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Magazine YORK

The Indulgence Issue

Sept/Oct

2012


                          

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In.dulge ............................................................................

(indulj)

v. in.dulged, in.dulg.ing, in.dulg.es

As the year is nearing its final quarter our imaginations are embarking on an epic journey. The Food and Drink Festival has inspired a Dionysian lilt to not only the design but also the concept of this month’s issue and via a dichotomy of indulgent debauchery we have arrived at its antithesis: Poverty, decay and true decadence. Aside from this focus on duality, we also welcome a new generation of scholars and present a few insiders’ tips to the city as both universities return after a summer break. They’ll soon be joined by the customs that accompany Halloween and we’ve a twist of the macabre in our pages to please even the blackest of souls. All of this arrives at a time when we’ve a few things to celebrate of our own. The 1st of September marks a major milestone: our first birthday, which will be celebrated in style with a huge retrospective of the eventful journey so far and the influx of creative genii we have had the huge fortune to work with; long may it continue. From One&Other’s earliest beginnings we have been lucky to receive the support of the community at large and together we’ve come a long way. As we move into our second year, we promise to continually strive to grow and evolve whilst not forgetting our primary aim as a non-profit to be the collective voice of the local community. Some of these changes will hopefully be immediately apparent, such as a new artistic direction in this issue. A new designer here and a few tweaks to format there, we’re keen to hear any feedback you may have, as what’s ours is yours. With that comes an invitation to pop in and visit us in our new studio: The Creative Chapel, just outside the city walls. All in all the autumn is promising to be the season that keeps on giving. There is so much on offer, so much to think about and so much to emerge ourselves in. All hail Bacchus, now let’s indulge.

............................................................................ VICKY PARRY Editorial Director

oneandother.com oneandother.tv facebook.com/oneandother @oneanotheryork

02

ONEANDOTHER.COM


DIRECTORS Editorial Director - Vicky Parry (vicky@oneandother.com) Managing Director - Stuart Goulden (stuart@oneandother.com)

EDITORIAL editorial@oneandother.com

WRITERS Laurence Cook, Adam Alcock, Matt Keay, Kezia Buckley, Katharine Wootton, Heather Welsh, Lotte Inch, Clare Nattress, Alan Gillot, Lindsay Whitwell, Alysia Judge, Kezia Buckley, Alice Thomson, James Arden, Jade Aitkin, Kiran Tanna, Giles Bennett

ILLUSTRATORS Nathan Markham, Amy Evans, Jonathan Sillence, Jason Mortimer, Ben Bainbridge, Holly Gallacher

PHOTOGRAPHERS Ben Bentley, Joel Smith, Cover (Greg at According to McGee)

SUB EDITORS Mark Allen, Adam Alcock, Laurence Cook

DESIGN design@oneandother.com Chief Design - Jordan Took Design Intern - Daniel Holmes

ADVERTISING Michael Wilkins Stuart Goulden

hello@oneandother.com

PRINT

Pressision With special thanks to: Keyfund, The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Beautiful Meme, Parashoots, Treasurer’s House, Charlotte Boyle Media, York Youth Council, Jack Casling (Choir of Vision), The Phoenix Centre, Rural Creative, Ian Walker & Co and our Founding Members: Ambiente, Charles Newton, Mike Brudenell, Stephen Parry & Richard Goulden This months cover stars are: Anna Robinson, who has just completed her stint as Eve in 2012 York Mystery Plays & Michael O'Hare who is head chef and creator of magic at The Blind Swine. One&Other is published by: The Creative Chapel 3 Apollo Street York YO10 5AP

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.................................................................................................................... CITY’S ARCHIVES UNLEASHED

DRIVING FORWARD CAR SAFETY

September / October Issue

THE FUTURE OF COMMUNITY

NEW ORGANIC CAFÉ

Brief The

Inform

CITY’S ARCHIVES UNLEASHED City of York Council is to unveil a paper history of our city as the lid is lifted on the secrets buried within York’s city archives. Until 30 September, thousands of handwritten documents from York’s 800 years in the making will be on display in a free exhibition at York Explore Learning Library Centre. CAMPAIGN TO REMEMBER JOSEPH ROWNTREE Inscribed into every street of York lurks the legacy of Joseph Rowntree. Now a social media campaign has been launched calling for a statue in the city centre to serve as a permanent and tangible reminder of his efforts to be admired by future generations.

Consume

Do

York-based charity SASH has been awarded almost £200,000 to lead their crusade against homelessness in our city. By boosting their army of volunteers and ‘hosts’ from the community, SASH wants to ensure the estimated 150 people sleeping rough in Yorkshire don’t have to spend more than one night on the streets.

COUNCIL OFFICES CONVERT TO NEW HOTEL green light on plans to convert the St Leonard’s place council offices into a 5 storey upmarket hotel with more than 600 extra hotel beds.

........................................................ ........................................................

UNIVERSITY GROWS

Work has now begun on a £12m expansion of York St John University’s student accommodation. Over the next year 258 extra bedrooms will be built for the growing student body, also creating around 100 jobs.

This will see parts of Hungate and Carmelite Street closed to the public for 10 months.

258 extra bedrooms

oneandother.com 04

Issue 04 / Indulgence Free

Culture

BOOST IN FIGHT AGAINST HOMELESSNESS

The Grade II listed building in which our council workers pace could be about to become the fleeting home of York’s tourists. Officials have now given the

oneandother.com

Think

EXPLOSIVE FAWKES TRIBUTE York’s most notorious rogue is to be celebrated in his home city for the first time in seven years. Born on Stonegate in 1570, the legacy of Guy Fawkes’ treasonous gunpowder plot sees cities and towns across the country light up the night sky on November 5th and an explosive fireworks festival is being earmarked for the Knavesmire this year. THE FUTURE OF COMMUNITY York’s tourism agency, Visit York, has announced it will receive a total of £1,000,000 from the Government’s Regional Growth Fund and local partners to inspire more Britons to holiday in England. The campaign aims to boost the local economy by 5%, an estimated £22 million over the three years, creating almost 400 new jobs.


September / October Issue YORK MOSQUE PLANS APPROVED Plans to build a new £1 million mosque in York have been approved by City of York Council. The new mosque will replace the existing one on the Bull Lane site, which has been used for

the last 25 years and is now too small. The new design will accommodate up to 600 worshipers and also includes an interfaith room, which will allow locals, school groups, and religious groups to visit the mosque.

........................................................ LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR UP FOR NATIONAL AWARD This year York’s Dom Smith is up for a National Diversity Award. The Awards aim is to recognise and reward positive role models, entrepreneurs and community organisations from a grass roots level which naturally throws Dom into the running. His nomination is for setting up Soundsphere

magazine, the Creative Condition and Disabled Entrepreneurs, a UKwide network which aims to support and inspire people from all backgrounds to pursue new business ventures. The National Diversity Awards are to be hosted this year by Brian Dowling at Manchester’s Midland Hotel on 21 September.

ZEITGEIST IN MOURNING FOR GLAMOUR Black is most definitely back in the fashion world this autumn, with gothic glamour and vixen chic dominating the catwalks (thank you ‘Fifty Shades of Grey”…). Valentino and Calvin Klein both presented sleek gowns in full black leather, offering a bold take on the season’s latest trend. Here in York, as the nights get longer, the city transforms into the perfect backdrop for gothic decadence with the start of the Ghost Festival. From paranormal investigations to pumpkin carving, there has never been a better time to layer up in leather.

..................................................... OLYMPIC DREAMS The Olympics have revolutionised our attitudes to sport, with vast numbers of us laying down our wii remotes to indulge in some proper exercise. If you too are inspired, take a trip down to the recently opened Sports Village on Heslington East. With spa facilities, an eight lane 25m swimming pool and a 120-station fitness suite it’s the perfect place to start your Olympic dream.

..................................................... GOING IT ALONE The word entrepreneur has always carried cultural kudos but it seems more and more are taking the leap to carve out a future pursuing their dreams. Some even describe entrepreneurship as the new rock and roll! Sheffield’s MADE Festival on 19-21 September aims to release your inner Branson and inspire a new generation to turn their vision into world beating businesses. Pop along to the two-day masterclass and we hope to see you in our pages in the near future!

oneandother.com 05


September / October Issue

........................................................ ILLUMINATING YORK October sees the much welcome return of the Illuminating York Festival. Joining the yearlong celebrations that are taking part across the city for York 800, this year’s event promises to be larger and more spectacular than ever before with its own “Wonderland� in Museum Gardens. To date, we’ve enjoyed seven magical festivals displaying digital art and extraordinary light displays. Illuminating York 2011 saw 60,000 people flock to the festival that not only gave artistic pleasure for York’s tourists and residents but also

brought an expected £1.7 million to the local economy. Organisers hope to top both figures with this years intallment. Over the years the festival has presented specially commissioned digital artworks on several of the city’s historic buildings (including York Minster, the Yorkshire Museum and the Bar Walls), celebrating York’s unique architecture and bringing internationally renowned artists to the city centre. The festival is organised by a steering committee, which comprises of representatives from

Visit York, City of York Council, York Museums Trust, Science City York, University of York and local York businesses. York’s ambition is to showcase the city in exciting and innovative ways. So keep your eyes peeled for the full program of events (due for release in September) to find out

which places will this year be opening their doors after hours and inviting visitors to see a series of special performances, installations and exhibitions. Illuminating York Festival will run from 31 October to 3 November.

         

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The perfect platform for your christmas party

Celebrate Christmas in true spectacular style this year at North Yorkshire’s leading stylish Christmas party venue.

Mistletoe an Experience luxurious ca down to a s followed by

Rock ‘n’ Rai Experience carriages an spectacular dancing unt

Packages from £29.99 New for 2012! Come Dancing Christmas BBC Strictly Come Dancing's most successful couple, Darren Bennett and Lilia Kopylova, will perform at this evening of good food and dancing, set in the atmospheric setting of Station Hall.

New for 2012: Come Dancing Christmas featuring dancers from BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing

T 01904 686 22tnrm.org.uk/christmasparty

Festive Froli Looking for a Christmas d sure to be a fork buffet, b and dancin

Champers a See in the N Sit down to a followed by and DJ.

T 01904 686 22tnrm.org.uk/christmasparty

COME DANCING CHRISTMAS AT NATIONAL RAILWAY MUSEUM

........................................................

Strictly Come Dancing stars Darren Bennett and Lilia Kopylova will be performing at the National Railway Museum in York this Christmas. The stars of stage and screen will host an evening of dinner and dancing in the museum’s atmospheric Station Hall. Darren, who grew up in the industry due to his parents being professional dancers, told us: “We have

performed in some amazing places such as Leeds Armoury and Magna in Sheffield so performing at the National Railway Museum is another great setting to tick off the list.” The show will be similar to their performances on TV, showing off styles such as samba, cha-cha and jive but would also involve some audience participation. “The audience will be able to get involved in a little bit of salsa or some on the spot rhythm stuff around their tables. We want to get them all having a good time because

at the end of the day it is a Christmas party so we want everyone to have a really great night,” Darren said. He hoped that the event will give people a taste of Latin and ballroom dancing to inspire and encourage them to go out and find their own dance classes, saying it is a “great form of exercise and a great way to meet new people.” Darren and Lilia will be at the National Railway Museum on December 8th and tickets can be booked at www.nrm. org.uk

oneandother.com 07


INFORM / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

Food Festival Special 21 – 30 September

..........................

For ten days this September, the heart of the city will turn into bustling hub for food lovers as York celebrates its annual food and drink festival. The city-wide event expects to attract around 450,000 visitors and aims to celebrate all things Yorkshire, from offering the best local produce, to cookery master-classes and even seminars on food sustainability. The theme this year is ‘feeding the city’ in the past, present, and future, which will focus on the history of food in York and what challenges the city may have to overcome in the future. With so much going on this year, there is something for everyone to indulge on any budget. Here are our highlights:

FREE

UNDER £5

UNDER £10

You’ll be pleased to hear there are plenty of things to enjoy at the festival without spending a penny. Marker stalls will be offering free tasters of their wares, which is a good way to try out new cuisines before committing to buy and nominate your favourites for the Yorkshire Post Readers Award.

If you have a little more money to spare why not try out some Roman and Viking drinks and nibbles at the Eat Through The Ages Demo (£2), or if you love cheese you can join in British Cheese Week, sampling some of the winners at the British Cheese Awards (£2).

New for 2012, the taste trail booklet is one of the best ways to experience the festival. The booklet offers free samples of canapés, cheeses, chocolates and 25ml measures of drinks across 24 venues with further discounts on purchases (£8 each or two for £12).

Also on offer are also lots of complimentary demonstrations including a cookery presentation by Michelin starred chef James Mackenzie, a lesson in mixology with Hotel Du Vin’s cocktail class or you can learn the secrets behind the famous Bettys Tea Rooms.

If you are a wannabe Heston Blumenthal then why not go along to What’s cooking - the chemistry of food seminar looking at the science behind food and try a nitrogen chocolate.

“If you are a wannabe Heston Blumenthal then why not go along to What’s cooking - the chemistry of food seminar”

Words: Alice Thomson | Visuals: Nathan Markham 08

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Chocolate

TASTING Events Exclusive experiences taking your love of chocolate a step further. Book a place and bring a friend for FREE!

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Dine at my table is back following its overwhelming success in its inaugural year last year. This is a community-led event where local people will open up their homes and host an intimate meal for the evening. Meals will vary in style, length (number of courses) and price but it is a great way to experience something new.

If you really want to indulge you could try a 6 course fish tasting (£40) or learn the skills of traditional bread-making (£70 for six hours). Woth raiding the savings the piggy bank for.

09


PROMOTION / Indulgence Issue .....................................................................................................................

Enjoy the ride Free training is being offered to young drivers in York wanting to improve their confidence on the road and cut their insurance premiums. ..................................................................................................................... The virtues of road safety are easily forgotten amidst the euphoria of passing your driving test and losing those ‘L’ plates. We’ve all been there. Ever the trailblazer, York has become the first city to join forces with the UK’s leading road safety charity to offer free training to improve the confidence of young drivers on our roads. From increased fatalities to higher premiums, the statistics for younger drivers makes grim reading and the York Momentum scheme seeks to improve their fortunes with free courses for up to 300 drivers aged 17 to 26, who live or work in York. It’s the perfect bridge between driving under supervision from an instructor to enjoying the full freedom of the road. What’s more, it could just lower your insurance premiums

10

which have skyrocketed over the £4,000-a-year mark for the average 17 to 20 year old male. The partnership between The Institute of Advanced Motoring (IAM) and City of York Council does not involve any exams and there is no risk of failure; it offers a quick and easy option to improve their core driving skills. The course is split into two modules: an interactive online assessment, followed by an on-road session with an IAM representative. On launching the initiative, Cllr Dave Merrett, Cabinet Member for Transport, Planning and Sustainability, said: “Young people are at the highest risk of being killed or seriously injured on UK roads, whether as drivers or passengers of other young drivers. So this scheme will provide our young drivers with advanced knowledge and invaluable experience.”

Statistics sadly show that four in five fatal road accidents in the UK involve young people under the age of 21 and that one in five young drivers crash within six months of driving. Also, with the weather - and therefore driving conditions - due to take a turn for the worst in recent months the training can offer their passengers and parents more peace of mind that they’re driving with their heads as well as the hands and feet. And as the training is completely free of charge, there really is nothing to lose. Places are available now on a first-come-first-served basis so act quickly if you fit the bill! Email momentum@york.gov.uk for more details about Momentum York.

ONEANDOTHER.COM


Email:momentum@york.gov.uk


PROMOTION / Indulgence Issue .....................................................................................................................

Cycle Heaven Cycle Heaven is somewhat of a York institution. Established in 1993 on a mission to convert the world to cycling, they’ve carved out a reputation as the good guys of travel. Earlier this year they opened up a second store in York station that carries the same dedication to expert and approachable service as their ever popular Bishopthorpe Road base. It offers on the spot repairs, hires from as little as £5 a day, and the largest range of folding bikes for miles around, including all the leading brands such as Brompton, Birdy, Airnimal, Dahon, Mezzo and Ridgeback. One step ahead of the big trends, Cycle Heaven is famed for Dutch Bikes, being the UK’s oldest Ga-

zelle dealer. They also specialise in custom builds with the Italianbuilt steel framesets of iconic British cycling brand Condor a firm favourite. Cycle Heaven has proudly sponsored Yorkshire Ambulance’s cycle paramedics for 12 years now – providing all their bikes and servicing. With such a commitment to the cause, it’s no surprise they continue to go from strength to strength.

Open 7 days a week: Cycle Heaven of York

The Classic Bike Shop 2 Bishopthorpe Road York, YO23 1JJ 01904 636578 / 651870 Cycle Heaven at York Station

For cycle repairs, cycle hire and folding bikes. York Railway Station, York, YO24 1AY 01904 622701 / 630378 www.cycle-heaven.co.uk


............................................................................

Gigs inYork BY HEATHER WELSH To coincide with this issue we’ve put together a Spotify playlist, riffing off the theme of indulgence. To get you started, here are our top 7 tracks of the lot: ERIC CLAPTON 01. COCAINE THE DIVINE COMEDY 02. GENERATION SEX RUFUS WAINWRIGHT 03. SANSSOUCI THE O’JAYS FOR THE LOVE OF 04. MONEY NEW YORK DOLLS 05. SEVEN DAY WEEKEND BENNY GOODMAN 06. SING, SING, SING LOUIS ARMSTRONG AND DAVE BRUBECK 07. KING FOR A DAY

.................................... .................................... POCKTOBERFEST NEWTON 2012 FAULKNER ....................................

....................................

For the 8th year, Pocktoberfest is to invade Pocklington with gallons of hot music washed down with litres of Great British ale. From the post-punk sounds of 80s icons Echo and the Bunnymen, to the acoustic pop-rock of Leeds’ rising stars Ellen and the Escapades, Pocktoberfest captures all the frolics of Munich’s legendary Oktoberfest in Yorkshire style.

Newton’s trademark rust-red dreadlocks and feel-good summer rhythms are to bring a little ray of music sunshine into the chilly autumn months. Promoting his new album Write it on Your Skin as well as playing songs from the acclaimed Rebuilt by Humans, this is your chance to see Newton’s famed love affair with the guitar in action.

Pocklington School Sports Centre 27-28 October [£10-£43]

York Barbican 12 October [£17.50]

.................................... .................................... JESCA HOOP ROZI PLAIN

.................................... .................................... A founding member of the Cleaner Records Collective - a loose assortment of singer-songwriters based in Bristol - Rozi Plain makes whimsical, unassuming tracks full of whispers and smiles. Since supporting Devendra Banhart on tour in 2010, Plain released the outstanding single Humans in 2011 on Need No Water Records. Her new album, Joined Sometimes Unjoined, was released in July and is sure to provide a good chunk of material for her live performance. Basement Bar 16 October [£5]

American singer and guitarist Jesca Hoop rose to fame after being recommended by Tom Waits on a Californian radio show back in 2003. Since then she’s toured with the likes of Elbow, Andrew Bird and Greg Laswell. With a unique folk/blues and sometimes pop influenced sound, Hoop has a vast range of musical talents. She’s duetted with Peter Gabriel and given her fair share of covers a go - always using her easy singing style to great effect.

The Duchess 27 September [£12] ONEANDOTHER.COM


.................................................................................................................... .................................... .................................... JAILL ALT.YORKFEST .................................... .................................... This shiny new music festival welcomes familiar faces and hidden talents to the Fulford Arms for a bumper family fun day in aid of Macmillan Cancer Care. As the soundtrack to a day of food, drink and pub entertainment, alt. yorkfest will feature ex-Seahorses frontman Chris Helme alongside Stolen Earth, Joe Solo and standup storyteller Adrian Spendlow plus lots more.

Sub Pop trio Jaill are making their first tour of the UK to accompany the release of their fourth album Traps. Lyrics and melody stand out with the Milwaukee group’s catchy brand of psych-pop. Recorded in the lead singer’s basement the new album is crammed with guitar hooks and is sure to provide material for a high energy show.

Fulford Arms 2 September

Stereo 30 September [£6]

04. 05. 06.

07.

08. 09. 10.


DO / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

Theatre Previews THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER

summer to see a spectacular show complete with storytelling, poetry and physical theatre. Rowntree Park, York 30 August - 2 September

Pilot Theatre present a story of class and justice in this new play. The story follows a rebellious runner, Colin Smith, who constantly finds himself in and out of detention centres and young offenders institutions. Roy Williams’s adaption of Alan Sillitoe’s text proves a bitter drama against the backdrop of Britain’s 2012 Olympic Games.

THE GUINEA PIG CLUB Vroom Productions and our local in-house team at York Theatre Royal tackle this new play about Archibald McIndoe, a cosmetic surgeon in the Second World War. With the perfect ingredients for comedy and pathos, YTR’s new play looks to be an antidote to the bigger commercial theatre usually found in the early autumn season.

York Theatre Royal 14-29 September KEEP UP!

Six Lips theatre present an energetic promenade family show in Rowntree Park. The cast in the garb of animals, mythic creatures, gods and athletes will lead the audience through five continents of the world. Six Lips have described the show as “fun and silly” - so join the team by the river this 16

nature of the book and brings the cast of colourful characters alive with a new reading of the book which adds a theatrical flourish to the already dramatic tale of money and power in the original.

York Theatre Royal 19-20 October BLUE/ORANGE Joe Penhall’s sharply witty and edgily contemporary classic Blue/ Orange welcomes an all-star cast for its national tour. This Olivier Award-winning play follows a young patient convinced that his father is a military dictator: a story that quickly spirals into a harrowing exploration of mental health, race and the ‘broken Britain’ of the 21st century. The Grand Opera House 9-13 October [£10-£29.50]

York Theatre Royal 5-27 October DOMBEY AND SON A new adaptation of the classic novel Dombey and Son is coming to York Theatre Royal in late October. Red Dog Theatre captures the quintessentially Dickensian ONEANDOTHER.COM


WINNER ‘BEST PLAY’

OLIVIER AWARDS THE CRITICS’ CIRCLE AWARDS THE EVENING STANDARD AWARDS

STARRING

ROBERT BATHURST GERARD M C CARTHY OLIVER WILSON WRITTEN BY JOE PENHALL

DIRECTED BY CHRISTOPHER

LUSCOMBE

TUE 9 - SAT 13 OCTOBER

0844 871 3024* www.atgtickets.com/york* GROUPS HOTLINE 01904 678 705 yorkgroups@theambassadors.com

*fees apply


DO / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

MUSEUMS ..........................

FUN WITH PADDINGTON BEAR

THE PRICE OF DEBT

THE VICTORIAN COOK

FULFORD BATTLE RE-ENACTMENT

Paddington Bear will be here for the October school holidays so grab your duffle coat and marmalade sandwiches and pop along for lots of family fun. You’ll have the chance to meet him at various times throughout the day and dress up like the bear himself.

The story of York Debtors’ Prison is brought to life in a wonderful social history of the late 1700s. Discover the daily life of a prisoner and what they were expected to pay for the privilege of being punished.

The Mansion House kitchens are being opened to the public with demonstrations from a trained Victorian cook as the main attraction. The chefs will be cooking food from the Georgian and Victorian past of Mansion House as well as teaching the history of the kitchens.

In 1066 the men of York clashed with Harald Hardrada’s Viking army and a bloodbath ensued. Officer Russell Marwood takes visitors on a tour around the site and gives a detailed account of the events of this famous battle.

27 October – 4 November National Railway Museum

7 September The Castle Museum

23 September York Mansion House

23 September Meet at the Bay Horse Inn Car Park (Fulford)

Fri 14 - Sat 29 Sep Box Office 01904 623568 www.yorktheatreroyal.co.uk


The Loneliness of the real Long Distance Runner from London. Well I’m none of those things apart A new Pilot Theatre production is to fuse together the ‘angry young man’ of the past, present and potential from a boy in London but that expectation can’t change. And so I feel that frustration that Colin feels future as they present BAFTA winning playwright, which is almost political failure and not knowing Roy Williams’, up-to-the-minute adaptation of one where to go.” of the definitive 1950s anarchist texts: Alan Sillitoe’s The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. Yet, like his character Colin, who Tracking the thoughts of a young reb“I was lucky finds an escape through running, Elel in post-Olympic Britain, incensed with the alienating world around because I found a liot has also found an outlet through him as he runs a long-distance race, passion in acting, which to channel his frustration: “I lucky because I found a passion The Loneliness of the Long Distance poetry and running. was in acting, poetry and running. And Runner puts a magnifying glass on Colin Smith, played here by Elliot And these are three these are three things that I can say Barnes-Worrell. things that I can say ‘these are mine’”. Elliot is therefore hugely excited that this, his first pro‘these are mine” fessional role, combines together his Still exploring his character in the love for “incredible words” of poetry alongside his early stages of rehearsals, Elliot already feels the passion for running. very knowable anger of Colin: “I think for me, it’s knowing there is a fight but not knowing exactly how Already a great fan of the work of Roy Williams, Elto fight it. And there are so many conflicts inside of Colin. And he’s young and when you’re young you’re liot now believes that this adaptation of The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner by Pilot Theatre, really passionately angry.” a company renowned for their forward-thinking approach, will be a real innovation “because it’s actuPersonally angered to see the “neglect” surrounding him in his home town of Peckham, Elliot is also keen ally saying something.” to point out the inescapable cycle of misconceptions that can quickly arise in his situation: “You can see The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner is at York that people expect that I’m a rude boy who rioted Theatre Royal from 14- 29 September. Katharine Wootton

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UMBRELLA Will Self Man Booker nominated, Umbrella, follows the exploits of Zack Busner, a maverick psychiatrist who appears in Self ’s other fiction. This time Busner wants to revitalise a ward of postencephalitics in a Victorian insane asylum. One of his patients is Audrey Dearth, a working-class girl from Fulham, which is where the political dimensions of Self ’s speculative writing begins.

THE CASUAL VACANCY Jk Rowling Rowling’s attempt to break into adult fiction, The Casual Vacancy is about a small town called Pagford - imagine cobbled market square and a nearby abbey. Rowling has styled the backdrop of her novel as “a town at war.” Barry Fairbrother dies in his forties, leaving his community in shock, and a power vacuum ready to be filled. Nearer to Middlemarch than Potter, this book is Rowling’s attempt to be seen as a serious novelist.

Literature Events

JOSEPH ANTON Salman Rushdie

LAURA LAMONT’S LIFE IN PICTURES Emma Straub

Inspired by his own persecution in 1989 by the Ayatollah Khomeini, Rushdie presents a new novel about a fictitious writer, Joseph Anton, who lives in fear for his life for nine years. The book is a meditation on literary freedom and how the human soul can exist under pressures. Rushdie explores how an author can continue to love, feel, and most importantly, continue to write in the face of oppression.

Emma Straub’s debut novel is set in 1930s Hollywood, with the titular character, Laura Lamont aspiring to fame and fortune. Straub’s novel explores how a small town girl deals with newfound notoriety, especially when the veneer of stardom smashes before her eyes. This new author is interested in the nature of celebrity but also in the unities of novel writing: conflict, character and compulsion.

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BOOKS ..........................

Autumn marks the close of an important literary year for York. Following in the footsteps of the announcement of Susanna Gregory’s Mystery in the Minster as The Big City Read, a series of events will run through September, including History of Holgate Windmill (5 Sept), An Introduction to Medieval Literature (13 Sept), and Medieval Murderers (20 Sept).

Ryedale Writer’s Group has also organised “A Weekend With Words”, a season of literary workshops, including   poetry, song-writing and short story events. The events run from 12-14 October followed by a literary festival in 2013, with Simon Armitage as poet-in-residence.

September

October

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ONEANDOTHER.COM


York Theatre Royal in association with Vroom Productions

An extraordinary new play based on the true story of a maverick plastic surgeon and his guinea pig patients.

Fri 5 - Sat 27 Oct

.................................

Box Office 01904 623568 www.yorktheatreroyal.co.uk

The York National Book Fair also takes place on the Knavesmire on the 14-15 September, where over 200 booksellers convene to offer for sale Europe’s most extensive antiquarian, rare and out-of-print book selection.

Waterstones York will also be hosting many author signings throughout September and October, showcasing various seasoned and up and coming writers, including Roger Barton (8 Sept), Suzanne Fagence Cooper (13 Sept), A.J. Dalton (13 Oct), and children’s author David Lawrence Jones (31 Oct).

September

September October

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FILM ....................

DR. STRANGELOVE Stanley Kubrick

FRANKENWEENIE Tim Burton

ON THE ROAD Walter Salles

Focusing on a war room, Kubrick’s nuclear satire explores the frantic efforts of politicians and military men trying to stop a pending nuclear holocaust set in motion by an insane United States general. Peter Sellers stars as Capt. Lionel Mandrake, President Merkin Muffley, and ex-Nazi scientist and inventor of the “Doomsday Device”, Dr Strangelove.

The master of gothic cinema returns to animation. A featurelength remake of Burton’s 1984 short, Frankenweenie is all about a boy and his dog. When Sparky is run over, young Victor harnesses the power of science to bring his beloved canine back to life. But when Sparky gets out, Victor has to face the unprecedented mayhem.

“The only people for me are the mad ones” - The long-awaited adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s semi-autobiographical Beat Generation novel. After the death of his father, young writer Sal Paradise (Sam Riley) and his bohemian friend Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund) embark on a trip across America, in every sense of the word.

City Screen: 2 September

All cinemas: 17 October

All cinemas: 12 October

Comedy

MARK WATSON

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Comedian and novelist, Mark Watson, one of the new generation of ‘campus comedians’, comes to York with a bizarre new stand-up set. He humorously meditates on the power of the internet, identity and crime through anecdotes, observations and oneliners. Strangely, if you want to go and see the show you have to email the Grand Opera House for a preshow briefing. Expect high-octane audience interaction in what is set to be Watson’s best tour yet.

Grand Opera House 26t September ONEANDOTHER.COM


Help our new students get to know the real York by sharing your city secrets and you could win £100 to spend at Café No 8 Upload photos of your city secrets to win even more prizes

Big

YORK WELCOME

Be part of the BIG York welcome! #BigYorkWelcome www.yorksj.ac.uk/bigyorkwelcome facebook.com/YorkStJohnUniversity

!"#$%&'($)*+,&-*$./01233$$$4

5678975845$$$4:;8<;==

CHRIS RAMSEY

ALUN COCHRANE

Ramsey is a regular on the TV panel show circuit, guest starring on Celebrity Juice, Never Mind the Buzzcocks, and 8 Out of 10 Cats, amongst others. After his sell-out spring show Offermation Ramsey brings an exciting set to the City Screen Basement. The Sunday Times says he has the “potential to be a mainstream hit, a cult favourite.” This raconteur is a comedians comedian that promises to be hilarious.

Cochrane is an acquired taste. His straight down the line nonsensical style has been praised and derided by esteemed broadsheet critics who just can’t make up their mind. He brings his critically acclaimed show Moments of Alun to York this month. Audiences can expect his characteristic relaxed style: thinking aloud, chatting with the front row, and an assumed care-free persona. Do not be tricked by his blasé attitude. His indifference is a mask for a shrewd wit and a clever comedian.

The Basement, City Screen 14 October #INDULGENCEISSUE

Hyena Club, 23 September 23


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Exhibitions SALLE DES DEPARTS York-based artist Zosia Olenska’s debut exhibition (left) is currently being held at City Screen bar and cafe. Centred around the theme of mourning and loss, her intricate drawings capture the essence death by using detailed anatomical images of skeletons juxtaposed with creatures of nature. City Screen, Coney Street

ABSTRACT PAINTING: A POETIC RIPOSTE TO A CHANGING WORLD This show at the Pyramid gallery in Stonegate by artist Patrick Smith is his artistic response to the immediacy of the soundbyte on radio and television. In this show he expresses an emotional response as a changing world in abstract landscape. This exhibition runs in parallel with a collection of smoke fired ceramic vessels by Stephen Murfitt. The Pyramid Gallery, 43 Stonegate, from 1 September – 17 October

AGAINST THE GRAIN An exhibition by award winning artist Tom Palin who creates small intimate images in startling colours. This exhibition shows an artist at the top of his game. According to McGee, 8 Tower Street, from 8 September - 24

INTERPRETATIONS IN CLOTH A rare opportunity to see the work of Pauline Burbridge, one of the most influential contemporary quiltmakers and a key player in the revival of Quilting in the 1980s. Quilt Museum and Gallery, Peasholme Green from 7 Sept - 1 December

LANDSCAPES AND SEASCAPES York’s own Rosie Dean has been a strong part in York’s Open Studios for the past three years. Her strong use of texture in her various landscapes make for an atmospheric series of paintings. Opens September 1, Kentmere House Gallery ONEANDOTHER.COM


............................................ TALES FROM THE RIVERBANK An exhibition of works donated by local artists which will be offered as prizes in a raffle in aid of St. Leonard’s Hospice. The Pyramid Gallery, 43 Stonegate from 20 October

BIO Saturday 29th September for one day only: two local artists,  Nicola  Cook and Catherine Whitesite, will features new collections of paintings, drawings and photographs on many aspects of nature.

YORKSHIRE AIR MUSEUM First class facilities and catering

According to McGee, 8 Tower Street, on 29 September.

Flexible capacity from 10 to 1,800

IAN LAYTON Ian Layton , an exponent of ‘coutre jour’ where the artist paints into the light, will be showing paintings of York, Venice and other cities from the 29th September. Ian has been widely exhibited and has been shown at the Royal Academy. The Blake Gallery, Blake Street York from the 29 September.

Perfect for seminars and conferences

"!"!"!

! Contact us today: 01904 608595

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Get into the Festive Spirit at York Marriott.

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The York Marriott Hotel provides the perfect setting at York’s finest backdrop.

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Whether you want to host a Christmas Lunch, join one of our fun filled party nights or join us for our New Years Eve Gala Dinner.

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Experience Yorkshire Hospitality in our luxurious surroundings.

Party Nights from £19.95 for 3 courses. 01904 701 000 York Marriott, York, YO24 1QQ YorkMarriott.co.uk

Rates are from £19.95 and are per person. Subject to availability.

museum@yorkshireairmuseum.org www.yorkshireairmuseum.org


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An Autumnal Forager’s Guide Giles Bennett is a lover of Yorkshire produce and sees nothing better than getting out into the countryside and utilising what the hedgerows have on offer. Here he invites our readers to share in his wealth of knowledge of what September and October’s forager can expect. As September creeps in, soft fruit gives way to stoned fruit and thoughts inevitably turn to this year’s batch of sloe gin (or, if your tastes are like mine, damson vodka). Often overlooked, though, is another fruit in abundance, particularly around these parts – the humble rowanberry. With as much Viking heritage as most of York (the name itself derives from the Old Norse word for the tree, “raun”), at this time of year the branches of the rowan are groaning under the weight of large clusters of ripening small red berries. Depending on the weather, the berries may not be

fully ripe until October, but leaving it that late risks the birds (which seem to overlook them in favour of other fruits when available) decimating them, so delay at your own peril. Store in sterilized jars, properly labelled, where it should keep well for at least a year. Whilst some recommend rowan jelly as both a sweet and a savoury jelly, it’s a little too tart for spreading on your toast for breakfast in my view. North of the border in Scotland it’s traditionally eaten with game – grouse and venison both marry well with it – but if your tastes and your larder run to the more mundane, try it with cheeses, roast lamb, and cold pork pies. You won’t be disappointed.

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Rowan Jelly Ingredients 1KG ROWAN BERRIES 1KG WASHED ROUGHLY CHOPPED CRABAPPLES 500ML WATER 750G PER LITRE OF BERRIES

You will need MUSLIN CLOTH LARGE PAN SIDE PLATES STERILISED JARS

As with all jellies, it couldn’t be easier to make – gather around a kilogram of berries, then strip them from their stalks by pulling them through the tines of a fork, wash them well and pop into a large pan. Add a kilogram of washed roughly chopped crabapples – whilst too tart to eat raw, the high pectin count them makes them perfect for jellies. Add around 500ml of water to the pan then bring to the boil, stirring well and mushing the fruit down with the back of the spoon as it starts to soften. When everything is one large mushy rowan-crabapple goo, pass it through a muslin, suspended over a large pan to catch the liquid as it drips off. As with any jelly, obtaining a nice clear end result requires that the mash be allowed to seep through a muslin at its own pace – preferably overnight – because any attempt to force it through the muslin faster will result in a cloudy jelly. Pop three or four sideplates into the fridge at the same time. The next day, measure the quantity of liquid that has emerged and add 750g of sugar for each litre. Warm the mix, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved, and then boil vigorously until a set is reached – dribble some onto one of the chilled sideplates, wait a minute or so, then push your finger through the mixture – if it bunches up and forms a “skin” (think cold custard) then the mixture will set properly when cooled. If not, carry on boiling the mixture for another five minutes and test again.

#INDULGENCEISSUE


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MG GOP FA OWS F TB CS

06

SUN

02 Morris Minor Cars Rally (Ryedale Folk Museum) Thunder Day (Yorkshire Air Museum) Fangfest (Main Street, Fangfoss)

01 Jackie Oates (The Duchess) Summer Royal Recital: Phillip Moore (York Minster) Fangfest (Main Street, Fangfoss)

MUSEUM GARDENS GRAND OPERA HOUSE FULFORD ARMS OLD WHITE SWAN FIBBERS THE BASEMENT CITY SCREEN

SAT

CALENDAR 2012 September

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26

25

Comedy Night With Supper (York Racecourse) Michelin Star Chef James MacKenzie Demonstration (St Sampson’s Square)

Cave Painting (Stereo) The Coal Porters (Fibbers)

Underground Heroes (Fibbers)

24

CAMRA Beer and Cider Palestine Veterans Festival (Ends 22nd Sept) Association Saturday (Eden Camp Museum)

18

Cottage Cooking for Beginners (Ryedale Folk Museum)

Malefice (Stereo) Mark Watson (Grand Opera House) Autumn Wildlife Walk (Yorkshire Museum & Gardens)

19

27

Dr Feel Good (Fibbers)

20

Inspiral Carpets (The Duchess) Special Occasions Fayre (Barley Hall)

13

17

Buddy Holly and the Cricketers (Grand Opera House) Bee Keeping with John Cook ;\QTTQVOÆMM\4WLOM/IZLMV[

12

11

David Francey (Black Swan Inn) Luke Jermay’s Psycic Caberet (The Basement @ Cityscreen) Dr Sketchey’s Revolting Rhymes (The Golden Fleece)

06

Mullholand (The Victoria Vaults) Blood Donor Session (York Racecourse)

Sea Swim Poetry Reading and Workshop (York Art Gallery) Owl Pellet Taxidermy Workshop (Yorkshire Museum)

05

Jim Jeffries (Grand Opera House) Winemaker Dinner (The Grange Hotel)

Legally Blonde The Musical (Showing at Grand Opera House until 8th Sept) Miriam Margolyes in Dickens Woman (York Theatre Royal)

Emma Pollock (The Basement @ Cityscreen)

10

04

03

Jason Byrne (York Barbican) Autumn Steam Gala (North Yorkshire Moors Railway)

28

York Food Festival Begins (Ends 30th Sept) Fowler’s Boys (St Sampson’s Square)

21

Loneliness of a Long Distance Runner (York Theatre Royal until 29 Sept)

14

Vintage Rock Band (O’Neills) Euro Childs + Wellgreen (The Duchess) Start of the Festival of Writing (Ends Sept 9th)

07

16

Press Family Sunday (York Racecourse) Allied Forces Memorial Day and Parade (Yorkshire Air Museum) Remembrance Parade (Eden Camp Museum)

09

8th York 50+ Festival (29 Sept till 7 Oct)

29

Prom Praise (York Barbican) Chilean Food Tasting and Matching (The Guildhall) Dragon Boat Racing (River Ouse)

22

Yorkshire Museum of Farming)

Stamford Bridge Battlefield Walk (Meet 10.30am at Shallows Car Park Stamford) York 800: York Minster Revealed (York Minster) Harvest Festival (The

30

Fulford Battlefield York (Meet 10.30am at Bau Horse Inn Car Park, Fulford) Antiques Fair (York Racecourse)

23

Dirty DC (Fibbers) Dry Stone Walling PBFA Book Fair (The Moors National (York Racecourse) Park Centre) Summer Royal Recital: Robert Sharpe (York Minster) Just 30 Fair (Rowntree Park)

15

Manning (The Duchess) Summer Royal Recital: Nathan Laube (York Minster) Meet The Green Man (St Nicholas Fields)

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02

Plant Hunting in the 21st Century Symposium (Garden Museum) Soul Sister (York Barbican, Ends 6th October)

01

06

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04 Dara Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Briain (Barbican)

Smoke Fairies (The Duchess)

THUR

03

WED

5 Turbowolf (Fibbers) The Guinea Pig Club (York Theatre Royal until 27 October)

05

FRI

Rock & Gem Show (York Racecourse) Ryedale Festival (York Barbican) Acoustic Gig

06

SAT

Rock & Gem Show (York Racecourse) Josie Long (Basement @ Cityscreen) Scampston Plant Fair (Scampston)

07

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29

Grease The Musical (Grand Opera House) Saints Alive (All Saints North Street)

30

Greece (Grand Opera House)

31

Illuminate York Begins Halloween Crafts (The Moors National Park Centre) Halloween Event (North Yorkshire Moors Railway)

24

23

York Ghost Festival Othello Begins (York Theatre Royal until 27 (Ends 31st October) October) The Proclaimers (Grand Opera House) Submotion Orchestra (The Duchess)

22

17 Jack Dee (Grand Opera House) Tim Burgess (The Duchess)

16

15

10 Two Wounded Birds (Stereo) Frank Vignola (The Duchess)

Kid British (Stereo)

09

Maddy Prior (NCEM) The Travelling Band (The Duchess)

08

Ray Davies (York Barbican) York St John Graduate Performance (York Theatre Royal)

12

19

Newton Faulkner (York Barbican) Aled Jones (York Minster) We Could B Astronauts Launch (The Duchess)

25

Hawklords (Fibbers)

Comedy Night (York Racecourse) Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market (Parliament Street)

26

Arras Culture Donbey and Son Workshop (York Theatre Royal (Yorkshire Museum) until 20 October) Caribbean Spook Tales (York Theatre Royal)

18

The Magic of Motown (York Barbican Centre)

11

27

Halloween Gaga and Ghouls (York Racecourse) Ross Noble (Grand Opera House)

Black Eyed Teaz and Disco (York Racecourse) Greg Davies (Grand Opera House)

20

Countryside Photography (The Moors National Park Centre)

13

28

Toy Fair (York Racecourse)

Brides Fair (York Racecourse)

21

York Does Vintage (Merchant Adventurers Hall)

14


Festival of Cycling 8th and 9th of September YORKFESTIVALOFCYCLING.ORG.UK

Hot on the heels of the heroics of Bradley Wiggins & Co, York’s third Festival of Cycling will take place on 8th and 9th of September. Aimed at discerning cycling fans and budding cyclists alike, each year 10,000 people descend on Rowntree Park to be entertained by professional cycle stunt demonstrations and KMX racing. The festival also indexes heavily on ‘have-a-go’ sessions offering free trial rides on the full spectrum of weird and wonderful pedal powered machinery. The human scalextric is always a guaranteed crowd pleaser with up to four friends able to test their pedalling prowess in any one race. This year the festival will also feature other sustainable modes of transport including displays of the latest electric vehicles in the market. For those looking to take to two wheels of their own, York’s top cycle retailers will be showcasing their latest ranges with the opportunity to buy on the spot.

York Festival of Cycling takes place 10am-5pm on 8-9 September at Rowntree Park.

Admission and events are free for all across the two days.

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Janne Hellsten on flickr

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3.Stag Head What signifies ‘Indulgence’ more than a wall adorned with a stag head? This variation however saw no animal killed in the process. Snow Home £125

2. Elliotttees Hailing from Wales Elliott Lane’s designs Purple Haze Vintage £12

1. Gazelle Miss Grace 3 speed 2012 Cycle Heaven £599.99

CONSUME / Indulgence Issue

4.Toffee Apple Lollipop Soap You have to smell this to believe it Tonic Cosmetics £3 5. 18ml Snazaroo Cake Blood It is Halloween so you really ought to make an effort. This blood concentrate is applied with brush and water. Festival of Fun £6.99 6. Cat O Nine Tails For those who just want to stay in on Halloween then we can rely on Dario Argento for some healthy sensationalist fear. HMV £7

The Hit List Our highlights of what is available on the York high-street throughout September/October


NICOLA 1970s angel sleeve chiffon wedding dress £400 Glory Days Vintage

DAVEY Black Wool Scoop Front Waistcoat £65 White Windsor Men’s Shirt £75 Priestley’s Vintage Clothing

CAT

1940s honey, satin gown £450 Floral Baroque Headdress £85 Glory Days Vintage


DĂ?A DE LOS MUERTOS

Photography: Joel Smith Styling: Vicky Parry Make-up: Nicola Scott

On November 1st, Day of The Dead is celebrated across Mexico and the tradition has started to infiltrated culture internationally. Suggested to be dedicated to the ancient Aztec goddess Mictecacihuatl, it is a celebration of those close to us that we have loved and lost. To tie in with Halloween we have adopted this festival and paid special homage to the deceased.


NICOLA

1970s angel sleeve chiffon wedding dress £400 Glory Days Vintage

CAT

1940s honey, satin gown £450 Floral Baroque Headdress £85 Glory Days Vintage

NICOLA

Black Smock Shirt £49 Paper Doll Gold hand Bracelets – Stylist’s Own Black hat – Stylist’s own


DAVEY Grey Men’s Crombie Coat £185 White Windsor Men’s Shirt £75 Priestley’s Vintage Clothing


PETE

1960s Wool Tweed Coat £160 Chambray Blue Shirt £70 Priestley’s Vintage Clothing


CAT

1970s Ruffle Dress with Black Trim £350 Glory Days Vintage

NICOLA Cape £65 Paper Doll

Supporting

Hospitium, Museum Gardens, York 23rd September 10.30-4.30 Only £1 entry 25+ stalls selling Yorkshire’s very best handmade and homegrown produce, featuring free upcycled workshops great for all ages, deluxe beauty bar, children’s storytime, and Yorkshire’s finest traveling tearoom serving the very best afternoon teas on vintage crockery


CONSUME / Indulgence Issue

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Street Style

There is no better way to see how fashion has filtered down to the high street than to see what people are wearing on our doorstep. Be it casual minimalism to handmade interpretations of catwalk works. Here is our selection of some favourites.

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Hannah Hunter Influence -Paul Smith Inspirations - Hand Made

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Sam Jefferies Influences - Kraftwerk/DAF Shop - Purple Haze

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Jacob de Graaf Influences - Minimalism Designer - Marni


Masters of mixology It’s often remarked our fine city is starting to shed its label as an aging timebomb with the York of tomorrow beginning to cut a confident, cultural figure. Finally, after a few false starts, we’re pleased to report this insurrection has finally penetrated our bar scene. Often the collateral damage to an ever-reliable monoculture

of pubs, York’s bars are moving out of the shadows with admirable intrepidity. There is still some way to match the 1,748 bars of Tel Aviv or hedonism of New York but the seeds are there. As a great man once said: “Alcohol is the anesthesia by which we endure the operation of life” and at the top of that list is a devilishly good cocktail after a long week.

Words: Stuart Goulden | Visuals: Mark Ivkovic

Join us as we take a tour of the York’s best concoctions, from the understated classics to the bombastic rebels in the pack. Drink responsibly and savour.


.................................................................................................................... EVIL EYE

THE BLIND SWINE

1331

Celebrating the mardy and the macabre since 2002, Evil Eye deserves to be the first name on the teamsheet. The bohemian hangout is a must for dangerously striking cocktails so potent they’ll leave you feeling like you’re starring down the barrel of a gun. With names such as Physcho Tsnami and Brain Haemorrhage that probably comes as no surprise. Fight your way to the bar and take refuge in the garden out back.

This new kid in the block arrived with much swagger when it opened its doors this summer. Boasting a fluid cocktail menu that reads like a topical list of cardinal sins, The Blind Swine merits special mention for its war chest of all manner of potions and botanics. Having managed bars in Sydney, London and York, James Wreglesworth is obsessive about his trade and his creations are iconoclast takes on apothecary and alchemy traditions. Tattoos are optional.

The much-loved temple for York’s young professionals’ ritual of seeing in the weekend, 1331 specialises in martini and champagne cocktails. Bonus points are awarded for its all day, every day 2-4-1 offers and its secret garden.

SOTANO

DUSK

Buried beneath Little Stonegate this clandestine haunt plays host to many a serendipitous visit after-after-hours. A low-lit and intimate affair, Sotano has more in common with 1920s speakeasies than its peers and is quickly building a reputation for inspired contemporary twists on old classics. Bar manager Sam Wheatley now takes residency in the underground establishment which serves Wednesday through to Saturday. We recommend his rather delicious Chase Negroni.

Masquerading as a touristy eatery during the day, Dusk transforms into late-night drinking den where bums, students and musicians rub shoulders and romance over 2-4-1 cocktails. With loyal servants such as Jack Bauer and Graham Norton on the menu, the bar’s cocktails predate the tenders who serve them today. Its shortcomings are easily forgiven on account of its enduring simplicity.

A novel addition to our cocktail landscape is The Chocolate Bar at York’s CHOCOLATE Story on King’s Square. Some of the UK’s finest chocolatiers have raided the recipe books of old to create “choctails” such as After Eight Delight, Chocolate Orange Temptation and Mocha Martini that are every bit as exquisite as they sound. Take a seat at the bar and indulge your sweet tooth!


0732 TBS Yorkshire Life Advert_0732 TBS Yorkshire Life Advert 13/08/2012 08:49 Page 1

Dates for your diary A Fashion Inspired Afternoon Tea

Beer & Food Pairing Dinner

Sunday 16th September 2012 - 2pm

Wednesday 3rd October 2012 – 7pm

This September we’re delighted to team up with three fabulous fashion designers to bring you a stylish afternoon of glitz and glamour. Our garden party style fashion event will showcase some fantastic creations by local milliner Suzanne Gill, Rijk Zeman of Zeman Couture, and Kelly Clark, designer of bespoke occasion wear.

To celebrate Oktoberfest, for the first time, the Black Swan is excited to bring you a beer and food pairing dinner. This fabulous five course menu has been carefully matched with selected beers from around the world by Head Chef Paul Peters, to show that even a stout can taste fantastic with salmon!

Tickets: £25.00 per person, including full Afternoon Tea and a glass of sparkling rose

Fusion Gourmet Dinner

Five courses, with carefully chosen beers to accompany each course priced at £49 per person

Game Dinner

Friday 2nd November 2012 – 7pm

Friday 30th November 2012 – 7pm

This is a dinner not to be missed. We are delighted to showcase for the first time at the Black Swan our Australian-born Head Chef Paul Peter’ talents from down under, with an awe inspiring seven course dinner from the Pacific region. Each course will be carefully paired with wines from Australia and New Zealand to complement the dishes.

With our undoubtable prime location on the edge of the North Yorkshire Moors, we’re delighted to offer an evening to demonstrate the fabulous dishes that can be created using local game. This five course menu, which will include pheasant, pigeon, and grouse, will also be paired with great French wines to celebrate the launch of the 2012 Beaujolais Nouveau.

Seven courses, with five carefully chosen wines to accompany selected courses priced at £49 per person

Five courses, with carefully chosen wines to accompany each course priced at £49 per person

For more information about any of these events please visit www.blackswan-helmsley.co.uk or call us on 01439 770466. If you would like to book a room and stay on the evening when attending one of these events, a preferential rate of £129.00 per room, including full English breakfast is available. The Black Swan Hotel | Market Place | Helmsley | Yorkshire | YO62 5BJ | Tel: 01439 770466 | E-mail: enquiries@blackswan-helmsley.co.uk | www.blackswan-helmsley.co.uk


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SIX OF THE BEST…

Budget Indulgences 1

Through the persistently inclement seasons that seem to be blurring into one, Keep Calm and Carry On… eating ice cream. Choose your two favourite flavours of dreamy, creamy homemade ice cream, frozen yoghurt and sorbets from Licc (Luxury Ice Cream Company), the delightful confectionary parlour nestled on Back Swinegate. For the ultimate indulgence try the new Liccabocker Glory, heaven for under £3.

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York and the surrounding Shire boasts a rich literary heritage and if you have the means to travel little is more exhilarating than an afternoon on the Moors shouting “Heathcliff ! It’s me, Cathy, oh come home now!” at the top of your lungs (leotard optional). But if you only have an hour, why not re-home one of the overwhelming selection of pre-loved classics available in any of the charity shops in York. You could even dust off your library card...

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Hit refresh on your weekend and start the world anew on Sunday morning. Pick up your favourite newspaper, along with this mighty magazine, and enjoy the age-old past time of promenading. Dotted along the banks of the River Ouse at perfectly positioned intervals are benches to aid your leisure; set up picnic and watch the world go by. The added luxury of watching others exert vast quantities of effort (presumably training for Rio 2016) only adds to the appeal.

Little conjures up indulgence more than great food and in the city and surrounding villages we are spoiled with riches of restaurants and gastropubs. For a weekday extravagance on a budget try The ‘Magnificent Seven’ menu at one of the four Provenance Inns (Durham Ox in Crayke, The Punch Bowl in Marton-cumGrafton, The Oak Tree in Helperby or The Carpenters Arms in Felixkirk - my personal favourite). Seven of their best dishes for £7 each before 7pm.

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.......................... Long to visit the new version of our magnificent city? Why not treat yourself to a Big Apple themed day? Don your chicest outfit, add shades and start by perusing the exhibitions in York Art Gallery for free. When you concentrate very hard it could easily be the famous 5th Avenue counterpart. Order a long-winded coffee to go (something half-whip, half caff, half and half…) to be enjoyed on the steps outside. Voila! You’re at the Met!

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.......................... Next with a budget of only $10 (£6.38 in today’s exchange), à la Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, take your time and peruse the independent shops in York, starting with the antique centres on Stonegate and Lendal, and pick up something you will cherish. Power-walk to the stand off Pavement and Feasgate and finish your day with the best hot dog in town. Feel free to holler “I’m walking here!” to any tourists who have mistakenly driven through the centre before 6pm.

Words: Lindsay Whitwell

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Deli Belly If you’re looking for some lunchtime inspiration, come feast your eyes upon our autumnal food guide. This issue we’re taking it upon ourselves to lure you away from eating a packed lunch at your desk to make the most of some of the top independent delis on our doorsteps. Truth be told, we’re spoilt for choice in York, but here are our fabulous four of the moment.

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Vanilla Café

Xing

This charming little café offers arguably the best cakes in town and a view of York Minster’s Great East Window to match. Head for the bunting on College Street for a spot of tranquil lunch, particularly on a sunny day where Vanilla Cafe‘s alfresco appeal really shines. The very best local produce creates delicious sandwiches and cakes that can be washed down with a pot of Yorkshire tea. Should you find yourself attached to any of the vintage crockery or artwork adorning the walls, you’ll be pleased to discover it’s all for sale too!

Xing, nestled on the corner of Shambles and Pavement, has recently been reborn less a smoothie bar than a city centre haven for exploring and indulging in “feel good food”.

12 College Street 01904 658852

28 The Shambles 01904 674684 xinghealth.co.uk

The addition of hearty soups and worldly curries to their menu of liquid stimulation means there are even more reasons to love eating there. You will also find wrappinis – a lighter version of the Panini minus the stodge and cheese. Catch them at this year’s York Food & Drink Festival.

ONEANDOTHER.COM


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Henshelwoods

Filmore & Union

We do love a good delicatessen. Found on the corner of Newgate Market, Henshelwoods is a treasure trove of the finest and freshest local and seasonal delicacies. Perfect for stocking up on an impromptu picnic by the river, a Henshelwoods hamper could see you sampling from over 70 British and continental cheeses and charcuterie, twelve different types of olives, and tasty sandwiches and pies, all washed down with some locally made drinks. If thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not enough to whet your appetite, their tiramisu are heavenly.

Named after a cross-section in San Francisco, this relatively new face on Low Petergate is a must for energising breakfasts, healthy lunches, and nourishing suppers. With lots and lots of vegetarian, dairy free and gluten free options on the menu, it really does cover all bases. Rumour has it weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be seeing a Filmore & Union popping up on the platform at York railway station in the near future.

10 Newgate 01904 673877 deliyork.co.uk

62a Low Petergate 01904 654123 filmoreandunion.com

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Only in York would you find, wandering through the streets on a blue autumn day, the clangs of an upright piano echoing around the local stone. Pianos advertising the Three Legged Mare’s blues and jazz nights. Even clicking through the pages of York What’s Ons will reveal that the jazz scene in the city is flourishing. The Phoenix Inn on George Street holds an established jazz night every Wednesday which attracts both regulars and music fans alike. Across town, the Old White Swan, Goodramgate, has been running a night for over twenty years, with the Mardi Gras Band alternating with Bejazzled and Mike Riley. The Tap and Spile often features Jazz musicians and

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the University of York has its own Jazz Orchestra, regularly featuring in their concert programmes. Though why York, the UK’s 47th city by population and very near the thriving music scene of Leeds, has a jazz scene competitive with most cities in Britain is anyone’s guess. Is it the mix of academics and professionals from across the two Universities? The strong presence independent book shops and galleries hold across the city? The National Centre for Early Music certainly plays a role, being a body dedicated to recreating and informing people about Early music and attracting a wide range of musicians to its concerts and festivals in York.

Words: Laurence Cook | Visuals: Holly Gallacher

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.................................................................................................................... The Phoenix plays an important part too, introducing people to the weekly jams and allowing newcomers to move onto gigs by bands or artists they have seen and liked. Ian Chalk reveals how the pub came into being: “Early in 2009 I was playing at Scarborough Jazz Club and was approached by Tim and Val Everton. They explained that they were buying a pub in York (The Phoenix) which was to be a jazz venue and would I like to lead the ‘house band’. Needless to say I agreed and set about recruiting members.” Playing a residency at The Phoenix (Sundays 20:00 till 22:30) has provided the foundation to take the Ian Chalk Quartet to a wider audience and to venues throughout the North.

Since opening and refurbishing the Phoenix, Tim has sadly died and is now owned by Tim and Val’s daughter Jenny and her partner Jon Fulton. It seems that this pub is the centre of diverse and buzzing scene here, leading the way in approachable and inexpensive gigs.

The Ian Chalk Quartet play Sundays from 8-10.30pm, Wednesday Jazz evenings are free.

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01. Herman Leonard 02. Bob Willoughby 03. Herman Leonard

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“As for the abundance of horror genre films, I think that’s more to do with the mental state of us northerners... but it helps that we have so many dark, foreboding locations in the area.” Ah, Yorkshire, we love it so: the rolling hills, the heritage, Yorkshire puddings, the tea, Wensleydale, Judi Dench, Look North... the list goes on. In the world of cinema, filmmakers hardly struggle to find beautiful locales in the white rose county. Numerous classic films showcase the beauty of Yorkshire’s countryside and culture: Kes, The Full Monty, The Railway Children, Brassed Off and Wuthering Heights to name but a few. On the small screen, Emmerdale has been showcasing life in the Yorkshire Dales since 1972. Yet alongside the cheeriness and splendour of Yorkshire’s filmmaking industry there lays a much darker side, one that transforms our tranquil hills into ominous, eerie mountains of death and bloodshed. It’s there, lurking in the shadows, watching, waiting... The Yorkshire Horror Scene is here, and it’s growing more than ever.

From light-hearted web series set in York (Zomblogalypse, I Am Tim) to upcoming features poised to truly terrify audiences (Heretic), the genre is flourishing. Emmerdale actors and zombieenthusiasts Dominic Brunt and Mark Charnock arguably sit at the forefront of this movement to bring horror to the heart of Yorkshire. A far cry from their soap-opera personas, the two friends conducted the first Leeds Zombie Film Festival in 2008; the gruesome revelry now returns on an annual basis. In 2011 Brunt appeared in Inbred, a Wicker Man-esque horror film by Alex Chandon. The film is less than flattering – hilariously so - in its depiction of the inhabitants of a remote Yorkshire village (the clue is in the title). Since then, Brunt has written and directed his own zombie-horror feature, Before Dawn. The film was produced in part by fellow horror-lover Marc Price, director of low-budget zombie hit Colin.

During filming for Before Dawn, Brunt was fully aware of the ominous power lurking in the surrounding Yorkshire countryside: “Certainly in the filming and editing, the panoramic landscapes of this county became one of the main characters in our tale. The same vistas and horizons looked both welcoming and dangerous according to the dimensions of the plot.” It’s clear the Yorkshire horror scene is here to stay, but one has to wonder: are these zombie-lovers and gore- aficionados merely taking advantage of their menacing surroundings, or is there something about the Yorkshire countryside that gets under the skin? Jamie McKeller, creator of I Am Tim, has his own thoughts on the matter: “As for the abundance of horror genre films, I think that’s more to do with the mental state of us northerners... but it helps that we have so many dark, foreboding locations in the area.” I couldn’t agree more.

Words: James Arden | Visuals: Holly Gallacher


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A Student's Welcome Guide to York

.................................... With new students starting their university courses this month there will be many readers who have just arrived in York. This guide gives you a rough idea of where to go to suit your interests.

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Scholars When was the last time you left the library? A true student city, you can study almost anywhere in York. Pens at the ready, you’re going to want to take note. Recently opened, the reading café in Rowntree Park doubles as a library and coffee house serving up homemade treats and even ice-cream from LICC (though you should visit their shop on Back Swinegate for the décor alone!). The free wi-fi and inspiring view of the park makes it the perfect place to study - you can even take books out with your City of York library card and return them to any council library. St Helen’s Square and Coney Street are also free wi-fi zones, courtesy of the council. If you’re looking for a cosy place to nestle with a book, independent coffee shops The Perky Peacock and The Attic are recommended for their friendly atmosphere, you can find them in the tower on Lendal Bridge and hidden above Harlequin’s Café in King’s Square respectively. When the weather is behaving you can always find like-minded souls pondering under the trees in Museum Gardens or lazing with a book in Dean’s Park next to the Minster. To put all that knowledge to good use, get your pub quiz team swotting up for Tuesdays at craft beer bar Pivni, or Thursdays at the Fulford Arms.

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Urbanites

Hipsters

York has a false reputation for being a quiet city. You uptown girls and guys better get your gladrags on and suit up, we’re taking you out.

There’s always something innovative and fresh to be involved with in York. We can find you hipsters something to do quicker than you can say “carnage t-shirt customisation” which, of course, you never would.

Splash some of that student loan and go shopping for something new to hit the town in. The main shopping areas are Coney Street and Coppergate, but if you fancy something different try Stonegate and Petergate on for size. Get your new town, new you mop-chop from award-winning Bang Hair, and you’re ready to go! The Latin Quarter is buzzing every evening, Bora Bora and Vudu Lounge serve cocktails with flare that will make you forget your post-summer blues. Broke after shopping for your attire? Make the most of the student deals at Dusk and The Lowther. Evil Eye’s monstrous Sunday roasts are especially good if you’re homesick, it puts your mum’s to shame. Go to Stonegate Yard or Kennedy’s during the week with a group for a relaxed bite to eat. For a more intimate setting, wine at Wilde’s and tapas at Ambiente always please (try their sherry, too). The secret garden tucked away at the back of 1331 is cosy and romantic, but they have a stylish bar space (and cinema) available to hire for free if you want to make it a party.

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You’ve just missed out on Orillo Cinema’s latest event, but watch out for more. Showing modern classics in unique settings, with a touch of Secret Cinema, every Orillo event is silver screen gold. House Concerts York is exactly what it sounds like, gigs in people’s homes. If you’re into music and after an original experience, this could be right up your street. Looking for something individual to kit out your digs with? For furniture and other hidden treasures delve into Banana Warehouse and Aladdin’s Cave. Contemporary art gallery Bar Lane Studios is bursting with creative talent and wants to share it. They regularly run workshops and are home to The Division of Spectacular Tasks, a project that’s previously gifted this city with underground club night Wrong Side of the River (RIP) and jumble sales like you’ve never seen before. Watch out for PANDEMIC in early September, a diverse and infectious event with performers, musicians, speakers and more.

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Athletes

Nerds

Running around in circles looking for new ways to up your game for entertainment in this city? On your marks, get set, go and do some of these!

York can be a bit of a maze for newcomers but we’ve handy hints and tips to help you start exploring.

Both our universities have great sports teams, but why not try something out of the ordinary? Ladies roller derby team the York Minxters always keep an eye out for new recruits, guys can even get involved as officials. They’re open to all abilities, but if you want to practise your roller skills first, take a trip to Rowntree Park skate park. York’s cycle path network weaves around most of the city, and it’s always being expanded. Cycle Heaven repair, hire and sell bikes, or pop to Bike Rescue on Wellington Row and make use of their bicycle recycle service. Then release your inner Wiggo on the Orbital Route. In need of nourishment after all that exercise? For somewhere to refuel, Filmore & Union and Xing serve up enticing yet guilt-free meals, your mum will be pleased you’re eating properly at uni. Plenty of gyms offer deep student discounts as do York City Football Club with tickets around the £10 mark for concessions.

One of the most versatile venues, City Screen shows all your usual blockbusters in between streamed live theatre, Q&A’s and documentaries. Their Basement is home to the Hyena Lounge Comedy Club, and their Riverside Café is a first-rate place for a pint and debate about who the most pointless superhero is (I’m looking at you, Aquaman). Continuing the film vibe, the South Bank Community Cinema has monthly showings of classics and foreign cinema, and in November, the Aesthetica Short Film Festival comes to town. For four days, hundreds of short films of all genres descend on 15 striking venues across the city. If you’re a record enthusiast, head to Patrick Pool and up the narrow stairway to Attic Records for your vinyl fix. Be sure to make a beeline for The Inkwell on Gillygate, stocking popular vinyl and pulp-fiction, there’s a real variety of pop-culture gems. York’s branch of Travelling Man is our most established comic book (and more) store, well-stocked and with welcoming service. There are great stories available closer to home, take a trip to York pubs The Black Swan and The Maltings for ghostly tales and real ales.

Author: Alice Thomson | Illustrator: Nathan Markham 56

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Kuda: New Name, Fresh Ethos After a £750,000 refurbishment, York nightclub The Gallery has re-opened its doors under the new name of Kuda. The club has had a complete overhaul with state of the art LED lighting, a bigger dance floor and a new VIP Mambo lounge with chilled-out Balearic house music playing in private booths with waitress service. General manager Dave Harrison, 44, who has been in the nightclub industry for 25 years emphasised that the new club was not interested in getting into a price war with competitors. He said: “The Gallery didn’t have a good reputation in the end but Kuda is going to change that. We promised the council that we will not sell drinks under £1.20 because we don’t think it

122493 - KUDA YORK ONE & OTHER MAGAZINE ADVERT.indd 1

is ethical. If you want to go and drink 75p drinks all night then you are not our type of customer.” Downstairs is, perhaps, where the biggest change will be seen with a new Polynesian Tiki bar open from 7pm every night. Once inside revellers can enjoy cocktails in pineapples or coconut shells, while sitting in a bed or in the back of a VW campervan. Mr. Harrison said: “You can sit and chill in Tiki bar all night and then when the doors to Kuda open you automatically get free entry to the club to continue the adventure.” Kuda officially opened with a VIP launch night on 31st August, where Britain’s Got Talent dance troupe Area 51 performed along with theatrical cir cus acts.

23/08/2012 10:10


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A Ramble ‘Round York’s Bookshops York is a city without a city’s worth of bookshops, however all is not lost. Laurence Cook takes us on a route of some local merchants and vendors that keep the bookworms amongst us happy.

KEN SPELLMEN’S Micklegate

OXFAM BOOKS Petergate

OXFAM BOOKS Micklegate

We begin on that hill which so rudely rises in opposition to the ever-deepening Ouse which runs by its belly. Here, amongst the pubs and clubs growing sadder as the light grows more blinding, is a bookshop which I can only do justice to by using it as the opening note of this score. Special mention should go to the selection of art, architecture and antiquarian sections, friendly staff and possibility of a good haggle. No jeans, trainers or phones are allowed.

Strangely on this side of town the books in Oxfam are cheaper, though there are some exceptions. Collections of poetry ands plays are more expensive here, though you’ll often find something worth shedding the cash for – novels are cheap though, lots of classics and quick reads. I picked up a lovely pristine Finnegan’s Wake which, at £1.99, is very good value – it’s only the sort of book one reads of an afternoon anyway.

Just down the road you’ll find a shop that, though a similar number of books seem to adorn the shelves, is as large a drop in quality as it is in literal elevation from Spellmen’s. The money goes to charity, which is good considering that the prices are a little high. The same copy of a collected Dryden has been in there all time I have been in York. However, every cloud… some very good plays, often a brilliant selection of paperback classics and foreign authors.

£3.50 Fiction, £4 Poetry

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£2.50 Fiction, £3 Poetry

£3.50 Fiction, £5 Poetry

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FOSSGATE BOOKS Fossgate

MINSTERGATE BOOKS Just Off Petergate

A short walk out of town and you’ll find, amongst the many salons and coffee shops, a brilliant two floor shop. Everything is perfect, the strict silence inside, the gloom and smell of pages and pages shoved into order on walls of bookshelves – except the prices can be a little steep for those who need to pay the bills as much as they need to buy The Faerie Queen.

If you can manage the stairs on a warm autumn day, which after a visit to the Guy Fawkes down the road – myself and my gaggles of fellow bookhunters often cannot – then it is worth a climb up to the literature room. The basement often has good cheap novels but it is upstairs which holds the best horde. Fantastic history rooms also. Never haggle at prices or make eye contact, as with any classic bookshop.

£6 Fiction, £7-10 Poetry

£4 Fiction, £5 Poetry

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BOOKSTALL Newgate Market The Newgate Market bookstall is something of a lucky dip. It can contain some absolute treasures that at £2 a pop is well worth the trouble of sifting through last year’s bestsellers and a few penny dreadfuls.

For those of you willing and able, the York National Book Fair is coming to the Racecourse,14-15 September and 5 January.

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A Question Of The Ego with Gavin Turk Words: Lotte Inch

Seated in the sunshine amongst a group of elaborately costumed people at the most decadent and luxurious picnic conceivable; complete with glamorous 50s-style chef, two waitresses, Champagne, Pimms, strawberries, delicacies brought 85 miles from London I felt quietly overwhelmed by the scene before me. This was definitely the most extravagant and expensive picnic I had ever been fortunate enough to experience. I was actually here, would you believe, in a working capacity, having organised an exhibition at the National Trust’s Mottisfont Abbey in Hampshire which included work and curatorial elements envisioned by The House of Fairy Tales (a London based art charity directed by artist Gavin Turk and his wife and fellow artist Deborah Curtis.) So, this was the House of Fairy Tales?! It was pure luxury, frivolity and merriment.

This was the illustrious Gavin Turk! In my mind it all fit together perfectly; aside from his involvement in the House of Fairy Tales, Turk’s self-assuredness and presence here amongst this display of indulgence and festivity, embodied all preconceived ideas of the ‘Young British Artist.’ Over-the-top, slightly odd, very intelligent, misleadingly modest and badly dressed!

Pimms in hand, I struck up conversation with the people beside me. Topics of conversation flowed from contemporary art, to early music, to the history of the surroundings and back to art again and I quickly noticed that the person beside me - a modest, slightly quirky looking character - was clearly an authority on art and the influences of historical artists on contemporary art production. But, of course!

Gavin Turk’s fame resides in an ironic work which in effect memorialised his career and perversely saw it begin with its end. The work in question, Cave (1991) consisted of a mock English Heritage-style blue, ceramic plaque, placed in an otherwise empty studio, which read: ‘Borough of Kensington, Gavin Turk, Sculptor, worked here 1989-1991’.

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Since that particular afternoon, I have met Turk on a number of occasions and in spite of his occasionally abrupt manner – provoked no doubt by overwork and what he calls a “schizophrenic” schedule – I have quickly come to realise that Turk is in fact an astute, interesting, eloquent and indeed droll individual whose persona and art challenges the stereotype of the (celebrity) artist.

ONEANDOTHER.COM


.................................................................................................................... The words on the plaque were true; the form it took however, suggested that Turk was an important and now deceased historical figure - not a mere art student at the Royal College of Art in Knightsbridge. This was a seemingly self-indulgent and self-promotional exercise. It was also the birth of a theme that has permeated Turk’s creative output since: a critique in fact, of authorship and the myth of ‘the artist.’

“Life only acquires meaning and shape through death. The plaque is the end point that allows my life to unravel.”

Indeed, much of his work challenges traditional notions of authenticity and identity, and often comments on the value that an artist’s name confers onto a work. Whilst Turk thus creates artworks which on the surface seem to support our understanding of the artist as an egomaniac figure concerned with selfpromotion it becomes clear that in fact this slightly nervous but incredibly perceptive person is in fact challenging exactly what one might at first accuse him of: Indulgence, self-aggrandisement and the noA small exhibition of works by Gavin tion of the exclusivity of art and the celebrity artist. Turk will be on show in York: Perhaps then Gavin Turk is after all actually an indi8 September - 18 October at ‘Lotte vidual whose life is little different to yours or mine… Inch’, 5 High Petergate, York. With the exception of the occasional fairytale picnic of course! COY York Gold One&Other Magazine_Layout 1 17/08/2012 11:58 Page 1

Are you ready to join in? Just 30 Fair Saturday 15 September at Rowntree Park 12 noon to 5pm An action packed afternoon of family fun – and all for free! Join us at Rowntree Park and talk to over 30 local sports clubs and fitness providers. Find out what’s happening at leisure centres, watch exciting demonstrations and try your hand at a huge range of different sports and physical activities all in one place!

Eng-AGE 50+ Games Starts Sunday 30 September Various locations If you’re over 50 and looking for new sporting opportunities then why not join in the free taster sessions.

Just 30

@just30york

For further details of all these and more visit www.york.gov.uk/yorkgold2012. Tel: 01904 553377


CULTURE / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

An Indulgent Renaissance: Exploring Theme Through Art

In Classical art, Titian’s mythological work Bacchus and Ariadne 1520-23, depicts Bacchus the God of wine, emerging with his followers from the landscape to the far right hand corner of the painting. Falling in love with Ariadne in his sight, he leaps from his chariot, pulled by cheetahs, towards her. In the art world Bacchus, from ancient Greek/Roman mythology and his followers are the heroes of misrule and ecstasy whom indulge in pleasure, habits and extravagance. In the London’s National Gallery this spectacle of sacrifice, ritual and hedonistic pleasure can be witnessed. At first sight, Bacchus’ followers look harmless, however on closer inspection the scene reveals the torn-off leg of a beast being waved into the air, and we can begin to imagine the chaos that lies ahead. The gratification of desire can be seen in many interpretations of Bacchus, firstly Michelangelo’s Bacchus 1497, Caravaggio’s Bacchus 1596, Caravaggio’s Sick Bacchus 1593, and Velazquez’ The Triumph of Bacchus in 1629. When observing Caravaggio’s Bacchus the still-life of fruit in the foreground becomes an obvious focal point in each painting. On a table in front of him the bowl of fruit and carafe of red wine which in his left hand he offers to the viewer seemingly inviting the viewer to join him. Bacchus is often euphemistically described as the “god of wine”, but realistically he is the god of drunkenness and debauchery. In Michelangelo’s depiction, we understand from the figure’s reeling pose that he is experiencing the effects of his wine. Michelangelo’s profound interest and exploration of the nature and personality of his subject led him to create a figure difficult to accept by someone anticipating a more traditional representation.

Bacchus still inspires art today. In the Tate Modern wine-red abstractions by American artist Cy Twombly captures the sublimity of hedonism in circles and loops of thick pigment with actions that cause nausea on open eyes. In the Bacchus series made in 2005, the chaotic movements of the paint come to life with pleasure, vibrancy and danger. Over the centuries, Bacchus has been represented both as an uplifting inspiration for men and women, and the crazed, violent God of Dionysian fury. If you want to indulge in art here in York, York Art Gallery plays host to a number of Renaissance paintings in their ground floor gallery space. Frans Snyder’s lavish still-life paintings were a speciality, especially in his depiction of bountiful food. In the painting A Game Stall (1625-35) the message of dead game was that while one may enjoy the pleasures of life, there were severe consequences for any wrongdoing. Amongst this work we can see Abraham Hendricksz van Beyeren’s Banquet Still Life 164060. Being one of the most admired still life painters of the 17th century, Van Beyeren is well known for lavish banquet pieces such as this one. Celebrating the wealth, luxury and indulgence, all fruit depicted here are shown at the very peak of ripeness. In the lower gallery we can also see a gleaming peacock, a symbol of eternal virtue. Peacocks were indeed regarded as tempting fare for the dinner table in the 17th century. The lower gallery houses paintings to be viewed as objects for contemplation, the exquisite composition and rich colours interpret indulgence to a tee.

Words: Clare Nattress


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.................................... 01. A Game Stall by Snyders or Snijders, Frans (1579-1657)

.................................... 02. Banquet Still Life, Abraham Hendrickz van Beyeren (1667)

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CULTURE / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

Macabre

With Halloween upon us there is little room to move in this haunted city without reminders of our desolate past. So let us pay homage to some of the most gruesome secrets that our obscure town has on offer.

THE COCK AND BOTTLE PUB This pub on Skeldergate is claimed to be haunted by George Villiers, who held office here after the Restoration of Charles II. The pub was built on land Villiers used to own, which may explain his constant knocking on the front door their late at night, showing his reluctance to leave.

ST. DENYS OPENING The church on Walmgate may seem unassuming, but it is one of York’s oldest buildings. The entrance is strangely pagan for a Christian establishment. Icons of griffins and the infamous “Green Man” from mythology arch around the stone door frame. This makes the entrance look like a huge mouth filled with fangs representing horrors, old and new.

LUDDITE HANGINGS NEAR CASTLE MUSEUM. Fourteen Luddites were sentenced to death by hanging in 1813 for several attacks on mills owned by rich industrialists in the city. This was York’s biggest hanging, and it took place outside York Castle, what is now the York Castle Museum. Thousands gathered on St. George’s field to see the spectacle.

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.................................................................................................................... CLIFFORD’S TOWER EXECUTION As you may have seen on the side of some of York’s tour buses, Clifford’s Tower was at the centre of a Jewish massacre in the 12th Century. After a long seige, the Jews set the, then wooden, keep alight to prevent their bodies being mutilated should the King’s forces take the Tower. The tower was rebuilt after it burned to the ground, and later supported with stone to give us our modern day tourist attraction.

DICK TURPIN’S BURIAL SITE Whether or not this is the actual place where Turpin is buried, or just a tourist attraction, one can’t help feel one is occupying hallowed ground when approaching the only proper gravestone George Street cemetery. The other stones are flat on the floor, illegible. Turpin’s looms over them all, still as sinister since the day he was buried there.

In 1896, August Carlson was the last man to hang in York. The dapper irony was that he was hanged on a newly built balcony gallows in the Debtor’s prison (now the Castle museum). Carlson, a Swedish drunkard was partnered with a known prostitute, Juliet Wood. His frustration with his girlfriend’s profession led him to beat her regularly, and eventually slit her throat after one particularly gluttonous night in the taverns of York. He felt the guilt immediately and cried at his landlord’s door, “I’ve just killed Juliet.”

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Words: Adam Alcock Visuals: Ben Bainbridge

AUGUST CARLSON LAST MAN HANGING

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Our Oral Tradition

Words: Vicky Parry Visuals: Ben Bentley

Trevor Rooney is a character that most York residents would know by sight alone. Be it for his flamboyant attire and feathered hat, his large cardboard cut-out on Stonegate advertising his ghost walk or his recent appearance on Chanel 4’s Come Dine With Me – it goes without saying that he has deep-rooted ties with these streets. It was fascinating to spend some time with Trevor and really gauge his deep love of the city’s history. As he walks down its streets, he caresses its creases like a map; he knows every alleyway, every brick and every obscurity that lines our cobbled maze. It is for this reason that what is initially intended as a guide to his favourite haunts soon becomes a historical tour of the details that become the layers of our being. Our stroll around York begins at the Minster, a place that, as with many York residents, holds a special place in Trevor’s heart. At seventeen he worked as an apprentice stone carver – carving out the Cathedral’s statues and gargoyles. It was while on this apprenticeship that he learnt all of the secrets about its pagan background and the sites that York Minster was built upon. 66

He knows every alleyway, every brick and every obscurity that lines our cobbled maze. We then progress past Treasurer’s House (a popular point of Trevor’s ghost walk) towards St William’s College where he pulls me aside to point out the small mouse carved of wood upon the door, a product of Kilburn’s Mousey Thompson. Trevor tells us that the carpenter had initially been commissioned to make a clock for a child’s room and added the mouse detail as an ode to the nursery rhyme “Hickory Dickory Dock” – then, when commissioned to make the doors for the college he again added a mouse, this time perceiving it lucky. Then, the night before the doors were hung he had made a wish upon that mouse and the wish came true; ever since then urban legend has made that very mouse a symbol of good luck (I rub it and close my eyes).

ONEANDOTHER.COM


.................................................................................................................... Around this point Trevor scrambles to unearth a one pound piece from an undisclosed location. He had placed it there the night before and has done so for thirty– five years, a small, sentimental detail that has been a part of his evening ritual for all these years. More often than not the money has been claimed, a small gift for an unknowing recipient.

Trevor then leads us up Goodramgate past The Snickleways pub (a favourite of his) and towards La Piazza. He first came here many years ago whilst working as a photographer under John Mitchell (St Peter’s History Master and author of Ghosts of an Ancient City). This turned out to be something of a changing point in his life. With John he hosted indoor ghost nights by candlelight, something which was so popular that they chose to take to the streets, and from that point the theatrical ghost walk was born; a trend which has since spread to international copycats.

“The magic is the complexity of its residents that have built and made the city that we now live in.”


CULTURE / Indulgence Issue .................................................................................................................... As Trevor leads us up the stairs in La Piazza into a small room he points out a small covered piece of plaster on the wall that states “Marmaduke Buckle 1698 – 1715, aged 17.” Marmaduke had been born with a deformity and, although educated, the family had kept him hidden in the attic so as not to face public shame. Then, at the age of 17, he took his own life and all that was left was this inscription on the wall: his suicide note. The number of stories Trevor tells is limitless (or seemingly so). His knowledge is of the city’s tiny secrets, a city of which he claims, “The magic is the complexity of its residents that have built and made the city that we now live in.” He is a storyteller, a poet sharing his passion. He sees himself as fulfilling the old pagan tradition of oral legend and this is how he delivers his tour. “When I’m long gone, these stories will still be there for generations.” And so be it …

Trevor Rooney’s Ghost Tour of York departs every night at 19:30 on Stonegate outside Evil Eye.

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ONEANDOTHER.COM


THINK / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

The Evolution Of Our City’s Palate VIKINGS

ROMANS

TERRY’S

The diet of some of York’s earliest settlers, the Vikings, reflected their farming and fishing cultures. Livestock, game and wild birds made up a varied and rich culinary experience. All meat and fish would be smoked, dried and salted over the year to last through winter. 

Romans in York were keen on using every part of all the ingredients in their meals and were also attracted to the theatrical potential of their iconic ‘table culture’ of extended mealtimes. For instance, chefs would configure sausages to fall from a whole pig’s ripped-open stomach at the table, or goatfish, (whose scales glow red in death), would be served alive for diners to kill and prepare themselves.  Thankfully, the usual York dining experience is a mite more reserved today.

Noel Terry’s chocolate empire was bought by Kraft in 1993 and the manufacture outsourced from York in 2005, but the legacy of Terry’s business existed before him and outlasts him even today.

Aside from beer and mead, a very popular Viking Age drink was ‘Bjorr’, a strong liquor which was produced from fermented juice.

Words: Matt Keay | Visuals: Nathan Markham

The company originated in 1767 as Bayldon and Berry Confectionery, but it would be 164 years (and various ownership changes) before Terry’s as a chocolate factory developed the products the brand is most well-known for: Terry’s Chocolate Orange (1931) and All Gold (1936).


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YORK HAM

TODAY

The food of 13th century York was basic, consisting of unleavened bread meals, sometimes with fresh vegetables, budget permitting. However, even with a simple diet there was room for meat. 

Today, York plays host to a huge variety of bars, cafes and restaurants, representing a rich selection of world foods, including French, Italian, Cuban, Polish and Japanese. The city offers a wealth of high-quality cuisine and is beginning to branch out with some experimental, technical even, food with the tasting menu at The Blind Swine and some aspects of other menus around York.

Legend has it that the original recipe for the world-renowned York Ham utilised the sawdust from the oak construction of the Minster to smoke the meat. The cured ham has a delicate flavour and is traditionally served with a Madeira sauce. Lord Castlerosse saw great merit in the meat and regularly dined on a whole York ham and six bottles of claret!

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Above all, York is maintaining its reputation as an innovative, trend-setting culinary force, and long may it continue.

“Legend has it that the original recipe for the world-renowned York Ham utilised the sawdust from the oak construction of the Minster to smoke the meat.”

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THINK / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

For the Love of Money .....................................................................................................................

Money. A concept that in theory is capable of rendering whatever unto whoever. When hungry – buy food. When cold – buy heat. When sad – buy happiness. It is easy to see how such a simple thing can be the most talked about idea in the world. More than politics. More than religion. More than sex. But do we really need as much money as we think we do? Do we need to keep spending as much as we do to be happy? Large sums of money do have fundamental uses. Wealth can protect us. We live in a world where one can buy food, shelter and healthcare. We save money to defend ourselves from the hardships of life. And the more we have, the safer we are. But that doesn’t explain why we love to spend on the unnecessary.

Spending money can be cathartic. Perhaps this is because money is important, so spending it makes us feel like we are buying that much needed safety – even if we aren’t. Maybe it’s because money can be a heavy burden to bear and getting rid of it by purchasing intoxicating drinks and pricey foods makes us feel like we’re putting the responsibility back into the hands of our bigger betters, 72

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Words: Kiran Tanna

“We live in a world where one can buy food, shelter and healthcare. We save money to defend ourselves from the hardships of life. And the more we have, the safer we are.”

those companies whose flashing lights and big budget adverts reassure us that we’ll be okay – that we are, indeed, loving it. Perhaps we are rebellious or stupid or apathetic or addicted to whatever it is we keep buying but the end result is never inconsequential. Using money is about living as happily as we can for as long as possible. If we decided to stop spending money then we would leave ourselves unprotected. The businesses upon whose taxes our governments depend would collapse and we would be left rather cold and hungry and altogether miserable – metaphorically speaking. If you are looking for ways to live life for less, there are countless ways to do so. Plenty of it is common sense. Go to the supermarket and look for offers. Learn to cook food that lasts and serves a group. There are lots of ways to avoid coughing up more money than you can afford. However, we should remember that people don’t always overspend because they are lazy or ignorant. We over-spend because it makes us feel better. Does it make us bad? Or simply human? ONEANDOTHER.COM


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16/07/2012 12:39


THINK / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

Science Of Altruism .................................... Fighting against the goody two shoes concept of altruism, Adam Alcock explores the science behind it and why giving can be fundamental to happiness and your sense of self.

.................................... Being indulgent is one route to happiness, but indulging in altruism is scientifically proven to improve quality of life. There has been a recent interest in the concept of feeling good by donating to charity or volunteering at a local club or youth group. It’s not a new idea, or a revolutionary one. Altruism makes you feel better about yourself, and now science has caught up with common sense and is able to prove the link.

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Psychologists at the University of Louisville in Kentucky found that sharing and giving to others stimulates the chemical processes in the brain which causes happiness. By gifting presents or donating money we promote a sense of purpose and meaning in our own lives, rather than getting a small thrill from a shopping spree or binge drinking. Other researchers in the University of Massachusetts Medical School conducted an experiment with two thousand people to discover whether helping others caused an increase in happiness rather primitively they discovered that this was the case. People who were more solitary and selfish were, obviously, more miserable. American psychologist Professor Ed Diener from the University of Illinois is a proponent of the

“Happiness Formula” theory. He believes that you can go beyond the simple link and actually measure happiness, like economists can measure recession and so on. He says “It may sound silly but we ask people how happy they are, 1-7, 1-10?” Diener then gives a questionnaire to his subjects and from a series of plain English questions he can rate their happiness. He also suggests that happier people live longer, nine years to be exact. Another of Professor Oswald’s calculations is the sum of money which would act as a substitute in the happiness void for a lack of friends. The answer was £50,000. American political scientist, David Brooks however thinks that their is no substitute for being a “Social Animal.” Indeed that’s the title of his latest book which

ONEANDOTHER.COM


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Words: Adam Alcock Visuals: Ben Bentley

“By gifting presents or donating money we promote a sense of purpose and meaning in our own lives, rather than getting a small thrill from a shopping spree or binge drinking.”

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seeks to prove that social relations (marriage, clubs, societies) are what makes us happy. The science of happiness may sound frilly and un-mathematical to the cynics, however our politicians and thinkers are serious about the “happiness factor.” Ed Milliband’s “Blue Labour” and David Cameron’s “Big Society” has Brooks’ theory behind it. In York we have many charitable opportunities to improve happiness - volunteering at the homeless shelter, supporting local youth groups, or taking the time to support a friend. As science hurries behind the indulgence of altruism movement it is perhaps time to shuffle off our mortal coil and start a new regime of helping and giving.

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THINK / Indulgence Issue ....................................................................................................................

How York Has Indulged Our Creative Palate Historically, York has been a powerful driving force for creative types living in and visiting the city. A great number of actors, writers, artists and musicians have felt inspired by the picturesque landscape, relaxed atmosphere and assured cool of the ‘Capital of the North’. Here’s how our fair city has been interpreted and channelled creatively over the centuries.

.......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... As the 1953 Evelyn Award commission, L.S. Lowry’s painting of Clifford’s Tower is a simple yet evocative representation of one of York’s most iconic buildings. The scene features the spire of St. Mary’s and a cooling tower in the distance, now a mere memory on the horizon. Lowry is known primarily for his crowds of ‘match-stick’ figures, but the painting is noticeably sparsely populated. It can be found hanging at York Art Gallery. Other paintings of York include Henry Cave’s 1809 painting The Old Bridge over the River Ouse and Junction of Bootham and Gillygate, by ‘Carroll’, an unknown artist in 1990.

Possibly the most famous novel set in York is Kate Atkinson’s 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year winner, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. Atkinson drew on her experience of growing up in the city, portraying the history of four generations of women from a particular family, and the novel is a rich tableau of life throughout twentieth century York, mentioning specific streets and landmarks of the city, fleshing out the story with a believable, relevant and realistic setting. The story was transferred to the stage in a production that celebrated its debut at the Theatre Royal in 2000. Other literary works set in York include Laurence Sterne’s loquacious 1759 book concerning ecclesiastical politics, A Political Romance. Susanna Clarke’s recent magical Johnathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, which was phenomenally popular.

Words: Matt Keay Visuals: Jason Mortimer

Television series set in York are few and far between but include the recent, ill-fated Eternal Law and the moody, violent Red Riding. Eternal Law photographed the city beautifully, and portrayed the unparalleled magnificence of York in a way unrivalled before or since. Red Riding represented an amalgam of all aspects of Yorkshire metaphorically, in a new style of television drama, dubbed “Yorkshire Noir.”

Many students of the educational institutions of York have gone on to become celebrities in their own right. Famous alumni of The University of York include comedian Harry Enfield, Bridget Jones, actor James Callis, and author Jung Chang. York even boasts celebrity natives, namely Dame Judi Dench, Hogwarts caretaker David Bradley, Bond movie music composer John Barry, Shed Seven frontman Rick Witter, and King of Westeros/Sheffield stripper Mark Addy, proving the power of the creative well the city has been proven to be.

Following in the footsteps of these talented individuals, future creatives will continue to represent York and its surrounding areas with the same fervour, passion and commitment as their forebears.

ONEANDOTHER.COM


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THINK / Indulgence Issue

The e c a F l u f h Yout of Poverty

Have you ever been bullied? Have you ever gone without your lunch just so people don’t pick on you? Well, that’s what many children across York are doing on a daily basis. York Youth Council is working hard to make people recognise this problem. Here they tell us the story in their own words. Imagine you are queuing for lunch, having to hold up all of the people behind you whilst you try to find your name on one of many sheets in a folder. Well that’s what the people receiving free school meals have to do every day. Unfortunately that is the case in many of York’s schools as few have cashless systems, which are completely anonymous. The York Youth Council wants all secondary schools to consider installing a cashless system and hopes many will follow through and get them installed. Free school meals are available to low income families and are greatly beneficial. However, with the stigma attached and the lack of anonymity of who is receiving them, many children opt to miss having lunch to avoid people finding out. So, what can be done to change this? Over the last year the York Youth Council have been looking at the stigma attached to free school meals and the cost of school uniforms, talking to all secondary schools in York in the process.

The pressure for teenagers to look good in front of their friends is felt by all. But for low-income families this is almost impossible for parents to achieve. Parents on low income only receive £60 a year from the government for young people going into year 7 and £30 for years 8 to 10 yet nothing for year 11. As a parent in the UK you may think your child’s school education is free, but that’s not the complete picture. The cheapest school uniform in York is £107.46 but the most expensive is an astonishing £204.04 for the basic items of clothing and footwear specified. This is more than triple the amount low-income families are given. We want schools in York to set up second hand uniform shops supplying affordable quality uniforms to low income families. School uniforms are diverse and give a school an identity. However, the York Youth Councils research shows that schools are prescribing long lists of clothing, many of which are compelled to carry the school logo. Is this really necessary? Well, no, it isn’t. Secondary schools in York need to review their uniform policy. School uniform should be smart, simple, cheap and comfy for everyone. After all school is meant to be all about equality.

ONEANDOTHER.COM


CH? ERGH! FREE LUN WHAT A TRAMP

WHY DON’T YOU HAVE THE RIGHT UNIFORM?

TING A I’M NEVER GET IN FREE LUNCH AGA

MY PARENTS CAN’T AFFORD IT!

I CAN’T TELL MY DAD HOW HARD THIS IS, IT’S NOT HIS FAULT

I DON’T WANT TO GO TO SCHOOL, I’LL GET BULLIED FOR MY CLOTHES

E AITKEN WORDS: JAD CE ATHAN SILLEN IMAGES: JON OF P S TO THE HEL (WITH THANK COUNCIL) YORK YOUTH


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One&Other [York] Magazine (Sep/Oct)