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Herefordshire Free

Issue 02

™

Why One & Six?

The story behind our name

Party In The Garden Enjoy the summer in your garden

Places to Visit

A day out in Ironbridge

Explore:

In this issue we take a visit to the beautiful Queenswood Country Park

Your FREE Copy

August 2010


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Contents

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Why One & Six?

The story behind our name

The Adventures Of Archie Meet Archie the Border Collie puppy

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Eco -Gardening

Look after your garden and the planet

ello and Welcome to the second issue of One and Six Magazine. Thank you to everyone who was kind enough to let us know how much you liked our magazine it was great to know that you enjoyed it. If you missed it you can read it on line at our web-site(www.hroneandsix.co.uk). The website is very much a work in progress at the moment but keep visiting as we will be adding more content and there will be exciting things happening there. This is your magazine too, don’t forget to let us know what’s going on send us news of your events and charity fundraising and we’ll include as much as we can. Send your news, views and events to susan@hroneandsix.co.uk they’ll all be gratefully received! I hope you’ll find this month’s issue interesting. Until next time enjoy the summer. Susan

Lost In The Woods We visit the beautiful Queenswood

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Places to Visit

A lovely day at the Iron Bridge

Party In The Garden

Ways to enjoy the summer

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Tales of the Woodland

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Every Boy Needs A Hobby

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More from Moreton Wood

We take a look at Warhammer 40,000

Puzzles & Games Word Puzzles and word search

Editor Susan Haworth susan@hroneandsix.co.uk 01568797872 Publisher LakeWood Media info@lakewoodmedia.co.uk www.lakewoodmedia.co.uk Printer Bloomfield Ltd 01789490528 Disclaimer: All advertisements are published in good faith. We do not under any circumstances accept responsibility for the accuracy of such advertisements, nor is any kind of warranty or endorsement expressed or implied by such publication. We specifically disclaim all and any liability to advertisers, readers and users of any kind for loss or damage whatsoever and however arising, whether due to inaccuracy, error, omission or any other cause and whether on the part of One and Six Magazine, our agents or any other person.

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August 2010 | One & Six Magazine

Top Left: Blossom in the orchards at the heart of One and Six. Right: The One and Six Logo

Why One & Six?

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t’s a question that has been asked several times since the first issue came out, ‘What does One and Six mean?’ So I thought I’d better give an explanation.

knew I could do this without an expensive franchise, but the postcode idea seemed a good one, but which to choose?

I live in HR1 and work in HR6 and as I can (just) When I started to remember preresearch the idea of publishing a local magazine decimalisation currency One I came across franchises that and Six (1/6) had a nice ring offered to ‘sell’ the rights to to it. a postcode. The boundary 1/6 was one shilling and of the postcode giving focus to the six pence, a fortune to a small child back then, but magazine just as a equivalent to about 7½p Parish or Village magazines are defined in today’s money! You by their boundaries. As a could buy the Beano and the Village magazine editor or Dandy (comics), a Milky Way and a many years experience I

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Toffee Crisp and still have enough for a whole bag of sweets off the ‘penny tray’ – Fruit Salads and Black Jacks 4 for 1 penny! Of course, shillings and pence don’t mean much to many people today, but the name stuck in my head and the logo makes me smile even if my designer, mere stripling that he is, doesn’t get it at all!

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The Adventures Of Archie

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ver wondered what your dog is up to? What mischief they are planning? Well Archie is here to tell you what he’s been

up to. I’m Archie and I’m a 12 week old Border Collie, two weeks ago I got taken away from my mum, my brothers and my sisters! It was very sad but I think I have a new family now. A young man and a lady came to pick me up early one Thursday morning, that’s when they put me in the silver puppy eater that they use to get around in, well I think it’s a puppy eater because once it opens you can’t get out and it shakes around and makes grumbling noises. Anyway it wasn’t very nice in fact it was so scary I was sick, I think this made the puppy eater let me go because shortly after it stopped grumbling and opened its mouth so I could make a quick escape. Not long after escaping I realised I was in a different place from before, the air was fresh and I could hear ducks and there were lots of trees around. Before I could sprint for freedom I was picked up and the puppy eater’s master started paying much affection towards me, this was nice until I realised it was clearly a trap to make me into cat food, as shortly upon arrival I was taken into a building owned by two very mean cats who seemed to want me dead. They shouted at me and ran around as if to perform some evil spell towards me. Just before I was destined to be eaten alive I was quickly swooped up and rescued by

the puppy eater master. Maybe he’s not so bad after all. But then I was taken to another part of the evil cats’ building where I was placed in a bowl of some description, then all of a sudden warm water started to surround me! I then understood the cats’ plan, they were going to stew me alive and make me into dinner. The water was rising quickly, I was shaking and covered in my own sick from the puppy eater I had begun to say my puppy prayers when the water stopped. I closed my eyes and much to my surprise the water started to disappear through a hole in the bowl, I then realise I was nice and clean maybe the cats dont want me dead but what are they planning. . . I must find out.

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August 2010 | One & Six Magazine

Eco-gardening

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y father was a man ahead of his time. When I was a child though, I considered him eccentric and, to be frank, pretty embarrassing. This was in the eighties: an era where conspicuous consumption was the norm and my father, with his tendency to make do and mend, re-use and never buy new if he could help it, stood out as being…well…just a bit weird. Now, recycling, up-cycling, conservation and sustainability are buzzwords and we’re all environmentally aware. As a gardener, I find I’m turning back to my father for sage advice and inspiration. Here are a few of his gems: Conserve water Install big water butts. Save as much rainwater as possible and deploy it with care. Don’t water little and often: water generously only where it’s needed. This encourages deeper rooting, so your plants will be better able to find their own water during a dry spell. Water at the roots and only in the cool of the morning or the evening to minimise evaporation, and mulch well. Right plant, right place If your garden is free-draining, as mine is, don’t plant thirsty plants which require a lot of water. If it’s clay, like my father’s, then choose deep-rooted, strong plants, like roses and hardy fuchsias, which will withstand dry periods where the ground bakes. If they’re carefully chosen, established plants should have little need for extra water. I’ve now taken the view that if a mature plant can’t survive in my garden

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without extra help, it’s probably not the right plant for my plot. Never use peat Peat bogs are an essential part of our eco system. Once they’re gone they’re gone forever. There is no excuse for buying peat-based products…ever. Use only peat-free composts, soil-improvers and mulches. Recycle. Recycle. Recycle Make a compost heap or buy a compost bin. Making lovely crumbly compost has never been easier. Re-use plastic and crock pots. My father uses old yoghurt pots and plastic food trays for growing his seedlings. He even collects discarded plastic bottles when he walks the dog and cuts them in half to use as mini cloches. The propagators in the photograph are his and are made using milk cartons and plastic bottles! He strings old cds and bottle tops over newly planted seedlings as bird scarers: ingenious. Restrict chemical usage This goes without saying really in an eco-garden. Try nematodes for pest control. Encourage ladybirds for greenfly control by planting fennel, dill, white cosmos and scented geraniums. Leave a wild patch A pile of logs and fallen leaves and a patch of nettles will provide shelter for all manner of garden wildlife, including hedgehogs, ladybirds and beetles. This natural army of slug and bug killers will repay you handsomely for your kindness.

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Lost In The Woods We visit one of Herefordshires most beautiful attactions

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he two areas covered by One and Six magazine meander north from Hereford and south from the Shropshire border and meet somewhere around Dinmore Hill, putting Queenswood Country Park and Arboretum at the centre of One and Six territory. It was tempting to say the wood is at the heart of the county but with more than 700 acres of trees including 650 rare and exotic species in the arboretum itself this wonderful place probably equates more to the lungs of the county as trees play a big part in making oxygen and refreshing the air around us. The A49 labours its way up either side of Dinmore Hill and at the very top is the entrance to Queenswood. There’s ample parking in front of the visitor centre made up of two timber framed buildings moved here from Hereford and Leominster. One houses an excellent cafe where you can refresh yourself with anything

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from and ice-cream to a full meal. The other building is the Tourist Information Centre and gift shop and the all important toilets. Around the back you will find a water tap and drinking bowl for your canine friends and Queenswood is rightly a favourite dog walking spot. A path leading straight from the back of the visitor centre sets you on your way through a Border Oak shelter which has maps and information boards and benches to rest, on the path goes past the children’s playground and the picnic area and off into the trees. Eventually the path branches and you can choose which way to go by following one of the animal footprint trail markers. There are leaflets in the shop that give details of each route. Whichever way you go be sure to pay a visit to the viewing point that breaks out from the tree cover like a balcony to give a panoramic view of the land to the south of the hill. You’ll find a plaque that gives a guide to the distant

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landmarks and a telescope to give a closer view. If the time of year is right you must visit the Autumn garden full of trees chosen to make the most of the fantastic colours that mark the end of the summer. Another must see feature is the grove of giant Redwood trees which also featured on the cover of the first issue of the One & Six Magazine, mere midgets compared to their cousins across the Atlantic but their straight trunks and the deep shadow created by their canopy gives the space beneath them a quiet stillness quite different to anywhere else in the wood. Standing under all these great trees it seems incredible to reflect that they have been there a relatively short time. All the trees on the hill were removed for use in World War I and those growing there now have only been established during the latter part of the 20th century. Susan Haworth


Didn’t we have a lovely time the day we went to.... Ironbridge.

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tourist attraction before it was even completed. The Museum of the Gorge – with a model of the village as it was in 1796; Of course it would be impossible to exactly recreate the noise, the smells, the black clouds of smoke under which the people of the 18th and 19th centuries had to endure, working and living their lives in conditions that we, in our pampered easy 21st century lives would find intolerable. With state of the art technology, you get an insight into the environmental consequences of almost 300 years of industry on the local area. The popular and excellent Blists Hill Victorian Town

he problem with Ironbridge is there is simply too much to see and do in one day. So it helps to have a plan. That plan should involve the very fine value for money Museum Passport which for £21.95* for an adult gives access to all ten Ironbridge Museums, as many times as you like, for a year! That has to be one of the best value tickets in the country. The Iron Bridge itself, with its Toll booth exhibition centre, with photos and paintings, and information on the building of Abraham Darby III’s masterpiece. A revolutionary concept at it’s time of opening in 1781, it was a

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is worth the Passport on its own. One visit would never be enough as during the year there is an expanding programme of events including weddings, steam rallies, cycle events. A living museum with school classes – popular with all ages, a genuine Victorian pharmacy (as featured in a recent BBC2 documentary) and other traditional crafts and businesses with well trained and committed staff who really bring the Victorian era to life. There are three refreshment areas which can be accessed independently of museum entry. The Museum of Iron , showcasing the innovation of Abraham Darby who, at the

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beginning of the 18th century, here in Coalbrookdale, pioneered the smelting of iron using Coke and kick-started the Industrial Revolution; The Tar Tunnel, where natural bitumen oozing through the rock has been a source of wonder for 200 years; The Coalport China Museum where 200 years of porcelain production is exhibited in the original riverside buildings; The Jackfield Tile Museum Victorian glazed tiles were an intrinsic decorative feature, The Brosely Pipeworks, before cigarettes, pipes were the popular way to smoke tobacco, and were cheaply and skilfully made of clay. The Darby Houses where generations of the Darby lived and embodied their Quaker philosophy of universal education and philanthropy; Last but not least, the newest

Museum, Enginuity, which is fast becoming as popular as Blist Hill, with its innovation and state of the art technology, allowing you to see inside everyday objects from several aspects, materials, design, energy and systems and control, get an insight into how they work. Hands on exhibitions and changing events during the yvear make this another museum you can visit again and again. The ten museums are well spaced out along the valley and you do need a car to get from one to another. Ironbridge village is worth a visit in its own right. Incredibly pretty now the scars of industry have healed over, there are pleasant walking paths along the valley sides and the village has tea shops, craft and gift shops to

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satisfy the most committed day tripper. But that Bridge is always there, reminding us of a time when Britain was a world leader in industry, something to be genuinely proud of. *Seniors £17.60; Children £14.25 and a family tickets which is for 2 adults and up to three children is £59.95 Kim Riddell is a Blue Badge Guide and experienced tour manager. v Find out more or contact her at www.selecttourseurope.com

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Party In The Garden

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plan ahead so that it is easy on the guests and the hosts. Know your menu. Decide the week before what you will serve for the meal. Appetizers or finger foods of some sort allow guests to munch while they wait for the main course to finish on the grill.

hat’s more fun in the warm months than cooking outside? It’s cooking outside with friends. Host your own barbeque and invite all your friends over for a tasty meal and some fun. Here are some tips to get that party started right.

Appetizers should be small especially if you plan on serving a variety of grilled meats and vegetables. Try a selection of veggies or fruit with some low calorie dip. This is easy to make—you go to the store and pick some up! The name of the game here is to have fun and to do as much as you can ahead of time.

The number one complaint I have about throwing a barbeque party is that the cooks do more cooking than enjoying their company. Last minute preparations mean that the food is not ready when the guests arrive. It is hard to entertain and fix the appetizers at the same time. People seem to eat in shifts as the food gets ready.

Punch is a good idea for a party where there will be children as well as grown ups. If the punch is meant to be sparkling (adding soda water

Let’s avoid that bit of nonsense this year. If you are going to have a barbeque get-together,

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or lemonade), chill the punch first without the fizz and add it just before the guests arrive. That way, the punch won’t lose its kick while in the fridge. If the guests were told to bring their appetites, you may want to eliminate chicken from the menu. Chicken takes a long time to cook depending on the parts of the bird you are grilling. This will cause some people to get their food ahead of others. So no guest is left with an empty plate, choose other meats or pre-bake your chicken and finish off on the barbecue to reduce cooking time. Remember to always preheat the grill. When people come in and see smoke rising from the coals they expect that you have already put food on. Don’t surprise them with the smell

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of smoldering charcoal. Forty-five minutes before the party, start the gas or charcoal grill so that the coals get hot and are ready for grilling once the guests arrive. As for the side dishes and cold salads, prepare those at least an hour (for the side dishes) or two (for the salads) before the party. This cuts down on the work of the host and hostess. You can

sit with your friends and await the goodies from the grill. Better still, everyone can watch the grill master at work and nibble on appetizers. The barbeque party should flow smoothly when you take the time to prepare. When the work is done early, the fun can begin as soon as the guests arrive.

What You Need: 1 lb chicken breasts, boneless, skinless and cubed 1 lb beef sirloin, boneless and cubed 100ml oil 3 garlic cloves, minced 60ml pineapple juice 2 tsp soy sauce 1 tsp red pepper flakes 4 jalapeno peppers (or red peppers) 8 rashers of bacon - cut in half 16 wooden cocktail sticks soaked in cold water

How to Make It: Whisk together the oil and minced garlic in a large mixing bowl. Add the pineapple juice and soy sauce and continue whisking until well blended. Stir in the red pepper flakes. Place the mixture into a large zip lock bag. Trim any fat away from the pieces of meat. Place the meat into the zip lock bag, close tightly and shake to make sure the meat is completely covered by the marinade. Allow the meat to sit in the marinade at least one hour. Meat can marinate over night if you prefer. Remove the meat from the bag and discard the marinade. Cut the peppers lengthwise and remove the seeds, membrane and stems. Cut the peppers into strips. Place one strip of pepper on each piece of bacon. Place one cube of meat on top of each pepper strip. Add another pepper strip on top. Wrap the bacon completely around each piece and secure with a toothpick. Heat grill to medium hot or if using coals place coals in the center of the grill and when the coals burn down to a slight gray spread in a single layer. Cook 20 minutes, turning every 5 minutes to insure they are cooked on all sides. When done the bacon should be crisp and the juices from the chicken should run clear. (When working with jalapeno peppers if possible wear gloves. Never touch your face or eyes until you have washed your hands thoroughly.)

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Tales of woodland Work and Life

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t is summer in the woods and everywhere is a deep and dappled green. The birds are quieter, singing less as they work hard to rear their young. The bees are buzzing, the butterflies are out and the sap is flowing. It is the season for bark stripping.

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Here in Moreton Wood we spend the summer months stripping the bark of wych elm and cedar for weaving into chair seating and baskets. The inner bark of wych elm is a fantastic material for weaving because of its flexible nature. It will weave around the seat rail of a chair without breaking and it has a pattern which looks very attractive when it is dried and woven.

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We fell the tree when it is about 14 – 20 years old. This ensures it has the best chance of surviving Dutch Elm Disease, as it is older trees that are more susceptible, but the trees will still grow large enough for the white-letter hairstreak butterfly colony which is unusually large in Moreton Wood. The felled trees will, of course, grow from the stumps and can be harvested again in 14 – 20 years. Our wood is classified as ancient woodland as it has been there since at least as early as the 16th century, but along with many other areas

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of Britain’s natural woodland, it was cleared in the 1960s for the cultivation of softwoods. Moreton Wood was planted with spruce, douglas fir and western red cedar to the detriment of the native wild flowers, insects and birds. We are now taking out these conifers and regenerating the broadleaf trees that were indigenous to the woods. We are always racking our brains to think of ways of using this softwood timber. So a couple of summers ago Paul tried stripping the bark of the Western Red Cedar to see if it was any good for seat weaving. Western red cedar has a wonderful outer bark, a deep reddish brown. “I stripped off the outer bark with my drawknife,’ says Paul. “To test its flexibility I bent the strip in half, then I wound it round my finger. It was nice and bendy so I

“The bees are buzzing, the butterflies are out and the sap is flowing.” stripped the whole tree, coiled the bark and hung it up to dry. It turned a nice deep red.” Now we use both wych elm and western red cedar for weaving and sell the barks to other greenwoodworkers too. I sit in the shade of the wych elm quietly stripping the bark a white letter hairstreak flutters by and lands on my cheek and then my hand. It feels very special to be touched by one of these rare and threatened butterflies. Paul & Jo Morton manage Moreton Wood at Ullingswick. Find out more at www.moretonwood.co.uk

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August 2010 | One & Six Magazine

“Every boy needs a hobby””

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t’s a well known fact that ‘every boy needs a hobby’, but where does a young lad turn to in a world where television has murdered imagination and video games have stolen creativity? In the 20th century, airfix was the answer (obviously it didn’t have Playstations to compete with) but how about a 21st century option or, perhaps even, a 41st century option?

somewhat sneakily, they are picking up social skills, learning to think critically and gaining numerical skills.

Games Workshop’s Warhammer 40,000, a tabletop battle game, could be described reasonably well as a cross between airfix (without the nostalgia), Dungeons and Dragons (without the complexity) and chess (without the regicide).

For the past couple of years, Herefordshire Libraries have provided venues for young people aged 10-18 to play Warhammer 40,000 at its Hereford, Leominster and Ross branches and put the game in Herefordshire on the map (Hereford Library is used as a case study on Games Workshop’s website).

In an era where intellectual stimulation amongst the young is achieved by thumping buttons on an Xbox, it is encouraging that this and its sister game, Warhammer Fantasy Battles, are modernising and gaining popularity.

Players collect, assemble and paint armies of models based on one of 12 science fictional races of the 41st millennium (hence the name) and do battle with friends lasting anywhere between 40 minutes with a hand full of dice and a ruler to the best part of a day with industrial sized tape measures and dice by the bucketful.

The clubs run regularly every Wednesday in Hereford, every other Wednesday at Leominster and once a month at Ross, all 5pm – 7pm and are open to anyone aged 10-18.

More details are available at the Libraries, as well as books based on the background of the To the younger player, the game game which can be borrowed outwardly consists of mashing and White Dwarf, Games monsters with militaristic Workshop’s monthly magazine miniatures but subliminally and can be read in the Library. Stuart McEwan

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Above: Examples of Warhammer figures

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MORETON WOOD ¥

High Quality hand made Garden Fencing, Screens, Arbours and Structures

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Sawn timber for sheds and decking

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Sustainably produced Barbecue Charcoal

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Other hand made quality woodland products & services

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Fun and Educational Community Events and Workshops

ALL FROM LOCAL SUSTAINABLY MANAGED WOODLAND IN ULLINGSWICK, HEREFORDSHIRE

Paul and Jo Morton will be happy to answer your queries Tel: 07920 851 674 moretonwood@googlemail.com www.moretonwood.co.uk

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Puzzles

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August 2010 | One & Six Magazine

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August 2010 | One & Six Magazine

What’s On? 1st Herefordshire Country Fair at Hampton Court, Dinmore. Contact 01568 797777 6th – 8th Big Chill at Eastnor Castle, nr Ledbury Contact 01531 633160 14th – 22nd IBSA World Blind Football Championship Royal College for the Blind, Hereford 15th

Yarkhill Canal Walks from Yarkhill Village Hall for info call 01568 615575

29th Mediaeval Fun at Hampton Court, Dinmore 11am – 5pm 29th – 30th The Siege of Goodrich Castle – Civil War Re-enactment 30th River Wye Festival and Dragon Boats and Duck Race. Between Hunderton Bridge and the Rowing Club, Hereford. From about 10.30am Thursdays in August Time Travellers Go. . . Robin Hood at Goodrich Castle Throughout the month Dr Who Exhibition, Time Machine Museum, Bromyard. Contact 01885 488329 Croft Castle (National Trust) and Berrington Hall (National Trust) are both open every day in August.

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Useful Numbers

Police Gas Emergency Hereford Hospital Leominster Community Hospital Hereford Council (switchboard)

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