to our Celtic heritage, or it can simply be a shape or look that I have seen which I feel would work within the Celtic lineage of Claddagh, Celtic Knot, Trinity Knot, Newgrange Spirals or Gaelic 230

sentiment. After that it is trial and error in production as we establish the best methods of producing the master design which will be used to reproduce copies of the piece. Only when the initial piece is finished will a final decision be made as to whether to put it into full production or not. Even then, we normally bring the master design to one or two of our trade shows to get feedback from our customers and then we may make further changes to the design. If we get negative feedback, we may scrap the design before it really has a chance to reach a mainstream audience. How does it feel when you see people wearing your jewelry? To see someone wearing a piece which I have personally designed is hugely rewarding. The ultimate is when I have met a client that wanted a specific design created and we talk through what they are looking for, deciding on colours, dimensions and finish. To physically be in their presence when they are presented with their unique rings is something very, very special for me. Their reactions when they first view them makes it all worthwhile and to me is priceless and very gratifying. I’ve been hugged, kissed and almost knocked over on more than one occasion!


You were commissioned to produce a lapel for President Obama when he visited Ireland and you created a pendant for Michelle Obama. Tell us about your personal favourite pieces and why? I had worked with Lulu O’Sullivan on creating the pieces for Barrack Obama and Michelle. The design incorporated his Irish ancestry with his African-American heritage. I have created many personal pieces over the years for clients, friends and family. I designed a ring for my wife Lisa which incorporated our three children’s names along with their birthstones and included diamond rails on either side. This was very personal to me and I was delighted with how it turned out. Another favourite was a wedding band I did for a client (and friend – extra pressure!) who wanted their band to tell a story visually with certain sentimental images, all drawn by hand first and reinterpreted onto a 5mm wide platinum band – very, very difficult! It turned out extremely well and everyone was very happy with the end result. What’s the most valuable thing you have learned over the years that impacts on what you do today? Never think a design is an automatic winner! Always get second opinions and feedback. Just because I may love a certain piece does not automatically mean the design will do well.

www.borujewelry.com

If you could go back and tell yourself one thing before beginning your career, what would it be? To trust in what I do and to accept constructive criticism. Mistakes happen and you learn from them, so pick yourself up and move forward. Looking at your achievements to date, is there any one thing that you would attribute your success to? It may sound cheesy, but without a doubt, my wife and business partner Lisa has been my absolute rock and often my inspiration. Lisa always hits the ground running. She had her own successful company at 21 years of age. When it was sold, Lisa was retained at senior management level and she was instrumental in taking that company to a €40 million turnover in just five years. At that stage she took some time out for what Lisa would regard as her greatest achievement; our children Zara, Zoe and Zachariah. While she always took an active interest in the business and was always on hand with advice, Lisa eventually came back into the family business in 2012, and by 2015 she was at its helm as Managing Directory. Pardon the pun, but it really is the perfect partnership. Between Lisa running the day to day business activities and myself focused on design and creative output, we work and complement

each other perfectly and we have big plans for the development of the Boru brand going forward. How do you see Boru evolving in the future? In the past five years we have changed dramatically in how we work. We are constantly improving and perfecting our design processes and our creativity. This constant evolution means that retail stores and their customers are receiving a product of immense detail and quality at the very best price using both traditional and new methods in craft making.

TM

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Out & About | NEWS

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A Gin Revolution Craft beers and microbreweries have seen a huge surge in popularity in recent times and now one of the oldest tipples is experiencing something of a renaissance.

that put a unique stamp on his or her gin. One distillery offers seasonal gins reflecting the changing weather. Some use herbs, flowers and other ingredients foraged locally.

From its earliest origins in the Middle Ages, gin has evolved from use in herbal medicine to the sophisticated drink that it is today. The process of making gin is quicker than whiskey; no long aging in barrels or intricate blending of different casks is needed. Gin is all about the botanicals. It must contain juniper; after that it is up to the master blender to come up with a concoction of herbs, spices and fruits

Up in Drogheda in County Louth, Listoke Distillery has opened Ireland’s first gin school. Situated in a 200-year-old stable in the grounds of Listoke House, the school opens every Saturday and teaches students all about the ins and outs of gin making. Each class begins with light refreshments, a brief introduction to the estate and a tour of the distillery. After the tour, you will be treated to

three different gin profiles and helped to design a flavor profile for your own personal gin. Not to be outdone, down in County Tipperary they have come up with something equally novel. On lovely Lough Derg they have launched Ireland’s first gin cruise. The aptly named ‘Spirit of Killaloe’ departs from picturesque Ballina Quay, taking visitors on a cruise around the lovely lake with an on-board gin masterclass. Thereafter a tasting of four premium gins with recommended mixers and garnishes are available and on return, gin cocktails & canapés are served.

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Out & About | NEWS

Jameson Experience WAR MUSEUM

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he Irish Military War Museum has just completed a new 8,000 square foot extension and will now be one of the largest privately owned museum’s in Europe. Located between Slane, County Meath and Collon, Couth Meath on the Louth Meath border, the Irish Military War Museum is a 13,000 sq.ft museum having just completed it’s 8,00 sq ft. extension that contains one of the largest private collections of WW1 and WW2 military equipment anywhere in Europe. The extension will include the following new additions: 1st Gulf War, Vietnam and Ireland’s only collection of WW11 Convoy of

The new Jameson Distillery on Bow Street opened its doors in March after a multi-million-euro redevelopment. It now offers three fully-guided experiences: ‘The Bow St. Experience’ tasting tour focuses on the stories of Jameson’s rich heritage and on-going innovations while ‘The Whiskey Makers’ and ‘The Whiskey Shakers’ experiences provide more in-depth whiskey and cocktail masterclasses, both including the opportunity to sample whiskey straight from a cask in the distillery’s new live maturation house. All trips can be booked online on www.jamesonwhiskey.com

American Military Vehicles. It will also have an additional 1,800 sq. ft. conference room. The Museum is now in prime position to cater for International coach tours and visitors and this component will be an excellent attraction to add to the existing success in both school educational tours and group based organizations alongside been opened to the public six days a week. The Museum also opens on most public holidays. See our website for further details. www.imwm.ie It is all personally owned by one man – founder and curator William Sullivan – who has a passion for all things military and who has been collecting since the age of nine. The museum also has large surrounding ground’s that contain a playground, an animal farm, and a full size replica WW1 trench. Also one of the most exciting features is a spin in its 15 ton British FV 432 PAC. William does not believe that historical artefacts should be hidden behind glass cases, and his ethos is one of ‘hands on’ history; visitors are invited to handle original weapons and artefacts to see just what it was like to be a soldier in the past. You can also take as many photos with the items as you like! At the Irish Military War Museum, we aim to give every group an unforgettable experience.

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Out & About | NEWS

Weddings. Hotel. Restaurant. Museum.

it’s historic

Weddings. Hotel. Restaurant. Museum.

it’s historic

Belleek Castle, one of Ireland’s historic stately homes, was expertly restored by the Marshall Doran. Set in the middle of Belleek Woods near Ballina (Salmon Capital of Ireland) we’re only 40 minutes drive from Knock Airport. Superb AA Rosette ne dining from master chef Stephen Lenahan. International golf courses, world class salmon shing & shooting, scenic walking, cycling and historic sites all close by.

The Castle tour includes an explanation of the origins of the Castle, the history of the Earl of Aaron: The Knox Gore family. The Castle and the Great Famine of 1845. The life of Marshall Doran and his collection at the Castle. The in uence of the Spanish Armada. The Mediaeval Great Hall. The fossil collection and Grace O’Malley room. The Castle Armour Collection. See and feel up close, the weaponry of the mediaeval soldier.

Enjoy the facilities of this ancestral home of the Earl of Arran, historic and unique, intimate and magical. The Castle is informal, cosy & friendly, rich in antiquities with many open log res to warm your steps back through half a millennium. We do not have dainty, articial décor as many modernized castles or houses do. Our walls are stone, our antiques genuine and our armour bullet proof! Unique, Intimate and Magical.

We will give you is “impact to your wedding”. A magical experience with two venues are available. For parties up to 60 the beautiful Granuaile’s Candlelight Restaurant and for weddings of up to 200 guests can be accommodates in our Mediaeval Banqueting Hall, located in the stone arched vaults, which formed part of the original Belleek Castle in the 16th century. If you want another hotel ball room wedding… Don’t come to us!

2 014 EuroT ques To

belleekcastle.com belleekcastle.com | |

Ballina, Co. Mayo, Ireland | Tel: +353 96 22400 | weddings@belleekcastle.com 235


LONG LOST IRISH ANCESTORS

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Out & About | NEWS

120 Years at The Park

Described as ‘the thinking man’s Killarney,’ Kenmare is a town oozing with charm and sophistication. And there really is nowhere finer to stay in these parts than at The Park Hotel, sitting majestically at the ‘top of the hill’ looking down on the town and out over the Kenmare estuary. Originally a Great Southern Hotel, it is certainly one of the greats to this day – and if you are particularly lucky you might run into another grand institution in the form of Frances Brennan, who has run this hotel with his brother John for many years to great effect. The Park is simply magical. Its spa simply sublime. Its restaurant an absolute explosion for the taste buds. It is the grand old dame of Kerry but a rather magnificent old lady at that, full of classic charm and effortless style. Frances for his part is quite the character and a regular in the USA where he promotes Ireland very effectively for Tourism Ireland. If you are in these parts, stop off even for an afternoon tea or a drink on the terrace at one of Ireland’s classic and classiest hotels.

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dodublintours

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Out & About | NEWS

Tee Time in Ireland Tourism Ireland has launched a new golf campaign in the United States to coincide with the 81st US Masters in Augusta. A new 30-second ad is airing to an estimated 6.5 million households on the NBC Golf Channel. It will also air later this year around other major championships and relevant TV shows. Tourism Ireland aims to build on the successful ‘Home of Champions’ campaign, reminding golfers across the US about our fantastic golf courses where our champions – including Rory McIlroy, Pádraig Harrington, Graeme McDowell and Darren Clarke – honed their skills.

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Out & About | NEWS

Ireland in Pictures

A fabulous new website, www.irelandinpictures.com provides a picture postcard insight into Ireland with a stunning collection of photographs by Spirit of Ireland magazine’s favourite photographer, Stefan Schnebelt. The “Ireland in Pictures” website supplies premium photographic prints and beautifully hand-crafted canvas prints - the perfect gift or a beautiful way to decorate your home, office or store. If you love the images in Spirit of Ireland magazine and you want to have some of them for yourself, check out the website where you can purchase your very own little piece of Ireland. 241


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Out & About | NEWS

Westport

Investment Westport House has been sold to a local Mayo business family who plan to invest €50 million in the property and its facilities. The ancestral home of the Marquises of Sligo is a stunning property with an entrance hall that is the only surviving Richard Cassels-designed interior of a Doric frieze and coffered barrel-vaulted ceiling. The magnificent imperial staircase is made of Sicilian marble which was designed by George Wilkinson and has balustrade details by Francis Skidmore, the supremo of 19th century metal work. Almost every top craftsman throughout the late 18th and 19th century was involved in decorating this family home where every room is a show-stopper, including the Chinese bedroom which features a full wall-to-ceiling hand painted depiction of the famous willow pattern, telling the tale of a tragic love story between a young oriental couple. The original house was built in the 1650s by Colonel John Browne on the foundation of Grace O’Malley’s Castle. He married O’Malley’s great-great granddaughter, Maude Burke. It is a glorious property to visit and also has the benefit of fantastic outdoor facilities including an excellent children’s playground.

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Out & About | NEWS

Walk this Way Move over Mayo, the newly opened Waterford Greenway is now the longest off-road walking and cycling experience in Ireland. The 46km routes uses the former Great Southern and Western Railway line to go from the edge of Waterford City to the town of Dungarvan. It incorporates tunnels, dramatic viaducts and splendid Copper Coast views. “It is unique because it’s such a long route,” said Olympic silver medalist and Chief Executive of Sport Ireland, John Treacy. “ The €15 million trail encompasses 11 bridges, three viaducts and a 400-meter tunnel dotting a swathe of coastal, forest and farmland landscapes.

Minimalist Design bathed in Cashmere Pretty much at the epicenter of the unspoilt island of Inis Meáin with sweeping views back towards the coastline, Inis Meáin Restaurant & Suites is more than just a small design hotel - it offers natural luxury being remotely situated on the least busy of the three Aran Islands. The natural barren beauty, lichen weathered limestone outcrops, clear aqua green waters are a tonic for the senses as is fresh lobster hoisted from the bay prepared by chef-owner Ruairi de Blacam, who with his co-owner & wife Marie-Thérèse, have crafted a signatory island retreat that is as honest and simple as the beauty of the island itself.

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Irish Military War Museum Meaths newest major visitor attraction, the Irish Military War Museum & Park offers a fascinating insight into the Irish participants involvement in both World War 1 and World War 2, as well as other military conflicts in world history

In-House Historian available Take a ride in a military tank There’s a whole lot to see and do!

www.imwm.ie Irish Military War Museum Starinagh, Collon, Co. Meath.

T: 041 9819501 E:  william@imwm.ie


Distinctive pieces made with skill and passion by the team in our Workshop near Clogher Strand, Ballyferriter, Co. Kerry

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STORE STORIES

STORE STORIES Irish Stores all over the USA and Canada open their doors and their hearts to customers every day. Here are some of their stories.

The Cross & Shamrock www.crossandshamrock.com Tel: 609-586-9696

T he Cross and Shamrock is a retail store and internet business located in Hamilton Square, New Jersey. It was established in 1987 by Ann & Len Bauersachs. Sadly, Len passed away in March 2017. He will be sorely missed by his loving family, as well as by the Irish American community. A proud Irishman, Len enjoyed his involvement in the Sons and Daughters of Erin, the Hibernian Bagpipe Band and The Ancient Order of Hibernians.

The shop is managed by his son Tim, who proudly carries on the tradition. “We have an impressive selection of Irish imports including Jewelry, Aran Sweaters, Belleek China, Waterford Crystal, Irish food and candy, Guinness merchandise, gifts, crafts, clothing, music and more,” says Tim, “but what makes us unique is our huge range of Catholic and Christian goods”.

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STORE STORIES

O’Meara’s IRISH HOUSE Fish Creek, WI www.omearasirish.com

O’Meara’s Irish House began in 1999 when Megan O’Meara and he family purchased the store from the Murrays. The store just celebrated its 40th anniversary. With the picturesque cottage setting at the north end of Fish Creek, Door County (a gorgeous resort area an hour north of Green Bay, WI), the store draws visitors and locals alike. “We are often asked ‘what is an Irish store doing in the middle of a Scandinavian area?’ As it turns out, many Irish settled in Door County originally,” Megan O’Meara explains. “Since we are in a resort area, we have over two million people visit the county every year. Most of our customers come from Chicago, Milwaukee and other parts of the Midwest. We frequently see some of those Scandinavians coming in for a peek at our fabulous wool room along with Germans, Italians and every other ethnicity you can imagine. We always say that you don’t have to be Irish to have good taste.” O’Meara’s wool room is dedicated to showcasing the best in Irish woolens from capes to Aran handknits to accessories. Customers come back to see their favorite designers year after year: Branigan Weavers, Condron Knitwear, Carraig Donn, and Jimmy Hourihan. “The majority of our vendors are master craftsmen who have been designing and creating for decades,” O’Meara says. “We, and

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ultimately our customers, benefit from their experience, knowledge and keen eye for quality and style.” Apart from the wool room, their expanded jewelry section features creations from Solvar, Fado Jewelry, ShanOre, Boru Jewelry and Facet. Customers also have the option of staying at O’Meara’s in their guest house above the store. The one bedroom suite was added in 2006 and is known as O’Meara’s Cottage Loft. Completely private and recently renovated, it is unlike any other lodging in Door County. O’Meara took her cues from her extensive travel in Ireland and patterned the guest house after the charming B & B’s throughout the Emerald Isle. Guests are welcomed with a basked full of Irish goodies including tea, biscuits, jam and Butler’s Chocolates. Megan is now leading trips to Ireland, so if you want to go there with someone who knows, give her a call. The store has been part of the Fish Creek landscape for decades and will hopefully be around for decades more to come. “I feel very blessed to be doing what I do,” Megan reflects. “Some say you shouldn’t make your hobby your career, but I very much disagree. When you love what you do, it doesn’t feel like work.”


New Tara’s Diary beads with crystals from Swarovski®

Bracelets and Charms www.shanore.com


Come and visit Liz Christy, Artist, Textile Designer and Hand-weaver at work in her studio, Swallow Studios, located in Annayalla among the rolling hills of Castleblayney, Co. Monaghan. Take in the stunning views from Concra Wood Golf and Country Club which were the genesis of Liz’s desire to be an artist and visit the home county of the famous poet Patrick Kavanagh, who is another inspiration for Liz’s beautiful hand-woven scarves and wraps. See the real Ireland, with all its mystic magic still at play in tandem with the modern day and bring back a gift to treasure forever!

Swallow Studios are open 10am to 6pm Monday to Friday come and see stunning colours hand-woven before your eyes, real poetry in motion ! For weekend opening and availability call Liz on 0876821563. The GPS co-ordinates for SAT NAVs are: N54˚09.930’ & W6˚47.772 . Parking is available and bus tours/large groups are welcome with prior arrangement for ease of access. Visa/Mastercard/Cash all welcome at Swallow Studio’s shop. See you soon !


STORE STORIES

FÁILTE IRISH IMPORTS In 2001 Liza Hendley Betz had an idea. In the US for more than five years, she still found herself missing Ireland. Liza wanted to help the Irish in Central Kentucky to have a bit of home to hand, whether they be long-standing residents or those just ‘fresh off the boat’. And to Liza, nothing said home like Irish sausages. So from that simple idea - sell sausages to the local Irish - Fáilte was born! 15 years and two locations later, Fáilte is now Lexington’s first stop for everything Irish. A wide variety of food, clothing, jewelry and gifts can all be found in their cozy location on South Upper. And the store has also become very involved with supporting and growing the local Irish community. This year, Liza added another dimension with the opening of the Failte Café, a cosy tea/coffee room

where visitors can enjoy delicious Irish scones as they sit and relax or take home a few scones to enjoy at home. Every March, Fáilte helps organize Lexington’s St. Patrick’s Day Festival, and the store now sponsors sending a Kentucky girl over to Ireland to participate in the Rose of Tralee International Festival.

113 South Upper St, Lexington,KY 40507 Tel: 859 381 1498 www.lexirish.com

“We feel like we are more than just an Irish shop” says Liza. We truly feel a responsibility to present Irish heritage and culture to our customers and we are honored that they appreciate us so much. So when you’re in the neighborhood, please stop by for a visit! We’d love to learn about your connection to Ireland, and show you all the store has to offer. And of course when you’re feeling homesick, we’ve got the sausages ready and waiting!

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STORE STORIES

Fenwick FLOAT-ORS

In 1989, Hughie McBride had an idea of how to clean up the inland bays. At the time, everyone was using plastic milk bottles or Clorox bottles to mark their crab pots. There were so many of them floating in the water, the bays looked like a landfill. Hughie would often say that if he ever found a supply of buoys “I would sit on the highway and sell them.” Sure enough, he did find them, painted them three different colors (of course, his favorite colors were green, white & orange) so people could identify their buoys and find their crab pots...hence cleaning up the bays with colorful buoys. However, customers buying them had a different idea once his wife, Tina, started personalizing and painting artwork on the buoys. The buoys became nautical accents and Fenwick Float-Ors took off. Before thy knew it, they were selling the buoys at craft shows from Maine to Florida and the Great Lakes. And where did the name come from? Fenwick (Fenwick Island, Delaware) Floators (buoys may be used as a float or nautical accent) ...Fenwick Float-ors! The Float-ors became so popular, that the buoys took over two houses. It came to a point where the family had to get into the business full-time or get out. They asked their son Jason what he’d like to do when he graduated from college, and he wanted to see what could be done with the buoys. So Hugh and Tina bought a piece of land and built a place to make an sell the Float-ors. Attending craft shows the family saw unusual and unique items on display so they decided to sell these too in the store.

Also, Hughie was instrumental in getting the first Ulster Project started in Delaware by organizing a fundraiser for the project and finding host families to bring both Catholic and Protestant Irish children to visit the United States. With such strong Irish connections, having just opened a new 8,400 square foot addition to the store, there is now a section strictly dedicated for Irish products - Finnegan & O’Riley’s Celtic Imports - named after their grandsons, Finn and Riley. “Although we have this new Irish section, you’ll see a strong Irish influence throughout our store,” explains Hughie.

35034 Buoy Blvd., West Fenwick Island, DE 19975 (Home of FINNEGAN & O’RILEY’S CELTIC IMPORTS) Tel: 302-436-5953 Email: fenwickfloators@gmail.com Website: www.fenwickfloators.com Contact: Hugh, Tina & Jason McBride

“We have been very fortunate through the years. Fenwick Float-ors has become a destination for those who come to visit the Delaware and Maryland beaches. We feel that the Irish products we carry art, pottery, home decor, apparel, jewelry, food and travel to Ireland - help to make our store a truly unique experience.

Hughie has a strong Irish background. He was raised in an Irish neighborhood in Wilmington, Delaware, the “Forty Acres.” His grandparents on both his mother and father’s side were from Ireland (McBride, Johnson, O’Connell and Ryan).

“The No. 1 question asked by our customers is ‘What’s with all the Irish products? This allows us to tell them about our partnership with NACTA, CIE Tours, Enterprise Ireland and The Spirit of Ireland Magazine...all of whom we owe a special “Thank You” to for their support and encouragement over the years.

Hughie was very active in the Irish community, having started the first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Wilmington which brought about the creation of the Irish Culture Club of Delaware.

“Should you get a chance to visit the Delaware and Maryland coast, please be sure to stop by Fenwick Float-ors for a “Buoyful”, “Float-orific” experience in FENWICK IRELAND!” 253


The Gaslamp Gallery is contemporary Art Gallery in Gorey, Co. Wexford – a popular destination shopping town located on the South East Coast. We have an unrivalled reputation for being a warm, welcoming gallery with exceptional customer service. We represent a diverse selection of national, and international artists including works by award winning Irish artists Kevin Roche, Kate Kos and Niki Purcell. We are also the exclusive stockists of original works by Yvonne Coomber in Ireland. Our aim is to make acquiring art an easy and enjoyable experience in a relaxed and informal environment. International Shipping Service available. Come visit – We would love to meet you. The Gaslamp Gallery 46 Esmonde Street, Gorey, Co. Wexford + 353 53 94 80486 www.thegaslampgallery.com info@thegaslampgallery.com


STORE STORIES

THE HOUSE of

Ireland

The House of Ireland St. Augustine, FL 904-824-5040

The House of Ireland has been an institution in St. Augustine, FLorida for 35 years. It recently moved to a house that is 180 years old complete with lace curtains which certainly brings the flavor of Ireland to the oldest city in the United States. The Spanish colonists who settled the town in 1565 were from the Celtic area of northern Spain and share many traditions with the Scots and the Irish, including the playing of bagpipes and wearing of kilts. In 1784, the incoming Spanish Governor was accompanied by the Hibernian Regiment. In a time when England discouraged Catholicism, Irishmen could serve the Spanish crown and avoid persecution while continuing to practice their faith. The roster for the Hibernian Regiment had names combining a Spanish first name attached to an Irish last name, like: Juan O’Donovan, Carlos Howard, Guillermo O’Kelly, Eduardo Nugent and Miguel O’Reilly, the incoming parish priest who took his religious training in Spain but originally hailed from the Emerald Isle. Saint Augustine is a huge tourist destination frequently cited as a top vacation destination spot. “We like to think everyone is a little Irish, if only in spirit,” explains owner Grace Geed, who has a warm welcome for everyone. “We welcome them with Authentic Irish merchandise, as well as Irishish items with universal appeal. Stop in and see us! The city of Saint Augustine is worth the trip.”

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STORE STORIES

The Tinker’s Cart 54 High Street, Clinton, MA 01510 Tel: 978-365-4334 www.tinkerscart.com

The Tinker’s Cart has been importing quality Irish goods for over 20 years. It all began in 1986 when John and Janice Hughes wheeled a pushcart chock full of Irish wares into a mall in New Hampshire and the Tinker’s Cart was born. One pushcart turned into two and then three. The pushcarts gave way to kiosks and seasonal stores at a variety of New England malls. Today, John’s daughter Cheryl Hughes is continuing the family business in a storefront location in the charming town of Clinton, Massachusetts.

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As well as a large array of Irish merchandise, the Tinker’s Cart also offers a huge selection of clothing custom embroidered with Irish logos and designs. “We have our own in-house embroidery business and can offer clothing with one of a kind designs as well as custom embroidery”, says Cheryl. The Wachusett Chamber of Commerce named the Tinker’s Cart Small Business of the Year and this marvelous shop was also named one of the Irish Echo’s Top 50 Small Irish Businesses.


IRISH HANDCRAFTED JEWELRY

Cuffs Bangles and Bracelets adorned with Swarovski® crystals www.shanore.com


McCormacks Celtic Jewellers This beautiful silver pendant by Irish Designer Mags Harnett Harnett, is symbolic of so many Irish People who have emigrated from Ireland She has used the lettering from the book of kells to inscribe a line from a poem by John Locke ““But the heart will sigh for the absent land land” The pendant is available exclusively in Mc Cormacks Jewellers, a family owned store for over half a century, centrally located on Grafton Street.

A treasure trove of Irish Celtic Jewellery

51 Grafton Street, Dublin 2 00353-1-6773737 www.celticdublin.com

Handmade in Ireland

M: +353 (0) 87 6158944 E: info@jobrowne.com www.jobrowne.com JUST LAUNCHED IN US


COLORADO

Celtic Treasures 4240 Old Seward Hwy #2, Anchorage, AK 99503 Tel: 907-333-2358 www.celtictreasuresak.com Contact: Lisa Caress-Beu

Kerreen O’Connor’s Irish Shop 2595 West Alamo Avenue, Littleton, CO 80120 Tel: 303-794-6388 Website: www.kerreen.com Contact: Heather Benedict

ARIZONA

CONNECTICUT

Mully’s Touch of Ireland 7054 E 5th Avenue Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Tel: 480-941-4198 Website: www. mullystouchofireland.com Contact: Nancy Morrall

Irish Eyes 8A Olde Mistick Village, 27 Coogan Boulevard, Mystic, CT 06355 Tel: 860-536-9960

Website:

Email:

irisheyesmystic@aol.com Contact: Donna Gorman

CALIFORNIA The Celtic Knot 28 Main Street, Jackson, CA 95642 Tel: 209-223-5830 Contact: Ron Busch

Lucky Ewe Irish Goods 2371 Whitney Avenue Hamden, CT 06518 Tel: 203-507-2160 Website:

www.luckyeweirishgoods.com Contact:

Celtic Shoppe 354 East Campbell Avenue, Campbell, CA 95008 Tel: 408-379-7474 Website:

www.celticshoppe.com Contact: Cathy Cavagnaro Ciara’s Irish Shop 334 Second Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Tel: 707-443-0102 Email: irishshopeureka@msn.com Contact: CC O’Brien-Cree O’Ireland 575 Grand Avenue, Carlsbad, CA 92008 Tel: 760-720-1500 Email: oirelandca@aol.com Contact: Tony Cross

Cathy Coghlan of Celtic Tweeds was delighted to win the award for Best New Vendor to the North American market.

STORE DIRECTORY

ALASKA

Kathleen O’Neill-Regan

FLORIDA

GEORGIA

O’Reilly’s Irish Gifts 248 Main Street, Farmington, CT 06032 Tel: 860-677-6958 Website: www.gotirish.com Contact: Sergio & Luana Berardelli

Enchanted Shire 6905 Virlyn B Smith Road Fairburn, GA 30213 Tel: 585-329-5653 Website: www. enchantedshire.com Contact: Arleen Dougherty

DELAWARE

Celtic Elegance / Name Heritage International Spanish Springs & Sumter Landing The Villages, FL 32159 Tel: 352-840-3212 Website: www. celticsterlingsilver.com Contact: Marian Halpin

Fenwick Float’ors 35034 Buoy Blvd., West Fenwick Island, DE 19975 Tel: 302-436-5953

Celtic Shop of Dunedin 354 Main Street, Dunedin, FL 34698 Tel: 727-733-2200

Website:

Website:

Contact: Hope Ebberwein

www.celticshopdundedin.com Contact: Lynn Thorn

IDAHO

www.fenwickfloators.com Contact: Jason, Tina & Hughie McBride

House of Ireland 26 Cuna Street St. Augustine, FL 32084 Tel: 904-824-5040 Website: www. theirishgiftshop.com Contact: Grace Reed

Saints & Shamrocks 309 Bull Street Savannah, GA 31401 Tel: 912-233-8858 Website:

www.saintsandshamrocks.com

All Things Irish 315 E Sherman Avenue, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814 Tel: 208-667-0131 Website:

www.all-thingsirish.com Contact: Ilene Moss

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Store Directory | NACTA

Mike & Judy Siegert, owners of Shamrock Imports in Dubuque, IA, have been directing tours of Ireland for over 30 years. Contact them for the vacation of a lifetime!

ILLINOIS Heartland Gallery The Vault Arts Collective, 100 N. Main Street, Tuscola, IL 61953 Tel: 217-377-4502 Website:

www.heartland-gallery.com Contact: Jan Chandler Irish American Heritage Center Gift Shop 4626 N Knox Avenue Chicago IL 60630 Tel: 773-282-7035 Website: www.irish-american.org Contact: Irene Higgins-Hruby & Mary Rose Teahan The Irish Boutique 434 Coffin Road, Long Grove, IL 60074 Tel: 847-634-3540

Irish Connoisseur 1232 Waukegan Rd, Glenview, IL 60025 Tel: 847-998-1988 Website: www.irishirish.com Contact: Megan Quinlisk Van Treeck

IOWA The Irish Shop 100 N Oakpark Ave, Oak Park, IL 60301 Tel: 708-445-1149 Website:

www.theirishshopoakpark.com Contact: Jim & Anne August

The Irish Boutique 6606 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake Plaza, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Tel: 815-459-1800 Website:

www.irishboutique.com Contact: Patrick Barry 260

A Celtic Tradition 7672 Hickman Road, Windsor Heights, IA 50324 Tel: 515-278-8302 Website: www.2celts.com Contact: Kris & Garry Knapp

Paddy’s On The Square 228 Robert Parker Coffin Road, Long Grove, IL 60047 Tel: 847-634-0339

Shamrock Imports 391 Bluff St, Dubuque, IA 52001 Tel: 563-583-5000

Website:

www.shamrockjeweler.com Contact: Michael & Judy Siegert

www.irishboutique.com Contact: John Barry

Website:

www.irishboutique.com Contact: Patrick Barry

South Side Irish Imports 7725 W 159th Street, Tinley Park, IL 60477 Tel: 708-444-4747 Email: irish3446@gmail.com Contact: Linda & Ron Gorman

South Side Irish Imports 3446 W. 111th St., Chicago, IL 60655 Tel: 773-881-8585 Email: irish3446@gmail.com Contact: Linda & Ron Gorman

Website:

KANSAS Irish Crystal Company 7108 West 135th St., Overland Park, KS 66223 Tel: 913-341-4438 Website: www.IrishCrystal.com” Contact: Michelle Nestel KENTUCKY Failte Irish Import Shop 113 South Upper Street, Lexington, KY 40507 Tel: 859-381-1498 Website: www.lexirish.com Contact: Liza Hendley Betz Molly’s Celtic Center 931 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, KY 40204 Tel: 502-459-9888 Website:

St Pat’s Association & Irish Gift Shop 1001 South Broadway, Emmetsburg, IA 50536 Tel: 712-852-4326 Website:

www.emmetsburgirishgifts.com Contact: Billie Jo Hoffman

www.mollyscelticcenter.com Contact: Sandy Nedrow


LOUISIANA

MAINE

Website:

Website:

MICHIGAN

MARYLAND Irish Traditions 141-143 Main Street, Annapolis, MD 21401 Tel: 410-990-4747 Website:

www.irishtraditionsonline.com Contact: Margaret McLemore

MASSACHUSETTS Bridget’s - An Irish Tradition 88 West Main Street, Norton, MA 02766 Tel: 508-285-9700 Website:

www.bridgetsirish.com Contact: Bridget Daly Ireland on the Square 10 Market Square Newburyport, MA 01950 Tel: 978-463-6288 Website:

www.irelandonthesquare.com Contact: Jennifer Dumas Irish Specialty Shoppe Inc 158 President Avenue, Fall River, MA 02720-2638 Tel: 508-678-4096 Website:

www.irishspecialtyshoppe.com Contact: Joseph Reilly

NEW JERSEY

Brownes Irish Market Inc 3300 Pennsylvania Avenue, Kansas City, MO 64111-2724 Tel: 816-561-0030

Bridget’s Irish Cottage Inc 15 E Broad Street, Westfield, NJ 07090 Tel: 908-789-0909 Website: www.bridgets.com Contact: Bridget Lawn

Website:

Wexford House Irish Imports 9 Crescent St, West Boylston, MA 01583-1309 Tel: 508-835-6677

Ireland on the Square 3 Dock Square Kennebunkport, ME 04046 Tel: 207-967-0534 www.irelandonthesquare.com Contact: Jennifer Dumas

MISSOURI

www.wexfordhouse.com Contact: Dorothy Trow

Always Irish 37650 W. 6 Mile Road, Livonia, MI 48152 Tel: 734-462-7200 Email:

alwaysirish@aceweb.com Contact: Judy & Dean Valovich The Celtic Path 214 E Main Street, Hubbardston, MI 48845 Tel: 989-981-6066

www.BrownesIrishMarket.com Contact: Kerry Browne

The Celtic Ranch 404 Main Street, Weston, MO 64098 Tel: 816-640-2881 Website: www.celticranch.com Contact: Terry Kast Kerry Cottage Ltd 2119 S. Big Bend Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63117 Tel: 314-647-0166 Website:

www.kerrycottage.com Sheehan’s Irish Imports 410 E. Gregory Blvd. Kansas City, MO 64131 Tel: 816-561-4480 Website:

www.sheehansirish.com

Email:

Contact: Katy Sheehan Morris

thecelticpath.pb@gmail.com Contact: Patricia Baese

& Molly Sheehan Corkill

Celtic Seasons 301 N Harbor Drive, Grand Haven, MI 49417 Tel: 269-352-0376 Email: eboyle54@gmail.com Contact: Eileen Boyle Chlebana Sullivan’s Irish Alley & Travel Too 104 East Main Street, Flushing, MI 48433 Tel: 810-487-2473

Thistle and Clover 424 South Main Street, St. Charles, MO 63301 Tel: 636-946-2449 Website:

www.thistleandclover.com Contact: Karen Heitzman

& Jim Slack NEW HAMPSHIRE

Website:

Celtic Crossing 112 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH 03801 Tel: 603-436-0200

www.SullivansIrishAlley.com

Website:

Contact: Caron & Ed Sullivan

www.celticcrossing.com Contact: Karin Scott

The Twisted Shamrock 3074 12 Mile Road, Berkley, MI 48072 Tel: 248-544-4170 Website:

www.thetwistedchamrock.com Contact: Jim Monahan

Ireland on the Square 6 Market Square Portsmouth, NH 03801 Tel: 603-319-1670 Website:

www.irelandonthesquare.com Contact: Jennifer Dumas

The Cross & Shamrock 1669 Route 33, Hamilton Square, NJ 08690 Tel: 609-586-9696 Website:

www.crossandshamrock.com Contact: Ann & Tim Bauersachs Emerald Gifts 137 Parsippany Rd, Parsippany, NJ 07054 Tel: 973-884-3241 Email:

edhansberry69@gmail.com Contact: Edward Hansberry Faith & Begorra 40 Broadway, Denville, NJ 07834 Tel: 973-625-0070

STORE DIRECTORY

Enchanted Shire 46468 River Road Hammond, LA 70401 Tel: 585-329-5653 Website: www. enchantedshire.com Contact: Arlene Dougherty

The Tinker’s Cart 54 High Street, Clinton, MA 01510 Tel: 978-365-4334 Website: www.tinkerscart.com Contact: Cheryl Hughes

Website:

www.faithandbegorra.com Contact: Susan Banks Irish Centre 1120 Third Ave, Spring Lake, NJ 07762 Tel: 732-449-6650 Website: www.njirish.com Contact: Moya Rush Kellys A Touch of Ireland 5 South Broadway, Pitman, NJ 08071 Tel: 856-589-4988 Email: info@ atouchofireland.comcastbiz.net Contact: Judy Miller O’Ireland 30 Monmouth Street, Red Bank, NJ 07701 Tel: 732-747-4433 Email: oireland@msn.com Contact: Paul Savoi O’Ireland 130 North Broadway, South Amboy, NJ 08879 Tel: 732-525-0515 Website: www.oireland.com Contact: Rosanne Savoi 261


Store Directory | NACTA

Owners of Irish/Celtic shops in North America on a recent tour of Ireland with CIE Tours International. Come with us next time! Call us at 866-622-2244 for the guaranteed lowest price!

Out of Ireland Store #22, 3 New York Road, Historic Smithville, NJ 08205 Tel: 609-748-6707 Website:

www.shopoutofireland.com Contact: Kathleen O’Gara Pipeline Celtic Themes 128 Wanaque Avenue, Pompton Lakes, NJ 07442 Tel: 973-839-4761 Website:

www.celticthemesusa.com Contact: Gerald Rooney The Pipers Cove 212 Kearny Ave, Kearny, NJ 07032 Tel: 201-998-3695 Website: www.piperscove.com Contact: John & Joan Nisbet

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NEW YORK Cashel House 224 Tompkins St, Syracuse, NY 13204 Tel: 315-472-4438 Email: cashelhouse@gmail.com Contact: Peter Heverin Celtic Aer Gift Shop 1451 Strawberry Rd., Mohegan Lake, NY 10547 Tel: 914-526-3361 Website: www.celticaer.com Contact: Ashley Rooney Celtic Gifts & Treasures 72-17 Grand Avenue Maspeth, NY 11378 Email: celticgiftsandtreasures@gmail.com Tel: 718-424-8686 Contact: Liz Kenny

Celtic Treasures 456 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 Tel: 518-583-9452

Irish Crossroads Ltd 58 Main Street, Sayville, NY 11782 Tel: 631-569-5464

Website:

Website:

www.celtictreasures.com Contact: Paul O’Donnell

www.irishcrossroadsonline.com Contact: Kathleen Quinn

The Danu Gallery 39 E. Central Avenue, Pearl River, NY 10965 Tel: 845-735-4477

Irish Import Shop 2590 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626 Tel: 585-225-1050

Website:

Website:

www.thedanugallery.com Contact: Isabel & Audrey Haley

www.irishandcelticimports.com Contact: Patricia Lloyd

Guaranteed Irish 2220 Route 145, East Durham, NY 12423 Tel: 518-634-2392 Email:

guaranteedirish145@ yahoo.com Contact: Donal Gallagher

Lennon’s Irish Shop 164 Jay Street, Schenectady, NY 12305 Tel: 518-377-0064 Website:

www.lennonsirishshop.com Contact: Mary Ann & Dale May


Website:

www.littleshopofshamrocks.com Contact: Linda Low Mary-Anne’s Irish Gift Shop 5694 Riverdale Avenue Bronx, NY 10471 Tel: 718-549-7660 Website: www.maryannesirishgiftshop.com Contact: Mary-Anne Connaughton McNerney’s Irish Imports Eastern Hills Mall 4545 Transit Road Williamsville, NY 14221 Tel: 716-870-0033 Website: www. mcnerneysirishimports.com Contact: Michael McNerney Molly Malone’s Irish Gifts 295 Canada Street, Lake George, NY 12845 Tel: 518-668-3363 Website: www. mollymalonesirishgifts.com Contact: Bill & Emily Manion Tipperary Irish Importer - Celtic Jeweler 3956 NY 2 Brunswick Road, Troy, NY 12180 Tel: 518-279-8272 Website:

www.shoptipperary.com Contact: Tom McGrath Walker Metalsmith Celtic Jewelry 1 Main Street, Andover, NY 14806 Tel: 607-478-8567 Website:

www.walkerscelticjewelry.com Contact: Stephen Walker

NORTH CAROLINA The Carolina Celt 9650 Strickland Road Suite 167 Durham, NC 27615 Tel: 919-286-9206

Irish Crossroads & Gift Shop 38015 Euclid Avenue, Willoughby, OH 44094 Tel: 440-954-9032 Website: www. irishcrossroadsohio.com Contact: Michelle Morgan

Website:

www.carolinacelt.com Contact: Bruce Wright Enchanted Shire 16445 Poplar Tent Road Huntersville, NC 28078 Tel: 585-329-5653 Website: www. enchantedshire.com Contact: Arleen Dougherty Sinead’s Cottage Blue Moon Gift Shops 203 Racine Dr Wilmington, NC 28403 Tel: 910-763-7056 Website:

www.sineadscottage.com Contact: Cathy Lynch Sinead’s Cottage Tickled Pink Gift Shops Lumina Station 1904 Eastwood Rd #106-107, Wilmington, NC 28403 Tel: 910-763-7056 Website:

www.sineadscottage.com Contact: Cathy Lynch OHIO Casey’s Irish Imports Inc 19626 Center Ridge Rd, Rocky River, OH 44116 Tel: 440-333-8383 Website:

www.caseysirishimports.com Contact: Kathleen Casey Proctor & Maureen Casey Brubaker Ha’penny Bridge Imports of Ireland 75 South High Street, Dublin, OH 43017-2154 Tel: 614-889-9615 Website: www. hapennybridgeimports.com Contact: Anne & Al Gleine

Shamrock & Rose Creations 25576 Mill Street Olmsted Falls, OH 44138 Tel: 440-714-9000 Website:

Celtic Culture 137 East Main Street, Ligonier, PA 15658 Tel: 724-238-2420 Website:

www.celticcultureonline.com Contact: Andrew Carr

The Celtic Rose Peddlers Village Courtyard Store 14, Lahaska, PA 18931 Tel: 215-794-5882 Website:

www.thecelticrose.com Contact: Marilyn Mellon

shamrock-rose@att.net Contact: Shawn Jeffrey

OREGON Bridie’s Irish Faire 715 NW 3rd St (Nye Beach), Newport, OR 97365 Tel: 541-574-9366 Website:

www.bridiesirishfaire.com Contact: Susan Spencer

PENNSYLVANIA A Lit’le Irish Too 9 Chambersburg Street, Gettysburg, PA 17325 Tel: 717-334-6609

Donegal Square 534 Main Street, Bethlehem, PA 18018 Tel: 610-866-3244 Website: www.donegal.com Contact: Neville Gardner & Marie Barry Enchanted Shire 2775 Lebanon Road Manheim, PA 17545 Tel: 585-329-5653 Website: www. enchantedshire.com Contact: Arleen Dougherty

Website:

Giggles Gifts 7400 Frankford Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19136 Tel: 215-624-8311

www.alittleirishtoo.com

Website:

Contact: Tory Warren

STORE DIRECTORY

Little Shop of Shamrocks 173 Islip Avenue, Islip, NY 11751 Tel: 631-224-4311

www.gigglesgifts.com Contact: Rosemary

Celt-Iberia Traders 52 South Main Street, New Hope, PA 18938 Tel: 215-862-4922

Veneziale

www.celtiberiatraders.com

Irish Design Center 303 South Craig St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Tel: 412-682-6125

Contact: Michael Burns

Website:

Website:

& Richard Cordover

www.irishdesigncenter.com Contact: Paul Carey

The Celtic Cross 729 Washington Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15228 Tel: 412-306-1890 Website:

www.celticcross1.com Contact: Thomas Macik

Oxford Hall Celtic Shoppe & Tea Cafe 233 Bridge St, New Cumberland, PA 17070 Tel: 717-774-8789 Website:

www.oxfordhall.com Contact: Cindy &

Steve Washburn

263


Store Directory | NACTA Tipperary West Irish Imports 3026 Cherry St, Erie, PA 16508 Tel: 814-459-5797

CANADA A Bit of Home 2-1248 Dundas Street East Mississauga, ON L4Y 2C1 Canada Tel: 905-804-1731 Website: www.abitofhome.ca Contact: Henry & Geraldine Porsch

Website:

www.tipperarywest.com Contact: Jeff Hardner Tullycross Inc 110 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147 Tel: 215-925-1995 Website:

www.tullycross.com Contact: Meg Turner USA Kilts 3389 Schuylkill Road (Rt. 724), Spring City, PA 19475 Tel: 610-948-4110 Website: www.usakilts.com Contact: Rocky Roeger TENNESSEE The Celtic Cup 106 North Anderson Street, Tullahoma, TN 37388 Tel: 931-563-7733 Website:

www.thecelticcup.com Contact: Denise & Chris Smith Celtic Heritage 634 Parkway, The Village #26, Gatlinburg, TN 37738 Tel: 865-436-2588 Website:

www.celticheritage.net Contact: Melody VanNus TEXAS Things Celtic 1806 West 35th St, Austin, TX 78703 Tel: 512-472-2358 Website: www.thingsceltic.com Contact: Lanora Davidson VIRGINIA Irish Eyes of Virginia 725 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Tel: 540-373-0703 Website:

www.irisheyesofva.com Contact: Bernadette & Mike Esler

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Katie Regan & Susan Charboneau at the Dublin, Ireland trade show, finding new products for their shop Lucky Ewe Irish Goods in Hamden CT. Piper Dan’s Keltic Shoppe 109E Main Street Old Town Purcellville, VA 20132 Tel: 540-751-0777 Contact: Mary Brady Shea Knight Pixie Treasures Celtic Shoppe 829 Lynnhaven Pkwy, #106, Virginia Beach, VA 23452 Tel: 757-961-7494 Website:

www.pixietreasures.com Contact: Jeanne & Bob Rider Scotland House Ltd 430 Duke of Gloucester St, Williamsburg, VA 23185 Tel: 757-229-7800 Contact:

Sam & Michelle Wallace WASHINGTON Galway Bay Trading Company 880 Point Brown Ave NE, Ocean Shores, WA 98569 Tel: 360-289-2300 Website:

www.galwaybayirishpub.com Contact: William Gibbons Wandering Angus 914 Water Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368 Tel: 360-385-9549

WISCONSIN Legacy House Imports, Inc. 4221 Lien Road Madison, WI 53704 Tel: 608-663-1340 Website: www.legacyhouseimports.com Contact: Patrick & Marsha Flannery Legends of the Celts 10556 Main Street, Hayward, WI 54843 Tel: 715-634-0901 Website:

www.legendsofthecelts.com Contact: Steve & Barb Hand O’Meara’s Irish House LLC 3970 State Highway 42, Fish Creek, WI 54212 Tel: 920-868-3528 Website:

www.omearasirish.com Contact: Megan O’Meara Robin’s European Cottage N70 W6340 Bridge Road Cedarburg, WI 53012 Tel: 262-377-3444 Contact: Robin Parsons

Celtic Creations 208-123 Carrie Cates Ct, North Vancouver, BC V7M 3K7 Tel: 604-903-8704 Website:

www.celticcreations.net Contact: Helen Richie Gold & Shamrocks 3398 Old Kingston Road Toronto, ONT M1C 3J2 Tel: 416-884-5991 Website:

www.goldandshamrock.com Contact: Monika Donnelly The Scottish & Irish Store East 1713 St. Laurent Blvd (at Innes), Ottawa, ON K1G 3V4 Tel: 613-739-3393 Website:

www.scottishandirishstore.com Contact: Michael Cox The Scottish & Irish Store West 2194 Robertson Road, Ottawa, ON K2H 9J5 Tel: 613.829.2251 Website:

www.scottishandirishstore.com Contact: Michael Cox The Scottish Shoppe & A Little Bit of Ireland 1206 - 17 Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta T2T 0B8 Tel: 403-264-6383 Website:

www.scottishshoppe.net Contact: Jim Osborne The Wee Tartan Shop 177 Queen Street, Port Perry, ON L9L 1B8 Tel: 905-985-6573

Website:

Website:

www.wanderingangus.com Contact: Tracy Williamson

www.weetartanshop.ca Contact: Stewart Bennett


time to

Explore...

Give your family an unforgettable experience at The K Club This five star resort is nestled amidst 550 acres of lush Irish countryside in the heart of Ireland’s Ancient East yet is only 30 minutes from Dublin International Airport.

one of Ireland’s hidden treasures

The K Club is ideally located for those who wish to explore the wonders of Ireland but also offers a selection of on-site experiences, including falconry, fishing, horse riding through the Irish countryside and championship golf.

• Three daily sailings to all three Aran Islands

Offering a range of family friendly accommodation including interconnecting family rooms and two-bedroom suites, The K Club is guaranteed to have the perfect option for your family.

• Bicycles, jaunting cars and mini-buses available for hire • Explore traditional Irish heritage and stunning scenery

your discovery starts here

call +353 91 568903 visit aranislandferries.com email info@aranislandferries.com AIF US ad.indd 2

For more information call +353 (0) 1 601 7200 or email sales@kclub.ie

www.kclub.ie 03/08/2016 09:15


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The Spirit of Ireland

Vol 2, Issue 1 • Spring / Summer 2017 • $4.95

Marks of Heritage

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CMY

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Markedly Personal

Top Travel Tips

Every line has a meaning and each mark etched into our precious metal creates another part of the story - your story. Ogham, an ancient Celtic language, follows it’s own set of rules - reading from bottom to top, this Celtic Alphabet can be custom made to create names that mean the most to you, giving your loved one a truly uniquely crafted piece of jewelry which will become a talking point for years to come....

ARTS & CRAFTS

Custom Order in Precious Metals today

www.borujewelry.com

Vol 2, Issue 1 • Spring / Summer 2017

TM

DO DUBLIN

Galway

GASTRONOMY 02

In Association with

The North American Celtic Trade Association

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Spirit of Ireland Issue 11  
Spirit of Ireland Issue 11